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Full text of "School of Medicine Catalog 1932-1939"

/ 






Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/medicine32unse 



VOL. XVI APRIL, 1932 No. 4 

BULLETIN 

OF THE 

SCHOOL of MEDICINE 




UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 





PUBLISHED FIVE TIMES A YEAR 

JANUARY, APRIL, MAY, JULY AND OCTOBER 

Lombard and Greene Streets 

BALTIMORE, MD. 



Entered as second'dass matter June 16, 1916, at the Postoffice at 
Baltimore, Maryland, under the Act of August 24, 1912. 



INDEX 



Alumni Association. 



Page 

._. 96 

Annual Hospital Appointments 82 

Board of Regents...- 6 

Calendar — 4 

Combined Course in Arts and Medi- 
cine 75 

Consolidation of Schools „ 14 

Curriculum, Organization of. — 38 



Page 



Anatomy _ — 89 

Histology 40 

Embryology - _ „ _ — 40 

Neuro Anatomy _ — 40 

Physiology - 42 

Bacteriology and Immunology. 42 

Biological Chemistry — 43 

Pharmacology and Materia Medica.... 43 

Pathology „ 46 

Medicine _ 48 

Clinical Pathology 51 

Gastro-Enterology 52 

Psychiatry _ 52 

Pediatrics _ -... 53 

Neurology _ _ 54 

Hygiene and Preventive Medicine 55 

Medical Jurisprudence ..._ 55 

Surgery „ 56 

Anaesthesia 59 

Dermatology 59 

Orthopaedic Surgery _ 60 

Roentgenology — 60 

Diathermy and Radium Therapy 60 

Throat and Nose 61 

Genito-Urinary _ _ _ 62 

Colon and Rectum „ 62 

Bronchoscopy and Esophagoscopy 63 

Otology „ _..„ 63 

Neurological Surgery _ _... 63 

Oncology 64 

Obstetrics ~ „ 64 

Gynecology _ _ 65 

Ophthalmology „ _ 65 

History of Medicine _ 66 



Dispensary Reports : 

Mercy Hospital 

University Hospital 



Clinical Facilities: 

Mercy Hospital 

University Hospital 



Dispensary Staffs : 

Mercy Hospital 

University Hospital 

Endowment Fund ...- 

Expenses, Students 

Faculty of Physic __ 

Fees _..„ 

General Summary of Students. 

Hospitals : 

James Lawrence Kernan 

Mercy Hospital _ 

Baltimore City Hospitals 

University Hospital 

St. Vincent's Infant Asylum. 



Interneships _ 

Libraries 

Matriculates _ 

Medical Care of Students 

Medical Council — 

Prizes „ _ 

Requirements for Matriculation. 

Rules _ „ 

Schedule 

Scholarships _ _ 

Staffs: 

Baltimore City Hospitals 



17 



30 
21 

97 

83 

8 

76 

95 



James Lawrence Kernan Hospital 34 

Mercy Hospital 26 

University Hospital 19 



102 



Training Schools for Nurses: 

Mercy Hospital ..._ 

University Hospital _ _ — 

University Council . — 

University of Maryland, Organization 
of ^ _ 



# 



BULLETIN 

OF THE 

University of Maryland School of Medicine 

AND 

College of Physicians and Surgeons 

Successor to The Hospital Bulletin of the University of 
Maryland, Baltimore Medical College News, and the Journal 
of the Alumni Association of the College of Physicians and 
Surgeons. 



VOL. XVI APRIL, 1932 No. 4 



annual announcement 

SESSION 1932-33 



This catalogue presents the teaching staff for the present year and the 
announcement of courses for the ensuing one. Changes in the teaching staff 
and list of graduates of the Class 1931-32 will appear in the July Bulletin. 



CALENDAR 
1932-1933 

SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 

FIRST SEMESTER 



1982 



September 23, Friday — * Registration for first- and second-year students. 
September 24, Saturday — * Registration for all other students. 
September 26, Monday — Instruction begins with the first scheduled period. 
September 30, Saturday — Delayed registration, with fine included, until 

noon this day. 
November 24, Thursday — Thanksgiving Day. Holiday. 
December 21, Wednesday — Christmas recess begins after the last scheduled 

period. 

1933 

January 3, Tuesday — Instruction resumed with the first scheduled period. 

January 28, Saturday — First semester ends after the last scheduled period. 

SECOND SEMESTER 

January 30, Monday — * Registration for first- and second-year students. 
January 31, Tuesday — *Registration for all other students. 

Instruction resumed for first- and second-year stu- 
dents, with the first scheduled period. 
February 1, Wednesday — Instruction resumed for third- and fourth-year 

students, with the first scheduled period. 
February 4, Saturday — Delayed registration, with fine included, until noon 

this day. 
February 22, Wednesday — Washington's Birthday. Holiday. 
April 13, Thursday — Easter recess begins after the last scheduled period. 
April 18, Tuesday — Instruction resumed with the first scheduled period. 
June 3, Saturday — Commencement. (Four o'clock in the afternoon.) 



* A STUDENT WHO NEGLECTS OR FAILS TO REGISTER PRIOR TO OR WITHIN 
THE DAY OR DAYS SPECIFIED FOR HIS OR HER SCHOOL, WILL BE CALLED UPON 
TO PAY A FINE OF $5.00. THE LAST DAY OF REGISTRATION WITH FINE ADDED 
TO REGULAR FEES IS SATURDAY AT NOON OF THE WEEK IN WHICH INSTRUC- 
TION BEGINS, FOLLOWING THE SPECIFIED REGISTRATION PERIOD. (THIS RULE 
MAY BE WAIVED ONLY ON THE WRITTEN RECOMMENDATION OF THE DEAN.) 

* The offices of the Registrar and Comptroller are open during the registration periods 
from 8:30 A. M. to 6:00 P. M. Advance registration encouraged. 



ORGANIZATION 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



Control of the University of Maryland is vested in a Board of 
nine Regents, appointed by the Governor and confirmed by the 
Senate for terms of nine years each. The general administra- 
tion of the University is vested in the President. The University 
Council is an advisory body, composed of the President, the 
Assistant to the President, the Director of the Agricultural Ex- 
periment Station, the Director of the Extension Service, and the 
Deans. The University Council acts upon all matters having 
relation to the University as a whole or to cooperative work be- 
tween the constituent groups. Each school has its own Faculty 
Council, composed of the Dean and members of its Faculty ; each 
Faculty Council controls the internal affairs of the group it rep- 
resents. 

The University has the following educational organization : 

The College of Agriculture, 

The College of Engineering, 

The College of Arts and Sciences, 

The School of Medicine, 

The School of Law, 

The School of Dentistry, 

The School of Pharmacy, 

The College of Education, 

The College of Home Economics, 

The Graduate School, 

The Summer School, 

The Department of Physical Education and Recreation. 

The Schools of Medicine, Law, Dentistry and Pharmacy are 
located in Baltimore; the others in College Park, Maryland. 



BOARD OF REGENTS 

OF 

THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



Samuel M. Shoemaker, Esq., Chairman 

John M. Dennis, Esq., Treasurer _ _ 

John E. Raine, Esq , k ... 

C. C. Gelder, Esq , , . 

Dr. W. W. Skinner, Secretary 

Henry Holzapfel, Jr., Esq. 

E. Brooke Lee, Esq «. 

George M. Shriver, Esq 

William P. Cole, Jr., Esq . 



- 


Term expires 1933 





- Term expires 1932 




„ Term expires 1939 





......Term expires 1938 


.„....*... 


—..Term expires 1936 




Term expires 1934 


, 


......Term expires 1935 




Term expires 1935 





Term expires 1939 



Raymond A. Pearson, M. S., D.Agr., LL.D., President and Executive Officer 



THE UNIVERSITY COUNCIL 

Raymond A. Pearson, M.S., D.Agr., LL.D _ .„ _ President 

H. C. Byrd, B.S _....- Assistant to the President 

H. J. Patterson, D.Sc . Dean of the College of Agriculture and 

Director of the Experiment Station 

A. N. Johnson, S.B., D.Eng _ .......Dean of the College of Engineering 

T. H. Taliaferro, C.E., Ph.D Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences 

Roger Howell, A.B., LL.D., Ph.D _ _._ Dean of the School of Law 

J. M. H. Rowland, M.D Dean of the School of Medicine 

A. G. Du Mez, Ph.D _...„ -.... _ Dean of the School of Pharmacy 

T. 0. Heatwole, M.D., D.D.S Secretary of the Baltimore Schools 

W. S. Small, Ph.D _ Dean of the College of Education 

M. Marie Mount, M.A. „ Dean of the College of Home Economics 

C. 0. Appleman, Ph.D Dean of the Graduate School 

Thomas B. Symons, M.S., D.Agr Director of Extension Service 

J. Ben Robinson, D.D.S., F.A.C.D Dean of the School of Dentistry 






THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 
SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 

AND 

COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS AND 
SURGEONS 



MEDICAL COUNCIL 

ARTHUR M. SHIPLEY, M.D., Sc.D. 

GORDON WILSON, M.D. 

WILLIAM S. GARDNER, M.D. 

STANDISH McCLEARY, M.D. 

JULIUS FRIEDENWALD, A.M. M.D. 

J. M. H. ROWLAND, M.D. 

ALEXIUS McGLANNAN, A.M., M.D., LL.D. 

HUGH R. SPENCER, M.D. 

H. BOYD WYLIE, M.D. 

CARL L DAVIS, M.D. 

WILLIAM H. SCHULTZ, Ph.B., Ph.D. 

MAURICE C. PINCOFFS, S.B., M.D. 

FRANK W. HACHTEL, M.D. 

EDUARD UHLENHUTH, Ph.D. 

CLYDE A. CLAPP, M.D. 



FACULTY OF PHYSIC 



FACULTY OF PHYSIC* 

EMERITUS PROFESSORS. 

Randolph Winslow, A.M., M.D., LL.D „ _ _ _ Surgery 

Samuel K. Merrick, M.D „ Rhinology and Laryngology 

J. Frank Crouch, M.D Clinical Ophthalmology and Otology 

John R. Winslow, A.B., M.D Rhinology and Laryngology 

Edward N. Brush, M.D _ „ Psychiatry 

L. E. Neale, M.D., LL.D..„ _ __ _ ....Obstetrics 

Frank Dyer Sanger, M.D Rhinology and Laryngology 

Harry Friedenwald, A.B., M.D _ _ Ophthalmology 

PROFESSORS, ASSOCIATES, INSTRUCTORS AND ASSISTANTS. 

Arthur M. Shipley, M.D., Sc.D., Professor of Surgery 
Gordon Wilson, M.D., Professor of Medicine. 
William S. Gardner, M.D., Professor of Gynecology. 
•/ Standisk McCleary, M.D., Professor of Pathology and Clinical Medicine. 
Julius Friedenwald, A.M., M.D., Professor of Gastro-Enterology. 
J. M. H. Rowland, M.D., Professor of Obstetrics and Dean of the Faculty. 
Alexius McGlannan, A.M., M.D., LL.D., Professor of Surgery. 
H. R. Spencer, M.D., Professor of Pathology 
H. Boyd Wylie, M.D., Professor of Biological Chemistry. 
Carl L. Davis, M.D., Professor of Anatomy. 
Wm. H. Schultz, Ph.B., Ph.D., Professor of Pharmacology. 
Maurice C. Pincoffs, S.B., M.D., Professor of Medicine. 
Frank W. Hachtel, M.D., Professor of Bacteriology. 
Clyde A. Clapp, M.D., Professor of Ophthalmology. 
G. Milton Linthicum, A.M., M.D., Professor of Diseases of the Rectum 

and Colon. 
Joseph E. Gichner, M.D., Professor of Clinical Medicine and Physical 

Therapeutics. 
Irving J. Spear, M.D., Professor of Neurology. 
John Ruhrah, M.D., Professor of Pediatrics. 
Charles F. Blake, A.M., M.D., Professor of Proctology. 
S. Griffith Davis, A.B., M.D., Professor of Anaesthesia. 
G. Carroll Lockard, M.D., Professor of Clinical Medicine. 
Charles E. Brack, Ph.G., M.D., Professor of Clinical Obstetrics. 
Harvey G. Beck, M.D., Sc.D., Professor of Clinical Medicine. 
Albertus Cotton, A.M., M.D., Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery and 

Roentgenology. 
Andrew C. Gillis, A.M., M.D., LL.D., Professor of Neurology. 



♦For the year 1931-32. 



FACULTY OF PHYSIC 9 

Henry J. Walton, M.D., Professor of Roentgenology. 

R. M. Chapman, M.D., Professor of Psychiatry. 

John Rathbone Oliver, A.B., M.D., Ph.D., Professor of the History of 

Medicine. 
L. H. Douglass, M.D., Professor of Clinical Obstetrics. 
Edgar B. Friedenwald, M.D., Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. 
Edward A. Looper, M.D., D.Oph., Professor of Diseases of the Nose and 

Throat. 
C. Loring Joslin, M.D., Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. 
Melvin Rosenthal, M.D., Professor of Dermatology. 
J. W. Downey, M.D., Professor of Otology. 
Eduard Uhlenhuth, Ph.D., Professor of Gross Anatomy. 
Hugh Brent, M.D., Professor of Clinical Gynecology. 
Harry M. Stein, M.D., Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

W. H. Toulson, A.B., M.Sc, M.D., Professor of Genito-Urinary Diseases. 
Charles Bagley, A.B., M.D., Professor of Neuro- Surgery. 
Allen Fiske Voshell, A.B., M.D., Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery. 
Nathan Winslow, A.M., M.D., Professor of Clinical Surgery. 
Page Edmunds, M.D., Professor of Clinical and Industrial Surgery. 
Walter D. Wise, M.D., Professor of Clinical Surgery. 
Frank S. Lynn, M.D., Professor of Clinical Surgery. 
Elliott H. Hutchins, A.M., M.D., Professor of Clinical Surgery. 
Charles Reid Edwards, M.D., Professor of Clinical Surgery. 
Harry M. Robinson, M.D., Professor of Clinical Dermatology. 
Compton Riely, M.D., Clinical Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery. 
W. S. Smith, M.D., Clinical Professor of Gynecology. 
T. Fred Leitz, M.D., Clinical Professor of Gastro-Enterology. 
M. Randolph Kahn, M.D., Clinical Professor of Opthalmology. 
W. F. Zinn, M.D., Clinical Professor of Diseases of the Nose and Throat. 
J. Dawson Reeder, M.D., Clinical Professor of Diseases of the Colon and 

Rectum. 
R. W. Locher, M.D., Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery. 
Sydney M. Cone, A.B., M.D., Associate Professor of Pathology. 
Abram S. Samuels, M.D., Associate Professor of Gynecology. 
Lewis J. Rosenthal, M.D., Associate Professor of Proctology. 
C. C. Conser, M.D., Associate Professor of Physiology. 
H. J. Maldeis, M.D., Associate Professor of Medical Jurisprudence. 
G. M. Settle, A.B., M.D., Associate Professor of Neurology and Clinical 

Medicine. 
C. C. W. Judd, A.B., M.D., Associate Professor of Medicine. 
Thomas R. Chambers, A.B., M.D., Associate Professor of Surgery. 
William H. Smith, M.D., Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine. 
Paul W. Clough, B.S., M.D., Associate Professor of Medicine. 
Sydney R. Miller, A.B., M.D., Associate Professor of Medicine. 
J. McFarland Bergland, M.D., Associate Professor of Obstetrics. 
Walter A. Baetjer, A.B., M.D., Associate Professor of Medicine. 



10 FACULTY OF PHYSIC 

A. M. Evans, M.D., Associate Professor of Surgery. 

F. L. Jennings, M. D., Associate Professor of Surgery. 

F. A. Ries, M.D., Associate Professor of Physiology. 

J. Harry Ullrich, M.D., Associate Professor of Gastroenterology. 

Theodore H. Morrison, M.D., Associate Professor of Gastro-Enterology. 

A. J. Gillis, M.D., Associate Professor of Genito-Urinary Diseases. 

Edward S. Johnson, M.D., Associate Professor of Surgery. 

H. K. Fleck, M.D., Associate Professor of Ophthalmology. 

Emil Novak, M.D., Associate Professor of Obstetrics. 

Charles C. Habliston, M.D., Associate Professor of Medicine. 

Ralph P. Truitt, M.D., Associate Professor of Psychiatry. 

H. M. Foster, M.D., Associate Professor of Surgery. 

S. Lloyd Johnson, A.B., M.D., Assistant Professor of Medicine. 

John G. Huck, M.D., Assistant Professor of Medicine. 

George McLean, M.D., Assistant Professor of Medicine. 

Maurice Feldman, M.D., Assistant Professor of Gastro-Enterology. 

Robert B. Wright, M.D., Assistant Professor of Pathology. 

L. A. M. Krause, M.D., Assistant Professor of Medicine. 

H. R. Peters, M.D., Assistant Professor of Medicine. 

Milford Levy, M.D., Assistant Professor of Neurology. 

John Traband, M.D., Assistant Professor of Pediatrics. 

Clarence E. Macke, M.D., Assistant Professor of Pediatrics. 

Albert Jaffe, M.D., Assistant Professor of Pediatrics. 

0. G. Harne, A.B., Assistant Professor of Physiology. 

Thomas B. Aycock, A.B., M.D., Assistant Professor of Anatomy and Asso- 
ciate in Surgery. 

Jonas Freedenwald, A.B., M.D., Lecturer in Ophthalmic Pathology. 

E. H. Hayward, M.D., Associate in Surgery. 

George A. Strauss, Jr., M.D., Associate in Gynecology. 

Joseph I. Kemler, M.D., Associate in Ophthalmology. 

R. G. Willse, M.D., Associate in Gynecology. 

Frank N. Ogden, M.D., Associate in Biological Chemistry. 

E. P. Smith, M.D., Associate in Obstetrics. 

Thomas K. Galvin, M.D., Associate in Gynecology. 

Howard E. Ashbury, M.D., Associate in Roentgenology. 

Franklin B. Anderson, M.D., Associate in Diseases of the Nose and Throat 
and Otology. 

W. H. Dandsls, M.D., Associate in Orthopaedic Surgery. 

Harris Goldman, M.D., Associate in Genito-Urinary Surgery. 

C. A. Reifschneider, M.D., Associate in Surgery. 

A. H. Wood, M.D., Associate in Genito-Urinary Surgery. 

Albert E. Goldstein, M.D., Associate in Pathology. 

H. M. Bubert, M.D., Associate in Medicine and Assistant in Bacteriology. 

Zachariah Morgan, M.D., Associate in Gastro-Enterology. 

J. M. Hundley, Jr., M.D., Associate in Gynecology. 

Leo Brady, M.D., Associate in Gynecology. 



FACULTY OF PHYSIC 11 

Harry L. Rogers, M.D., Associate in Orthopaedic Surgery. 

D. J. Pessagno, M.D., Associate in Surgery. 

J. G. M. Reese, M.D., Associate in Obstetrics 

M. A. Novey, A.B., M.D., Associate in Obstetrics and Instructor in Pathology. 

W. S. Love, Jr., M.D., Associate in Medicine and Instructor in Pathology. 

Leon Freedom, M.D., Associate in Neurology and Instructor in Pathology. 

Samuel Glick, M.D., Associate in Pediatrics. 

Emil G. Schmidt, Ph.D., Associate in Biological Chemistry. 

C. F. Horine, M.D., Associate in Surgery. 

W. J. Todd, M.D., Associate in Pediatrics. 

W. F. Geyer, M.D., Associate in Pediatrics. 

Clewell Howell, M.D., Associate in Pediatrics. 

Walter C. Merkle, M.D., Associate in Pathology. 

John G. Murray, Jr., M.D., Associate in Obstetrics. 

Monte Edwards, M.D., Associate in Surgery and Anatomy. 

Lewis B. Hill, M.D., Associate in Psychiatry. 

Joseph Sindler, M.D., Associate in Gastro-Enterology. 

John F. Lutz, M.D., Associate in Histology. 

Isadore A. Siegel, A.B., M.D., Associate in Obstetrics. 

C. Gardner Warner, M.D., Associate in Pathology. 

Moses Gellman, M.D., Associate in Orthopaedic Surgery. 

H. F. Bongardt, M.D., Associate in Surgery. 

1. 0. Ridgley, M.D., Associate in Surgery. 

R. D. West, M.D., Associate in Ophthalmology. 

Frederick B. Dart, M.D., Associate in Pediatrics. 

A. H. Finkelstein, M.D., Associate in Pediatrics. 

Eugene L. Flippin, M.D., Associate in Roentgenology. 

Richard G. C'oblentz, M.D., Associate in Neuro- Surgery. 

J. S. Eastland, M.D., Associate in Medicine. 

Thomas C. Wolff, M.D., Associate in Medicine. 

F. A. Holden, M.D., Associate in Diseases of Nose and Throat. 

Henry F. Buettner, M.D., Instructor in Bacteriology. 

J. A. F. Pfeiffer, M.D., Instructor in Bacteriology. 

Joseph E. Gately, M.D., Instructor in Dermatology. 

R. F. McKenzie, M.D., Instructor in Diseases of the Nose and Throat. 

Harry Goldsmith, M.D., Instructor in Psychiatry. 

L. K. Fargo, M.D., Instructor in Genito-Urinary Diseases. 

William Michel, M.D., Instructor in Medicine. 

M. Koppleman, M.D., Instructor in Gastro-Enterology. 

F. S. Orem, M.D., Instructor in Pediatrics. 

M. G. Gichner, M.D., Instructor in Medicine. 

V. L. Ellicott, M.D., Instructor in Hygiene and Public Health. 

M. G. Tull, M.D., Instructor in Hygiene and Public Health. 

William A. Strauss, M.D., Instructor in Medicine. 

W. R. Johnson, M.D., Instructor in Surgery and Pathology. 

E. M. Hanrahan, A.B., M.D., Instructor in Surgery. 



12 FACULTY OF PHYSIC 

R. M. Hening, M.D., Instructor in Pediatrics 

Marie Kovner, M.D., Instructor in Pediatrics. 

Wetherbee Fort, M.D., Instructor in Medicine. 

Henry Sheppard, M.D., Instructor in Medicine. 

T. Nelson Carey, M.D., Instructor in Medicine and Physician in Charge of 

Medical Care of Students. 
L. J. Millan, M.D., Instructor in Genito-Urinary Diseases. 
K. B. Legge, M.D., Instructor in Genito-Urinary Diseases. 
Francis Ellis, A.B., M.D., Instructor in Dermatology. 
Ruth Musser, B.A., M.S., Instructor in Pharmacology. 
Benjamin Abeshouse, M.D., Instructor in Pathology. 
Frank H. Figge, B.S., Instructor in Anatomy. 
Joseph Pokorney, M.D., Instructor in Histology. 
J. Hulla, M.D., Instructor in Histology. 
M. H. Goodman, M.D., Instructor in Dermatology. 
A. C. Monninger, M.D., Instructor in Dermatology. 
Henry F. Graff, A.B., M.D., Instructor in Ophthalmology. 
Clyde Marvel, M.D., Instructor in Surgery. 
S. Demarco, M.D., Instructor in Surgery. 
Karl J. Steinmuller, A.B., M.D., Instructor in Surgery. 
Harry Wasserman, M.D., Instructor in Dermatology. 

H. S. Rubenstein, M.D., Instructor in Anatomy and Assistant in Medicine. 
Frank J. Geraghty, M.D., Instructor in Pathology. 
William Ellsworth Evans, B.S., Instructor in Pharmacology. 
E. S. Faison, M.D., Instructor in Pathology. 
Frank A. Pacienza, M.D., Instructor in Refraction. 
Dwight Mohr, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

W. R. Geraghty, B.S., M.D., Assistant in Surgery and Neuro- Surgery. 
H. C. Knapp, M.D., Assistant in Genito-Urinary Diseases. 
H. T. Collenberg, M.D., Assistant in Genito-Urinary Diseases. 
J. H. Collinson, M.D., Assistant in Genito-Urinary Diseases. 
J. G. Onnen, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 
H. B. McElwain, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 
Robert W. Johnson, M.D., Assistant in Pathology and Surgery. 
John A. O'Connor, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 
A. V. Buchness, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 
William Emrich, M.D., Assistant in Genito-Urinary Surgery. 
W. H. Woody, M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 
Z. V. Hooper, M.D., Assistant in Gastro-Enterology. 
James W. Nelson, M.D., Assistant in Histology. 
Benjamin Miller, M.D., Assistant in Pediatrics. 
E. V. Teagarden, M.D., Assistant in Pediatrics. 
S. C Feldman, M.D., Assistant in Pediatrics. 
Ruth 'C. Vanden Bosche, B.S., Assistant in Biological Chemistry. 
T. J. Touhey, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 
Henry C. Smith, M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 



FACULTY OF PHYSIC 13 

Nathaniel Beck, M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 

Carl Benson, M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 

F. S. Waesche, M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 

A. Scagnetti, M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 

I. H. Maseritz, M.D., Assistant in Orthopaedic Surgery. 

W. J. Schmitz, M.D., Assistant in Pediatrics. 

M. Paul Byerly, M.D., Assistant in Pediatrics. 

H. E. Levin, M.D., Assistant in Bacteriology. 

W. W. Walker, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

John G. Runkle, M.D., Assistant in Ophthalmology. 

M. B. Ballard, M.D., Assistant in Obstetrics. 

E. S. Edlavitch, M.D., Assistant in Gynecology and Obstetrics. 

Birckhead McGowan, M.D., Assistant in Diseases of the Nose and Throat 

Maurice J. Abrams, M.D., Assistant in Pathology. 

Thomas R. O'Rourke, M.D., Assistant in Diseases of the Nose and Throat. f " 

J. G. Benesunes, M.D., Assistant in Orthopaedic Surgery. 

Clyde F. Karns, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

L. U. Lumpkin, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

Paul Schenker, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

Elizabeth Painter, A.B., Assistant in Physiology. 

Meyer Miller, M.D., Assistant in Gastro-Enterology. 

Samuel Morrison, M.D., Assistant in Gastro-Enterology. 

J. J. Leyko, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

Harry A. Rutledge, M.D., Assistant in Pediatrics. 

Kendig Wallace, M.D., Assistant in Pediatrics. 

Elizabeth Sherman, M.D., Assistant in Pediatrics. 

Morris Fine, M.D., Assistant in Pediatrics. 

William G. Queen, M.D., Assistant in Pediatrics. 

Conrad B. Acton, M.D., Assistant in Pathology. 

E. P. H. Harrison, A.B., M.D., Assistant in Obstetrics. 

Frank K. Morris, A.B., M.D., Assistant in Anatomy and Surgery. 



University of Maryland School of Medicine 

AND 

College of Physicians and Surgeons 

As a result of the merger accomplished in 1915 the combined 
schools offer the student the abundant resources of both institu- 
tions, and, in addition, by earlier combination with the Baltimore 
Medical College, the entire equipment of three large medical 
colleges. 

The School of Medicine of the University of Maryland is one of 
the oldest foundations for medical education in America, ranking 
fifth in point of age among the medical colleges of the United 
States. It was organized in 1807, and chartered in 1808, under 
the name of the College of Medicine of Maryland, and its first 
class was graduated in 1810. In 1812 the College was empowered 
by the Legislature to annex three other colleges or faculties: 
Divinity, Law, and Arts and Sciences ; and the four colleges thus 
united were "constituted an University by the name and under 
the title of the University of Maryland." 

Established thus for more than a century, the School of Medi- 
cine of the University of Maryland has always been a leading 
medical college, especially prominent in the South and widely 
known and highly honored throughout the country. 

The beautiful college building at Lombard and Greene Streets, 
erected in 1812, is the oldest structure in America devoted to 
medical teaching. Here was founded one of the first medical 
libraries and the first medical college library in the United States. 

Here for the first time in America dissecting was made a com- 
pulsory part of the curriculum ; here instruction in Dentistry was 
first given (1837) and here were first installed independent chairs 
for the teaching of Diseases of Women and Children (1867), and 
of Eye and Ear Diseases (1873). 

The School of Medicine was one of the first to provide for ade- 
quate clinical instruction by the erection in 1823 of its own hos- 

14 



ORGANIZATION 15 

pital, and in this hospital intramural residency for the senior 
student was first established. 

In 1913, juncture was brought about with the Baltimore Medi- 
cal College, an institution of thirty-two years 5 growth. By this 
association the facilities of the School of Medicine were enlarged 
in faculty, equipment and hospital connection. 

The College of Physicians and Surgeons was incorporated in 
1872, and established on Hanover Street in a building afterwards 
known as the Maternite, the first obstetrical hospital in Mary- 
land. In 1878 union was affected with the Washington Univer- 
sity School of Medicine, in existence since 1827, and the college 
was removed to its present location at Calvert and Saratoga 
streets. By this arrangement medical control of the City Hos- 
pital, now the Mercy Hospital, was obtained, and on this founda- 
tion in 1899 the present admirable college building was erected. 



ORGANIZATION OF THE SCHOOL OF 
MEDICINE 



LABORATORY AND CLINICAL FACILITIES 
The Laboratories 

The laboratories are located at two centers, the group of build- 
ings at Greene and Lombard Streets, and at 32 and 34 South 
Paca Street. The schedule is so adjusted that the laboratory 
periods are placed with a view of obviating unnecessary move- 
ment on the part of the classes. The building known as Gray 
Laboratory, at Greene and Lombard Streets, houses three depart- 
ments. The Anatomical Laboratory is placed upon the top floor, 
where skylights and an auxiliary modern system of electric light- 
ing give adequate illumination of the subjects. The Depart- 
ment of Pharmacology occupies the second floor. There is 
a large room for the general student laboratory, which is 
thoroughly equipped with apparatus of recent acquisition, and in 
addition contains many instruments of unique and original de- 
sign. With office and stockroom adjoining, this laboratory is 
complete for student experimentation. On the first floor of Gray 



16 ORGANIZATION 

Laboratory is the Department of Physiology. In addition to the 
large student laboratory, which is constructed for groups of 
fifty-eight students there are rooms for the departmental office, 
preparation of material, and storage of apparatus. An additional 
room is devoted exclusively to mammalian experiments. In this 
building there is maintained an animal room where is kept an 
abundance of material for experimental purposes. The embalm- 
ing and storage plant for the Department of Anatomy is in physi- 
cal connection with the building and its special departments. The 
laboratories of physiology and pharmacology are completely 
equipped with apparatus lockers, so that, in accord with the best 
ideas of instruction, the students work in groups of two each, and 
each group has sufficient apparatus, so that the experimental 
work can be carried on without delay or recourse to a general 
stockroom. 

The laboratories of Pathology, Bacteriology, Biochemistry and 
Clinical Pathology are located in the Medical laboratory build- 
ing on Greene Street north of Lombard. 

The Departments of Pathology, Bacteriology and Clinical Path- 
ology use, conjointly, the large modernly equipped student labora- 
tory on the second floor. The capacity is one hundred students. 
On the second floor also there are students' preparation rooms 
for the making and sterilization of media, cold storage and incu- 
bating rooms and research laboratories for the departments of 
Bacteriology and Clinical Pathology. 

On the main floor of this building are the offices, library, re- 
search and technical rooms of the Departments of Pathology and 
Bacteriology. The Department of Art also occupies quarters on 
this floor. The basement is given over to teaching museums, 
store rooms, students' locker room and lavatories. 

The Department of Biological Chemistry is housed on the top 
floor of this building. The space allotted to teaching includes a 
large student laboratory equipped with one hundred and thirty- 
two commodious locker units, supplied with gas, hot and cold 
water, vacuum and direct current service, a special apparatus 
room, a warm room, a colorimeter room, a balance room, a first- 
aid room and a stockroom. These rooms are appointed with mod- 
ern laboratory furniture and apparatus, a constant temperature 



CLINICAL FACILITIES 17 

and ventilating system, and equipped and arranged for economic 
use of the students' time. 

Adjoining the students' space are private offices and labora- 
tories of the staff, a departmental library, a shop and a prepara- 
tion room. 

In the Main Building is the Museum of Anatomy, where are 
arranged for student reference, specimens which represent the 
careful selection of material over a period of many years. In the 
University Hospital is the Student Laboratory for the analytical 
studies by those students who are serving as clinical clerks on the 
wards. A similar laboratory is maintained in the building at the 
northwest corner of Saratoga and Calvert Streets, for the student 
work on the wards of the Mercy Hospital. 

At 32 and 34 South Paca Street are the Laboratories of His- 
tology and Embryology. These laboratories accommodate one 
hundred and twenty-five students, or the full class, and are 
equipped with necessary lockers for microscopes and apparatus. 
The department housed in this building is provided with indi- 
vidual offices, preparation and stockrooms. 

Clinical Facilities 
UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL 

The University Hospital, which is the property of the Univer- 
sity of Maryland, is the oldest institution for the care of the sick 
in the State of Maryland. It was opened in September, 1823, 
under the name of the Baltimore Infirmary, and at that time 
consisted of but four wards, one of which was reserved for eye 
patients. 

The present hospital has a capacity of two hundred and fifty 
beds, devoted to general medicine, surgery, obstetrics and the 
various medical and surgical specialties. It is equipped with a 
thoroughly modern X-ray department and clinical laboratory, and 
a post-mortem building which is constructed with special refer- 
ence to the instruction of students in pathological anatomy. 

The hospital is situated opposite the medical school buildings, 
so that the students lose no time in passing from the lecture halls 
and laboratories to the clinical amphitheater, dispensary and 
wards. 



18 CLINICAL FACILITIES 

Owing to its situation, being adjacent to the largest manufac- 
turing district of the city and the shipping district, large numbers 
of accident patients are received. These, combined with a large 
number of sick seamen and with patients from our own city, fur- 
nish a large amount of clinical material. Accommodations for 
twenty-five obstetrical patients are provided in the hospital for 
the purpose of furnishing actual obstetrical experience to each 
member of the graduating class. 

In connection with the University Hospital an outdoor obstet- 
rical clinic is conducted, in which every patient is given careful 
prenatal supervision, is attended during labor by a senior student, 
supervised by a hospital physician and assisted by a graduate 
nurse, and is visited during the puerperium by the attending stu- 
dent and graduate nurse. Careful prenatal, labor and puerperal 
records are kept, making this work of extreme value to the medi- 
cal student, not only from the obstetrical standpoint, but also 
helping him to appreciate the value of social service and public 
health work. 

During the year ending December 31, 1931, 398 cases were 
delivered in the hospital and 1,150 cases in the outdoor depart- 
ment. Students in the graduating class delivered or observed an 
average of fourteen cases, each student being required to deliver 
twelve cases. 

The dispensaries associated with the University Hospital and 
the Mercy Hospital are organized upon a uniform plan in order 
that the teaching may be the same in each. Each dispensary has 
the following departments : Medicine, Surgery, Obstetrics, Pedi- 
atrics, Eye and Ear, Genito-Urinary, Gynecology, Gastroenter- 
ology, Neurology, Orthopaedics, Proctology, Dermatology, Throat 
and Nose, Tuberculosis and Psychiatry. 

All students in their junior year work in the departments of 
Medicine and Surgery each day in one of the dispensaries. 

All students in their senior year work in the special depart- 
ments one hour each day. 



UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL STAFF 19 

HOSPITAL COUNCIL 

Raymond A. Pearson, M.S., D.Agr., LL.D., President. 

Samuel M. Shoemaker, Esq., President of the Board of Regents. 

J. M. H. Rowland, M.D., Dean of the School of Medicine. 

M. C Pincoffs, S.B., M.D., Head of the Department of Medicine. 

A. M. Shipley, M.D., Sc.D., Head of the Department of Surgery. 

A. J. Lomas, M.D., CM., D.P.H., Superintendent of the Hospital. 

Miss Annie Crighton, R.N., Superintendent of Nurses. 

J. Allison Muir, Esq. 

G. M. Shriver, Esq. 

W. B. Brooks, Esq. 

Miss Florence Sadtler, Representing Woman's Auxiliary Board. 

Representing Hospital Staff 
Page Edmunds, M.D. C. Reid Edwards, M.D. 

Representing Medical Alumni 
Charles Bagley, M.D. Charles C. Habliston, M.D. 

UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL STAFF 
Superintendent of the Hospital, A. J. Lomas, M.D., CM., D.P.H. 

Physicians 

Gordon Wilson, M.D. Maurice C Pincoffs, B.S., M.D. 

Harry M. Stein, M.D. G. Carroll Lockard, M.D. 

Walter A. Baetjer, M.D. Joseph E. Gichner, M.D. 

C C Habliston, M.D. William H. Smith, M.D. 

L. A. M. Krause, M.D. William S. Love, Jr., M.D. 

Gastro-Enterologist 

Julius Friedenwald, A.M., M.D. 

J. Harry Ullrich, M.D. Theodore H. Morrison, M.D. 

Neurologist 
Irving J. Spear, M.D. 

Psychiatrist 
R. M. Chapman, M.D. 

Pediatrician 

C. LORING JOSLIN, M.D. 



20 UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL STAFF 

Pathologists 
Hugh R. Spencer, M.D. S. Lloyd Johnson, M.D. 

Surgeons 
Randolph Winslow, A.M., M.D., LL.D. Arthur M. Shipley, M.D., Sc.D. 
Nathan Winslow, M.D. Page Edmunds, M.D. 

Charles Reid Edwards, M.D. Frank S. Lynn, M.D. 

Laryngolo gists 
Edward A. Looper, M.D. Franklin B. Anderson, M.D. 

Proctologists 
G. Milton Linthicum, A.M., M.D. J. Dawson Reeder, M.D. 

Monte Edwards, M.D. 

Orthopaedic Surgeons 

Allen Fiske Voshell, A.B., M.D., Compton Rdsly, M.D. 

Moses Gellman, B.S., M.D. 

Genito-Urinary Surgeons 
W. H. Toulson, A.B., M.Sc, M.D. Lyle J. Millan, M.D. 

Roentgenologists 
Henry J. Walton, M.D. Eugene L. Flippin, M.D. 

Dermatologists 
Melvin S. Rosenthal, M.D. Harry M. Robinson, M.D. 

Bronchoscopist 
Edward A. Looper, M.D. 

Anaesthetists 
S. Griffith Davis, M.D. George H. Yeager, B.S., M.D. 

Mary J. O'Brien, R.N. 

Obstetricians 

J. M. H. Rowland, M.D. L. H. Douglass, M.D. 

M. A. Novey, A.B., M.D. J. G. M. Reese, M.D. 

Isador A. Siegel, A.B., M.D. E. P. H. Harrison, Jr., A.B., M.D. 

Ophthahno logists 
Clyde A. Clapp, M.D. William Tarun, M.D. 

Otologist 
J. W. Downey, Jr., M.D. 

Gynecologists 
W. S. Gardner, M.D. Hugh Brent, M.D. 

R. G. Willse, M.D. 



UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL STAFF 21 

UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL RESIDENT AND INTERN STAFF 
RESIDENT STAFF, 1932-1933 

Resident in Surgery Paul S. Hill, M.D. 

Assistant Resident in Surgery Emil J. C. Hildenbrand, M.D. 

Assistant Resident in Surgery Harry C. Shelley, M.D. 

Assistant Resident in Surgery Milford H. Sprecher, M.D. 

Resident in Medicine - Maurice J. Abrams, M.D. 

Assistant Resident in Medicine W. M. Seabold, M.D. 

Assistant Resident in Medicine David N. Andrew, M.D. 

Resident in Obstetrics - - - * W. A. Hart, M.D. 

Assistant Resident in Obstetrics _ E. W. Warren, M.D. 

Resident in Gynecology * Zack Doxey Owens, M.D. 

INTERN STAFF, 1932-1933 

C. Richard Ahroon, Jr., M.D. R. Richard Louft, M.D. 

William E. Brown, M.D. William Owen McMillan, M.D. 

Dwight McIver Currie, M.D. J. Duer Moores, M.D. 

S. Demarco, Jr., M.D. Thomas Sewell Saunders, M.D. 

John C. Dumler, M.D. John Edward Savage, M.D. 

Andrew M. France, M.D. John Frederick Simmons, M.D. 

Harry C. Hull, Jr., M.D. Frank Wilson, Jr., M.D. 

UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL DISPENSARY STAFF 

Medicine 

L. A. M. Krause, M.D., Chief of Clinic 

S. C. Feldman, M.D. H. S. Rubenstein, M.D. 

M. A. Fine, M.D. W. H. Triplett, M.D. 

Z. V. Hooper, M.D. 

Diseases of the Stomach and Intestines 

J. H. Ullrich, Ph.G., M.D., Chief of Clinic 

Joseph Sindler, M.D. M. S. Koppelman, M.D. 

Z. Morgan, M.D. C. Vance Hooper, M.D. 

C. Victor Richards, M.D. Samuel Morrison, M.D. 

Neurology 

Irving J. Spear, M.D., Professor of Neurology 

G. M. Settle, M.D., Associate Professor of Neurology 

Leon Freedom, M.D., Chief of Clinic 

Mental Hygiene 

Ralph P. Truitt, M.D., Director 

Elmer Klein, M.D. 

Diseases of the Lungs 

C. C. Habliston, M.D., Chief of Clinic 

H. C. Smith, M.D. 



22 UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL DISPENSARY STAFF 

Diseases of Metabolism 

H. M. Stein, M.D., Chief of Clinic 

L. P. Gundry, M.D. 

Cardiovascular Diseases 

William S. Love, Jr., M.D., Chief of Clinic 

Samuel J. Harkin, M.D. Frank J. Geraghty, M.D. 

Allergy Clinic 
H. M. Bubert, M.D., Chief of Clinic 

Pediatrics 

C. Loring Joslin, M.D., Professor of Clinical Pediatrics 

John H. Traband, M.D., Chief of Clinic 

Clarence E. Macke, M.D., Chief of Clinic 

Albert Jaffe, M.D. Elizabeth S. Sherman, M.D. 

William J. Todd, M.D. A. H. Finkelstein, M.D. 

F. Stratner Orem, M.D. M. Paul Byerly, M.D. 

William G. Geyer, M.D. Morris A. Fine, M.D. 

R. M. Hening, M.D. William G. Queen, M.D. 

Marie Kovner, M.D. Harry A. Rutledge, M.D. 

Clewell Howell, M.D. S. Kendig Wallace, M.D. 

Samuel Glick, M.D. Joseph Rosenblatt, M.D. 

Surgery 

Charles Reid Edwards, M.D., Chief of Clinic 

J. Willis Guyton, M.D. C. F. Karns, M.D. 

Thomas B. Aycock, M.D. A. C. Monninger, M.D. 

E. S. Johnson, M.D. W. W. Walker, M.D. 

W. R. Johnson, M.D. A. V. Buchness, M.D. 

Hugh A. Bailey, A.B., M.D. W. N. McFaul, Jr., M.D. 
A. N. Owens, M.D. 

Orthopaedic Surgery 

Allen Fiske Voshell, A.B., M.D., Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery 

Moses Gellman, B.S., M.D. I. H. Maseritz, M.D. 

J. G. Benesunes, M.D. H. A. Bailey, A.B., M.D. 

Genito-Urinary 

W. H. Toulson, M.D;, Chief of Clinic 

Harris Goldman, M.D. Milton C. Lang, M.D. 

Samuel J. Helms, M.D. L. K. Fargo, M.D. 

Lyle J. Millan, M.D. 



UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL DISPENSARY STAFF 23 

Roentgenology 

Henry J. Walton, M.D., Chief of Clinic 

Eugene L. Flippin, M.D. 

Dermatology 

H. M. Robinson, M.D., Chief of Clinic 

M. H. Goodman, M.D. Francis Ellis, M.D. 

Harry Wasserman, M.D. A. C. Monninger, M.D. 

Nose and Throat 
Edward A. Looper, M.D., Clinical Professor of Diseases of the Nose and 
Throat 

Franklin B. Anderson, M.D., Chief of Clinic 

F. A. Holden, M.D. Thomas O'Rourke, M.D. 

Charles H. Cahn, M.D. Edward Talbott, M.D. 

Joseph Nurkin, M.D. 

Colon and Rectum 
Monte Edwards, M.D., Chief of Clinic 

Gynecology 
J. M. Hundley, Jr., M.D. James J. Marston, M.D. 

William J. Fulton, M.D. Leo Brady, M.D. 

John T. Kibbitts, M.D. Kenneth Boyd, M.D. 

Joseph V. Castagna, M.D. E. Eugene Covington, M.D. 

Thomas S. Boyer, M.D. 

Obstetrics 

L. H. Douglas, M.D., Chief of Clinic 

J. G. M. Reese, M.D. M. Alexander Novey, M.D. 

Maxwell Mazer, M.D. Isadore A. Siegel, A.B., M.D. 

Margaret B. Ballard, M.D. S. K. Wallace, M.D. 

E. P. H. Harrison, A.B., M.D. 

Eye and Ear 

Clyde A. Clapp, M.D., Professor of Ophthalmology 

J. W. Downey, M.D., Professor of Otology 

John G. Runkel, M.D. H. F. Graff, A.B., M.D. 

Frank A. Pacienza, M.D. 

Social Service 
Miss Grace Pearson, Directress 



24 UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL DISPENSARY STAFF 

Dispensary Report From October 1st, 1930, To September 30th, 1931 

"Total" 

Departments New Cases Old Cases Total 

Pediatrics 3,316 19,777 23,093 

Dermatology 6,647 14,805 21,452 

Surgery 3,672 12,678 16,350 

Medicine 1,906 7,930 9,836 

Obstetrics 1,878 7,241 9,119 

Orthopedic 892 6,898 7,790 

Genito-Urinary _ 1,159 5,705 6,864 

Gynecology 1,329 2,346 3,675 

Eye _ - 1,098 2,345 3,443 

Nose and Throat 1,292 1,970 2,362 

Gastro-Intestinal 298 1,127 1,425 

Ear 455 567 1,022 

Neurology _ 276 557 833 

Tuberculosis 260 357 617 

Oncology 94 454 548 

Proctology 198 322 520 

Cardiology 147 370 517 

Cystoscopy 63 230 293 

Mental Hygiene 664 1,652 2,316 

Total 25,644 86,431 112,075 



MERCY HOSPITAL 25 

MERCY HOSPITAL 

The Sisters of Mercy first assumed charge of the Hospital at 
the corner of Calvert and Saratoga Streets, then owned by the 
Washington University, in 1874. By the merger of 1878 the 
Hospital came under the control of the College of Physicians and 
Surgeons, but the Sisters continued their work of administering 
to the patients. 

In a very few years it became apparent that the City Hospital, 
as it was then called, was much too small to accommodate the 
rapidly growing demands upon it. However, it was not until 
1888 that the Sisters of Mercy, with the assistance of the Faculty 
of the College of Physicians and Surgeons, were able to lay the 
cornerstone of the present Hospital. This building was com- 
pleted and occupied late in 1889. Since then the growing de- 
mands for more space have compelled the erection of additions, 
until now there are accommodations for 275 patients. 

In 1909 the name was changed from The Baltimore City Hos- 
pital to Mercy Hospital. 

The clinical material in the free wards is under the exclusive 
control of the Faculty of the University of Maryland School of 
Medicine and College of Physicians and Surgeons. 

The Hospital adjoins the College building, and all surgical 
patients from the public wards are operated upon in the College 
operating rooms. This union of the Hospital and College build- 
ings greatly facilitates the clinical teaching. 

Mercy Hospital is the hospital of the United Railways and 
Electric Company of Baltimore City, and receives patients from 
the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad Company and from the Penn- 
sylvania Railroad Company and its branches. 



26 



MERCY HOSPITAL STAFF 
BOARD OF GOVERNORS 



Samuel M. Shoemaker, Esq., Chair man 
Mother M. Picarda Dr. Alexius McGlannan 

Sister M. Helen Dr. Walter D. Wise 

Sister M. Hildegarde Dr. Thomas K. Galvin 

Sister M. Vincent Dr. Waitman F. Zinn 

Sister M. Cornelia Dr. Standish McCleary 



MERCY HOSPITAL STAFF 
SURGICAL DIVISION 



Alexius McGlannan, M.D. 
W. D. Wise, M.D. 
C. F. Blake, M.D. 



R. H. Locher, M.D. 
T. R. Chambers, M.D. 



Charles Maxson, M.D. 
A. B. McElwain, M.D. 
T. J. Touhey, M.D. 



Associate Surgeons 

D. J. Pessagno, M.D. 
Assistant Surgeons 



Elliott Hutchins, M.D. 

A. M. Evans, M.D. 

F. L. Jennings, M.D. 



I. 0. Ridgley, M.D. 
N. C. Marvel, M.D. 



Dwight Mohr, M.D. 

H. F. Bongardt, M.D. 

J. W. Nelson, M.D. 



John A. O'Connor, M.D. 



Ophthalmologist and Otologist 
Harry Friedenwald, M.D. 

Associates 



H. K. Fleck, M.D. 



J. W. Downey, M.D. 



Rhinologists and Laryngolo gists 
Frank D. Sanger, M.D. George W. Mitchell, M.D. 



W. F. Zinn, M.D. 
F. A. Pacienza, M.D. 



Associates 
F. A. Kayser, M.D. 



Raymond McKenzie, M.D. 

BlRCKHEAD McGOWAN, M.D. 



Proctologist 
Charles F. Blake, M.D. 

Orthopaedic Surgeon 
Albertus Cotton, M.D. 

Associate 
H. L. Rogers, M.D. 



MERCY HOSPITAL STAFF 27 

Urologist 
Alexander J. Gillis 

Associate 
Kenneth B. Legge, M.D. 

Dentist 
J. D. Fusco, D.D.S. 

MEDICAL DIVISION 

Physicians 

Maurice C. Pincoffs, M.D. Cary B. Gamble, M.D. 

Standish McCleary, M.D. Harvey G. Beck, M.D. 

Associates 

Hubert C. Knapp, M.D. George McLean, M.D. 

C. C. W. Judd, M.D. A. A. Sussman, M.D. 

H. R. Peters, M.D. L. A. M. Krause, M.D. 

Bartus T. Baggott, M.D. John E. Legge, M.D. 

J. S. Eastland, M.D. 

Assistant Physicians 

Wetherbee Fort, M.D. J. M. Miller, M.D. 

S. A. Tumminello, M.D. 

Gastro-Enteroloffist 
Julius Friedenwald, M.D. 

Associates 
T. Frederick Leitz, M.D. Theodore Morrison, M.D. 

Assistants 
Maurice Feldman, M.D. Joseph Sindler, M.D. 

Pediatricians 
John Ruhrah, M.D. Edgar B. Friedenwald, M.D. 

Associate Pediatrician 
F. B. Smith, M.D. 

Assistant Pediatricians 
W. J. Schmitz, M.D. G. B. Mansdorfer, M.D. 

Neurologist and Psychiatrist 
Andrew C. Gillis, M.D. 

Associates 
Milford Levy, M.D. 

Dermatologist 
Melvin Rosenthal, M.D. 



28 MERCY HOSPITAL STAFF 

OBSTETRICAL DIVISION 

Charles E. Brack, M.D. E. P. Smith, M.D. 

A. Samuels, M.D. j. j. Erwin, M.D. 

W. S. Gardner, M.D. T. K. Galvin, M.D. 

G. A. Strauss, M.D. E. S. Edlavitch, M.D. 

F. K. Morris, M.D. 

GYNECOLOGICAL DIVISION 

Gynecologists 

William S. Gardner, M.D. Abram Samuels, M.D. 

George A. Strauss, M.D. E. P. Smith, M.D. 

T. K. Galvin, M.D. 

Associate 
J. J. Erwin, M.D. 

Assistants 
E. S. Edlavitch, M.D. Frank K. Morris, M.D. 

PATHOLOGICAL DIVISION 
Standish McCleary, M.D. Hugh R. Spencer, M.D. 

Clinical Pathologists 

H. T. Collenberg, M.D. 
H. R. Peters, M.D. Emil G. Schmidt, Ph.D. 

Technicians 

Sister M. Joan, Ph.G., R.N. Eleanor Behr, R.N. 

Frances Donovan, R.N. 

X-RAY DEPARTMENT 

Radiographers 

Albertus Cotton, M.D. Harry L. Rogers, M.D. 

William Greenfield, M.D. 

Technician 
Sister M. Antonia, R.N. 



MERCY HOSPITAL STAFF 29 



MERCY HOSPITAL RESIDENT STAFF 

Resident Surgeon 
Simon Brager, M.D. 

Assistant Resident Surgeons 

Julius Goodman, M.D. Jos. J. Smith, M.D. 

W. Merle Warman, M.D. 

Resident, Nose and Throat 
Horace G. Strickland, M.D. 

Resident Physician 
Howard Burns, M.D. 

Assistant Resident Physician 
Joseph Smith, M.D. 

Resident Gynecologist 
Raymond F. Helfrich, M.D. 

Interne Staff 1931-32 

E. I. Baumgartner, M.D. Emmitt Markwood, M.D. 

I. K. Grossman, M.D. A. G. Siwinski, M.D. 

Myer Hantman, M.D. Solomon Smith, M.D. 

R. F. Helfrich, M.D. Harry Wigderson, M.D. 



30 DISPENSARY STAFF OF MERCY HOSPITAL 

DISPENSARY STAFF OF MERCY HOSPITAL 

Surgery 
Supervisor Julius J. Leyko, M.D. 



Attending Surgeons 



D. H. Mohr, M.D. 
I. 0. Ridgley, M.D. 
John O'Connor, M.D. 



A. J. Gillis, M.D. 



Genito -Urinary Surgery 



H. F. Bongardt, M.D. 
T. J. Touhey, M.D. 
J. W. Nelson, M.D. 



K. B. Legge, M.D. 



Orthopaedic Surgery 

Albertus Cotton, M.D. Harry L. Rogers, M.D. 

I. H. Maseritz, M.D. 

Medicine 
Supervisor M. C. Pincoffs, M.D. 



J. M. Miller, M.D. 



Attending Physicians 

Henry Sheppard, M.D. 
R. Hooper Smith, M.D. 



S. A. Tumminello, M.D. 



Chiefs of Clinic 

S. Snyder, M.D. 



Cardiovascular Diseases 
T. C. Wolff, M.D., Chief of Clinic 

Diseases of the Lungs 
S. Snyder, M.D., Chief of Clinic 

Diseases of Metabolism 
J. S. Eastland, M.D., Chief of Clinic 

Allergic Diseases 

H. M. Bubert, M.D., Chief of Clinic 
S. Snyder, M.D. 



DISPENSARY STAFF OF MERCY HOSPITAL 31 

Diseases of Stomach 
Supervisor, Julius Friedenwald, M.D. 

Attending Physicians 
T. Frederick Leitz, M.D. Theodore H. Morrison, M.D. 

M. Feldman, M.D. Joseph Sindler, M.D. 

I. I. Levy, M.D. 

Esophagoscopist 
W. F. Zinn, M.D. 

Nervous Diseases 
Supervisor, A. C. Gillis, M.D. 

Attending Physicians 
Milford Levy, M.D. Miriam F. Dunn, M.D. 

Pediatrics 
Supervisor, Edgar B. Friedenwald, M.D. 
Attending Physician, W. J. Schmitz, M.D. 

Gynecology 

Supervisors 

W. S. Gardner, M.D. A. Samuels, M.D. 

Attending Surgeons 

George A. Strauss, M.D. C. F. J. Coughlin, M.D. 

J. J. Erwin, M.D. E. Edlavitch, M.D. 

F. K. Morris, M.D. F. W. Gillis, M.D. 

Diseases of Nose and Throat 
W. F. Zinn, M.D. R. F. McKenzie, M.D. 

F. A. Pacienza, M.D. Louise Small, M.D. 

B. McGowan, M.D. 

Diseases of Eye and Ear 
H. F. Fleck, M.D. M. Raskin, M.D. 

J. I. Kemler, M.D. F. A. Pacienza, M.D. 

Dermatology 
Melvin Rosenthal, M.D. Llewellyn Lord, M.D. 

Social Service Department 
Sister M. Helen, R.N. Virginia Judge 



MUNICIPAL HOSPITALS 

MERCY HOSPITAL DISPENSARY 

(1931) 

Old New Total 

Surgical 2,141 1,054 3,195 

Medical 1,253 1,120 2,373 

Gynecological _ 566 282 847 

Eye and Ear 476 308 784 

Nose and Throat 766 545 1,311 

Neurological 232 73 305 

Pediatrics ~ _ 165 249 414 

Gastro-Intestinal 371 79 450 

Dental 66 134 200 

Rectal 69 55 124 

Orthopaedic 1,062 312 1,374 

Skin 575 319 894 

Genito-Urinary 2,258 652 2,910 

Cardiac 120 86 206 

Totals 10,120 5,268 15,387 



OTHER CLINICAL FACILITIES 



THE BALTIMORE CITY HOSPITALS 

The clinical advantages of the University have been largely in- 
creased by the liberal decision of the Board of Supervisors of 
City Charities to allow the immense material of these hospitals 
to be used for the purpose of medical education. There are daily 
visits and clinics in medicine and surgery by the Staff of the Hos- 
pitals. The autopsy material is unsurpassed in this country in 
amount, thoroughness of study, and the use made of it in medi- 
cal teaching. 

The Baltimore City Hospitals consist of the following separate 
hospitals : 

The General Hospital, 209 beds. 
The Hospital for Chronic Cases, 427 beds. 
The Hospital for Tuberculosis, 172 beds. 
The Psychopathic Hospital, 325 beds. 
Infirmary (Home for Aged), 911 beds. 



STAFF OF BALTIMORE CITY HOSPITALS 33 

STAFF OF THE BALTIMORE CITY HOSPITALS 
R. E. Longan, Brig. Gen., Superintendent 

VISITING STAFF 

Thomas R. Boggs, S.B., M.D., Physician-in-Chief. 

Arthur M. Shipley, Sc.D., M.D., Surgeon-in-Chief. 

C. C. Habuston, M.D., Physician-in-Chief to the Tuberculosis Hosjntal. 

Harry Goldsmith, M.D., Physician-in-Chief , Psychopathic Hospital. 

S. S. Blackman, A.B., M.D., Visiting Pathologist. 

Conrad B. Action, M.D., Resident Pathologist. 

CONSULTING STAFF 

Gynecologists 

R. G. Willse, M.D. J. Mason Hundley, Jr., M.A., M.D. 

Urologist 

W. H. Toulson, A.B., M.D. 

Laryngolo gists 

H. R. Slack, M.D. E. A. Looper, M.D. 

W. F. Zinn, M.D. Franklin B. Anderson, M.D. 

Pediatrician 

Lawson Wilkins, M.D. 

Neurological Surgeon 

Charles Bagley, M.D. 

Psychiatrist 

Esther L. Richards, M.D. 

Orthopaedist 

Allen Fiske Voshell, A.B., M.D. 

H. S. Wheeler, M.D. 

Proctologist 

Monte Edwards, M.D. 

Assisting Visiting Physician 

Charles R. Austrian, M.D. 

Assisting Visiting Surgeons 

Frank S. Lynn, M.D. C. A. Reifschneider, M.D. 

E. M. Hanrahan, A.B., M.D. T. B. Aycock, M.D. 

Assistant Neurologist 

0. R. Langworthy, M.D. 

Assistant Physician — Tuberculosis 

Henry C. Smith, M.D. 

Ophthalmologist 

Cecil Bagley, M.D. 

Obstetrician 

Louis H. Douglass, M.D. 

Dermatologist 

Isaac R. Pels, M.D. 

Roentgenologist 

John W. Pierson, M.D. 



34 JAMES LAWRENCE KERNAN HOSPITAL 

THE JAMES LAWRENCE KERNAN HOSPITAL AND INDUSTRIAL 
SCHOOL OF MARYLAND FOR CRIPPLED CHILDREN 

This institution is situated on an estate of 75 acres at Hillsdale. 
The site is just within the northwestern city limits and of easy 
access from the city proper. 

The location is ideal for the treatment of children, in that it 
affords all the advantages of sunshine and country air. 

A complete hospital unit, new in every respect, offers all mod- 
ern facilities for the care of any orthopaedic condition in chil- 
dren. 

The hospital is equipped with 82 beds — endowed, and city and 
state supported. 

The Children's Orthopaedic Dispensary at University Hospital 
is maintained in closest affiliation and cares for the cases dis- 
charged from the Kernan Hospital. The physiotherapy depart- 
ment is very well equipped with modern apparatus and trained 
personnel. 

STAFF 

Surgeon-in-Chief and Medical Director 
Allen Fiske Voshell, A.B., M.D. 

Attending Orthopaedic Surgeon 
Albertus Cotton, A.M., M. D. 

Associate Orthopaedic Surgeons 
Moses Gellman, B.S., M.D. Harry L. Rogers, M.D. 

Resident Orthopaedic Surgeon 
Hugh A. Bailey, A.B., M.D. 

Consulting Surgeons 

J. M. T. Finney, A.B., M.D., D.S.M., F.R.C.S. (Eng, Ire,) Hon. 

Arthur M. Shipley, Sc.D., M.D. 

Consulting Plastic Surgeon 
John Staige Davis, B.Sc, M.D. 

Consulting Neurological Surgeon 
Charles Bagley, Jr., A.B., M.D. 

Consulting Oculist 
Harry Friedenwald, M.D. 



JAMES LAWRENCE KERNAN HOSPITAL 35 

Oculist 
F. A. Pacienza, M.D. 

Consulting Aurist and Laryngologist 
Edward A. Looper, M.D. 

Aurist and Laryngologist 
F. B. Anderson, M.D. 

Consulting Dentist 
Harry B. McCarthy, D.D.S. 

Dentist 
M. E. Coberth, D.D.S. 

Consulting Physicians 
Thomas B. Futcher, A.B., M.D. Thomas R. Brown, A.B., M.D. 

Lewellys F. Barker, A.B., M.D. William S. Thayer, A.B., M.D. 

Pediatrist 
Benjamin Tappan, A.B., M.D. 

Dermatologists 
Harry M. Robinson, M.D. Leon Ginsberg, M.D. 

Consulting Pathologist 
Sydney M. Cone, A.B., M.D. 

Pathologist 
Hugh R. Spencer, M.D. 

Consulting Neurologist 
Irving T. Spear, M.D. 

Neurologist 
R. V. Seliger, M.D. 

Anesthetists 
J. A. Tompkins, M.D. J. D. Holly, M.D. 

Roentgenologist 
Albertus Cotton, A.M., M.D. 

Superintendent 
Miss C. Gertrude Forrester, R.N. 

Dispensary and Social Service Nurse 
Miss Mabel S. Brown, R.N. 

Physiotherapist and X-Ray Technician 
Mrs. Georgiana Wisong 

Instructors in Grammar School 
Miss Mary H. Lee, Principal Miss Laura Hampson, Assistant 



36 



ST. VINCENT'S INFANT ASYLUM 
ST. VINCENT'S INFANT ASYLUM 



The facilities of this institution, containing 150 infants and 
children, have been kindly extended to the University of Mary- 
land by the Sisters of Charity. This large clinic enables this 
school to present to its students liberal opportunities for the 
study of diseases of infants and children. 



L. H. Douglass, M.D. 



STAFF 

Obstetricians 



M. B. Ballard, M.D. 



W. C. Bacon, M.D. 
Clewell Howell, M.D. 



Pediatricians 



C. L. Joslin, M.D. 
Chas. R. Goldsborough, M.D. 



Surgeon 
N. Winslow, M.D. 

Dermatologist 
J. A. Buchness, M.D. 



C A. Clapp, M.D. 



Oculists 



F. B. Anderson, M.D. 



Orthopaedic Surgeon 
H. L. Wheeler, M.D. 

Physician 
C. P. Clautice, M.D. 



Epidemiologist 
M. B. Ballard, M.D. 



LIBRARIES 37 



LIBRARIES 



The University Library, founded in 1813 by the purchase of 
the collection of Dr. John Crawford, now contains 17,453 vol- 
umes, a file of 150 current medical journals, and several thousand 
pamphlets and reprints. It is well stocked with recent literature, 
including books and periodicals of general interest. The home of 
the library is Davidge Hall, a comfortable and commodious 
building in close proximity to the classrooms and the laboratories 
of the Medical Department. The Library is open daily during 
the year for use of members of the Faculty, the students, and the 
profession generally. 

The Library of the Medical and Chirurgical Faculty of Mary- 
land, containing 44,000 volumes, are open to the students of the 
school. The leading medical publications of the world are re- 
ceived by the library, and complete sets of many journals are 
available. Other libraries of Baltimore are the Peabody (250,- 
000 volumes), the Enoch Pratt Free Library (684,919 volumes), 
and the Welch Library. 

All these libraries are open to the students of the school with- 
out charge. 



38 ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 

ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 

The following curriculum is the result of a thorough revision 
of teaching in this school in order to meet modern requirements. 
The multiplication of specialties in medicine and surgery necessi- 
tates a very crowded course and the introduction of electives will 
very soon be depended on to solve some of the difficulties. 

The curriculum is organized under eleven departments. 

1. Anatomy (including Histology and Embryology) . 

2. Physiology. 

3. Bacteriology and Immunology. 

4. Biological Chemistry. 

5. Pharmacology and Materia Medica. 

6. Pathology. 

7. Medicine (including Medical Specialties). 

8. Surgery (including Surgical Specialties). 

9. Obstetrics. 

10. Gynecology. 

11. Ophthalmology and Otology. 

The instruction is given in four years of graded work. 

Several courses of study extend through two years or more, 
but in no case are the students of different years thrown together* 
in the same course of teaching. 

The first and second years are devoted largely to the study of 
the structures and functions of the normal body. Laboratory 
work occupies most of the student's time during these two years. 

Some introductory instruction in Medicine and Surgery is 
given in the second year. The third and fourth years are almost 
entirely clinical. 

A special feature of instruction in the school is the attempt 
to bring together teacher and student in close personal relation- 
ship. In many courses of instruction the classes are divided into 
small groups and a large number of instructors insures attention 
to the needs of each student. 

In most courses the final examination as the sole test of pro- 
ficiency has disappeared and the student's final grade is deter- 
mined largely by partial examinations, recitations and assigned 
work carried on throughout the course. 



ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 39 



DEPARTMENT OF ANATOMY, INCLUDING HISTOLOGY 
AND EMBRYOLOGY 

C. L. Davis, M.D _ - Professor of Anatomy 

Eduard Uhlenhuth, Ph.D ...... Professor of Gross Anatomy 

Thomas B. Aycock, S.B., M.D Assistant Professor of Anatomy 

John F. Lutz, M.D. _ _ Associate in Histology 

Monte Edwards, M.D Associate in Anatomy 

Frank H. Figge, B.S _ Instructor in Anatomy 

Joseph Pokorny, M.D _ ...Instructor in Histology 

J. Hulla, M.D _ _ Instructor in Histology 

H. S. Rubinstein, Ph.G., M.D ..Instructor in Histology 

Frank Morris „ Instructor in Anatomy 

Gross Anatomy. First Year. Total number of hours 508. 
Five conferences and 18 laboratory hours per week during Feb- 
ruary and first half of March. Five conferences and 36 labora- 
tory hours per week to the end of the academic year. 

The entire course centers around the dissection of the human 
body. Each student is given opportunity to dissect an entire half 
(left or right) of the body. The dissection is supplemented by 
lecture and informal discussions. (One lecture a w T eek for five 
weeks.) 

Anatomy is taught as an independent science, emphasis being 
laid on the human species as contrasted with animal morphology. 
An attempt is made to familiarize the student with the elements 
of anthropometry, with systematic and regional anatomy, with 
the principles of topographical anatomy and with osteology. 

The actual dissection is preceded by a general examination of 
the body surface and superficial organs. Opportunity is provided 
for taking representative measurements of the head, face, trunk 
and limbs, and of acquiring a knowledge of using anthropometric 
instruments. Throughout the dissection the student is encour- 
aged to take measurements and weights of all the major organs, 
including the brain and the endocrines, and to obtain a knowl- 
edge of the proportions of each organ to the body as a whole as 
well as to the variability of these proportions. 

The dissection is undertaken in relation to topographical re- 
gions of the body, but systematic relations are continuously em- 
phasized and, wherever possible, brought out by actual dissection. 



40 ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 

Osteology is taught in conjunction with the dissection of the 
muscles and the study of the functional mechanism of the skeleto- 
muscular apparatus. Each student is provided with a set of 
bones to aid him in his homework. Fifty complete and perfect 
skeletons of the whole body and about as many of the limbs are 
available for reference and special advanced work. 

Second, Third and Fourth Years. Opportunity is provided 
for advanced special dissections and for research work in every 
branch of anatomy. Dr. Uhlenhuth. 

Histology and Embryology 

First Year. This course has three subdivisions: First, gen- 
eral histology ; second, organology, and third, the central nervous 
system, the last being distinguished as neuro-anatomy. The first 
semester is divided equally between the study of the fundamental 
tissues and that of organs. Neuro-anatomy is taught during the 
first five weeks of the second semester. Throughout the entire 
course the embryology of the part being studied precedes the 
study of the fully developed tissue. Thus embryology becomes a 
correlated part of the whole subject of microscopic anatomy and 
not an independent subject. 

A brief course in histological technic precedes the study of his- 
tological tissues, thus familiarizing the student with the princi- 
pals involved in the preparation of material for microscopic 
study. For the remainder of the course, students are fur- 
nished slides of the required tissues, previously prepared in our 
own laboratory, thus insuring a uniform and satisfactory quality 
of material for study and permitting the time of the student to 
be expended in the study of material rather than in the technic 
of its preparation. 

Neuro-anatomy embraces a study of the fundamental structure 
of the central nervous system as applied to its function. An 
abundance of material permits of individual dissection of the 
human brain. A series of appropriately stained sections of the 
human brain stem is furnished each student for the microscopic 
study of the internal structure of the nervous system. In addi- 
tion, each student is required to construct a model of the princi- 



ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 41 

pal tracts, comprising the central nervous system. Dr. Davis, 
Dr. Lutz, Dr. Rubinstein. 

Total assigned hours, Microscopic Anatomy 245. 

Graduate Courses 

Anat. 101 s. (Minor). Human Gross Anatomy (10) — Total 
number of hours 508. Five lecture periods and 18 laboratory 
hours per week during February and second half of March. Five 
lecture periods and 36 laboratory hours per week to the end of 
the academic year. A complete dissection of the human body 
(exclusive of the central nervous system). Dr. Uhlenhuth and 
Dr. Edwards. 

Anat. 102 /. (Minor). Mammalian Histology (6) — Two lec^ 
tures, 10 laboratory periods. 

A general survey of the histological structure of the organs of 
mammals and man. Opportunity is offered for examining and 
studying a complete collection of microscopical sections. Dr. 
Davis and Dr. Lutz. 

Anat. 103 s. (Minor). Human Neurology (4) — Three lec- 
tures, 9 laboratory hours for the first five weeks of the second 
semester. 

This course provides a general survey of the structure of the 
human central nervous system, being mainly directed toward the 
fiber tracts and nuclei contained therein. It includes a brief 
study of the special senses. The laboratory work is based on a 
dissection of the human brain, together with the study of pre- 
pared microscopic sections of the brain stem. Anat. 102 f., or its 
equivalent, required to enter this course. Dr. Davis, Dr. Rubin- 
stein. 

Anat . 202 /. and s. (Major) . For work leading to a Ph. D. in 
Anatomy. A study of neurological problems based on 103 s. 
Only students who have had the preceding course in neurology 
are eligible for this work. Dr. Davis. 

Anat. 204 /. and s. (Major). Advanced Endocrinology. 
(Credit and time dependent upon the student's qualifications.) 

A study of the morphological equivalent of function. By 
means of proper experimentation the morphological responses of 



42 ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 

the endocrines to extrinsic and intrinsic factors are examined. 
This course will lead the student toward work for the Ph. D. in 
Anatomy. Dr. Uhlenhuth. 

DEPARTMENT OF PHYSIOLOGY 

Ferd A. Ries, M.D., 

Associate Professor of Physiology and Acting Head of the Department 

Charles C. Conser, M.D Associate Professor of Physiology 

O. G. Harne, A. B -. Assistant Professor of Physiology 

Elizabeth E. Painter, A.B _ Assistant in Physiology 

Nathan Brewer, B.S Weaver Fellow in Physiology 

Second Year. Lectures, laboratory, and conferences are given 
in the physiology of muscle-nerve, central nervous system and 
special senses, followed by work on blood, circulation, respira- 
tion, internal secretions, metabolism and nutrition. 

Lectures and conferences .... 96 hours 

Laboratory ... ... 144 hours 

Total 240 hours 

For a description of the graduate courses offered, consult the 
catalog of the Graduate School. 

DEPARTMENT OF BACTERIOLOGY AND IMMUNOLOGY 

Frank W. Hachtel, M.D Professor of Bacteriology 

J. A. F. Pfeiffer, M.D ..„ Instructor in Bacteriology 

Henry F. Buettner, M.D Instructor in Bacteriology 

H. E. Levin, M.D _ _ Assistant in Bacteriology 

H. M. Bubert, M.D Assistant in Bacteriology 

Instruction in bacteriology is given in the laboratory to the 
students of the second year during the first semester. This in- 
cludes the various methods of preparation and sterilization of 
culture media, the study of pathogenic bacteria and the bacterio- 
logical examination of water and milk. The bacteriological diag- 
nosis of the communicable diseases is also included in this course. 
Animal inoculations are made in connection with the bacteria 
studied. The most important protozoa are also studied in the 
laboratory. The principles of general bacteriology are taught by 
quiz, conference and lecture. 



ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 43 

The principles of immunology are presented by means of 
quizzes, conferences and lectures to the second-year class 
throughout the second semester, and practical experiments are 
carried out by the class in laboratory sessions. 

Bacteriology Immunology 

Lectures and recitations 16 hours 16 hours 

Laboratory -._ 128 hours 96 hours 

Total „ - 144 hours 112 hours 



DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGICAL CHEMISTRY 

H. Boyd Wylie, M.D Professor of Biological Chemistry 

Frank N. Ogden, M.D Associate in Biological Chemistry 

Emil G. Schmidt, Ph.D Associate in Biological Chemistry 

Ruth C. Vanden Bosche, B.S Assistant in Biological Chemistry 

This course is designed to present the fundamental concepts of 
Biological Chemistry. The principal constituents and the phe- 
nomena of living matter are discussed in the lectures and con- 
ferences and studied in the laboratory. Training is afforded in 
routine biochemical methods of investigation. 

Lectures and Conferences 96 hours 

Laboratory _ _ 96 hours 

Total _ - _ ..„ 192 hours 



PHARMACOLOGY AND MATERIA MEDICA 

William Henry Schultz, Ph.B., Ph.D Professor of Pharmacology 

Ruth Musser, B.A., M.S _ _ Instructor in Pharmacology 

William Ellsworth Evans, B.A., M.A ...Assistant in Pharmacology 

William Glenn Harne. Demonstrator in Pharmacology 

Charles E. Abramavich, Jr Isaac E. Emerson Fellow in Pharmacology 

1. Materia Medica and Pharmacology. The prerequisites 
to this and the following courses in pharmacology are college 
chemistry, pharmaceutical and biological chemistry. Special 
courses in physical and colloidal chemistry are highly recom- 
mended. 



44 ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 

2. Systematic Pharmacology. Second year. In teaching 
medical students the aim is to attain a mean between that which 
has a purely scientific bearing and that dominantly practical, so 
that both a critical attitude toward drugs and an understanding 
of the principles of dosage may be acquired. This is accom- 
plished by lectures, quizzes, conferences and the following course 
of laboratory exercises. 

3. Pharmacodynamics. Second Year. This laboratory 
course runs parallel with Pharmacology 2. 

In the first part of the course the experiments are upon nor- 
mal animals (anaesthetised). Special emphasis is laid upon 
technic and upon the student's ability to record and properly 
analyze the results. 

The second half of the course partakes more of the character 
of experimental medicine. Pathological animals are treated with 
chemotherapeutic agents and the toxicity of the drug for the 
host and for the parasite are studied. Students who by this time 
have demonstrated ability and initiative are encouraged to do 
intensive work along lines of special interest. 

4. Pharmacology of General and Local Anaesthetics 
and Soporifics. Four weeks; three lectures, three laboratory 
periods a week. This is a special course designed to meet the 
needs of physician and graduate nurse who wish to acquire a 
knowledge of the more recent developments in the pharmacology 
of depressant and sleep-producing drugs. The course is so ar- 
ranged that those properly qualified may continue the work under 
expert anaesthetists in the wards of the hospitals connected with 
the university. Dr. Schultz. 

Properly qualified students may be admitted, at the discretion 
of the head of the department, to work outlined under graduate 
courses. 

Materia Medica and Prescription Writing 

Lectures ~ - 20 hours 

Conferences - .-- 10 hours 

Laboratory - 30 hours 

Pharmacology 

Lectures - _ — 40 hours 

Conferences _ -.. 25 hours 

Laboratory _ - 102 hours 



ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 45 

Graduate Courses 

All students majoring in Pharmacology with a view to secur- 
ing the degree of Master of Arts or Doctor of Philosophy should 
secure special training in Mammalian Physiology, Organic Chem- 
istry 202 y, and Physical Chemistry 10 y or preferably 102 f. 

Pharmacology 108 /. and s. (Minor) . General Pharmacology 
(7), 3 lectures, 7 laboratory (January to May inclusive). 

This course consists of 50 lectures and 40 laboratory periods 
of three hours each ; offered each year, January to May inclusive, 
at the Medical School. The fundamental principles of pharma- 
cologic technic are taught in this course, hence it is a prerequisite 
for all other advanced courses in this subject. Dr. Schultz. 

Pharmacology 209 / (Major) . The Pharmacology of Biologic 
Products. 

This course involves problems of modern therapy that can be 
studied from the experimental physiological point of view, which 
includes such subjects as anaphylaxis, allergic reactions, anaphy- 
lactoid phenomena, non-specific protein therapy, toxins, anti- 
toxins, and glandular products. 

The seminars, lectures, and demonstrations will be somewhat 
broad in scope, but the research will be intensive along some one 
chosen subject. 

Offered in alternate years beginning with 1930. Credit de- 
pendent upon quality of work. Dr. Schultz. 

Pharmacology 210 /. (Major). The pharmacology of indus- 
trial poisons, including insecticides and parasite remedies. The 
nature of the subject matter of this course will vary from year 
to year. Credit will depend upon the amount and quality of the 
work accomplished. 

Offered in alternate years beginning in 1931. Dr. Schultz. 

Pharmacology 211 / (Major). Chemotherapy. 

The action of new synthetic compounds from a pharmaco- 
dynamic point of view. Credit will depend upon the amount and 
quality of the work accomplished. Dr. Schultz. 

Pharmacology 212 /. and s. (Major) . Pharmacology Seminar 
— One report period each week. 



46 ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 



DEPARTMENT OF PATHOLOGY 

Hugh R. Spencer, M.D _ Professor of Pathology 

Standish McCleary, M.D _ ...Professor of Pathology 

Sydney M. Cone, M.D ...Associate Professor of Pathology 

Robert B. Wright, M.D Assistant Professor of Pathology 



Albert E. Goldstein, M.D _ Associate 

Walter C. Merkel, M.D _ Associate 

C. Gardner Warner, M.D..._ ._ Associate 

M. Alexander Novey, M.D Instructor 

Wm. S. Love, Jr., M.D.... _ Instructor 

Leon Freedom, M.D _ Instructor 

Maurice Goodman, M.D _ Instructor 

Benjamin Abeshouse, M.D Instructor 

Christopher C. Shaw, M.D. Instructor 

W. R, Johnson, M.D Instructor 

Frank J. Geraghty, M.D Instructor 

Maurice J. Abrams, M.D Assistant 

R. W. Johnson, M.D _ Assistant 

Conrad B. Acton, M.D Assistant 



n Pathology 
n Pathology 
n Pathology 
n Pathology 
n Pathology 
n Pathology 
n Pathology 
n Pathology 
n Pathology 
n Pathology 
n Pathology 
n Pathology 
n Pathology 
n Pathology 



Courses of instruction in pathology are given during the sec- 
ond and third years. These courses are based on previous study 
of normal structure and function and aim to outline the natural 
history of disease. Instruction is made as practical as possible 
that the student may become familiar with the appearance of 
tissues in disease and may be able to correlate anatomical lesions 
with clinical symptoms and signs. 

1. General Pathology. (Second Year.) This course in- 
cludes the study and demonstration of disturbances of the body 
fluids, disturbances of structure, nutrition and metabolism of 
cells, disturbances of fat, carbohydrate and protein metabolism, 
disturbances in pigment metabolism, inflammation and tumors. 

2. Applied Pathology. Including Gross Morbid Anatomy 
and Morbid Physiology. (Third Year.) In this course the 
special relation of lesions to clinical symptoms and signs is em- 
phasized. 

In the laboratory the class is divided into groups for the study 
of classified autopsy material. 

3. Autopsies. (Third Year.) Small groups of students 
attend autopsies at the morgues of the University Hospital and 



ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 47 

Baltimore City Hospital. They are required to assist at autopsies 
and to prepare protocols. 

4. Clinical Pathological Conference. (Fourth Year) . In 
collaboration with the Department of Medicine. Material from 
autopsies is studied with reference to the correlation of the clini- 
cal aspects with the pathological findings. 

5. Advanced Work in Pathology. Properly qualified stu- 
dents will be permitted to carry out advanced or research work 
along the lines of experimental pathology. 

Summary 
Second Year 

Lectures 60 hours 

Laboratory 150 hours 

Total _ 210 hours 

Third Year 

Lectures 60 hours 

Laboratory 120 hours 

Total 180 hours 

Fourth Year 

Clinical Pathological Conference - 30 hours 



48 



ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 



DEPARTMENT OF MEDICINE 

Maurice C. Pincoffs, B.S., M.D „ Professor of Medicine 

Gordon Wilson, M.D _ ..Professor of Medicine 

Standish MoCleary, M.D Professor of Pathology and Clinical Medicine 

Jos. E. Gichner, M.D., Prof, of Clinical Medicine and Physical Therapeutics 

G. Carroll Lockard, M.D „ _ _ Professor of Clinical Medicine 

Harvey G. Beck, Sc.D., M.D Professor of Clinical Medicine 

Harry M. Stein, M.D..... _ ....Professor of Clinical Medicine 

Paul W. Clough, B.S., M.D Associate Professor of Medicine 

C. C. W. Judd, A.B., M.D Associate Professor of Medicine 

Sydney R. Miller, M.D Associate Professor of Medicine 

Walter A. Baetjer, A.B., M.D Associate Professor of Medicine 

Wm. H. Smith, M.D Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine 

H. J. Maldeis, M.D..._ Associate Professor of Medical Jurisprudence 

C. C. Habliston, M.D..... Associate Professor of Medicine 

S. Lloyd Johnson, M.D Assistant Professor of Medicine 

John G. Huck, M.D ....Assistant Professor of Medicine 

George McLean, M.D_._ Assistant Professor of Medicine 

L. A. M. Krause, M.D .._ Assistant Professor of Medicine 

H. R. Peters, M.D Assistant Professor of Medicine 

n Medicine 
n Medicine 
n Medicine 
n Medicine 
n Medicine 
n Medicine 
n Medicine 
n Medicine 
n Medicine 
n Medicine 
n Medicine 
n Medicine 
n Medicine 
in Medicine 
n Medicine 
n Medicine 
n Medicine 
n Medicine 
n Medicine 



H. M. Bubert, M.D _ Associate 

W. S. Love, Jr., A.B., M.D _ Associate 

J. S. Eastland, M.D - Associate 

Thomas C. Wolfe, M.D Associate 

William Michel, MJ) _...._ Instructor 

M. G. Gichner, M.D _ Instructor 

William A. Strauss, M.D..... _. _.„ Instructor 

Henry Shepfard, M.D _ _ Instructor 

Wetherbee Fort, M.D „ _ Instructor 

R. Hooper Smith, M.D _ Instructor 

T. Nelson Carey, M.D _ Instructor 

Henry C. Smith, M.D..._ _ „ Assistant 

Nathandsl Beck, M.D ....._ „....„ Assistant 

Carl Benson, M.D..._ „ _...._ Assistant 

F. S. Waesche, M.D..._ „ Assistant 

A. Scagnetti, M.D _ Assistant 

Samuel T. Helms, M.D - Assistant 

Bernard Cohen, M.D Assistant 

L. P. Gundry, M.D..._ - -.- - -.-- Assistant 



ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 49 

GENERAL OUTLINE 
Second Year 

Introduction to clinical medicine. 

(a) Introductory physical diagnosis. 
(3 hours a week, first semester.) 

(b) Medical clinics. 

(1 hour a week, second semester.) 

Third Year 

I. The methods of examination (13 hours a week). 

(a) History taking. 

(b) Physical diagnosis. 

(c) Clinical pathology. 

These subjects are taught and practiced in the out-patient depart- 
ment and in the clinical laboratory. 

II. The principles of medicine (7 hours a week). 

(a) Lectures, clinics and demonstrations in general medicine, neu- 
rology, pediatrics and preventive medicine. 
III. The principles of therapeutics (2 hours a week). 

Lectures and demonstrations in general therapeutics, physi- 
cal therapeutics and materia medica. 

Fourth Year 

The practice of medicine. 
I. Clinical clerkship on the medical wards. 

(26 hours a week for ten weeks.) 

(a) Responsibility, under supervision, for the history, physical 
examination, laboratory examination and progress notes of 
assigned cases. 

(b) Ward classes in general medicine, the medical specialties, and 
therapeutics. 

II. Clinics in genuine medicine and the medical specialties. 

(6 hours a week.) 

III. Dispensary work in the medical specialties. 

IV. Clinical pathological conferences (1 hour a week.) 

Medical Dispensary Work 

The medical dispensaries of both the Mercy and the University 
Hospitals are utilized for teaching in the third year. Each stu- 
dent spends two periods a week of two hours each in dispensary 



50 ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 

work. The work is done in groups of four to six students under 
an instructor. Systematic history-taking is especially stressed. 
Physical findings are demonstrated. The student becomes famil- 
iar with the commoner acute and chronic disease processes. 

Physical Diagnosis 

Second Year. Didactic lectures and practical demonstrations 
in topographical anatomy and normal physical signs. 

Third Year. The class is divided into small groups, and each 
section receives instruction for four hours a week for the entire 
session in the medical dispensaries of the hospitals. The large 
clinical material of the dispensaries and hospitals is utilized to 
give each student the opportunity to familiarize himself with the 
common types of bodily structure, with the normal variations in 
physical signs and with the physical signs of the chief pulmonary, 
circulatory and abdominal diseases. 

A course of lectures (1 hour a week) on physical diagnosis 
supplements the practical work in this subject. 

Therapeutics 

Third Year. General therapeutics and materia medica are 
taken up and an effort is made to familiarize the student with 
the practical treatment of disease. The special therapy of the 
chief diseases is then reviewed. One hour a week. Dr. Lockard. 

Fourth Year. Special consideration is given to the practical 
application of therapeutic principles in bedside teaching and the 
chief therapeutic methods are demonstrated. 

Students attend therapeutic ward rounds once a week through- 
out their medical trimester. 

Tuberculosis 

During the third year in connection with the instruction in 
physical diagnosis a practical course is given weekly to sections 
of the class at the Municipal Tuberculosis Hospital. Stress is 
laid upon the recognition of the physical signs of the disease, as 
well as upon its symptomatology and gross pathology. 



ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 51 

Syphilis 

Third Year. During the third year the subject of syphilis is 
dealt with in the lecture course. 

Fourth Year. An elective course in the therapeutic manage- 
ment of syphilis is offered in the dispensary. 

CLINICAL PATHOLOGY 

John G. Huck, M.D Assistant Professor of Medicine 

Head of Department of Clinical Pathology 

H. J. Maldeis, M.D Associate Professor of Medical Jurisprudence 

William A. Strauss, M.D _._ Instructor in Medicine 

Samuel T. Helms, M.D _ „._ Assistant in Medicine 

During the third year the student is thoroughly drilled in the 
technic of the usual clinical laboratory work, so that he is able 
to perform all routine examinations which may be called for dur- 
ing his fourth year, in connection with the work in the wards 
and dispensary. 

The practical work is supplemented by a series of didactic lec- 
tures and demonstrations in which the entire teaching staff of the 
department takes an active part. The microscopical and chemi- 
cal study of blood, exudates and transudates, gastric juice, spinal 
fluid, feces and urine are successively taken up, and special atten- 
tion directed to the clinical significance of the findings. 

Clinical parasitology from the standpoint of the infecting agent 
and the carrier is given careful consideration. 

The entire course is thoroughly practical. Each student has 
his own microscope and is provided with blood counters and 
hemoglobinometer for his exclusive use, and every two students 
are equipped with a special laboratory outfit for all routine pur- 
poses. 

During the fourth year the student applies what he has learned 
during the preceding year in the laboratories of the various affili- 
ated hospitals. He is also supplied with a laboratory outfit which 
is sufficiently complete to enable him to work independently of 
the general equipment. Special instructors are available during 
certain hours to give necessary assistance and advice. 

Lectures _ _._ 32 hours 

Laboratory _ ....._ _ 96 hours 

Total 128 hours 



52 ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 

GASTRO-ENTEROLOGY 

Julius Friedenwald, A.M., M.D _ Professor of Gastroenterology 

T. Fred Leitz, M.D _ _ Clinical Professor of Gastro-Enterology 

J. Harry Ullrich, M.D Associate Professor of Gastro-Enterology 

Theodore H. Morrison, M.D Associate Professor of Gastro-Enterology 

Maurice Feldman, M.D _ Assistant Professor of Gastro-Enterology 

Zachariah Morgan, M.D _._ Associate in Gastro-Enterology 

Joseph Sindler, M.D..... _....„ Associate in Gastro-Enterology 

Samuel Morrison, M.D..... _ Assistant in Gastro-Enterology 

M. S. Koppelman, M.D..._ _ ...Instructor in Gastro-Enterology 

C. Vance Hooper, M.D _ „ Assistant in Gastro-Enterology 

Meyer Miller, M.D „...._ .._ Assistant in Gastro-Enterology 

Fourth Year. Clinics and demonstrations to the class for one 
hour a week throughout the session. Dispensary instruction to 
small groups throughout the entire session. Practical instruction 
is given in the use of modern methods of study of the diseases of 
the gastro-intestinal tract. 



PSYCHIATRY 

R. M. Chapman, M.D Professor of Phychiatry 

Ralph Truitt, M.D - Assistant Professor of Psychiatry 

Lewis B. Hill, M.D _ Associate in Psychiatry 

Harry Goldsmith, M.D - - Instructor in Psychiatry 

Third Year. In the third year the student attends fifteen 
clinical lectures and five clinics which are designed to be intro- 
ductory to the more intensive work in psychiatry in the fourth 
year. 

Fourth Year. The class is divided into sections for clinical 
conferences on selected groups of cases. Each student may work 
for a short period as assistant in the Mental Hygiene Clinic, and 
thus gain practical experience of the problems of history-taking, 
examination, and the care of psychiatric patients. 



ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 



53 



PEDIATRICS 

Edgar B. Friedenwald, M.D Professor of Clinical Pediatrics 

C. Loring Joslin, M.D Professor of Clinical Pediatrics 

John H. Traband, M.D Assistant Professor of Pediatrics 

Clarence E. Macke, M.D Assistant Professor of Pediatrics 

Albert Jaffe, M.D Assistant Professor of Pediatrics 



William J. Todd, M.D Associate 

William G. Geyer, M.D „ Associate 

Clewell Howell, M.D _ Associate 

Samuel S. Glick, M.D Associate 

Frederick B. Dart, M.D Associate 

A. H. Finkelstein, M.D. Associate 

F. Stratner Orem, M.D Instructor 

Frederick Smith, M.D Instructor 

R. M. Hening, M.D..._ , _ Instructor 

Marie Kovner, M.D Instructor 

W. J. Schmitz, M.D Assistant 

M. Paul Byerly, M.D ...Assistant 

Harry A. Rutledge, M.D Assistant 

Kendig Wallace, M.D' ....Assistant 

Elizabeth Sherman, M.D Assistant 

Morris Fine, M.D _..„ Assistant 

William G. Queen, M.D Assistant 



n Pediatrics 
n Pediatrics 
n Pediatrics 
n Pediatrics 
n Pediatrics 
n Pediatrics 
n Pediatrics 
n Pediatrics 
n Pediatrics 
n Pediatrics 
n Pediatrics 
n Pediatrics 
n Pediatrics 
n Pediatrics 
n Pediatrics 
n Pediatrics 
n Pediatrics 



Third Year. Instruction during the third year consists of a 
weekly lecture. The more important diseases of infancy and 
childhood are reviewed. The principles of infant feeding are 
presented in brief form. 



Fourth Year. Weekly clinical lectures are given at which 
patients are shown to demonstrate the chief features of the dis- 
eases discussed. The students attend a weekly ward round on 
the pediatric service throughout their medical trimester. A spe- 
cial course on physical diagnosis in children is given. Sections 
of the class work daily in the Babies' and Children's Clinic. 



54 ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 

NEUROLOGY 

Irving J. Spear, M.D _ Professor of Neurology 

Andrew C. Gillis, A.M., M.D., LL.D _ Professor of Neurology 

G. M. Settle, A.B., M.D., 

Associate Professor of Neurology and Clinical Medicine 

Milford Levy, M.D _ Assistant Professor of Neurology 

Leon Freedom, M.D _._ _ ...Associate in Neurology 

Third Year. Lectures and recitations one hour each week to 
the entire class. Instruction in clinical neurology two hours a 
week at the City Hospital to small groups. By means of didactic 
lectures and clinical conferences, there are considered the com- 
moner types of diseases of the nervous system, the methods of 
neurological examination, and the relationship of signs and 
symptoms to pathological conditions. The material at the Uni- 
versity and Mercy Hospitals is available. 

Fourth Year. Clinical conference one hour each week to the 
entire class. This subject is taught at the University and Mercy 
Hospitals. All patients presented at these clinics are carefully 
examined; complete written records are made by the students 
who demonstrate the patients before the class. The patients are 
usually assigned one or two weeks before they are presented, and 
each student in the class must prepare one or more cases during 
the year. 

Ward Class Instruction. In small sections at the University 
and Mercy Hospitals. In these classes the students come in close 
personal contact with the patients in the wards under the super- 
vision of the instructor. 

Dispensary Instruction. Small sections are instructed in the 
dispensaries of the University and Mercy Hospitals four after- 
noons each week. In this way students are brought into contact 
with nervous diseases in their early and late manifestations. 



ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 

HYGIENE AND PREVENTIVE MEDICINE 

.._ Professor of Hygiene and Public Health 

V. L. Ellicott, M.D Instructor in Hygiene and Public Health 

M. G. Tull, M.D _ _ Instructor in Hygiene and Public Health 

Third Year. Two lectures a week throughout the session. The 
lectures will encompass the fundamental subjects: air, water, 
soil, food, disposal of wastes, communicable diseases, state and 
federal public health laws, and industrial diseases. Small groups 
visit the Sydenham Hospital weekly and are given practical in- 
struction in the diagnosis, treatment, and isolation of the con- 
tagious diseases. 

Fourth Year. Demonstrations and discussion of Health De- 
partment work with emphasis on those phases which concern 
the practicing physician. The class is divided into small groups, 
each group making five visits to the Health Department of one 
and a half hours each. 

MEDICAL JURISPRUDENCE 

H. J. Maldeis, M.D Associate Professor of Medical Jurisprudence 

Baltimore City Post Mortem Physician 

Fourth Year. One hour each week for one semester. (16 
lecture hours.) 

Inasmuch as medical jurisprudence teaches the application of 
every branch of medical knowledge to the needs of the law, civil 
or criminal, this course embraces the following : Proceedings in 
criminal and civil prosecution ; medical evidence and testimony ; 
identity and its general relations; sexual abnormalities; personal 
identity ; impotence and sterility ; rape ; criminal abortions ; signs 
of death; wounds in their medico-legal relations, death, natural 
and homicidal ; malpractice ; insanity ; and medico-legal autopsies. 



56 



ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 



DEPARTMENT OF SURGERY 



Arthur M. Shipley, Sc.D., M.D _ „ Professor of 

Alexius McGlannan, A.M., M.D ...... Professor of 

Nathan Winslow, A.M., M.D Professor of Clinical 

Page Edmunds, M.D Professor of Clinical and Industrial 

Walter D. Wise, M.D _ .....Professor of Clinical 

Frank S. Lynn, M.D Professor of Clinical 

Elliott H. Hutchins, A.M., M.D _ Professor of Clinical 

Charles Reid Edwards, M.D Professor of Clinical 

Charles Bagley, Jr., A.B., M.D Professor of Neuro 

Thomas R. Chambers, A.M., M.D . Associate Professor of 

R. W. Locher, M.D Associate Professor of Clinical 

A. M. Evans, M.D. Associate Professor of 

F. L. Jennings, M.D _ _ Associate Professor of 

E. S. Johnson, M.D ...... Associate Professor of 

E. H. Hayward, M.D _ Associate 

C. A. Reifschneider, M.D Associate 

D. J. Pessagno, M.D Associate 

C. F. Horine, M.D . Associate 

I. 0. Ridgley, M.D Associate 

H. F. Bongardt, M.D Associate 

Thomas B. Aycock, A.B., M.D. Associate 

Monte Edwards, M.D _ Associate 

Richard G. Coblentz, M.D Associate in Neurc 

W. R. Johnson, M.D _ Instructor 

E. M. Hanrahan, A.B., M.D _ Instructor 

S. Demarco, M.D „ Instructor 

Clyde Marvel, M.D _ Instructor 

Karl J. Steinmueller, A.B., M.D Instructor 

W. W. Walker, M.D Assistant 

Dwight Mohr, M.D Assistant 

William R. Geraghty, B.S., M.D Assistant 

H. M. McElwain, M.D _ Assistant in 

J. G. Onnen, M.D _ _ Assistant 

A. V. Buchness, M.D _ Assistant 

T. J. Touhey, M.D Assistant 

Clyde F. Karns, M.D Assistant 

Paul Schenker, M.D _ Assistant 

J. J. Leyko, M.D _ Assistant 

Robt. W. Johnson, M.D _ Assistant 

Frank K. Morris, A.B., M.D Assistant 



ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 57 

Instruction is given by means of lectures, recitations, dispen- 
sary work, bedside instruction, ward classes, and clinics. The 
work begins in the second year, and continues throughout the 
third and fourth years. 

Second Year 

Topographic and Surgical Anatomy. The course is designed 
to bridge the gap between anatomy in the abstract, and clinical 
anatomy as applied to the study and practice of medicine and 
surgery. 

The teaching is done in the anatomical laboratory, and students 
are required to demonstrate all points, outlines, and regions on 
the cadaver. Underlying regions are dissected when necessary 
to bring out outlines and relations of structures. 

Didactic Lectures. Two hours a week for one semester, aug- 
mented by demonstrations with specimens, charts, and cross 
sections. Dr. Monte Edwards. 

Laboratory. Five hours a week for 16 weeks. Dr. Monte 
Edwards assisted by Drs. Bailey, Ward and Morris. 

Principles of Surgery. This course includes history-taking, 
records of physical examinations and of operations and progress 
notes ; the preparation of surgical dressings, suture materials and 
solutions. It includes inflammation, infections, ulcers, gangrene, 
fistulae and sinuses, hemorrhage, shock and tumors; the use of 
splints, bed frames, bone plates, bone grafts, etc., local anaes- 
thesia and the preparation of patients for operation. Lectures 
and conferences, two hours per week for one semester, to the 
entire class. Dr. C. R. Edwards. 

Third Year 

General and Regional Surgery. Principles of surgery and 
general surgery, three hours a week throughout the year to the 
entire class, lectures, recitations and clinics. Drs. Shipley and 
Wise. 

The class is divided into groups and receives instruction in 
history-taking, gross pathology, and surgical diagnosis — at the 
bedside and in the dead-house of the Baltimore City Hospitals. 
Drs. Shipley, Lynn, Reifschneider and Hanrahan. 



•58 ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 

Operative Surgery. Instruction is given in operative surgery 
upon the cadaver and on dogs. The class is divided into sections, 
and each section is given practical and individual work under the 
supervision of the instructors. Dr. Lynn, assisted by Drs. Wins- 
low, Hayward, E. S. Johnson, Aycock, Geraghty, Demarco, 
Horine, Pessagno, Onnen, W. R. Johnson, Steinmueller and R. W. 
Johnson. 

Fractures and Dislocations. This course consists of in- 
struction in the various forms of fractures, dislocations and their 
treatment. There is a regular schedule of didactic lectures, which 
is supplemented by practical demonstrations in diagnosis and 
treatment. This practical work is given at the Mercy, University 
and Baltimore City Hospitals. Drs. Lynn and Jennings. 

Surgical Dispensary. Under supervision, the student takes 
the history, makes the physical examinations, attempts the diag- 
nosis, and, as far as possible, carries out the treatment of the 
ambulatory surgical patients in the University and in the Mercy 
Hospitals. Mercy Hospital — Drs. Dwight Mohr, Ridgely, Touhey, 
Bongardt and McElwain. University Hospital — Drs. Lynn, 
Winslow, Edwards and E. S. Johnson. 

Fourth Year 

Clinics. A weekly clinic is given at the Mercy and at 
the University Hospitals to one-half the class throughout the 
year. As far as possible this is a diagnostic clinic. Mercy Hos- 
pital — Dr. McGlannan. University Hospital — Dr. Shipley. 

Surgical Pathology. A weekly exercise of one hour at Mercy 
Hospital for one semester, at which specimens from the operat- 
ing room and museum are studied in the gross and microscopi- 
cally, in relation to the case history. Dr. McGlannan. 

Industrial Surgery. Operative and post-operative treatment 
of accident cases, with instructions as to the relationship between 
the state, the employee, the employer, and the physician's duty 
to each. One hour a week to sections of the class throughout the 
year. Dr. Edmunds. 

Clinical Clerkship. The personal study of assigned hospital 
patients, under supervision of the staffs of the University and 
Mercy Hospitals, history-taking, and physical examination of 



ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 59 

patients, laboratory examinations, attendance at operations and 
observation of post-operative treatment. 

Ward Classes. Ward class instruction in small groups will 
consist of ward rounds; surgical diagnosis, treatment and the 
after-care of operative cases. Mercy Hospital — Drs. McGlannan, 
Wise, Elliot Hutchins, Evans and Jennings. University Hos- 
pital — Drs. Shipley, Edmunds, Lynn and Edwards. 

ANAESTHESIA 

S. Griffith Davis, A.B., M.D Professor of Anaesthesia 

George H. Yeager, B.S., M.D Instructor in Anaesthesia 

Mary J. O'Brien, R.N „ Anaesthetist 

Third Year 

Lectures on the general physiology of anaesthesia, with con- 
sideration of special physiology of each anaesthetic agent. 
Methods of induction and administration of anaesthesia. Factors 
influencing the selection of the anaesthetic and types of anaesthe- 
tic agents. Preparation and care of the anaesthetized patient. 

The lectures are correlated with practical demonstrations 
during operative clinics at the City Hospitals. 

Fourth Year 

During operative clinics in both surgery and gynecology each 
student will be given practical instruction in the administration 
of anaesthetics and will be required to record such changes as 
take place in blood pressure, pulse and respiration. 

DERMATOLOGY 

Melvin Rosenthal, M.D Professor of Dermatology 

Harry M. Robinson, M.D. Professor of Clinical Dermatology 

John R. Abercrombie, A.B., M.D. _...._ Associate in Dermatology 

Francis Ellis, A.B., M.D. Instructor in Dermatology 

A. C. Monninger, M.D Instructor in Dermatology 

Harry Wasserman, M.D Instructor in Dermatology 

M. H. Goodman, A.B., M.D Instructor in Dermatology 

Clinical conferences one hour each week to the entire class. 
This course will consist of demonstrations of the common dis- 
eases of the skin, in addition to a number of lectures on the gen- 
eral principles of Dermatology. 



60 ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 

Dispensary instruction, University Hospital daily, in the 
diagnosis and treatment of skin lesions, Drs. Robinson, Ellis, 
Goodman, Monninger. Mercy Hospital, Mondays, Wednesdays 
and Saturdays, Dr. Rosenthal. 

ORTHOPAEDIC SURGERY 

Allen Fiske Voshell, A.B., M.D Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery 

Albertus Cotton, A.M., M.D Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery 

Compton Riely, M.D _.„ Clinical Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery 

Moses Gellman, B.S., M.D Associate Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery 

Harry L. Rogers, M.D -.- Associate Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery 

I. H. Maseritz, M.D _.... Assistant in Orthopaedic Surgery 

J. G. Benesunes, M.D Assistant in Orthopaedic Surgery 

In this course didactic, clinical, bedside and out-patient instruc- 
tion is given. This instruction is provided in the University 
Hospital Amphitheatre, Mercy Hospital and Dispensary, Kernan 
Hospital and Industrial School for Crippled Children at "Radnor 
Park" and in the Dispensary of the University Hospital. 

Lectures or clinics are held once a week at each of the hos- 
pitals named in town. In addition, a weekly bedside clinic is held 
for small sections of the class at "Radnor Park" and Mercy Hos- 
pital. Daily teaching in the Dispensary is stressed. 

The course covers instruction in the special methods of exami- 
nation, pathology, diagnosis and treatment in this specialty. 

Brief outlines and demonstrations are also given of the appa- 
ratus employed in Physiotherapy, Muscle Training and Cor- 
rective Gymnastics. 

ROENTGENOLOGY 

Henry J. Walton, M.D Professor of Roentgenology 

Albertus Cotton, M.D _ Professor of Roentgenology 

Eugene L. Flippin, M.D _ Associate in Roentgenology 

During the academic year small groups of the fourth year 
class are given weekly demonstrations in the diagnostic and 
therapeutic uses of the Roentgen Rays. An effort is made to 
familiarize the student with the appearance of normal Roentgen- 
ograms, after which instruction is given in the interpretation of 
the more common pathological lesions seen on the Roentgen films 
and fluoroscopic screen. The history, physics and practical ap- 



ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 61 

plication of the Roentgen Rays are alluded to, but not stressed. 
Two conferences are held each week with the medical and path- 
ological Departments, which are also open to members of the 
fourth year class. 

DISEASES OF THE NOSE AND THROAT 

Edward A. Looper, M.D...- Professor of Diseases of the Nose and Throat 

W. F. Zinn, M.D Clinical Professor of Diseases of the Nose and Throat 

F. A. Holden, M.D Associate in Diseases of the Nose and Throat 

Franklin B. Anderson, M.D., 

Associate in Diseases of the Nose and Throat 

R. F. McKenzie, M.D. _ Instructor in Diseases of the Nose and Throat 

Thomas O'Rourk, M.D Assistant in Diseases of the Nose and Throat 

Birckhead McGowan, M.D Assistant in Diseases of the Nose and Throat 

Third Year. Instruction to entire class is given in the common 
diseases of the nose and throat, attention being especially di- 
rected to infections of the accessory sinuses, the importance of 
focal infections in the etiology of general diseases and modern 
methods of diagnosis. Lectures illustrated by lantern slides are 
given one hour weekly throughout the second semester by Dr. 
Looper. 

Fourth Year. Dispensary instruction one and one-half hours 
daily, to small sections at the University and the Mercy Hospitals. 
The student is given opportunity to study, diagnose and treat 
patients under supervision. Ward classes and clinical demon- 
strations are given in periods of one and one-half hours weekly 
throughout the session in the University and the Mercy 
Hospitals. 

The Looper Clinic, recently established in the University Hos- 
pital for bronchoscopy and esophagoscopy, affords unusual op- 
portunities for students to study diseases of the larynx, bronchi 
and esophagus. The clinic is open to students daily from 2 to 
4 P. M., under direction of Dr. Looper. 

The Mercy Hospital Clinic for bronchoscopy and esophagos- 
copy is under the direction of Dr. Zinn. In these two clinics the 
etiology, symtomatology, diagnosis and treatment of foreign 
bodies in the air and food passages, as well as bronchoscopy, are 
taught to students, as an aid in the diagnosis and treatment of 
diseases of the lungs. 



62 ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 

GENITO-URINARY SURGERY 

W. H. Toulson, A.B., M.Sc, M.D Professor of Genito-Urinary Surgery 

A. J. Gillis, M.D Clinical Professor of Genito-Urinary Surgery 

Harris Goldman, M.D Associate in Genito-Urinary Surgery 

Austin H. Wood, M.D _ Associate in Genito-Urinary Surgery 

L. J. Millan, M.D _ Instructor in Genito-Urinary Surgery 

L. K. Fargo, M.D Instructor in Genito-Urinary Surgery 

K. D. Legge, M.D _ Instructor in Genito-Urinary Surgery 

Third Year. Eight hours to the entire class. This is a didactic 
course in the principles of Genito-Urinary Surgery. Dr. Toulson. 

Fourth Year. The course includes urethroscopy, cystoscopy, 
ureter catheterization, renal function tests, urography, urine 
cultures, etc. The teaching consists of clinics in the amphithea- 
ter, ward rounds, and attendance by members of the senior class 
upon out-patients in the dispensary. The dispensary classes are 
carried on both at the Mercy and the University Hospital dis- 
pensaries. Every variety of venereal disease is here encountered 
and this rich wealth of material is available for teaching pur- 
poses. In addition to this, a cystoscopic clinic is conducted in 
another part of the dispensary, where the students are given 
practical instruction in the modern diagnostic methods. 

DISEASES OF THE RECTUM AND COLON 

G. Milton Linthicum, A.M., M.D. 

Professor of Diseases of Rectum and Colon 

Charles F. Blake, M.D Professor of Diseases of Rectum and Colon 

J. Dawson Reeder, M.D. 

Clinical Professor of Diseases of Rectum and Colon 
Monte Edwards, M.D Associate in Diseases of Rectum and Colon 

Third Year. Six hours to the entire class. This course is for 
instruction in the diseases of the colon, sigmoid flexure, rectum 
and anus, and will cover the essential features of the anatomy 
and physiology of the large intestine as wxll as the various dis- 
eases to which it is subject. Dr. Linthicum. 

The class is divided into sections for clinical instruction in the 
Baltimore City Hospitals. Dr. Linthicum. 



ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 63 

Fourth Year. Ward and dispensary instruction is given in 
the University and Mercy Hospitals, where different phases of 
the various diseases are taught by direct observation and exami- 
nation. The use of the proctoscope and sigmoidoscope in the ex- 
amination of the rectum and sigmoid is made familiar to each 
student. Mercy Hospital — Dr. Blake. University Hospital — 
Drs. Linthicum, Reeder and Monte Edwards. 

OTOLOGY 

J. W. Downey, M.D Professor of Otology 

Franklin B. Anderson, M.D Associate in Otology 

F. A. Holden, M.D _ _.... Instructor in Otology 

The course in otology is planned to give a practical knowledge 
of the anatomy and physiology of the ear, and its proximity and 
relationship to the brain and other vital structures. The inflam- 
matory diseases, their etiology, diagnosis, treatment and compli- 
cations are particularly stressed, with emphasis upon their rela- 
tionship to the diseases of children, head-surgery and neurology. 

Third Year. The entire class is given instruction by means of 
talks, anatomical specimens and lantern slides. 

Fourth Year. Small sections of the class receive instruction 
and make personal examinations of patients under the direction 
of an instructor. The student is urged to make a routine exami- 
nation of the ear in his ward work in general medicine and 
surgery. 

NEUROLOGICAL SURGERY 

Charles Bagley, Jr., A.B., M.D Professor of Neurological Surgery 

Richard G. Coblentz, M.D. Associate in Neurological Surgery 

William R. Geraghty, B.S., M.D., Assistant in Neurological Surgery 

James G. Arnold, Jr., A.B., M.D _ Fellow in Neurological Surgery 

Third Year. The course covers instruction in diagnosis and 
treatment of surgical conditions of the brain, spinal cord, and 
the peripheral nerves. Eight lectures are given to the entire 
class and conferences are held from time to time. Dr. Bagley. 



Fourth Year. Weekly ward rounds and conferences are given 
at the University Hospital. Drs. Bagley and Coblentz. 



64 ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 

ONCOLOGY 

J. Mason Hundley, Jr., A.B., M.A., M.D Associate in Gynaecology 

Grant E. Ward, A.B., M.D ......Instructor in Surgery 

Every facility for the diagnosis and treatment of neoplastic 
diseases is available; this includes electro-surgery, radium 
therapy and deep X-ray therapy. Instruction for one hour a 
week to small groups of students is given in the history, physics 
and practical application of radium. Dr. Ward. 

An out-patient clinic is held twice weekly which affords an 
opportunity for instruction to a limited number of students. The 
care of the general surgical conditions is under the supervision 
of Dr. Ward. Dr. Hundley, has supervision of the gynecological 
problems. 

DEPARTMENT OF OBSTETRICS 

J. M. H. Rowland, M.D Professor of Obstetrics 

L. H. Douglass, M.D Professor of Clinical Obstetrics 

Charles E. Brack, M.D _ Clinical Professor of Obstetrics 

J. McF. Bergland, M.D Associate Professor of Obstetrics 

Emil Novak, M.D Associate Professor of Obstetrics 

E. P. Smith, M.D Associate in Obstetrics 

J. G. M. Reese, M.D Associate in Obstetrics 

M. A. Novey, A.B., M.D Associate in Obstetrics 

J. G. Murray, Jr., A.B., M.D Associate in Obstetrics 

Isadore A. Siegel, A.B., M.D - Associate in Obstetrics 

Margaret B. Ballard, M.D Assistant in Obstetrics 

E. P. H. Harrison, A.B., M.D Assistant in Obstetrics 

E. S. Edlavitch, M.D _ _.... Assistant in Obstetrics 

Third Year. Three lectures and recitations each week by Drs. 
Bergland, Novak, Murray, Douglass and Rowland to entire class. 

Manikin Work. Drs. Brack, Smith and Edlavitch to sections 
of class at Mercy Hospital, and Drs. Douglass, Siegal, Harrison 
and Rowland at University Hospital. 

Fourth Year. Clinical Conference. One hour each week. Drs. 
Rowland, Douglass and Murray. 

Ward Classes. Six hours per week for five weeks to sections 
of class at University Hospital. Drs. Douglass, Reese and Novey. 

Each member of the Senior class is required to deliver ten 
women in their homes under supervision of the teaching and 
resident staff. 



ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 65 

DEPARTMENT OF GYNECOLOGY 

William S. Gardner, M.D Professor of Gynecology 

Hugh Brent, M.D Professor of Clinical Gynecology 

Abram Samuels, M.D Associate Professor of Gynecology 

George A. Strauss, M.D Associate in Gynecology 

R. G. Willse, M.D „ , Associate in Gynecology 

T. K. Galvin, M.D _ Associate in Gynecology 

J. M. Hundley, Jr., M.D Associate in Gynecology 

Leo Brady, M.D _ _ ....Associate in Gynecology 

E. E. Edlavitch, M.D _ Assistant in Gynecology 

Third Year. Diadactic Work. A course of thirty lectures 
and recitations. 

Fourth Year. Clinical Work. Six hours weekly for one 
trimester. In this course the student writes the clinical history 
of each patient in the ward and makes a general physical exami- 
nation, including the blood and urine, before the patient is 
brought before the class. A pelvic examination is made by six 
students, and any operation required is then done before a section 
of the class small enough to see clearly what is being done and 
how it is done. On a subsequent day the whole group examines, 
microscopically, sections prepared from material removed from 
patients that have been before them. 

DEPARTMENT OF OPHTHALMOLOGY 

Clyde A. Clapp, M.D Professor of Ophthalmology 

M. Randolph Kahn, M.D Clinical Professor of Ophthalmology 

H. K. Fleck, M.D Associate Professor of Ophthalmology 

R. D. West, M.D _._ Associate in Ophthalmology 

Jonas Frdj:denwald, A.B., M.D Lecturer in Ophthalmic Pathology 

Joseph I. Kemler, M.D _ Associate in Ophthalmolgy 

F. A. Holden, M.D Instructor in Ophthalmology 

Henry F. Graff, A.B., M.D _ _ Instructor in Ophthalmology 

Frank A. Pacienza Instructor in Refraction 

John G. Runkle, M.D. _ _...... Assistant in Ophthalmology 

Thomas O'Rourk, M.D ....._ Assistant in Ophthalmology 

Third Year. Second semester, Course in Diseases of the Eye 
by Dr. M. Randolph Kahn, consisting of lectures and demonstra- 
tions upon the commoner diseases of the eye and its appendages, 
with demonstration of refractive errors. Section work weekly 
demonstrating the use of the ophthalmoscope upon both the 
schematic eye and patients. 

Fourth Year. Clinics and Demonstrations in Diseases of 
the Eye, weekly, for one year. Dr. Clapp. 



66 ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 

Course consist of demonstrations by means of both patients 
and lantern slides, of the more common diseases of the eye and 
their relationship to general disease. 

Weekly ward classes at the University and the Baltimore Eye, 
Ear and Throat and City Hospitals during which the eye grounds 
in the various medical and surgical conditions are demonstrated 
by Drs. Fleck, West, Kemler and Graff. 

Also daily demonstrations in the taking of histories and the 
diagnosis and treatment of the various conditions as seen in the 
dispensary. 

Third Year 

Lectures 20 hours 

Laboratory 10 hours 

Total _ 30 hours 

Fourth Year 

Lectures and demonstrations 26 hours 

Clinical work 20 hours 

Total 46 hours 

HISTORY OF MEDICINE 

John Rathbone Oliver, A.B., M.D., Ph.D. 

Professor of the History of Medicine 
During the past academic year the lectures were devoted to 
Modern Medicine. Ten lectures were given. Five of these gave 
a general outline of the development of modern medicine, while 
the remaining five were devoted to outstanding personalities in 
the same period of medical history. A special emphasis was 
laid on America's contribution to medicine in connection with 
the lives of men like Beaumont, Walter Reed, Trudeau and Osier. 
The lectures were illustrated with a large number of lantern 
slides especially selected by Col. Fielding Garrison, then of the 
General Surgeon's Library, and prepared by the official pho- 
tographer in Washington. During the past four years this 
course of lectures has covered in a general way the entire field 
of medical history so that any medical student who has attended 
the lectures during his four years' course has been given at 
least an outline of the history of his profession. 

Beginning with the lectures of 1932-33 the four years' cycle 
will be repeated with a general introduction followed by lec- 
tures on primitive medicine; the Medicine of Egypt, of Assyrio- 
Babylonia, of India, of Greece and of Rome. 



FIRST YEAR SCHEDULE 

FIRST SEMESTER, SEPTEMBER 26, 1932, TO JANUARY 28, 1933 



Hours 


Monday 


Tuesday 


Wednesday 


Thursday 


Friday 


Saturday 


9.00— 
11.00 




Laboratory 

Biological 
Chemistry 

Section A 


Laboratory 

Biological 
Chemistry 

Section B 


Laboratory 

Biological 
Chemistry 

Section A 


Laboratory 

Biological 
Chemistry 

Section B 




11.00— 
12.00 


Biological 

Chemistry 

C.H. 




12.00 to 
12.50 


Lunch 


Lunch 


Lunch 


Lunch 


Lunch 




12.50 
to 
1.50 


Biological 

Chemistry 

C.H. 


Biological 

Chemistry 

C.H. 


Biological 

Chemistry 

C.H. 


Biological 

Chemistry 

C.H. 


Biological 

Chemistry 

Adm. 




2.00 
to 
5.00 


Laboratory 

Histology and 
Embryology 


Laboratory 

Histology and 
Embryology 




Laboratory 

Histology and 
Embryology 


Laboratory 

Histology and 
Embryology 





SECOND SEMESTER, JANUARY 30 TO MAY 27, 1933 



Hours 


Monday 


Tuesday 


Wednesday 


Thursday 


Friday 


Saturday 


9.00 
12.00 


Laboratory 


Laboratory 


Laboratory 


Laboratory 


Laboratory 


Laboratory 


•Anatomy 


Anatomy 


Anatomy 


Anatomy 


Anatomy 


Anatomy 


12.00 














to 


Lunch 


Lunch 


Lunch 


Lunch 


Lunch 




i| 1.00 














1.00 

to 

| 2.00 


Anatomy 


Anatomy 


Anatomy 


Anatomy 


Anatomy 




Adm. & A. H. 


C. H. & A. H. 


C. H. & A. H. 


C. H. & Adm. 


C. H. & A. H. 




2.00 
to 
5.00 


Laboratory 


Laboratory 


Laboratory 


Laboratory 


Laboratory 




Anatomy 


Anatomy 


Anatomy 


Anatomy 


Anatomy 




* Anatomy includes both Gross and Neural Anatomy. 




1 LOCATIONS OF LECTURE HALLS AND LABORATORIES: 




Adm. — Lower Hall, Administration Building, N. E. Cor. Lombard and Greene i 
A. H. — Anatomical Hall — Upper Hall, N. E. Cor. Lombard and Greene Street 
C. H. — Chemical Hall, Lower Hall, N. E. Cor. Lombard and Greene Streets. 
Anatomy Laboratory — Third Floor. Gray Laboratory, Lombard and Greene Sti 
Biological Chemistry Laboratory — Third Floor, 31 S. Greene Street. 
Histology and Embryology Laboratory— 32-34 S. Paca Street, Sixth Floor. 
Neural Anatomy Laboratory. 32-34 S. Paca Street, Sixth Floor. 


3treets. 

s. 

•eets. 


Mid-Year Examinations — January 23 to January 28, 1933. 
Final Examinations — May 22 to May 27, 1933. 




. ■ 






67 









SECOND YEAR SCHEDULE 
FIRST SEMESTER, SEPTEMBER 26, 1932, TO JANUARY 28, 1933 



Hours 


Monday 


Tuesday 


Wednesday 


Thursday 


Friday 


Saturday 


9.00 to 
10.00 


Physiology 
Adm. 


Physiology 
Adm. 


Physiology 
Adm. 


Laboratory 
Physiology 

Section A 


Laboratory 
Physiology 

Section B 


Surgical 
Anatomy 

Adm. 


10.00 

to 
11.00 


Pharmacology 
A. H. 


Pharmacology 
A. H. 


Pharmacology 
A. H. 


Physiology 
Adm. 


11.00 

to 
12.00 


Pathology 
A. H. 


Pathology 
A. H. 


Bacteriology 
A. H. 




12.00 to 
12.30 


Lunch 


Lunch 


Lunch 


Lunch 


(12-1) 
Lunch 


12.30 
to 


Laboratory 
Bacteriology 


Laboratory 
Bacteriology 


Laboratory 
Bacteriology 


Laboratory 
Bacteriology 


d-2) 

Medicine 

C. H. 


2.30 


(2-4) 

Physical 

Diagnosis 

Univ. Hosp. 

Disp. 


2.30 
to 


Laboratory 

Physiology 
Section A 

Pharmacology 
Section B 


Laboratory 

Physiology 
Section B 

Pharmacology 
Section A 


Laboratory 
Surgical 
Anatomy 


Surgical 

Anatomy 

C. H. 




3.30 






3.30 
to 
6.30 


Laboratory 

Surgical 
Anatomy 










6* 






1 



SECOND YEAR SCHEDULE 

SECOND SEMESTER, JANUARY 30 TO MAY 27, 1933 



Hours 


Monday 


Tuesday 


Wednesday 


Thursday 


Friday 


Saturday 


8.30 to 
9.30 


Surgery 
A. H. 


Surgery 
A. H. 


♦Physiology 
Adm. 


Laboratory 

Physiology 
Section A 

Pharmacology 
Section B 


Laboratory 

Physiology 
Section B 

Pharmacology 
Section A 




9.30 

to 

10.30 


Pharmacology 
A. H. 


Pharmacology 
A. H. 


Pharmacology 
A. H. 




10.30 

to 
11.30 


Pathology 
A. H. 


Pathology 
A. H. 


Physiology 
Adm. 




11.30 

to 
12.00 


Lunch 


Lunch 


Lunch 


Lunch 


Lunch 


(11-12) 

Physiology 

Adm. 


12.00 
to 
2.00 


Laboratory 
Pathology 


Laboratory 
Pathology 


Laboratory 
Pathology 


Laboratory 
Pathology 


Laboratory 
Pathology 


(12-1) 

Medical 

Clinic 

Amp. 


2.00 

to 

3.00 


Immunology 
Adm. 


Laboratory 
Immunology 


Laboratory 
Immunology 


Laboratory 

Physiology 
Section B 

Pharmacology 
Section A 


Laboratory 

Physiology 
Section A 

Pharmacology 
Section B 




3.00 

to 

4.00 


Physiology 
Adm. 




4.00 
to 
5.00 

• 







LOCATIONS OF LECTURE HALLS AND LABORATORIES: 

Adm. — Lower Hall. Administration Building, N. E. Cor. Lombard and Greene Streets. 
A. H. — Anatomical Hall — Upper Hall, N. E. Cor. Lombard and Greene Streets. 
C. H. — Chemical Hall, Lower Hall, N. E. Cor. Lombard and Greene Streets. 
Amp. — Amphitheatre, University Hospital, Lombard and Greene Streets. 
Laboratories : 

Bacteriology — Second Floor, 31 S. Greene Street. 
Immunology — Second Floor, 31 S. Greene Street. 
Pathology — Second Floor, 31 S. Greene Street. 

Pharmacology — Second Floor, Gray Laboratory, Lombard and Greene Streets. 
Physiology — First Floor, Gray Laboratory, Lombard and Greene Streets. 
Surgical Anatomy — Third Floor, Gray Laboratory, Lombard and Greene Streets. 
Univ. Hospital Disp. — Dispensary, University Hospital, Lombard and Greene Streets. 
* Physiology Course Terminates March 31, 1933. 

Mid-Year Examinations — January 23 to January 28, 1933. 
Final Examinations — May 22 to May 27, 1933. 

69 





THIRD YEAR SCHEDULE 

SEPTEMBER 26, 1932 TO MAY 27, 1933 




Hours 


Monday 


Tuesday 


Wednesday 


Thursday 


Friday 


Saturday 


8.30 

to 

9.30 


Therapeutics 
C. H. 


Pathology 
C. H. 


Medicine 
C. H. 


Medicine 
C. H. 


Pathology 
C. H. 


Medicine 
C. H. 


9.30 to 
10.30 


Obstetrics 
C. H. 


Surgery 
C. H. 


Obstetrics 
C. H. 


Surgery 
C. H. 


Medicine 
C. H. 


Surgery 
C. H. 


10.30 
to 
1.00 


Physical 
Diagnosis 

Operative 
Surgery 

Dispensary 

Lunch and 
Transfer 


Physical 
Diagnosis 

Operative 
Surgery 

Dispensary 

Lunch and 
Transfer 


Physical 
Diagnosis 

Operative 
Surgery 

Dispensary 

Lunch and 
Transfer 


Physical 
Diagnosis 

Operative 
Surgery 

Dispensary 

Lunch and 
Transfer 


Physical 
Diagnosis 

Operative 
Surgery 

Dispensary 

Lunch and 
Transfer 


Physical 
Diagnosis 

Operative 
Surgery 

Dispensary ! 

Lunch 


1.00 

to 

2.00 


Surgical 
Clinic 
Amp. 

**Nose-Throat 
C. H. 


Medical 
Clinic 
Amp. 


Neurology 
P. & S. 34 


(12.45-1.45) 
Gynecology 
29 S. Greene 


Obstetrics 
A.H. 


Transfer 


2.15 

to 

3.15 


Pathology 
Laboratory 


Pathology 
Laboratory 


(2.30-4.30) 

Section A 

Clinical 

Medicine 

Surgery 

Gross 

Pathology 

at Baltimore 

City Hospitals 


(2-3) 

Clinical 

Pathology 

29 S. Greene 


2.15 

to 

5.15 

Clinical 

Pathology 

Laboratory 


(2-4) 

Section B 

Clinical 

Medicine 

Surgery 

Gross 

Pathology 

at Baltimore 

City Hospitals 


3.15 

to 

4.15 


*(3-4) 
Eye and Ear 
29 S. Greene 


4.15 
to 
5.15 


Preventive 

Medicine 

C. H. 


Pediatrics 
C. H. 


(2.15-4.15) 
Section B 
Group Work 
Ophthalmos- 
copy 
B. E. H. 
Practical 
Obstetrics 
Univ. Hosp. 


(4-5) 
Preventive 
Medicine 

Legal 

Medicine 

Mental 

Hygiene 

29 S. Greene 




Fro 

C. ] 

A. 

Am 

P. 

B. 

At 

*] 
•] 

**: 


m 10.30 A. M. 
ing at Calvert 
H. — Chemical H 
H. — Anatomica 
p. — Amphithea 
& S.— N. W. C( 
E. H. — Baltimo 

the beginning c 
days, 2-4 P. M 
at Baltimore C 

1 

Car — First sem 
Dye — Second se 
Nose-Throat — S 


to 1.00 P. M. t 
and Saratoga 
all— N. E. Cor 
1 Hall— N. E. C 
tre — University 
)r. Calvert and 
re Eye, Ear an< 

f the second se 
., and Universi 
Jity Hospital or 

[id-Year Exami 
Final Examin. 

jster. 

m ester. 

econd semester. 


he class is divi 

Streets, the oth 
Lombard and 

/or. Lombard a 
Hospital, S. W 
Saratoga Stree 

i Throat Hospil 

mester Section 
cy Hospital on ' 
i Wednesdays, 5 

nations — Jan. 
itions — May 15 


ied into two se 
er at Lombard 
Greene Streets, 
id Greene Stre< 
. Cor. Lombarc 
ts. Rooms ind 
;al, 1214 Eutaw 

"A" at Baltimo 
Wednesdays, 2.1 
2.30-4.30 P. M. 

13 to Jan. 28, 
to May 27, 19 


ctions, one sect 
and Greene Sti 

;ts. 

and Greene S 
cated on Secon 

Place. 

re City Hospita 
5-4.15 P. M. ; S 

1933. 
53. 


ion report- 
eets. 

treets. 
d Floor. 

1 on Satur- 
ection "B" , 



70 






FOURTH YEAR SCHEDULE 

SEPTEMBER 26, 1932 TO MAY 27, 1933 



Hours 


Monday 


Tuesday 


Wednesday 


Thursday 


Friday 


Saturday 


9.00 to 
11.00 


Ward Classes 

Medicine 

Surgery 

Obstetrics 


Ward Classes 

Medicine 

Surgery 

Gynecology 


Ward Classes 

Medicine 

Surgery 

Obstetrics 


Ward Classes 

Medicine 

Surgery 

Gynecology 


Ward Classes 

Medicine 

Surgery 

Obstetrics 


Ward Classes 

Medicine 

Surgery 

Gynecology 


11.00 

to 
12.00 


Orthopaedic 
Surgery 

Univ.Sec.Amp. 
P. & S. Sec. 51 


Medical 

Clinic 

Univ.Sec.Amp. 

Surgical 

Pathology 

P. & S. Sec. 40 


Clinical 

Pathological 

Conference 

Univ.Sec.C.H. 
P. & S. Sec. 34 


Surgical 
Clinic 

Univ.Sec.Amp. 
P. & S. Sec. 51 


Medical 
Clinic 

Univ.Sec.Amp 
P. & S. Sec. 34 


Pediatric 
Clinic 

Univ.Sec.Amp. 
P. & S. 34 


12.00 

to 

2.00 


Dispensary 
Lunch and 
Transfer 


Dispensary 

and 

Lunch 


Dispensary 
Lunch and 
Transfer 


Dispensary 

and 

Lunch 


Dispensary 
Lunch and 
Transfer 


Dispensary 


2.15 

to 

3.15 


Dermatology 
Clinic 

(Full Class at 
Univ. Hosp.) 

Amp. 


Neurology 
Clinic 

Univ.Sec.Amp. 
P. & S. Sec. 34 


Eye and Ear 
Clinic 

(Full Class at 
Univ. Hosp.) 

Amp. & C. H. 


Obstetrical 
Clinic 

(Full Class at 
Univ. Hosp.) 

Amp. 


Gastroenter- 
ology Clinic 

(Full Class at 
Univ. Hosp.) 

Amp. 


Genito- 
urinary 
Clinic 

P. &S. Sec. 51 


3.30 
to 
5.00 


P. & S. Sec. 

Ward Classes 

Medicine 

Urology 

Eye and Ear 


Ward Classes 

Therapeutics 

Proctology 

Radiotherapy 


P. & S. Sec. 

Ward Classes 

Medicine 
Roentgenology 

Preventive 
Medicine 


Ward Classes 
Medicine 

Nose & Throat 

Physical 
Therapeutics 


Ward Classes 
Neurology 
Psychiatry 

U. H. 

Orthopaedic 

Surgery 

Kernan 

Hospital 




3.30 

to 
5.00 


Univ. Sec. 

Ward Classes 

Medicine 
Urology 




Univ. Sec. 

Ward Classes 

Medicine 

Roentgenology 

Eye and Ear 


(5 to 6 P.M.) 

March, 

April and 

May 

History of 

Medicine 

C.H. 







The Senior Class is divided into two sections, which report, one at Lombard and Greene 
Streets, the other at Calvert and Saratoga Streets, for one semester each, then rotate. 

Each section of the class is divided into three groups — Medical, Surgical, and Special. 
These groups will rotate on the following dates : 

FIRST SEMESTER SECOND SEMESTER 

1st period Sept. 26-Oct 29 1st period Jan. 30-Mch. 4 

2nd period „.Oct. 31-Dec. 3 2nd period „ Mch. 6-Apr. 8 

3rd period •> Dec. 5-Jan. 21 3rd period Apr. 10-May 13 

C. H. — Chemical Hall— N. E. Cor. Lombard and Greene Streets. 

Amp. — Amphitheatre — University Hospital. 

P. & S., 34— Second Floor, Calvert and Saratoga Streets. 

P. & S., 40. 51— Fourth Floor, Calvert and Saratoga Streets. 

For sab-sections of P. & S. ward classes, 3.30 to 5.00 P. M., see supplementary schedule 
at Mercy Hospital. For sub-sections of U. H. ward classes, 3.30 to 5.00 P. M., see Medical 
School bulletin board. 

Mid-Year Examinations — Jan. 23-28, 1933. 
Final Examinations- — May 15-20, 1933. 

71 



72 REQUIREMENTS FOR MATRICULATION 

REQUIREMENTS FOR MATRICULATION 

Admission to the course in medicine is by a completed Medical 
Student Certificate issued by the Registrar of the University of 
Maryland. This certificate is obtained from the Registrar on 
the basis of satisfactory educational credentials, and is essential 
for admission to any class. 

The minimum requirements for the issuance of the Medical 
Student Certificate are : 

(a) The completion of a standard four-year secondary school 
course, or the equivalent in entrance examinations, and at least 

(b) Two years or sixty semester hours of college credits 
(exclusive of military science and physical education), including 
chemistry, physics, biology, English, and a modern foreign lan- 
guage. (See details below.) 

Women are admitted to the School of Medicine of this Uni- 
versity. 

(A) SECONDARY SCHOOL REQUIREMENTS 

Graduation from an accredited secondary school, after pur- 
suing a four-year course (based upon an approved elementary 
school course), or the equivalent as demonstrated by entrance 
examinations. 

Total entrance units required, 15 ; prescribed, 9 ; elective, 6. 

Prescribed (9 units) ; English (I, II, III, IV), 3 units; algebra 
to quadratics, 1 unit ; plane geometry, 1 unit ; foreign language, 2 
units of one language ; history, 1 unit ; and science, 1 unit. 

Elective (6 units), of which not more than 4 units in voca- 
tional subjects, (agriculture, commercial, home economics, shop, 
and drawing) will be accepted : Agriculture, astronomy, biology, 
botany, chemistry, civics, commercial, drawing, economics, gen- 
eral science, geology, history, home economics, languages, math- 
ematics, physical geography, physics, zoology, or any other sub- 
ject offered in a standard secondary school for which graduation 
credit is granted toward college or university entrance. 

(B) DETAILS OF THE COLLEGE REQUIREMENT 

a. The preliminary college course shall extend through two 
college sessions of at least thirty-two weeks each, exclusive of 
holidays. 



REQUIREMENTS FOR MATRICULATION 73 

b. In excellence of teaching and in content, the work of this 
preliminary college course shall be equal to the work done in the 
freshman and sophomore years in standard colleges and uni- 
versities. 

c. This preliminary college course shall include courses in 
chemistry, physics, biology, English, and a modern foreign lan- 
guage, each course to embrace at least the credit shown in the 
schedule following : 

SCHEDULE OF SUBJECTS OF THE TWO-YEAR 
PREMEDICAL COLLEGE COURSE 

Sixty Semester Hours Required 

Semester 
Required Courses: Hours 

Chemistry (a) „ - - 12 

Physics (b) _ - — - 8 

Biology (c) _ 8 

English Composition and Literature (d) - 6 

Modern Foreign Language (e) - - 6 

Other Non-Science Subjects „ 6 

Courses Strongly Urged: 

Additional English. 

Additional Foreign Language. 

Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy. 

Quantitative Analysis or other Advanced Chemistry. 

Advanced Mathematics, including Algebra and Trigonometry. 

Psychology, Logic, Social Science, Economics, History, Political Science. 

A semester hour is the credit value of sixteen weeks' work consisting of 

one lecture or recitation period per week, each period to be of not less than 

fifty minutes' duration net, at least two hours of laboratory work to be 

considered as the equivalent of one lecture or recitation period. 

(a) Chemistry. Twelve semester hours required of which at 
least eight semester hours must be in general inorganic chem- 
istry, including four semester hours of laboratory work, and four 
semester hours in organic chemistry, including two semester 
hours of laboratory work. In the interpretation of this rule, 
work in qualitative analysis may be counted as general inorganic 
chemistry. 

(b) Physics. Eight semester hours required, of which at 
least two must be laboratory work. This course presupposes a 
knowledge of plane trigonometry. 



74 REQUIREMENTS FOR MATRICULATION 

(c) Biology. Eight semester hours required, of which four 
must be laboratory work. This requirement may be satisfied 
by a course of eight semester hours in either general biology or 
zoology, or by courses of four semester hours each in zoology 
and botany, but not by botany alone. 

(d) English Composition and Literature. The usual in- 
troductory college course of six semester hours, or its equivalent, 
is required. 

(e) Foreign Language. Six semester hours minimum re- 
quirement. A reading knowledge of a modern foreign language 
is very strongly urged. French and German have the closest 
bearing upon modem medical literature. 



REQUIREMENTS FOR MATRICULATION 75 

COMBINED COURSE IN ARTS AND SCIENCES, AND 

MEDICINE 

A combined seven years' curriculum is offered leading to the 
degrees of Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science and Doctor 
of Medicine. The first three years are taken in residence in the 
College of Arts and Sciences at College Park, and the last four 
years in the School of Medicine in Baltimore. (See University 
catalogue for details of quantitative and qualitative premedical 
course requirements.) 

Upon the successful completion of the first year in the School 
of Medicine, and upon the recommendation of the Dean, the de- 
gree of Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science may be con- 
ferred by the College of Arts and Sciences. 

Students are urged to consider carefully the advantages this 
combination course offers over the minimum requirements of 
two years. By completing three years the training may be grad- 
ually broadened by a wider latitude in the election of courses in 
the arts subjects. 

POST-GRADUATE STUDENTS 

Graduates in medicine desiring to take the work of the senior 
year without being candidates for the degree, and, therefore, 
without examination, may receive a certificate of attendance on 
completing the full course satisfactorily. 

The requirements for graduates in medicine admitted to the 
fourth-year class as candidates for the degree of Doctor of Medi- 
cine are the same as those enforced against undergraduates ad- 
mitted to advanced standing. 

Summer Post-Graduate Courses — In a later number of the 
Bulletin detailed announcement will be made of the Post-Gradu- 
ate Summer Courses. 

RULES 

1. All students are required to take the spring examinations 
unless excused by the Dean. No student will be permitted to 
advance from a lower to a higher class with conditions. 

2. Should a student be required to repeat any year in the 
coui*se, he must pay regular fees. 



76 RULES AND FEES 

3. A student failing in final examinations for graduation at 
the end of the fourth year wall be required to repeat the entire 
course of the fourth year and to take examination in such other 
branches as may be required should he again be permitted to 
enter the school as a candidate for graduation. 

4. The general fitness of a candidate for graduation as well 
as the results of his examinations will be taken into consideration 
by the Faculty. 

5. All students entering the School of Medicine of the Uni- 
versity of Maryland are required to provide themselves with 
microscopes of a satisfactory type. 

A standard microscope of either Bausch & Lomb, Leitz, Spen- 
cer Lens or Zeiss make, fitted with the following attachments, 
will fill the requirements : 

Triple nose piece 10 x and 5 x Oculars 

Wide aperture stage 16mm. and 4mm. Objectives 

Quick Screw condenser (Abbe) 1.9mm. 125 N.A. Oil Immersion Lens 

STUDENTS MUST BE PREPARED TO PURCHASE MICROSCOPES 
AT THE BEGINNING OF THE FIRST YEAR 

All the above rules, as well as the fees stated below, relate to 
the year ending June 3rd, 1933, only. The right is reserved to 
make changes in the curriculum, the requirements for gradua- 
tion, the fees and in any of the regulations whenever the Faculty 
deems it expedient. 

FEES 

Matriculation fee (paid once) _ - $10.00 

Tuition fee (each year) for residents of Maryland _ 350.00 

Tuition fee (each year) for non-residents _ 500.00 

Laboratory fee (each year) 25.00 

Special and re-examination fee „ _ 5.00 

Graduation fee _ _ _ 15.00 

No fees are returnable. 

The above fees apply to all students who matriculate in the 
School of Medicine in any class for the session beginning Sep- 
tember 26th, 1932. 

All students, after proper certification, are required to register 
at the Office of the Registrar. (See calendar in front part of 



DEFINITION OF RESIDENTS AND NON-RESIDENTS 77 

this bulletin for dates for the payments of fees, and the note 
regarding late registration fee.) 

The matriculation fee is payable at the time the applicant is 
offered acceptance as a student. 

The laboratory fee and one-half of the tuition fee for the year 
shall be paid at the time of the first semester registration, and 
one-half of the tuition fee shall be paid at the second semester 
registration date. 

Failure to meet these conditions will automatically debar the 
student from attendance on classes and other privileges of the 
University. 

When offering checks in payment of tuition and other fees, 
students are requested to have them drawn in the exact amount 
of such fees. Personal checks whose face value is in excess of 
the fees due will be accepted for collection. 

DEFINITION OF RESIDENCE AND NON-RESIDENCE* 

Students who are minors are considered to be resident students 
if, at the time of their registration, their parents* have been resi- 
dents of this State for at least one year. 

Adult students are considered to be resident students if, at the 
time of their registration, they have been residents of this State 
for at least one year. 

The status of the residence of a student is determined at the 
time of his first registration in the University and may not there- 
after be changed by him unless, in the case of a minor, his 
parents* move to and become legal residents of this State by 
maintaining such residence for at least one full calendar year. 
However, the right of the student (minor) to change from a non- 
resident to a resident status must be established by him prior to 
registration for a semester in any academic year. 



* The term "parents" includes persons who, by reason of death or other 

I unusual circumstances, have been legally constituted the guardians of or 
stand in loco parentis to such minor students. 



78 MEDICAL CARE OF STUDENTS 

STATE MEDICAL STUDENT QUALIFYING CERTIFICATES 

Candidates for admission who live in or expect to practice 
medicine in Pennsylvania, New Jersey or New York, and who 
are accepted as students by the University of Maryland, must 
apply immediately thereafter to their respective state board of 
education for a medical student qualifying certificate (Pennsyl- 
vania and New Jersey) , or an approval of application for a medi- 
cal student qualifying certificate (New York). 

These certificates are to be on file in the Office of the Registrar, 
University of Maryland, during the period of attendance in the 
School of Medicine. 

MEDICAL CARE OF STUDENTS 

The Medical Council has made provision for the systematic 
care of students in the Medical School, according to the following 
plan: 

1. Preliminary Examination — All new students will be exam- 
ined during the first week of the semester. Notice of the date, 
time, and place of the examination will be announced to the 
classes on the bulletin board. The passing of this physical exami- 
nation is necessary before final acceptance of any student. 

2. Medical Attention — Students in need of medical attention 
will be seen by the School Physician, Dr. T. N. Carey, in his 
office at the Medical School, between 4 and 5 P. M., daily, except 
Saturday and Sunday. In cases of necessity, students will be 
seen at their homes. 

3. Hospitalization — If it becomes necessary for any student 
to enter the hospital during the school year, the Medical Council 
has arranged for the payment of part or all of his hospital ex- 
penses, depending on the length of his stay and special expenses 
incurred. This applies only to students admitted through the 
School Physician's Office. 

4. Prospective students are advised to have any known physi- 
cal defects corrected before entering school in order to prevent 
loss of time which later correction might incur. As minor visual 
defects are frequently unrecognized until detected by an ophthal- 
mologist, it is especially urged that all new students have their 
eyes examined and any error of refraction corrected before be- 
ginning the course. 



PRIZES AND SCHOLARSHIPS 79 



PRIZES AND SCHOLARSHIPS* 

FACULTY PRIZE 

To stimulate study among the candidates for graduation, the 
Faculty offers a Gold Medal to the candidate who secures the 
highest average during the four years of his course. Certificates 
of Honor are awarded to the five candidates standing next 
highest. 

DR. A. BRADLEY GAITHER MEMORIAL PRIZE 

A prize of $25.00 is given each year by Mrs. A. Bradley Gaither 
as a memorial to the late Dr. A. Bradley Gaither, to the student 
in the senior class doing the best work in Genito-Urinary Sur- 
gery. 

SCHOLARSHIPS 
The Dr. Samuel Leon Frank Scholarship 

(Value $125.00) 

This scholarship was established by Mrs. Bertha Rayner Frank 
as a memorial to the late Dr. Samuel Leon Frank, an alumnus of 
this University. 

It is awarded by the Trustees of the Endowment Fund of the 
University each year upon nomination by the Medical Council 
"to a medical student of the University of Maryland, who in 
the judgment of said Council, is of good character and in need 

of pecuniary assistance to continue his medical course." 

i 

This scholarship is awarded to a second, third or fourth year 
student who has successfully completed one year's work in this 
school. No student may hold such scholarship for more than two 
years. 



T 



*Note: Scholarships, unless specifically renewed on consideration of ap- 
plication, are for one year only. 



80 SCHOLARSHIPS 

The Charles M. Hitchcock Scholarships 

(Value $125.00 each) 

Two scholarships were established from a bequest to the School 
of Medicine by the late Charles M. Hitchcock, M.D., an alumnus 
of the University. 

These scholarships are awarded annually by the Trustees of 
the Endowment Fund of the University upon nomination by the 
Medical Council to students who have meritoriously completed 
the work of at least the first year of the course in medicine, and 
who present to the Council satisfactory evidence of a good moral 
character and of inability to continue the course without pecuni- 
ary assistance. 

The Randolph Winslow Scholarship 

(Value $125.00) 

This scholarship was established by Prof. Randolph Winslow, 
M.D., LL.D. 

It is awarded annually by the Trustees of the Endowment 
Fund of the University, upon nomination by the Medical Coun- 
cil, to a "needy student of the Senior, Junior, or Sophomore Class 
of the Medical School." 

"He must have maintained an average grade of 85% in all his 
work up to the time of awarding the scholarship." 

"He must be a person of good character and must satisfy the 
Medical Council that he is worthy of and in need of assistance." 

The Dr. Leo Karlinsky Scholarship 

(Value $200.00) 

This scholarship was established by Mrs. Ray Mintz Karlinsky 
as a memorial to her husband, the late Dr. Leo Karlinsky, an 
alumnus of this University. 

The scholarship is awarded to a second-year student who at the 
end of the first year has passed the best examinations in An- 
atomy, Histology, Embryology, and Biological Chemistry. 



SCHOLARSHIPS 81 



The University Scholarships 



Two scholarships are awarded by the University: One to a 
student of the College of Arts and Sciences appointed by the 
President, to be held for only one year ; the other, which entitles 
the holder to exemption from payment of the tuition fee of the 
year, is awarded annually by the Medical Council to a student 
of the senior class who presents to the Medical Council satis- 
factory evidence that he is of good moral character and is worthy 
of and in need of assistance to complete the course. 

Frederica Gehrmann Scholarship 

This scholarship was established by the bequest of the late 
Mrs. Frederica Gehrmann and entitles the holder to exemption 
from payment of tuition fees. The scholarship is awarded to 
a third-year student who at the end of the second year has passed 
the best practical examinations in Anatomy, Physiology, Biologi- 
cal Chemistry, Pharmacology, Pathology, Bacteriology, Im- 
munology and Serology. 

The Clarence and Genevra Warfield Scholarships 

(Value $300.00 each) 

There are five scholarships established by the Regents from 
the income of the fund bequeathed by the will of Dr. Clarence 
Warfield. 

Terms and Conditions: These scholarships are available to 
students of any of the classes of the course in medicine. Prefer- 
ence is given to students from the counties of the State of Mary- 
land which the Medical Council may from time to time determine 
to be most in need of medical practitioners. 

Any student receiving one of these scholarships must agree, 

after graduation and a year's interneship, to undertake the prac- 

i tice of medicine, for a term of two years, in the county to which 

II the student is accredited or in a county selected by the Council. 
In the event that a student is not able to comply with the condi- 
J tion requiring him to practice in the county to which he is ac- 
credited by the Council, the money advanced by the Regents shall 
be refunded. 



J; 



82 HOSPITAL APPOINTMENTS 

Israel and Cecelia E. Cohen Scholarship 

(Value $250.00) 

This scholarship was established by Miss Eleanor S. Cohen in 
memory of her parents, Israel and Cecelia E. Cohen. Terms and 
conditions : This scholarship will be available to students of any 
one of the classes of the course in Medicine ; preference is given 
to students of the counties of the State of Maryland which the 
Medical Council may from time to time determine to be most in 
need of medical practitioners. Any student receiving one of 
these scholarships must, after graduation and a year's interne- 
ship, agree to undertake the practice of medicine for a term of 
two years in the county to which the student is accredited, or in 
a county selected by the Council. In the event that a student is 
not able to comply with the condition requiring him to practice 
in the county to which he is accredited by the Council, the money 
advanced by the Regents shall be refunded. 

Daughters of Harmony Scholarship 

(Value $100.00) 

This scholarship is given each year by the Daughters of Har- 
mony as part payment of the tuition of a needy student of good 
character. He must be a member of the senior class and a bona 
fide resident of Baltimore. He must be nominated by the Medi- 
cal Council. 

ANNUAL HOSPITAL APPOINTMENTS 

On February 1st of each session the following annual appoint- 
ments are made from among the graduates of the school : 

TO THE UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL 
Two Resident Surgeons Two Resident Obstetricians 

Two Resident Physicians Thirteen Junior Residents on a Rota- 

One Resident Gynecologist ting Service 

A number of students are appointed each year, at the close of 
the session, as Clinical Assistants in the University Hospital for 
the summer months. 

TO THE MERCY HOSPITAL 
Chief Resident Physician One Resident Gynecologist 

One Assistant Resident Physician One Resident Obstetrician 
Chief Resident Surgeon Eight Junior Residents on a Rotating 

Five Assistant Resident Surgeons Service 



NOTICE TO STUDENTS 83 

NOTICE TO STUDENTS 

The personal expenses of the students are at least as low in 
Baltimore as in any large city in the United States. The follow- 
ing estimates of a student's personal expenses for the academic 
year of eight months have been prepared by students, and are 
based upon actual experience. In addition to these the student 
must bear in mind the expenditure for a microscope. 

Items Low Average Liberal 

Books - $50 $75 $100 

College Incidentals - - 20 20 20 

Board, eight months 200 250 275 

Room rent ...... . 64 80 100 

Clothing and laundry ...... 50 80 150 

All other expenses _ 25 50 75 

Total $409 $556 $720 

Students will save time and expense upon their arrival in the 
city by going directly to the School of Medicine on the University 
grounds, N. E. Corner Lombard and Greene Streets. Here may 
i be found a list of comfortable and convenient boarding houses 
suitable to their means and wishes. 

For further information, apply to 

J. M. H. Rowland, M.D., Dean, 

Lombard and Greene Streets. 



GRADUATES, UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND SCHOOL OF 

MEDICINE AND COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS 

AND SURGEONS, JUNE 6, 1931 



Adalman, Philip, Ph.G Maryland 

Allen, Howard Stanley Pennsylvania 

Andrew, David Holmes, A.B., 

Maryland 
Arnett, Thomas Morrison, A.B., B.S., 
West Virginia 

Bamberger, Beatrice, A.B Maryland 

Barton, Paul Canfield, B.S - '.Ohio 

Baumgartner, Eugene Irving, A.B., 

Maryland 

Berman, Henry Irving _ Maryland 

Boggs, William Carroll, A.B., B.S., 

West Virginia 

Brice, Arthur Talbott Maryland 

Brill, Bernard, B.S .New York 

Brill, John Leonard, A.B., 

Pennsylvania 
Cashwell, Roy Lee, B.S., 

North Carolina 
Cloninger, Kenneth Lee, B.S., 

North Carolina 

Contract, Eli, A.B Maryland 

Davis, Melvin Booth, B. S. Maryland 

Dawson, William Maddren, B.S., 

New York 
Donohue, Bernard Walker, A.B., 

Maryland 
Drenga, Joseph Francis, A.B., 

Maryland 

Eckstein, Harry, M.A New York 

Edel, John Wesley, Jr., B.S., Maryland 
Eisenberg, David Solomon, B.S., 

New York 

Ernest, Roy Cooper, A.B Ohio 

Feldman, Samuel, A.M Maryland 

Feuer, Arthur, B.S. ..New York 

Foster, Ruth _ Massachusetts 

Friedman, Joseph, B.S. New York 

Grossman, Isadore Karl, A.B., 

Maryland 

Grove, Donald Birtner Maryland 

Gundry, Rachel Krebs, A.B., Maryland 
Hannum, Marvin Ray, B.S., 

West Virginia 

Harris, Joseph William _ Utah 

Helfrich, Raymond Frederick, A.B., 

Maryland 

Hoffman, Reuben, A.B Maryland 

Hollander, Mark Buckner, A.B., 

Maryland 
Hornbrook, Kent Maidlow, 

West Virginia 
Jacobson, Samuel Maurice, Ph.G., 



Maryland 
Jaklitsch, Frank Henry, B.S., 

New York 
Jensen, Carl Dana Fausbol, 

Washington 

Jett, Page Covington, A.B. Maryland 

Jones, Arthur Ford. _ Maryland 

Karger, Abraham, B.S. New York 

Kaufman, Max, Ph.G. New York 

Keefe, Walter Joseph, A.B., 

Connecticut 
Kermisch, Albert, Ph.G., B.S., 

Maryland 

Kilgus, John Frank, Jr Pennsylvania 

Kohn, Walter _....„ Maryland 

Krieger, Jerome Leon, A.B....Maryland 

KrosnofF, Michael, B.S Pennsylvania 

Lachman, Harry, B.S Maryland 

Langeluttig, Harry Vernon, A.B., 

Maryland 
Lanham, Alston Gordon, B.S., 

West Virginia 

Lerner, Philip Frank, A.B Maryland 

Leshine, Sidney Starr, B.S., 

Connecticut 

Levine, David Robert, B.S New York 

Lubin, Paul _ Maryland 

Mahan, Edgar Wade, B.S., 

Pennsylvania 
Mankovich, Desiderius George, 

Pennsylvania 
Martin, Thomas Adrian, Ph.G., 

Maryland 

Masterson, John Francis New Jersey 

Meyer, Leo Martin, M.A New York 

Morrison, Clarence Fisher, B.S., 

West Virginia 
Movers, Waldo Briggs, A.B., 

West Virginia 
Murphy, Richard Lawrence, A.B., 

New Hampshire 

Nocera, Francisco Paolo Porto Rico 

Palitz, Leo Solomon, M.A .New York 

Rehmeyer, Walter Owen, B.S., 

Pennsylvania 

Rhoads, John Peter Pennsylvania 

Rodriguez, Manuel, B.S ...Porto Rico 

Rohm, Robert Franklin Pennsylvania 

Rosenberg, Benjamin, B.S. New York 

Rozum, John Charles .New York 

Seabold, William Merven, A.B., 

Marvlan<li 



84 



GRADUATES— 1930 85 

Schimunek, Emmanuel Aloysius, A.B., Slavcoff, Alexander, B.S., 

Maryland Pennsylvania 

Seidman, Herman Harold, B.S., Smith, Solomon, A.B. Maryland 

New York Sprecher, Milford Harsh, B.S., 

Shaw, Christopher Campbell, Ph.B., Maryland 

Maryland Sterling, Susanne „ Maryland 

Shelley, Harry Sandberg, B.S., Stevens, Russell Alvin, A.B., 

Maryland Pennsylvania 

Shochat, Albert Joshua, B.S., Taylor, Robert Bruce _ Pennsylvania 

New York Van Ormer, William Alfred, 

Siwinski, Arthur George, A.B., Pennsylvania 

Maryland Warren, Edward William _..New York 

Skovron, Michael J., B.S., Pennsylvania Whims, Harold Carter, B.S., 

Slate, Marvin Longworth, A.B., North Carolina 

North Carolina Wigderson, Henry, B.S New York 

Honors 

University Prize Gold Medal _..... Samuel Feldman 

Certificates of Honor 

David Robert Levine Rachel Krebs Gundry 

Leo Martin Meyer Walter Kohn 

Richard Lawrence Murphy 

Prizes 

The Dr. Jose L. Hirsch memorial prize of $50.00 for the best work in 

Pathology during the second and third years Samuel Feldman 

The Dr. Leo Karlinsky memorial scholarship for the highest standing 

in the Freshman Class „ _ Max Needleman 

The Dr. A. Bradley Gaither memorial prize of $25.00 for the best work 
in Genito-Urinary Surgery during the senior year 

Christopher Campbell Shaw 



86 INTERNE SHIPS— CLASS 1931 



ENTTERNESHIPS— CLASS 1931 

Graduates of the Class of 1931 are serving internships as follows: 

Adalman, Philip _ Union Memorial Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland 

Allen, Howard Stanley ...... York Hospital, York, Pennsylvania 

Andrew, David Holmes U. S. Marine Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland 

Arnett, Thomas Morrison U. S. Naval Hospital, U. S. Navy 

Bamberger, Beatrice _ _ Sydenham Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland 

Barton, Paul Canfield ...St. Alexis Hospital, Cleveland, Ohio 

Baumgartner, Eugene Irving. Mercy Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland 

Berman, Henry Irving _ C. & 0. Hospital, Huntington, West Virginia 

Boggs, William Carroll Ohio Valley General Hospital, Wheeling, W. Va. 

Brice, Arthur Talbot. University Hospital, Baltimore, Md. 

Brill, Bernard „...._ Baltimore City Hospitals, Baltimore, Maryland 

Brill, John Leonard - St. Joseph's Hospital, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 

Cashwell, Roy Lee _ Greenville City Hospital, Greenville, South Carolina 

Cloninger, Kenneth Lee _...._ University Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland 

Contract, Eli _ St. Joseph's Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland 

Davis, Melvin Booth _ University Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland 

Dawson, William Maddren Xing's County Hospital, Brooklyn, New York 

Donohue, Bernard Walker _....:._ University Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland 

Drenga, Joseph Francis _ University Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland 

Eckstein, Harry „ St. Mary's Hospital, Passaic, New Jersey 

Edel, John Wesley, Jr St. Joseph's Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland 

Eisenberg, David Solomon. _ Governeur Hospital, New York, New York 

Ernest, Roy Cooper Charity Hospital, Cleveland, Ohio 

Feldman, Samuel „...._ _...._ Mt. Sinai Hospital, New York, New York 

Feuer, Arthur Metropolitan Hospital, Welfare Island, New York, New York 

Foster, Ruth. _ Baltimore City Hospitals, Baltimore, Maryland 

Friedman, Joseph Sinai Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland 

Grossman, Isadore Karl _...._ Mercy Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland 

Grove, Donald Birtner _ University Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland 

Gundry, Rachel Krebs Baltimore City Hospitals, Baltimore, Maryland 

Hannum, Marvin Ray St. Vincent's Hospital, Jacksonville, Florida 

Harris, Joseph William, 

W. H. Groves L. D. S. Hospital, Salt Lake City, Utah 

Helfrich, Raymond Frederick „ Mercy Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland 

Hoffman, Reuben. West Baltimore General Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland 

Hollander, Mark Buckner ...Baltimore City Hospitals, Baltimore, Maryland 

Hornbrook, Kent Maidlow Conemaugh Hospital, Johnstown, Pennsylvania 

Jacobson, Samuel Maurice Sinai Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland 

Jaklitsch, Frank Henry Englewood Hospital, Englewood, New Jersey 

Jensen, Carl Dana Fausbol 

Maryland General Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland 

Jett, Page Covington St. Joseph's Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland 

Jones, Arthur Ford. University Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland 



INTERNESHIPS— CLASS 1931 87 

Karger, Abraham „ Beth David Hospital, New York, New York 

Kaufman, Max _.... Englewood Hospital, Englewood, New Jersey 

Keefe, Walter Joseph St. Mary's Hospital, Waterbury, Connecticut 

Kermisch, Albert Baltimore City Hospitals, Baltimore, Maryland 

Kilgus, John Frank, Jr _ Waterbury Hospital, Waterbury, Connecticut 

Kohn, Walter _ Sinai Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland 

Krieger, Jerome Leon. _ ...._ _ Sinai Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland 

Krosnoff, Michael Washington Hospital, Washington, Pennsylvania 

Lachman, Harry West Baltimore General Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland 

Langeluttig, Harry Vernon St. Joseph's Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland 

Lanham, Alston Gordon University Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland 

Lerner, Philip Frank 

West Baltimore General Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland 

Leshine, Sidney Starr Norwalk General Hospital, Norwalk, Connecticut 

Levine, David Robert Mt. Sinai Hospital, New York, New York 

Lubin, Paul South Baltimore General Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland 

Mahan, Edgar Wade Washington Hospital, Washington, Pennsylvania 

Mankovich, Desiderius George St. Vincent's Hospital, Erie, Pennsylvania 

Martin, Thomas Adrian York Hospital, York, Pennsylvania 

Masterson, John Francis St. Michael's Hospital, Newark, New Jersey 

Meyer, Leo Martin _ Governeur Hospital, New York, New York 

Morrison, Clarence Fisher Naval Hospital, Washington, D. C. 

Moyers, Waldo Briggs _ University Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland 

Murphy, Richard Lawrence _..... St. Vincent's Hospital, Erie, Pennsylvania 

Nocera, Francisco Paolo 

Palitz, Leo Solomon _ Sinai Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland 

Rehmeyer, Walter Owen. York Hospital, York, Pennsylvania 

Rhoads, John Peter „ Reading Hospital, Reading, Pa. 

Rodriguez, Manuel R. 

Rohm, Robert Franklin _.... Mercy Hospital, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

Rosenberg, Benjamin. _ Cumberland Hospital, Brooklyn, New York 

Rozum, John Charles, 

West Baltimore General Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland 

Seabold, William Merven University Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland 

Schimunek, Emmanuel Aloysius, 

South Baltimore General Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland 

Seidman, Herman Harold Sinai Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland 

Shaw, Christopher Campbell University Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland 

Shelley, Harry Sandberg _ - University Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland 

Shochat, Albert Joshua University Hospital, New York, New York 

Siwinski, Arthur George Mercy Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland 

Skovron, Michael J _ St. Vincent's Hospital, Erie, Pennsylvania 

Slate, Marvin Longworth Maryland General Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland 

Slavcoff, Alexander Youngstown Hospital, Youngstown, Ohio 

Smith, Solomon _ Mercy Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland 

Sprecher, Milford Harsh University Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland 



88 INTERNESHIPS—CLASS 1931 

Taylor, Robert Bruce _ Union Memorial Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland 

Van Ormer, William Alfred _ St. Agnes Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland 

Warren, Edward William, 

Maryland General Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland 

Whims, Harold Carter....._ Baltimore City Hospitals, Baltimore, Maryland 

Wigderson, Henry _ Mercy Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland 

Sterling, Susanne Hospital for Women of Maryland, Baltimore, Maryland 

Stevens, Russell Alvin 

Wilkes-Barre General Hospital, Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania 






MATRICULATES, UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND SCHOOL OF 

MEDICINE AND COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS 

AND SURGEONS, 1931-1932 



FOURTH YEAR CLASS 



Abrashkin, Mortimer Dick, B.S., 

Connecticut 
Ahroon, Carl Richard, A.B., Maryland 

Ashman, Leon, B.S Maryland 

Bell, Charles Raymond, B.S., 

Pennsylvania 

Bell, James Russell Pennsylvania 

Bercovitz, Nathan .„ New York 

Berger, Herbert, B.S New York 

Blum, Samuel Daniel, B.S. New York 

Bogorad, Daniel Emil Maryland 

Brown, William Edward ...California 

Byer, Jacob, M.A New York 

Cannon, Martin Ohio 

Chimacoff, Hyman _._ New Jersey 

dayman, David Stanford Maryland 

Crecca, Anthony Daniel New Jersey 

Currie, D wight Mclver, A.B. 

North Carolina 

Davis, Carroll Kalman...... New York 

Demarco, Salvatore Joseph, A.B., 

Maryland 
Diamond, Joseph George, B.S., 

New Jersey 
Dumler, John Charles, B.S., Maryland 

Eichert, Herbert Maryland 

Eisenbrandt, William Henry, A.B., 

Maryland 

Fein, Jack, B.S New York 

Fishbein, Elliot, M.S - New Jersey 

Flom, Charles Maryland 

France, Andrew Menaris, B.S., 

Maryland 
Ganz, Samuel Evans, M.A., New York 

Seller, Samuel, B.S New Jersey 

Gershenson, David Abraham, A.B., 

Maryland 
Gittleman, Solomon Ellman, B.S., 

New York 

jlass, Albert Julius Maryland 

aluckman, Albert Gerson, B.S., 

Delaware 
aorenberg, Harold, A.B., New Jersey 
jrosh, Joseph Walter, B.S., 

Pennsylvania 
"Jail, Joseph Edwin, B.S., 

West Virginia 

rlalperin, David, B.S New Jersey 

lammell, Frank Mull New Jersey 

lantman, Irvin _ . Maryland 

larris, Jacob, A.B New York 



Hecht, Manes Scheuer, A.B., Maryland 

Hendler, Hyman Bernard ...Maryland 

Hull, Harry Clay _ Maryland 

Jacobson, Meyer William, A.B., 

Maryland 
Kaplan, Abraham Nathan, M.S., 

New York 

Karfgin, Arthur, B.S Maryland 

Katz, Abraham, B.S New York 

Katz, Leonard _ _ Maryland 

Katzenstein, Lawrence, B.S., 

Maryland 

Keiser, Sylvan _.... „ New York 

Klein, Henrietta Estelle, Ph.B., 

Maryland 

Klimes, Louis Frank...... Maryland 

Korostoff, Bernard, B.S New York 

Kress, Milton Bernard Maryland 

Krieger, Alexander Allan, 

Pennsylvania 
Lechner, Sidney Israel, M.A., 

New York 

Leffert, Jacob, B.S New York 

Legum, Samuel, A.B Maryland 

Lerner, George, M.A „ New York 

Lieberman, Samuel, M.S New York 

Louft, Reuben Richard, A.B., 

) Maryland 

Markman, Harry David, B.S., 

New York 
McGovern, William Joseph, B.S., 

Pennsylvania 
McMillan, William Owen, 

West Virginia 
Mebane, William Carter, 

North Carolina 
Mickley, John Hoke, B.S., 

Pennsylvania 
Miller, Myron Joseph, M.A., 

New York 

Moores, John Duer, B.S Maryland 

Nachlas, Arthur, A.B Maryland 

Newnam, Alpheus Carlton Maryland 

Panebianco, Richard Robert, B.S., 

New York 

Pear, Henry Robert Maryland 

Philip, Arthur Jay, B.S New York 

Pink, Solomon Harris, B.S., 

New Jersey 
Prigal, Samuel Jeremiah, B.S., 

New York 



89 



90 



MATRICULATES— 1931-32 



FOURTH YEAR CLASS— Continued 



Proctor, Samuel Edward, A.B., 

Maryland 

Reckson, Morris Murray -..New York 

Roberts, Marion Butler, A.B., 

North Carolina 

Rohm, Jack Zeth..... Pennsylvania 

Rosenthal, Stephen Isaiah, A.B., 

Pennsylvania 
Rubenstein, Robert, B.S., New Jersey 

*Sager, Harold, B.S _._ New Jersey 

Sanchez, Robert Luis, A.B. _ Mexico 

Saunders, Thomas Sewell Maryland 

Savage, John Edward, B.S., 

District of Columbia 

Schwartz, David Israel Maryland 

Shack, Max Herman....- New Jersey 

Shaw, John Jacob, A.B New Jersey 

Siegel, Sidney Leon, B.S., New Jersey 

Silverstein, George, A.B Connecticut 

Simmons, John Frederick Maryland 



Snyder, Jerome _ Maryland 

Sollod, Aaron Charles Maryland 

Statman, Arthur James, B.S., 

New Jersey 

Stein, Charles, A.B Maryland 

Stephenson, Frank Richard...Maryland 
Taylor, Francis Nicholson, A.B., 

Virginia 

Thompson, Harry Goff - Illinois 

Tomlinson, Thomas H., 

North Carolina 

Whicker, Max Evans North Carolina 

Wilson, Frank, B.S North Carolina 

Wirts, Carl Alexander, B.S., 

Pennsylvania 
Zupnik, Howard Lester, B.S., 

Pennsylvania 
Zuravin, Meyer Harry, B.S., 

New Jersey 



THIRD YEAR CLASS 



Aaron, Harold Henry, B.S., New York 
Baker, George Stansbury, M.A., 

Maryland 
Barnhardt, Albert Earl, A.B., 

North Carolina 

Beanstock, Sam, B.S New York 

Becker, Martin, M.S ...New Jersey 

Bellin, David Elias, M.A New York 

Bernstein, Joseph Cecil Maryland 

Blitzman, Louis, B.S - New York 

Bowman, Harry Daniel, B.S., 

Maryland 
Cohen, Marvin Meyer, B.S., 

New Jersey 
Comegys, Richard Williamson, A.B., 

Maryland 
Diehl, Harold Clayton, B.S....Maryland 

DiStasio, Frank, B.S Connecticut 

Drucker, Victor, B.S _....- New York 

Emanuel, Meyer, B.S New York 

Espinosa, Manuel, B.S. Porto Rico 

Etkind, Meyer George, B.S., 

Connecticut 

Fineman, Jerome Maryland 

Fox, Haskell Wright, B.S., 

North Carolina 
Franklin, Frank Anthony, B.S., 

New Jersey 
Garrison, Ralph Bernard, B.S., 

North Carolina 



Goldman, Abram Maryland 

Goldman, Alexander Blodnick, B.S., 

New York 
Goldman, Meyer Leo, A.B., New York 
Gorrell, James Stanley, A.B., 

Maryland 
Griggs, William Lemuel, Jr., B.S., 

North Carolina 

Harris, Earle Harold New York 

Hedgpeth, Louten Rhodes, B.S., 

North Carolina 
Hemminger, Earl Wentworth, B.S., 

Pennsylvania 

Highstein, Gustav _ Maryland 

Himelfarb, Albert Joseph, A.B., 

Maryland 
Hoover, William Alonzo, B.S., 

North Carolina 
Hurwitz, George Hillel, A.B., 

Connecticut 
Hyman, Joseph Jay, B.S., New York 

Hyman, Morris, A.B _ Connecticut 

Kenler, Myron Lewis, A.B., Maryland 
Kent, Ann Patrick, A.B., 

District of Columbia 
Keown, Lauriston Livingston, A.B., 

Maryland 

Kimmel, Charles, B.S New Jersey 

Kline, Albert Adolph, B.S Wisconsin 

Kochman, Leon Arthur Maryland 



* Did not complete the year. 



MATRICULATES— 1931-32 



91 



THIRD YEAR CLASS— Continued 



Konigsberg, Wilfred Kane, A.B., 

New Jersey 
Lentz, George Ellard, B.S., 

Pennsylvania 
Lifland, Bernard Daniel, B.S., 

New Jersey 
Lowman, Milton Edward, A.B., 

Maryland 

Malinoski, Wallace Henry Maryland 

Matheke, George Adolph, B.S., 

New Jersey 

Miller, Benjamin, B.S New York 

Miller, Meyer George, B.S., New York 
Moore, James Irving, A.B., Maryland 
Novenstein, Sidney, A.B., Connecticut 
Osserman, Kermit Edward, A.B., 

New York 

Peer, George Foster West Virginia 

Pico, Jose Teodoro, B.S Porto Rico 

Racusin, Nathan Maryland 

Ray, William Turner, North Carolina 
Robinson, Daniel Robert, B.S., 

New York 

Rosenberg, Arthur, B.S New York 

Rosenfeld, David Herman Maryland 

Rubin, Samuel S ....Maryland 

Rutland, Hedley Ethelbert, B.S., 

Pennsylvania 
Sasscer, James Ghiselin, B.S., 

Maryland 
Scarborough, Asa Mark, 

South Carolina 



Schiff, Hyman, A.B Maryland 

Schiff, Joseph, A.B Maryland 

Schindler, Blane Markwood, Maryland 

* Schlachman, Milton Maryland 

Schneiman, Maurice Harris, A.B., 

Pennsylvania 

Schochet, George _....- Maryland 

Schwartz, Alec Robert, B.S., 

Pennsylvania 

Schwartz, Paul M Maryland 

Shea, Cornelius Joseph ...Connecticut 

Shinn, George Clyde North Carolina 

Smith, Ashby Wade Virginia 

Soltis, Michael Joseph Wieciech, A.B., 

Maryland 

Stackhouse, Howard New Jersey 

Stern, Maurice Lee, A.B New York 

Szule, Stephen, Ph.M New Jersey 

Taylor, Clifford Morrison ...Maryland 

Thumin, Mark, B.S New York 

Turano, Leonard Francis, B.S., 

New York 
VanMetre, John Lee, A.B., 

West Virginia 
Way, Samuel Eason, A.B., 

North Carolina 

Weisman, Samuel Maryland 

Wolbert, Frank Olaf _ Maryland 

Woodard, Barney Lelon, B.S., 

North Carolina 
Woodford, Thomas Larry, B.S., 

West Virginia 
Zager, Saul, B.S New Jersey 



SECOND YEAR CLASS 



Abramovitz, Leonard Jerome, A.B., 

Maryland 
Adams, Thurston Ray, North Carolina 

Austraw, Henry Harrison Maryland 

Bayer, Ira Eugene _ Maryland 

Bayley, George Schwing, 

Pennsylvania 
Berenstein, Stanley Harry, Maryland 
Blum, Louis Vardee, A.B., Delaware 
Brodey, David Franklin, A.B., 

New York 
Burgtorf, George Edward, Maryland 
Campbell, Edgar Thrall, A.B., 

Maryland 

Caples, Delmas Maryland 

C'arliner, Paul Elliott Maryland 

Cassidy, William Adrian, A.B., Maine 
Coates, Stephen Paul, A.B., New York 
Cohen, Lawrence Jack Maryland 



Cooper, Jules New Jersey 

Deitz, Joseph Robert, A.B., 

New Jersey 

Diener, Samuel _ _ Maryland 

Dorman, George Edward, B.S., 

Pennsylvania 
Downey, Regis Fallon, B.S., 

Pennsylvania 
Dreher, Robert Hering, B.S., 

Pennsylvania 

Dunbar, John Charles Pennsylvania 

Echols, John Edward West Virginia 

Elterich, Charles Frederick, B.S., 

Pennsylvania 
Farr, Robert Wilbur, B.S., Maryland 
Fearing, William Lumsden, 

North Carolina 

Feldman, Leon Henry Maryland 

Finegold, Joseph, B.S., Pennsylvania 



* Did not complete year. 



92 



MATRICULATES— 1931-32 



SECOND YEAR CLASS— Continued 



Gaskel, Jason Howard, A.B., 

Maryland 

Gelb, Jerome, B.S -..New Jersey 

Gelman, Sidney New Jersey 

Goldstone, Herbert ► Maryland 

Goodhand, Charles Luther, A.B., 

Maryland 

Goodman, Howard Maryland 

Gordon, Joseph - Maryland 

Gutman, Isaac Maryland 

Hanigsberg, Murray Joseph, B.S., 

New York 
Healy, Robert Fairbank, B.S., 

Maryland 
Hoffman, Edward Sayer, A.B., 

New York 
Horan, William Henry, A.B., 

Pennsylvania 
Howard, William Lawrence, B.S., 

Maryland 
Hummel, Leonard Malcolm, Maryland 

Hunt, Josiah Arnold Maryland 

Hurwitz, Abraham Maryland 

Insley, Philip Asbury, B.S., Maryland 

Janousky, Nathan Bonny Maryland 

Jerardi, Joseph Victor, B.S., Maryland 

Johnson, Thorwald California 

Kallins, Edward Selig Maryland 

Katz, Simon, A.B New York 

Ketz, Wesley John Pennsylvania 

Knoll, William, B.S New York 

Kurz, Theodore George, B.S., 

Connecticut 
Lane, Edwin Charles, A.B., 

New Jersey 
Lawler, Thomas Gorman, A.B., 

California 

Leass, Reuben, B.S - New York 

Leavitt, Abraham Charles, B.S., 

Massachusetts 

Levin, Manuel, A.B Maryland 

Levin, Milton Maryland 

Levine, Matthew, B.S New York 

Maginnis, Helen Irene, A.B., 

Maryland 
Mains, Marshall Paul, A.B., 

Wisconsin 

Mancuso, Joseph, A.B Ohio 

Marlett, Neumann Clyde, Mus. B., 

New Jersey 

McNally, Hugh Bernard Maryland 

Means, Milton Charles Pennsylvania 

Millett, Joseph ....._ Pennsylvania 

Mirow, Richard Raymond New York 



Moore, Alfred Charles, A.B., 

Maryland 

Moulton, Olin Cates, A.B Maine 

Mund, Maxwell Herschel Maryland 

Neal, Roland Abbott Pennsylvania 

Needleman, Max, B.S New York 

O'Connor, Raymond Francis, 

Pennsylvania 
Orans, Alfred Abraham, A.B., 

New York 
Rabinowitz, Jacob Herbert, B.S., 

New Jersey 
Reardon, William Thomas, A.B., 

Delaware 

*Reier, Charles Henry .„ Maryland 

Riehl, Louis Milton .....Maryland 

Roberson, Edward Leon, B.S., 

North Carolina 

Rosen, Morris, A.B Pennsylvania 

Rosenthal, Charles Morton, B.S., 

New York 

Rudo, Nathan Maryland 

Sacks, Milton Samuel Maryland 

Satulsky, Emanuel Milton, 

New Jersey 

Schwartz, Daniel James Maryland 

Schwartz, Theodore Allison, 

Maryland 

Scoles, Peter Serafino New Jersey 

Sedlacek, Joseph Arthur Maryland 

Sekerak, Richard John Stephen, 

Connecticut 

Siegel, Benjamin Israel Maryland 

Siegel, Milton, B.S - New York 

Sisserson, Barney, B.S New York 

Smith, William Benjamin Maryland 

Snyder, John Newcomer, 

Pennsylvania 
Sollod, Bernard Walter, A.B., 

Maryland 
Soltz, William Boyer, B.S., New York 
Spitznagle, Vernon Edward, 

Maryland 
Sproul, Dorothy Gertrude, B.S., 

M.S.S., Massachusetts 

Stein, Milton Robert Maryland 

Stephens, Wilson Paschall, B.S., 

Virginia 
Stutzman, Clyde Malverne, B.S., 

Pennsylvania 

Sugar, Samuel Jacob Maryland 

Sutton, Harold Lawrence, A.B., 

New Jersey 



* Did not complete the year. 



MATRICULATES— 1931-32 93 

SECOND YEAR CLASS— Continued 

Taylor, Andrew DuVal, Udkow, Samuel, B.S New York 

North Carolina Wagner, Richard, A.B ...New Jersey 

Teitelbaum, Harry Allen, B.S., Warshawsky, Harry, B.S New York 

New York Wilder, Earle Maurice..... Maryland 

Terman, Irving, A.B _ New York Wolfe, William David, A.B., Maryland 

Timberlake, Landon, A.B ...Virginia Zurawski, Charles, Ph.B., 

Tuerk, Isadore ....^Maryland Rhode Island 



FIRST YEAR CLASS 



Adelman, Milton Harris, B.S., 

New York 

Albrittain, John Warren Maryland 

Alessi, Edward James Maryland 

Alonso, Miguel _ Porto Rico 

Aungst, Melvin Rauch Pennsylvania 

Battaglia, Dominic Thomas, B.S., 

Maryland 
Bierer, Dan George, B.S., 

Pennsylvania 
Bock, Charles Aloysius, B.S., 

Pennsylvania 
Booth, Harold Thomas, A.B., 

New York 
Brouillet, George Hector, 

Massachusetts 

Burns, Harold Hubert Pennsylvania 

Carney, William Howard, 

Pennsylvania 

Cohen, Philip New Jersey 

Connolly, John Calhoun, 

North Carolina 
Cooney, Robert Francis, 

Pennsylvania 

Coplin, George Joseph New Jersey 

Cornbrooks, Ernest Ivon, Jr., A.B., 

New Jersey 

Cotter, Edward Francis Maryland 

Cranage, Bidwell Chapman, A.B., 

Michigan 
Davidson, Nachman, A.B., Maryland 

Dickey, Francis George Maryland 

Diehl, Earl Henry, Ph.G ...Maryland 

Dittmar, Stuart Watt... Pennsylvania 

Dodge, Douglas Rude Michigan 

Doerner, Alexander Andrew, A.B., 

New York 
Drake, Francis James, B.S., 

New Jersey 

DuBois, Robert Lionel Connecticut 

"Dunnigan, William Charles, A.B., 

Maryland 
Einhorn, Samuel Edward, B.S., 

New Jersey 



Ewald, August Ludwig, B.S., 

Maryland 
Fader, Ferdinand, A.B., New Jersey 
Fichtner, Albon Russell, Pennsylvania 

Fox, Lester Mitchell Maryland 

Freeman, Irving Maryland 

Fruchtbaum, Robert Pearson, B.S., 

New Jersey 
Galitz, Philip Jacob, A.M., New York 
Gerwig, Walter Henry, Jr., 

West Virginia 

Ginsberg, Benjamin Maryland 

Glenn, Charles Arthur, A.B., 

North Carolina 
Godbey, John Randolph, 

West Virginia 
Grenzer, William Howard, A.B., 

Maryland 

Gross, Joseph Bernard Maryland 

Hammill, Gerard Paul, B.S., 

Pennsylvania 

Harris, Aaron _ M Maryland 

Hartman, Ira Frank, B.S., 

West Virginia 
Heghinian, Jeannette Rosaline E., 

Maryland 
Helfrich, William Goldsborough, B.S., 

Maryland 

Herald, James Kennedy Ohio 

Herrold, Lewis Charles, B.S., 

Pennsylvania 

Hollander, Arthur, B.S New York 

Hugg, John Henry, B.S., 

Pennsylvania 
Kaminsky, Aaron Louis, B.S., 

New Jersey 
Kane, Harry Francis- A.B., 

Maryland 
Keller, Michael Lawrence, New Jersey 

Klein, Harold Henry Pennsylvania 

Klompus, Irving, A.B New Jersey 

Knowles, Frederick Edwin, Jr., 

New Jersey 



94 



MATRICULATES— 1931-32 



FIRST YEAR CLASS— Continued 



Laino, Frank Armento, B.S., 

Maryland 

Layton, Caleb Rodney New York 

Levy, Abraham Maurice Maryland 

Lewis, Archie Clifton Maryland 

Lichtenberg, Walter, B.S., A.M., 

New York 

Lieb, Saul, A.B New Jersey 

Llewelyn, Louis Grandin, A.B., 

Maryland 
MacLaughlin, Donald Clay, A.B., 

Maryland 

Marek, Charles Bernard Maryland 

Mays, Howard Brooks Maryland 

McDonough, Oscar Tracy, Jr. 

Pennsylvania 

McGregor, Alpine Watson Utah 

McGregor, Lorenzo Watson Utah 

McHenry, DeArmond John, B.S., 

Pennsylvania 

Mech, Karl Frederick ._ Maryland 

Milan, Joseph Simon. ....Maryland 

Montgomery, Bruce „ Pennsylvania 

Noon, Milton A ..„ Maryland 

*Park, Clermont Dixon, B.S., 

West Virginia 
Pepe, Anthony James, B.S., 

Connecticut 

Pugatsky, David _ „ Maryland 

Raffel, William Maryland 

Reagle, Charles Donald, A.B., 

Maryland 
Robinson, Harry Maximilian, Jr., 

Maryland 

Robinson, Milton Irving _ New York 

Rogers, Leo David _ Maryland 

Rosen, Israel, A.B _ Maryland 

Rosen, Sol Hyman. New Jersey 

Rosenberg, Harold William, B.S., 

New York 



Russell, John Carroll _._ Maryland 

Rutherford, Miriam Hook, A.B., 

California 
Schmitt, George Fredrick, Jr., 

Maryland 
*Schmulovitz, Maurice Jacob, A.B., 

Maryland 

Schonfeld 1 Paul _._ Maryland 

Shapiro, Joseph, A.B New York 

Shapiro, Sydney Harold New Jersey 

Shaul, John Melvin, A.B New York 

Shub, Morris _ Maryland 

Siscovick, Milton _ _ Maryland 

Stein, Benjamin Maxwell New York 

Teitel, Louis „..New York 

* Tetter, William Howard, A.B., 

New Jersey 

Tuby, Joseph, B.S New York 

Vozel, Luther F _..... ...Maryland 

Waghelstein, Julius Meyer... Maryland 
Warren, John McCullen, A.B., 

North Carolina 
Wehs, Edward Peter, B.S., 

Pennsylvania 
Williams, Jesse Frank, B.S., 

West Virginia 
Williams, Richard Jones, A.B., 

Maryland 
Williamson, Charles Vernon, 

Maryland 

Wilson, John Jacob _ -..Maryland 

Wilson, Norman James Maryland 

V/ode, Alvin Eugene William, 

Maryland 
Wood, Everet Hardenbergh, A.B., 

New Jersey 
Woodward, Lewis Klair, Jr., A.B., 

Maryland 

Wright, Captain Short ...Kentucky 

Zimmerman, Fred, B.S New York 



*Did not complete the year. 



GENERAL SUMMARY 



95 



SUMMARY OF STUDENT ENROLLMENT AS OF 
MARCH 15, 1932 



College 
Park Baltimore 



Resident Collegiate Courses.-^ — Academic Year. 

College of Agriculture 

College of Arts and Sciences _ 

School of Dentistry _ 

College of Education „ 

College of Engineering 

Graduate School 

College of Home Economics 

School of Law _ _ 

School of Medicine _ „ 

School of Nursing _ 

School of Pharmacy „.. 

Total „ 

Summer School, 1931 „ _ _ -.. 

Extension Courses: 

Industrial Education (College Credit) 
Mining (Sub-Collegiate Credit) _.. 



Total 3,136 

Less Duplications _ 



Totals 



183 




183 


770 




770 




424 


424 


180 


_ 


180 


388 




388 


247 




247 


96 




96 




177 


177 




421 


421 




121 


121 




367 


367 



1,864 


1,510 


3,374 


927 




927 


177 




177 


168 





168 



1,510 4,646 
218 



4,428 



96 ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

ALUMNI ASSOCIATION SECTION 

OFFICERS 

Albert E. Goldstein, M.D., President 

Vice Presidents 

A. W. Valentine, M.D. Allen Graham, M.D. 

Alfred T. Gundry, M.D. 

Secretary 
Thomas B. Aycock, A.B., M.D. 

Assistant Secretary 
Kenneth Boyd, M.D. 

Treasurer 
W. Houston Toulson, M.D. 

Board of Directors Trustees Students' Rotating Fund 

-n MT v -, . William S. Love, M.D., Chairman 

l? u £ ? VANS %^-' Chalrman Charles E. Brack, M.D. 

H. M. Stein, M.D Frank j Kirby m >d< 

F. B. Andepson, M.D Robert L. Mitchell, M.D. 

Chas. Reid Edwards, M.D. G Milton Linthicum, M.D. 

Chas. R. Foutz, M.D. 

Albert E. Goldstein, M.D. Editors 

T B Aycock M.D. Emil Novak m<d . 

W. Houston Toulson, M.D. K s> j OH nson, M.D. 

Kenneth Boyd, M.D. 

Library Committee 

Advisory Committee Nathan Winslow, M.D. 
Wm. H. Triplett, M.D., Chairman 

Edgar Friedenwald, M.D. Hospital Council 

A. Ferd Ries, M.D. C C. Habliston, M.D. 

Charles A. Waters, M.D. Charles Bagley, M.D. 
Salvatore Demarco, M.D. 

Alumni Council 

M. LeRoy Lumpkin, M.D. 



The names listed above are officers for the term beginning July 1, 1931, and ending 
June 30, 1932. 



ENDOWMENT FUND 97 

ENDOWMENT FUND 

The following constitute the Board of Trustees of this Fund : 

E. F. Kelly, Ph.G., Chairman Stuart Janney 

J. M. H. Rowland, M.D. Daniel Baker, Jr. 

Harry Adler, M.D. Horace M. Davis, D.C.D. 

Randolph Winslow, A.M., M.D., LL.D. Robertson Griswold 
Arthur M. Shipley, Sc.D., M.D. 

This Board is incorporated by act of the Legislature of the 
State, its legal title being 'The Trustees of the Endowment Fund 
of the University of Maryland," and is independent and self-per- 
petuating. Its powers are limited to the expenditure of the in- 
terest derived from the various funds, which is applied as 
directed by donors for the benefit of the University. Contribu- 
tions, donations and bequests are solicited from Alumni and 
friends. They may be made to the general or University Fund, to 
the Medical Fund or to any other department of the University. 
If intended for the School of Medicine, they may be given to the 
general medical fund or to some special object, as building, re- 
search, library, pathology, hospital, publication, laboratories, 
gymnasium, scholarship, medal, prize, etc., in which case the 
wishes of the donor will be strictly regarded. Attention is in- 
vited to the "Charles Frick Research Fund," already established 
in memory of that distinguished investigator. Checks should be 
made payable to Endowment Fund of the University of Mary- 
land, J. M. H. Rowland, Treasurer, Lombard and Greene Streets, 
Baltimore, Md. 

FORMS OF DEVISE OR BEQUEST 
To School of Medicine 

I give, devise and bequeath to the Regents of the University of Maryland, 
a corporation incorporated under the laws of the State of Maryland, for the 

benefit of the Faculty of Physic _._ 

(Here state amount or describe property) 

To Endowment Fund 

I give, devise and bequeath to the Trustees of the Endowment Fund of the 
University of Maryland, a corporation incorporated under the laws of the 

State of Maryland, for the benefit of the Faculty of Physic 

(Here state amount or describe property) 



98 SCHOOL OF NURSING 

THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 
SCHOOL OF NURSING 

FACULTY AND INSTRUCTORS 

Superintendent of Nurses and Director of School of Nursing 

Annie Crighton, R.N. 

Assistant Superintendent of Nurses 

Frances M. Branley, R.N. 

Instructor in Nursing 

Lillie R. Hoke, R.N. 

Instructor in Nursing and Supervisor of Wards 

Helen Wright, R.N. 

Instructor in Surgical Technique for Nurses and 

Supervisor of Operating Pavilion 

Elizabeth Aitkenhead, R.N. 

Instructor in Dietetics 

Miriam Connelly 

Instructor in Massage 

Edith Walton 

Instructor in Social Service 

Grace Pearson, R.N. 

Assistant Instructor in Nursing and Supervisor of Wards 

Bertha Hoffman, R.N. 

Vesta Swartz, R.N . Night Supervisor 

Jane Moffatt, R.N ... „ -..Supervisor — Dispensary 

Beatrice Krause, R.N Head Nurse — Obstetrical Ward 

Estelle Baldwin, R.N „ ...Head Nurse — Children's Ward 

Grace Dick, R.N _ ...Head Nurse — Men's Medical Ward 

Elizabeth Cannon, R.N Head Nurse — Men's Surgical Ward 

Grace Dutterer, R.N _ Head Nurse — Men's Surgical Ward 

Freda Fazenbaker, R.N Head Nurse — Women's Medical, 

Surgical, and Gynecological Ward 

Lucy Brude, R.N Head Nurse — Private Hall 

Margaret Currens, R.N _ Head Nurse — Private Hall 

Gladys Adkins, R.N „ ...Assistant Head Nurse — Operating Room 

Carrie Miller, R.N „ Assistant Head Nurse — Operating Room 

Elizabeth Trice, R.N Head Nurse — Surgical Supply Room 

Emma Winship, R.N.... Head Nurse — Accident Room 

Grace Young, R.N Head Nurse — Outside Obstetrics 

Bertha Tarun, R.N _ ...Assistant Outside Obstetrics 

Catherine Rodenwald, R.N _ Head Nurse — Prenatal Clinic 

Stella Ricketts, R.N Assistant Prenatal Clinic 

Harriet Schroeder, R.N Head Nurse — Post-partum Clinic 

Evelyn Zapf, R.N „ Assistant Post-partum Clinic 

Naomi Allen, R.N Head Nurse Air Conditioning System 

Eva Laigneil, R.N „ Assistant Air Conditioning System 

Mone Cov, R.N _ _ „ Assistant Nigh Supervisor 



SCHOOL OF NURSING 99 

GENERAL INFORMATION 
The University of Maryland School for Nurses was established 
in the year 1889. 

Since that time it has been an integral part of the University 
of Maryland, coming under the same government. 

The school is non-sectarian, the only religious services being 
morning prayers. 

The University Hospital is a general hospital containing about 
250 beds. It is equipped to give young women a thorough course 
of instruction and practice in all phases of nursing. 

Programs Offered: The program of study of the school is 
planned for two groups of students: (a) the three-year group 
and (b) the five-year group. 

Requirements for Admission : A candidate for admission to 
the School of Nursing must be a graduate of an accredited high 
school or other recognized preparatory school, and must present 
record showing that she has completed satisfactorily the required 
amount of preparatory study. Preference will be given to stu- 
dents who rank in the upper third of the graduating class in their 
preparatory schools. 

Candidates are required to present 15 units for entrance. Re- 
quired (7), and Elective (8) units for entrance. 

Required: English (I, II, III, IV), 3 units; algebra to quad- 
ratics, 1 unit; plane geometry, 1 unit; history, 1 unit; science, 1 
unit. Total, 7 units. 

Elective: Astronomy, biology, botany, chemistry, civics, 
drawing, economics, general science, geology, history, home eco- 
nomics, vocational subjects, languages, mathematics, physical 
geography, physics, zoology, or any other subject offered in a 
standard high school or preparatory school for which graduation 
credit is granted toward college or university entrance. Eight 
units must be submitted from this group, of which not more than 
four units can pertain to vocational subjects. 

In addition to the above requirements, students must meet cer- 
tain other definite requirements in regard to health, age and per- 
sonal fitness for nursing work. 



100 SCHOOL OF NURSING 

The preferable age for students registering for the three-year 
course is 20 to 35 years, although students may be accepted at the 
age of 18. Women of superior education and culture are given 
preference, provided they meet the requirements in other particu- 
lars. If possible, a personal interview with the Director of the 
School should be arranged on Tuesday or Friday from 11 :00 
A.M.tol2:00M. 

Blank certificates will be furnished upon application to the 
Director of the School of Nursing, University of Maryland Hos- 
pital, Baltimore, Maryland. 

Registration With Maryland State Board of Examiners 
of Nurses: By regulation of the Maryland State Board of 
Examiners of Nurses, all students entering schools of nursing in 
Maryland must, at the beginning of their course, register with 
the Board in order to be eligible for examination and license on 
completion of this course. Blanks necessary for this purpose 
will be sent with application forms. A fee of $2 is charged for 
registration. 

The fitness of the applicant for the work and the propriety of 
dismissing or retaining her at the end of her term of probation 
are left to the decision of the Director of the School. Miscon- 
duct, disobedience, insubordination, inefficiency, or neglect of 
duty are causes for dismissal at any time by the President of the 
University. 

The requirements for admission to the five-year program of 
the School of Nursing are the same as for other colleges. (Spe- 
cial catalog will be sent upon request.) The three-year program 
is designed to meet the requirements for the diploma in Nursing 
and comprises the work of the first, second, and third hospital 
years. 

Admission to the School : Students for the spring term are 
admitted in February and those for the fall term in September or 
October, and the five-year course in September. 

Hours of Duty : During the preparatory period the students 
are engaged in class work for the first four months with no gen- 
eral duty in the hospital, and for the remainder of this period 
they are sent to the wards on eight-hour duty. During the first, 
second, and third years the students are on eight-hour day duty 
and nine-hour night duty, with six hours on holidays and Sun- 



SCHOOL OF NURSING 101 

days. The night-duty periods are approximately two months 
each, with one day at the termination of each term for rest and 
recreation. The period of night duty is approximately five to six 
months during the three years. 

The first four months of the preparatory period are devoted 
to theoretical instruction given entirely in the lecture and demon- 
stration rooms of the training school, hospital and medical school 
laboratories. The average number of hours per week in formal 
instruction, divided into lecture and laboratory periods, is 30 
hours, and includes courses in Anatomy, Physiology, Cookery and 
Nutrition, Dosage and Solution, Hygiene, Bacteriology, Chemis- 
try, Materia Medica, Practical Nursing, Bandaging, Ethics, and 
History of Nursing. During the last two months of the proba- 
tion period the students are placed on duty in the hospital wards 
for instruction in bedside nursing, and are expected to perform 
the duties assigned to them by the Director of the School. At the 
close of the first semester the students are required to pass satis- 
factorily both the written and practical tests. Failure to do so 
will be sufficient reason for terminating the course at this point. 

Sickness : A physician is in attendance each day, and when 
ill all students are cared for gratuitously. The time lost through 
illness in excess of two weeks, during the three years, must be 
made up. Should the authorities of the school decide that through 
the time lost the theoretical work has not been sufficiently cov- 
ered to permit the student to continue in that year, it will be nec- 
essary for her to continue her work with the next class. 

Vacations: Vacations are given between June and Septem- 
ber. A period of three weeks is allowed the student at the com- 
pletion of the first year, and four weeks at the completion of the 
second year. 

Expenses: A fee of $30.00, payable on entrance, is required 
from all students. This will not be returned. A student receives 
her board, lodging, and a reasonable amount of laundry from the 
date of entrance. During her period of probation she provides 
her own uniforms, obtained through the hospital at a nominal 
cost. After being accepted as a student nurse she wears the 
uniform supplied by the hospital. The student is also provided 
with text-oooks and shoes. Her personal expenses during the 
course of training and instruction will depend entirely upon her 
individual habits and tastes. 



102 SCHOOL OF NURSING 

FIVE-YEAR PROGRAM 

In addition to the regular three-year course of training, the 
University offers a combined Academic and Nursing program 
leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science and a Diploma in 
Nursing. 

The first two years of the course (or pre-hospital period) , con- 
sisting of 68 semester hours, are spent in the College of Arts and 
Sciences of the University, during which period the student has 
an introduction to the general cultural subjects which are consid- 
ered fundamental in any college training. At least the latter of 
these two years must be spent in residence at College Park, in 
order that the student may have her share in the social and cul- 
tural activities of college life. The last three years are spent in 
the School of Nursing in Baltimore. 

Degree and Diploma 

The degree of Bachelor of Science and the Diploma in Nursing 
are awarded to students who complete successfully the prescribed 
combined academic and nursing program. 

MERCY HOSPITAL SCHOOL OF NURSING 

The Mercy Hospital School of Nursing was established in 1899 
and incorporated under the laws of the State of Maryland in 
1901. It has developed the art of the profession according to 
the high standard requisite to qualify for Registered Nurse. 
Requirements for Admission. 

A candidate desiring to enter the School of Nursing should 
apply to the Superintendent of Nurses by letter or in person at 
least six weeks before the entrance date. It is preferred that 
she apply in person accompanied by her mother or guardian. If 
a personal interview is not possible, a written application may be 
submitted. 
Age. 

Candidates should be between the ages of eighteen and thirty- 
five years. 
Physique. 

Applicants should be of average height and good physique. 
Teeth and eyes should be attended to before entering the School, 



SCHOOL OF NURSING 103 

and tonsils removed if not in good condition. Every applicant 
is required to send in a certificate of health by her family physi- 
cian. A physical examination is also made by the school physi- 
cian during the preliminary period. 

Education. 

Applicants for admission should present at least high school 
certificate of graduation or its equivalent in educational values. 
The credits of preliminary education are fully accounted and the 
nurse who is the better qualified finds such a foundation more to 
her advantage as she progresses through the years of study. 

Calendar. 
Students are admitted September 1st and February 1st. 

Length of Course. 

The course of instruction covers three years. It is divided into 
a preliminary term of four months, a freshman term of eight 
months, a junior term of one year, and a senior term of one year 

Conditions of Acceptance. 

The Superintendent of Nurses decides as to the fitness for the 
work and the propriety of retaining or dismissing a student at 
the end of the term of probation or during its course. She may 
also, with the approval of the faculty, terminate the connection 
of a student with the School in any justifiable instance. At the 
end of the preliminary period, if the student's health, general 
education, and natural aptitude prove satisfactory to the Director 
of the School and the Sister Superior, she shall be appointed for 
enrollment as a student nurse. 

Expenses. 

An admission fee of fifty dollars is required from all students. 
This covers the cost of unforms and books required during the 
preliminary course. 

Should the student for any reason leave the school before com- 
pleting the course, this fee will not be returned, nor may she take 
with her any part of the equipment. 

After four months' probation, candidates, if they possess the 
necessary qualifications, are admitted to the School of Nursing 
proper. They receive ten dollars per month to help defray inci- 
dental expenses. No other compensation is given, the education 



104 SCHOOL OF NURSING 

received being considered sufficient return for service rendered. 
Board, laundry, etc., are furnished by the institution. 

Four weeks before admission candidates should forward the 
fifty-dollar entrance fee, and measurements for uniforms and 
aprons, which will be in readiness upon their arrival. No orders 
will be considered until this fee is received. 

THE FIVE-YEAR COURSE 

Leading to B.S. Degree and Diploma of Graduate Nurse 
The University of Maryland, in affiliation with the Mercy Hos- 
pital School of Nursing, offers a combined Academic and Nursing 
program. 

The completion of this course entitles the student to the degree 
of Bachelor of Science from the University of Maryland, and to 
the diploma of the Mercy Hospital School of Nursing. 

Graduate nurses who hold college degrees are greatly in de- 
mand, especially for positions in administration and teaching. 
This program consequently offers a distinct advantage. 

Outline of Course. 

Two years of this course (pre-nursing or post-nursing period) 
consisting of 70 semester hours are spent in the College of Arts 
and Sciences of the University, with the usual College vacations. 
At least the latter of these two years must be spent in residence 
at College Park in order that the student may have her share 
in the social and cultural activities of college life. 

Requirements for Admission. 

Students electing such a course must before entering the School 
of Nursing, satisfy the entrance requirements of the University 
of Maryland. Applicants must be personally adapted to profes- 
sional nursing. 

Fees and Other Expenses, 

During the two years which the students spend at College Park 
they maintain themselves, and pay their own College fees. (See 
University of Maryland bulletin.) 

Throughout the Nursing School Course the hospital provides 
without expense to the student maintenance and care during tem- 
porary illness. 



VOLUME XVII NUMBER 5 

BULLETIN 

OF THE 

SCHOOL of MEDICINE 

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

MAY, 1933 




PUBLISHED FIVE TIMES A YEAR 
(JANUARY, APRIL, MAY, JULY AND OCTOBER) 



Lombard and Greene Streets 
Baltimore, Md. 



Entered as second'dass matter June 16, 1916, at the Postomce at Baltimore, Maryland, 
under the Act of August 24, 1912. 



INDEX 



Page 

Alumni Association 96 

Annual Hospital Appointments 81 

Board of Regents 6 

Calendar 4 

Combined Course in Arts and Medi- 
cine 74 

Consolidation of Schools 14 

Curriculum, Organization of 38 

Anatomy 39 

Histology --. 40 

Embryology 40 

Neuro Anatomy 40 

Physiology - 42 

Bacteriology and Immunology 42 

Biological Chemistry 43 

Pharmacology and Materia Medica.... 43 

Pathology 44 

Medicine 46 

Clinical Pathology 49 

Gastro-Enterology 50 

Psychiatry 50 

Pediatrics 51 

Neurology 52 

Hygiene and Preventive Medicine 53 

Medical Jurisprudence 53 

Surgery 54 

Anaesthesia 57 

Dermatology 57 

Orthopaedic Surgery 58 

Roentgenology 58 

Diathermy and Radium Therapy 58 

at and Nose 59 

Genito-Urinary 60 

Colon and Rectum 60 

Bronchoscopy and Esophagoscopy 60 

Otology 61 

Neurological Surgery 61 

Oncology _ 62 

Obstetrics 62 

Gynecology 63 

Ophthalmology 63 

History of Medicine 65 

Dispensary Reports : 

Mercy Hospital 32 

University Hospital 24 



Page 
Clinical Facilities : 

Mercy Hospital 25 

University Hospital 17 

Dispensary Staffs : 

Mercy Hospital 30 

University Hospital 21 

Endowment Fund 97 

Expenses, Students 82 

Faculty of Physic 8 

Fees 75 

General Summary of Students 95 

Hospitals : 

James Lawrence Kernan 34 

Mercy Hospital 25 

Baltimore City Hospitals 33 

University Hospital 17 

St. Vincent's Infant Asylum 36 

Internships 85 

Libraries 37 

Matriculates _ 89 

Medical Care of Students 77 

Medical Council 7 

Prizes 78 

Requirements for Matriculation 71 

Rules 74 

Schedule _ 66 

Scholarships 78 

Staffs : 

Baltimore City Hospitals 33 

James Lawrence Kernan Hospital 34 

Mercy Hospital 26 

University Hospital 19 

Training Schools for Nurses : 

Mercy Hospital 103 

University Hospital 98 

University Council 6 

University of Maryland, Organization 

of 5 



BULLETIN 

OF THE 

University of Maryland School of Medicine 

AND 

College of Physicians and Surgeons 

Successor to The Hospital Bulletin of the University of 
Maryland, Baltimore Medical College News, and the Journal 
of the Alumni Association of the College of Physicians and 
Surgeons. 



VOL. XVII MAY, 1933 No. 5 



ANNUAL ANNOUNCEMENT 
SESSION 1933-34 



CALENDAR 

1933-34 

SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 

FIRST SEMESTER 

1933 

September 22, Friday — *Registration for first- and second-year students. 

September 23, Saturday — ^Registration for all other students. 

September 25, Monday — Instruction begins with the first scheduled period. 

September 30, Saturday — Late registration, with fine included, until noon 

this day. 
November 30, Thursday — Thanksgiving Day. Holiday. 
December 20, Wednesday — Christmas recess begins after the last scheduled 

period. 

1934 

January 2, Tuesday — Instruction resumed with the first scheduled period. 

January 27, Saturday — First semester ends after the last scheduled period. 

SECOND SEMESTER 

January 29, Monday — ^Registration for first- and second-year students. 

January 30, Tuesday — *Registration for all other students. 

January 30, Tuesday — Instruction begins with the first scheduled period for 

first and second-year students. 
January 31, Wednesday — Instruction begins with the first scheduled period 

for all other students. 
February 3, Saturday — Late registration, with fine included, until noon 

this day. 
February 22, Thursday — Washington's Birthday. Holiday. 
March 29, Thursday — Easter recess begins after the last scheduled period. 
April 3, Tuesday — Instruction resumed with the first scheduled period. 
June 6, Wednesday — Commencement. 



*A student who neglects or fails to register prior to or within the day or days specified 
for his or her school will be called upon to pay a fine of five dollars ($5.00). The last day 
of registration with fine added to regular fees is Saturday at noon of the week in which 
instruction begins following the specified registration period. (This rule may be waived only 
upon the written recommendation of the dean.) 

* The offices of the registrar and comptroller are open daily, not including Saturday, from 
9:00 A. M. to 5:00 P. M., and on Saturday from 9:00 A. M. to 12:30 P. M. On Saturday, 
September 23, 1933, the offices will remain open until 5:00 P. M. 

Advance registration is encouraged. 



ORGANIZATION 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



Control of the University of Maryland is vested in a Board of 
nine Regents, appointed by the Governor and confirmed by the 
Senate for terms of nine years each. The general administra- 
tion of the University is vested in the President. The University 
Council is an advisory body, composed of the President, the 
Vice-President, the Director of the Agricultural Experiment 
Station, the Director of the Extension Service, and the Deans. 
The University Council acts upon all matters having relation to 
the University as a whole or to cooperative work between the con- 
stituent groups. Each school has its own Faculty Council, com- 
posed of the Dean and members of its Faculty; each Faculty 
Council controls the internal affairs of the group it represents. 

The University has the following educational organization : 

The College of Agriculture, 

The College of Engineering, 

The College of Arts and Sciences, 

The School of Medicine, 

The School of Law, 

The School of Dentistry, 

The School of Pharmacy, 

The College of Education, 

The College of Home Economics, 

The Graduate School, 

The Summer School, 

The Department of Physical Education and Recreation. 

The Schools of Medicine, Law, Dentistry and Pharmacy are 
located in Baltimore ; the others in College Park, Maryland. 



BOARD OF REGENTS 

OF 

THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Samuel M. Shoemaker, Esq., Chairman Term expires 1942 

John M. Dennis, Esq., Treasurer _ Term expires 1941 

John E. Raine, Esq Term expires 1939 

C. C. Gelder, Esq. ....„ Term expires 1938 

Dr. W. W. Skinner, Secretary Term expires 1936 

Henry Holzapfel, Jr., Esq. Term expires 1934 

E. Brooke Lee, Esq _ Term expires 1935 

George M. Shriver, Esq _ Term expires 1933 

William P. Cole, Jr., Esq „ Term expires 1940 



Raymond A. Pearson, M.S., D.Agr., LL.D., President and Executive Officer 



THE UNIVERSITY COUNCIL 

Raymond A. Pearson, M.S., D.Agr., LL.D _ President 

H. C. Byrd, B. S -...- - Vice-President 

H. J. Patterson, D.Sc _..Dean of the College of Agriculture and 

Director of the Experiment Station 

A. N. Johnson, S.B., D.Eng Dean of the College of Engineering 

T. H. Taliaferro, C.E., Ph.D Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences 

Roger Howell, A.B., LL.D., Ph.D _ Dean of the School of Law 

J. M. H. Rowland, M.D Dean of the School of Medicine 

A. G. Du Mez, Ph.D Dean of the School of Pharmacy 

T. 0. Heatwole, M.D., D.D.S „ Secretary of the Baltimore Schools 

W. S. Small, Ph.D _ Dean of the College of Education 

M. Marie Mount, M.A..._ „ Dean of the College of Home Economics 

C. 0. Appleman, Ph.D. _ _ Dean of the Graduate School 

Thomas B. Symons, M.S., D.Agr Director of Extension Service 

J. Ben Robinson, D.D.S., F.A.C.D Dean of the School of Dentistry 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 
SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 

AND 

COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS AND 
SURGEONS 



MEDICAL COUNCIL 

ARTHUR M. SHIPLEY, M.D., Sc.D. 

WILLIAM S. GARDNER, M.D. 

STANDISH McCLEARY, M.D. 

JULIUS FRIEDENWALD, A.M., M.D. 

J. M. H. ROWLAND, M.D. 

ALEXIUS McGLANNAN, A.M., M.D., LL.D. 

HUGH R. SPENCER, M.D. 

H. BOYD WYLIE, M.D. 

CARL L. DAVIS, M.D. 

MAURICE C. PINCOFFS, B.S., M.D. 

FRANK W. HACHTEL, M.D. 

EDUARD UHLENHUTH, Ph.D. 

CLYDE A. CLAPP, M.D. 
JOHN C. KRANTZ, Jr., Ph.D. 



FACULTY OF PHYSIC 

Randolph Winslow, A.M., M.D., LL.D Professor Emeritus of Surgery 

Samuel K. Merrick, M.D., 

Professor Emeritus of Rhinology and Laryngology 
J. Frank Crouch, M.D., 

Professor Emeritus of Clinical Ophthalmology and Otology 
John R. Winslow, A.B., M.D., 

Professor Emeritus of Rhinology and Laryngology 

L. E. Neale, M.D., LL.D _ Professor Emeritus of Obstetrics 

Frank Dyer Sanger, M.D., 

Professor Emeritus of Rhinology and Laryngology 
Harry Friedenwald, A.B., M.D Professor Emeritus of Ophthalmology 



BOARD OF INSTRUCTION 

Arthur M. Shipley, M.D., Sc.D., Professor of Surgery. 

William S. Gardner, M.D., Professor of Gynecology. 

Standish McCleary, M.D., Professor of Pathology and Clinical Medicine. 

Julius Friedenwald, A.M., M.D., Professor of Gastro-Enterology. 

J. M. H. Rowland, M.D., Professor of Obstetrics and Dean of the Faculty. 

Alexius McGlannan, A.M., M.D., LL.D., Professor of Surgery. 

Hugh R. Spencer, M.D., Professor of Pathology. 

H. Boyd Wylie, M.D., Professor of Biological Chemistry. 

Carl L. Davis, M.D., Professor of Anatomy. 

Maurice C. Pincoffs, B.S., M.D., Professor of Medicine. 

Frank W. Hachtel, M.D., Professor of Bacteriology. 

Clyde A. Clapp, M.D., Professor of Ophthalmology. 

Jonh C. Krantz, Jr., Ph.D., Professor of Pharmacology. 

Eduard Uhlenhuth, Ph.D., Professor of Anatomy. 

William H. Schultz, Ph.B., Ph.D., Research Professor of Pharmacology. 

G. Milton Linthicum, A.M., M.D., Professor of Diseases of the Rectum 

and Colon. 
Joseph E. Gichner, M.D., Professor of Clinical Medicine and Physical 

Therapeutics. 
Irving J. Spear, M.D., Professor of Neurology. 
John Ruhrah, M.D., Professor of Pediatrics. 
Charles F. Blake, A.M., M.D., Professor of Proctology. 
S. Griffith Davis, A.B., M.D., Professor of Anaesthesia. 
G. Carroll Lockard, M.D., Professor of Clinical Medicine. 
Harvey G. Beck, M.D., Sc.D., Professor of Clinical Medicine. 
Albertus Cotton, A.M., M.D., Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery and 

Roentgenology. 
Andrew C. Gillis, A.M., M.D., LL.D., Professor of Neurology. 
Henry J. Walton, M.D., Professor of Roentgenology. 

8 



FACULTY OF PHYSIC 9 

R. M. Chapman, M.D., Professor of Psychiatry. 

John Rathbone Oliver, A.B., M.D., Ph.D., Professor of the History of 

Medicine. 
L. H. Douglass, M.D., Professor of Clinical Obstetrics. 
Edgar B. Friedenwald, M.D., Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. 
Edward A. Looper, M.D., D.Oph., Professor of Diseases of the Nose and 

Throat. 
C. Loring Joslin, M.D., Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. 
Melvin Rosenthal, M.D., Professor of Dermatology. 
J. W. Downey, M.D., Professor of Otology. 
Hugh Brent, M.D., Professor of Clinical Gynecology. 
Harry M. Stein, M.D., Professor of Clinical Medicine. 
W. H. Toulson, A.B., M.Sc, M.D., Professor of Genito-Urinary Surgery. 
Charles Bagley, A.B., M.D., Professor of Neurological Surgery. 
Allen Fiske Voshell, A.B., M.D., Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery. 
Nathan Winslow, A.M., M.D., Professor of Clinical Surgery. 
Page Edmunds, M.D., Professor of Traumatic Surgery. 
Walter D. Wise, M.D., Professor of Clinical Surgery. 
Frank S. Lynn, M.D., Professor of Clinical Surgery. 
Elliott H. Hutchins, A.M., M.D., Professor of Clinical Surgery. 
Charles Reid Edwards, M.D., Professor of Clinical Surgery. 
Harry M. Robinson, M.D., Professor of Clinical Dermatology. 

F. L. Jennings, M.D., Professor of Clinical Surgery. 

Compton Riely, M.D., Clinical Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery. 

W. S. Smith, M.D., Clinical Professor of Gynecology. 

T. Fred Leitz, M.D., Clinical Professor of Gastro-Enterology. 

M. Randolph Kahn, M.D., Clinical Professor of Ophthalmology. 

Waitman F. Zinn, M.D., Clinical Professor of Diseases of the Nose and 

Throat. 
J. Dawson Reeder, M.D., Clinical Professor of Diseases of the Colon and 

Rectum. 
A. J. Gillis, M.D., Clinical Professor of Genito-Urinary Diseases. 
R. W. Locher, M.D., Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery. 
Sydney M. Cone, A.B., M.D., Associate Professor of Pathology. 
Abram S. Samuels, M.D., Associate Professor of Gynecology. 
H. J. Maldeis, M.D., Associate Professor of Medical Jurisprudence. 

G. M. Settle, A.B., M.D., Associate Professor of Neurology and Clinical 

Medicine. 
C. C. W. Judd, A.B., M.D., Associate Professor of Medicine. 
Thomas R. Chambers, A.M., M.D., Associate Professor of Surgery. 
William H. Smith, M.D., Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine. 
Paul W. Clough, B.S., M.D., Associate Professor of Medicine. 
Sydney R. Miller, A.B., M.D., Associate Professor of Medicine. 
J. McFarland Bergland, M.D., Associate Professor of Obstetrics. 
Walter A. Baetjer, A.B., M.D., Associate Professor of Medicine. 
A. M. Evans, M.D., Associate Professor of Surgery. 
Ferd. A. Ries, M.D., Associate Professor of Physiology. 



10 FACULTY OF PHYSIC 

J. Harry Ullrich, M.D., Associate Professor of Gastro-Enterology. 
Theodore H. Morrison, M.D., Associate Professor of Gastro-Enterology. 
Edward S. Johnson, M.D., Associate Professor of Surgery. 
H. K. Fleck, M.D., Associate Professor of Ophthalmology. 
Emil Novak, M.D., Associate Professor of Obstetrics. 
Charles C. Habliston, M.D., Associate Professor of Medicine. 
Ralph P. Truitt, M.D., Associate Professor of Psychiatry. 

D. J. Pessagno, M.D., Associate Professor of Surgery. 

Moses Gellman, B.S., M.D., Associate Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery. 
Harry L. Rogers, M.D., Associate Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery. 
S. Lloyd Johnson, A.B., LL.B., M.D., Assistant Professor of Medicine. 
John G. Huck, M.D., Assistant Professor of Medicine. 
George McLean, M.D., Assistant Professor of Medicine. 
Maurice Feldman, M.D., Assistant Professor of Gastro-Enterology. 
Robert B. Wright, M.D., Assistant Professor of Pathology. 
L. A. M. Krause, M.D., Assistant Professor of Medicine. 
H. R. Peters, M.D., Assistant Professor of Medicine. 
Milford Levy, M.D., Assistant Professor of Neurology. 
John H. Traband, M.D., Assistant Professor of Pediatrics. 
Clarence E. Macke, M.D., Assistant Professor of Pediatrics. 
Albert Jaffe, M.D., Assistant Professor of Pediatrics. 
0. G. Harne, A.B., Assistant Professor of Physiology. 

Thomas B. Aycock, B.S., M.D., Assistant Professor of Anatomy and Asso- 
ciate in Surgery. 
Jonas Friedenw ald, A.B., M.D., Lecturer in Ophthalmic Pathology. 
John R. Abercrombie, A.B., M.D., Associate in Dermatology. 

E. H. Hayward, M.D., Associate in Surgery. 
George A. Strauss, Jr., M.D., Associate in Gynecology. 
Joseph I. Kemler, M.D., Associate in Ophthalmology. 
R. G. Willse, M.D., Associate in Gynecology. 

Frank N. Ogden, M.D., Associate in Biological Chemistry. 

E. P. Smith, M.D., Associate in Obstetrics. 

Thomas K. Galvin, M.D., Associate in Gynecology. 

Franklin B. Anderson, M.D., Associate in Diseases of the Nose and Throat 

and Otology. 
C. A. Reifschneider, M.D., Associate in Surgery. 
Austin H. Wood, M.D., Associate in Genito-Urinary Surgery. 
Albert E. Goldstein, M.D., Associate in Pathology. 

H. M. Bubert, M.D., Associate in Medicine and Assistant in Bacterio'ogy. 
Zachariah Morgan, M.D., Associate in Gastro-Enterology. 
J. Mason Hundley, Jr., M.A., M.D., Associate in Gynecology. 
Leo Brady, M.D., Associate in Gynecology. 
J. G. M. Reese, M.D., Associate in Obstretics. 

M. A. Novey, A.B., M.D., Associate in Obstetrics and Instructor in Pathology. 
W. S. Love, Jr., A.B., M.D., Associate in Medicine and Instructor in 

Pathology. 
Leon Freedom, M.D., Associate in Neurology and Instructor in Pathology. 



FACULTY OF PHYSIC 11 

Samuel S. Glick, M.D., Associate in Pediatrics. 

Emil G. Schmidt, Ph.D., Associate in Biological Chemistry. 

C. F. Horine, M.D., Associate in Surgery. 

W. J. Todd, M.D., Associate in Pediatrics. 

William G. Geyer, M.D., Associate in Pediatrics. 

Clewell Howell, M.D., Associate in Pediatrics. 

Walter C. Merkel, M.D., Associate in Pathology. 

John G. Murray, Jr., M.D., Associate in Obstetrics. 

Monte Edwards, M.D., Associate in Surgery, Anatomy and Diseases of the 

Colon and Rectum. 
Lewis B. Hill, M.D., Associate in Psychiatry. 
Joseph Sindler, M.D., Associate in Gastro-Enterology. 
John F. Lutz, M.D., Associate in Histology. 
Isadore A. Siegel, A.B., M.D., Associate in Obstetrics. 
C. Gardner Warner, M.D., Associate in Pathology. 
H. F. Bongardt, M.D., Associate in Surgery. 
I. O. Ridgley, M.D., Associate in Surgery. 
R. D. West, M.D., Associate in Ophthalmology. 
Frederick B. Dart, M.D., Associate in Pediatrics. 
A. H. Finkelstein, M.D., Associate in Pediatrics. 
Eugene L. Flippin, M.D., Associate in Roentgenology. 
Richard G. Coblentz, M.D., Associate in Neurological Surgery. 
J. S. Eastland, M.D., Associate in Medicine. 
Thomas C. Wolff, M.D., Associate in Medicine. 
N. Clyde Marvel, M.D., Associate in Surgery. 
L. J. Millan, M.D., Associate in Genito-Urinary Surgery. 
R. F. McKenzie, M.D., Associate in Diseases of the Nose and Throat. 
T. Nelson Carey, M.D., Associate in Medicine and Physician in Charge of 

Medical Care of Students. 
K. D. Legge, M.D., Associate in Genito-Urinary Surgery. 

E. P. H. Harrison, A.B., M.D., Associate in Obstetrics. 
Henry F. Buettner, M.D., Instructor in Bacteriology. 
J. A. F. Pfeiffer, M.D., Instructor in Bacteriology. 
Harry Goldsmith, M.D., Instructor in Psychiatry. 

L. K. Fargo, M.D., Instructor in Genito-Urinary Surgery. 
M. Koppelman, M.D., Instructor in Gastro-Enterology. 

F. Stratner Orem, M.D., Instructor in Pediatrics. 
M. G. Gichner, M.D., Instructor in Medicine. 

M. G. Tull, M.D., Instructor in Hygiene and Public Health. 

William A. Strauss, M.D., Instructor in Medicine. 

W. R. Johnson, M.D., Instructor in Surgery and Pathology. 

E. M. Hanrahan, A.B., M.D., Instructor in Surgery. 

R. M. Hening, M.D., Instructor in Pediatrics. 

Marie Kovner, M.D., Instructor in Pediatrics. 

Wetherbee Fort, M.D., Instructor in Medicine. 

Henry Sheppard, M.D., Instructor in Medicine. 

Francis Ellis, A.B., M.©., Instructor in Dermatology. 



12 FACULTY OF PHYSIC 

Ruth Musser, B.A., M.S., Instructor in Pharmacology. 

Benjamin Abeshouse, M.D., Instructor in Pathology. 

Frank H. Figge, B.S., Instructor in Anatomy. 

Joseph Pokorney, M.D., Instructor in Histology. 

Jaroslav Hulla, B.S., M.D., Instructor in Histology. 

M. Harold Goodman, M.D., Instructor in Dermatology and Pathology. 

A. C. Monninger, M.D., Instructor in Dermatology. 

Henry F. Graff, A.B., M.D., Instructor in Ophthalmology. 

S. Demarco, M.D., Instructor in Surgery. 

Karl J. Steinmueller, A.B., M.D., Instructor in Surgery. 

H. S. Rubinstein, B.S., M.D., Instructor in Anatomy and Assistant in 
Neurology. 

Frank J. Geraghty, M.D., Instructor in Pathology and Medicine. 

William Ellsworth Evans, M.S., Instructor in Pharmacology. 

Frank A. Pacienza, M.D., Instructor in Refraction. 

Samuel Morrison, M.D., Instructor in Gastro-Enterology. 

Henry C. Smith, M.D., Instructor in Medicine. 

L. P. Gundry, M.D., Instructor in Medicine. 

Samuel T. Helms, M.D., Instructor in Medicine and Genito-Urinary Surgery 
and Assistant in Pediatrics. 

Elizabeth Sherman, M.D., Instructor in Pediatrics. 

W. W. Walker, M.D., Instructor in Surgery. 

J. J. Leyko, M.D., Instructor in Surgery. 

William R. Geraghty, M.D., Instructor in Neurological Surgery and Assis- 
tant in Surgery. 

Thomas R. O'Rourk, M.D., Instructor in Diseases of the Nose and Throat 
and Assistant in Ophthalmology. 

George H. Yeager, B.S., M.D., Instructor in Anaesthesia. 

Grant E. Ward, A.B., M.D., Instructor in Surgery. 

William G. Queen, M.D., Instructor in Pediatrics. 

F. A. Holden, M.D., Instructor in Opththalmology and Otology. 

Frank K. Morris, A.B., M.D., Instructor in Anatomy and Assistant in 
Surgery. 

Frederick Smith, M.D., Instructor in Pediatrics. 

Christopher C. Shaw, M.D., Instructor in Pathology. 

Charles J. Farinacci, M.D., Instructor in Pathology. 

Dwight Mohr, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

J. G. Onnen, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

H. B. McElwain, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

Robert W. Johnson, M.D., Assistant in Pathology and Surgery. 

A. V. Buchness, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

Z. Vance Hooper, M.D., Assistant in Gastro-Enterology. 

Ruth C. Vanden Bosche, B.S., Assistant in Biological Chemistry. 

T. J. Touhey, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

Nathaniel Beck, M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 

Carl Benson, M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 

A. Scagnetti, M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 



FACULTY OF PHYSIC 13 

Bernard J. Cohen, M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 

I. H. Maseritz, M.D., Assistant in Orthopaedic Surgery. 

W. J. Schmitz, M.D., Assistant in Pediatrics. 

M.Paul Byerly, M.D., Assistant in Pediatrics and Medicine. 

H. Edmund Levin, M.D., Assistant in Bacteriology and Medicine. 

John G. Runkle, M.D., Assistant in Ophthalmology. 

Margaret B. Ballard, M.D., Assistant in Obstetrics. 

E. S. Edlavitch, M.D., Assistant in Gynecology and Obstetrics. 

Birckhead McGowan, M.D., Assistant in Diseases of the Nose and Throat 

and Otology. 
J. G. Benesunes, M.D., Assistant in Orthopaedic Surgery. 
Clyde F. Karns, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 
Paul Schenker, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 
Elizabeth E. Painter, A.B., Assistant in Physiology. 
Harry A. Rutledge, M.D., Assistant in Pediatrics. 
S. Kendig Wallace, M.D., Assistant in Pediatrics. 
Morris Fine, M.D., Assistant in Medicine and Pediatrics. 
Samuel H. Culver, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 
J. Willis Guyton, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 
J. Howard Burns, M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 
Luther E. Little, M.D., Assistant in Surgery and Anatomy. 
Benjamin S. Rich, M.D., Assistant in Otology. 
C. Victor Richards, M.D., Assistant in Gastro-Enterology. 
W. H. Triplett, M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 
David Tenner, M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 
Earl L. Chambers, M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 
Lawrence Serra, M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 
J. G. Feman, M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 
E. M. Reese, M.S., Assistant in Medicine. 

H. William Primakoff, M.D., Assistant in Gastro-Enterology. 
Frederick Wolf, M.D., Assistant in Neurology. 
William N. McFaul, Jr., M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 
Simon H. Brager, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 
C. W. Peake, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 
E. Hollister Davis, A.B., M.D., Assistant in Anaesthesia. 
J. Frank Hewitt, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 
James C. Owings, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 
Samuel A. Vest, M.D., Assistant in Pathology. 
James G. Arnold, M.D., Assistant in Pathology. 
Kenneth B. Boyd, M.D., Assistant in Obstetrics. 
George L. Wissig, M.D., Assistant in Obstetrics. 



University of Maryland School of Medicine 

AND 

College of Physicians and Surgeons 

As a result of the merger accomplished in 1915 the combined 
schools offer the student the abundant resources of both institu- 
tions, and, in addition, by earlier combination with the Baltimore 
Medical College, the entire equipment of three large medical 
colleges. 

The School of Medicine of the University of Maryland is one of 
the oldest foundations for medical education in America, ranking 
fifth in point of age among the medical colleges of the United 
States. It was organized in 1807, and chartered in 1808, under 
the name of the College of Medicine of Maryland, and its first 
class was graduated in 1810. In 1812 the College was empowered 
by the Legislature to annex three other colleges or faculties: 
Divinity, Law, and Arts and Sciences ; and the four colleges thus 
united were "constituted an University by the name and under 
the title of the University of Maryland." 

Established thus for more than a century, the School of Medi- 
cine of the University of Maryland has always been a leading 
medical college, especially prominent in the South and widely 
known and highly honored throughout the country. 

The beautiful college building at Lombard and Greene Streets, 
erected in 1812, is the oldest structure in America devoted to 
medical teaching. Here was founded one of the first medical 
libraries and the first medical college library in the United States. 

Here for the first time in America dissecting was made a com- 
pulsory part of the curriculum ; here instruction in Dentistry was 
first given (1837) and here were first installed independent chairs 
for the teaching of Diseases of Women and Children (1867), and 
of Eye and Ear Diseases (1873). 

The School of Medicine was one of the first to provide for ade- 
quate clinical instruction by the erection in 1823 of its own hos- 
pital, and in this hospital intramural residency for the senior 
student was first established. 

14 



ORGANIZATION 15 

In 1913, juncture was brought about with the Baltimore Medi- 
cal College, an institution of thirty-two years' growth. By this 
association the facilities of the School of Medicine were enlarged 
in faculty, equipment and hospital connection. 

The College of Physicians and Surgeons was incorporated in 
1872, and established on Hanover Street in a building afterwards 
known as the Maternite, the first obstetrical hospital in Mary- 
land. In 1878 union was affected with the Washington Univer- 
sity School of Medicine, in existence since 1827, and the college 
was removed to its present location at Calvert and Saratoga 
streets. By this arrangement medical control of the City Hos- 
pital, now the Mercy Hospital, was obtained, and on this founda- 
tion in 1899 the present admirable college building was erected. 



ORGANIZATION OF THE SCHOOL OF 
MEDICINE 



LABORATORY AND CLINICAL FACILITIES 
The Laboratories 

The laboratories are located at two centers, the group of build- 
ings at Greene and Lombard Streets, and at 32 and 34 South 
Paca Street. The schedule is so adjusted that the laboratory 
periods are placed with a view of obviating unnecessary move- 
ment on the part of the classes. The building known as Gray 
Laboratory, at Greene and Lombard Streets, houses three depart- 
ments. The Anatomical Laboratory is placed upon the top floor, 
where skylights and an auxiliary modern system of electric light- 
ing give adequate illumination of the subjects. The Depart- 
ment of Pharmacology occupies the second floor. There is 
a large room for the general student laboratory, which is 
thoroughly equipped with apparatus of recent acquisition, and in 
addition contains many instruments of unique and original de- 
sign. With office and stockroom adjoining, this laboratory is 
complete for student experimentation. On the first floor of Gray 
Laboratory is the Department of Physiology. In addition to the 



16 ORGANIZATION 

large student laboratory, which is constructed for groups of 
fifty-eight students, there are rooms for the departmental office, 
preparation of material, and storage of apparatus. An additional 
room is devoted exclusively to mammalian experiments. In this 
building there is maintained an animal room where is kept an 
abundance of material for experimental purposes. The embalm- 
ing and storage plant for the Department of Anatomy is in physi- 
cal connection with the building and its special departments. The 
laboratories of physiology and pharmacology are completely 
equipped with apparatus lockers, so that, in accord with the best 
ideas of instruction, the students work in groups of two each, and 
each group has sufficient apparatus, so that the experimental 
work can be carried on without delay or recourse to a general 
stockroom. 

The laboratories of Pathology, Bacteriology, Biochemistry and 
Clinical Pathology are located in the Medical laboratory build- 
ing on Greene Street north of Lombard. 

The Departments of Pathology, Bacteriology and Clinical Path- 
ology use, conjointly, the large modernly equipped student labora- 
tory on the second floor. The capacity is one hundred students. 
On the second floor also there are students' preparation rooms 
for the making and sterilization of media, cold storage and incu- 
bating rooms and research laboratories for the departments of 
Bacteriology and Clinical Pathology. 

On the main floor of this building are the offices, library, re- 
search and technical rooms of the Departments of Pathology and 
Bacteriology. The Department of Art also occupies quarters on 
this floor. The basement is given over to teaching museums, 
store rooms, students' locker room and lavatories. 

The Department of Biological Chemistry is housed on the top 
floor of this building. The space allotted to teaching includes a 
large student laboratory equipped with one hundred and thirty- 
two commodious locker units, supplied with gas, hot and cold 
water, vacuum and direct current service, a special apparatus 
room, a warm room, a colorimeter room, a balance room, a first- 
aid room and a stockroom. These rooms are appointed with mod- 
ern laboratory furniture and apparatus, a constant temperature 
and ventilating system, and equipped and arranged for economic 
use of the students' time. 



CLINICAL FACILITIES 17 

Adjoining the students' space are private offices and labora- 
tories of the staff, a departmental library, a shop and a prepara- 
tion room. 

In the Main Building is the Museum of Anatomy, where are 
arranged for student reference, specimens which represent the 
careful selection of material over a period of many years. In the 
University Hospital is the Student Laboratory for the analytical 
studies by those students who are serving as clinical clerks on the 
wards. A similar laboratory is maintained in the building at the 
northwest corner of Saratoga and Calvert Streets, for the student 
work on the wards of the Mercy Hospital. 

At 32 and 34 South Paca Street are the Laboratories of His- 
tology and Embryology. These laboratories accommodate one 
hundred and twenty-five students, or the full class, and are 
equipped with necessary lockers for microscopes and apparatus. 
The department housed in this building is provided with indi- 
vidual offices, preparation and stockrooms. 

Clinical Facilities 
UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL 

The University Hospital, which is the property of the Univer- 
sity of Maryland, is the oldest institution for the care of the sick 
in the State of Maryland. It was opened in September, 1823, 
under the name of the Baltimore Infirmary, and at that time 
consisted of but four wards, one of which was reserved for eye 
patients. 

The present hospital has a capacity of two hundred and fifty 
beds, devoted to general medicine, surgery, obstetrics and the 
various medical and surgical specialties. It is equipped with a 
thoroughly modern X-ray department and clinical laboratory, and 
a post-mortem building which is constructed with special refer- 
ence to the instruction of students in pathological anatomy. 

The hospital is situated opposite the medical school buildings, 
so that the students lose no time in passing from the lecture halls 
and laboratories to the clinical amphitheater, dispensary and 
wards. 

Owing to its situation, adjacent to the largest manufac- 
turing district of the city and the shipping district, large numbers 



18 CLINICAL FACILITIES 

of accident patients are received. These, combined with a large 
number of sick seamen and with patients from our own city, fur- 
nish a large amount of clinical material. Accommodations for 
twenty-five obstetrical patients are provided in the hospital for 
the purpose of furnishing actual obstetrical experience to each 
member of the graduating class. 

In connection with the University Hospital an outdoor obstet- 
rical clinic is conducted, in which every patient is given careful 
prenatal supervision, is attended during labor by a senior student, 
supervised by a hospital physician and assisted by a graduate 
nurse, and is visited during the puerperium by the attending stu- 
dent and graduate nurse. Careful prenatal, labor and puerperal 
records are kept, making this work of extreme value to the medi- 
cal student, not only from the obstetrical standpoint, but also 
helping him to appreciate the value of social service and public 
health work. 

During the year ending December 31, 1932, 406 cases were 
delivered in the hospital and 1,303 cases in the outdoor depart- 
ment. Students in the graduating class delivered or observed an 
average of fourteen cases, each student being required to deliver 
twelve cases. 

The dispensaries associated with the University Hospital and 
the Mercy Hospital are organized upon a uniform plan in order 
that the teaching may be the same in each. Each dispensary has 
the following departments : Medicine, Surgery, Obstetrics, Pedi- 
atrics, Eye and Ear, Genito-Urinary, Gynecology, Gastroenter- 
ology, Neurology, Orthopaedics, Proctology, Dermatology, Throat 
and Nose, Tuberculosis and Psychiatry. 

All students in their junior year work in the departments of 
Medicine and Surgery each day in one of the dispensaries. 

All students in their senior year work in the special depart- 
ments one hour each day. 



UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL STAFF 19 

HOSPITAL COUNCIL 

Raymond A. Pearson, M.S., D.Agr., LL.D., President. 

Samuel M. Shoemaker, Esq., President of the Board of Regents. 

J. M. H. Rowland, M.D., Dean of the School of Medicine. 

M. C. Pincoffs, B.S.,M.D., Head of the Department of Medicine. 

A. M. Shipley, M.D., Sc.D., Head of the Department of Surgery. 

A. J. Lomas, M.D., CM., D.P.H., Superintendent of the Hospital. 

Miss Annie Crighton, R.N., Superintendent of Nurses. 

G. M. Shriver, Esq. 

W. B. Brooks, Esq. 

Miss Florence Sadtler, Representing Woman's Auxiliary Board. 

Representing Hospital Staff 
Page Edmunds, M.D. C. Reid Edwards, M.D. 

Representing Medical Alumni 
George Sargent, M.D. Frank Keating, M.D. 

UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL STAFF 
Superintendent of the Hospital, A. J. Lomas, M.D., CM., D. P. H. 

Physicians 

Maurice C Pincoffs, B.S., M.D. 
Harry M. Stein, M.D. G. Carroll Lockard, M.D. 

Walter A. Baetjer, M.D. Joseph E. Gichner, M.D. 

C C. Habliston, M.D. William H. Smith, M.D. 

L. A. M. Krause, M.D. William S. Love, Jr., M.D. 

Gastro-Enterologists 

Julius Friedenwald, A.M., M.D. 

J. Harry Ullrich, M.D. Theodore H. Morrison, M.D. 

Neurologist 
Irving J. Spear, M.D. 

Psychiatrist 
R. M. Chapman, M.D. 

Pediatricians 

C Loring Joslin, M.D. 

Clarence E. Macke, M.D. Albert Jaffe, M.D. 

Pathologists 
Hugh R. Spencer, M.D. S. Lloyd Johnson, M.D. 



20 UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL STAFF 

Surgeons 

Randolph Winslow, A.M., M.D., LL.D. Arthur M. Shipley, M.D., Sc.D 

Nathan Winslow, M.D. Page Edmunds, M.D. 

Charles Reid Edwards, M.D. Frank S. Lynn, M.D. 

Larijngolo gists 
Edward A. Looper, M.D. Franklin B. Anderson, M.D. 

Proctologists 
G. Milton Linthicum, A.M., M.D. J. Dawson Reeder, M.D. 

Monte Edwards, M.D. 

Orthopaedic Surgeons 

Allen Fiske Voshell, A.B., M.D. Compton Riely, M.D. 

Moses Gellman, B.S., M.D. 

Genito-lJrinary Surgeons 
W. H. Toulson, A.B., M.Sc, M.D. Lyle J. Millan, M.D. 

Roentgenologists 
Henry J. Walton, M.D. Eugene L. Flippin, M.D. 

Dermatologists 
Melvin S. Rosenthal, M.D. Harry M. Robinson, M.D. 

Broncho sco pist 
Edward A. Looper, M.D. 

Anaesthetists 
S. Griffith Davis, M.D. George H. Yeager, B.S., M.D. 

E. Hollister Davis, M.D. Mary J. O'Brien, R.N. 

Obstetricians 
J. M. H. Rowland, M.D. L. H. Douglass, M.D. 

M. A. Novey, A.B., M.D. J. G. M. Reese, M.D. 

Isador A. Siegel, A.B., M.D. E. P. H. Harrison, Jr., A.B., M.D. 

Ophthahnolo gists 
Clyde A. Clapp, M.D. William Tarun, M.D. 

Otologist 
J. W. Downey, Jr., M.D. 

Gynecologists 

W. S. Gardner, M.D. Hugh Brent, M.D. 

J. M. Hundley, Jr., M.D. R. G. Willse, M.D. 

Leo Brady, M.D. Thos. K. Galvin, M.D. 



UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL STAFF 



21 



UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL RESIDENT AND INTERN STAFF 

1933-1934 

RESIDENT STAFF 



Resident in Surgery 
Assistant Resident in Surgery 
Assistant Resident in Surgery 
Assistant Resident in Surgery 
Assistant Resident in Surgery 
Resident in Nose and Throat 
Resident in Medicine 
Assistant Resident in Medicine 
Assistant Resident in Medicine 
Assistant Resident in Medicine 
Resident in Obstetrics 
Assistant Resident in Obstetrics 
Resident in Gynecology 
Resident in Roentgenology 



EMIL J. C. HlLDEBRAND. M.D. 

Frank Wilson, Jr., M.D. 

Harry C. Hull, Jr., M.D. 

R. Richard Louft, M.D. 

C. Richard Ahroon, Jr., M.D. 

Marion Butler Roberts, M.D. 

Harry Vernon Langeluttig, M.D. 

Milford Harsh Sprecher, M.D. 

J. Francis Warren, M.D. 

Herbert P. Lenton, M.D. 

Bernard W. Donohue, M.D. 

John Edward Savage, M.D. 

Harry S. Shelley, M.D. 

Ervin F. Lyon, M.D. 



INTERN STAFF 



George S. Baker, M.D. 
A. E. Barnhardt, M.D. 
Harry D. Bowman, M.D. 
Manuel Espinosa, M.D. 
Haskell W. Fox, M.D. 
Lauriston L. Keown, M.D. 



James I. Moore, M.D. 

Jose Teodoro Pico, M.D. 

Howard Stackhouse, M.D. 

Clifford M. Taylor, M.D. 

John L. Van Metre, M.D. 

Samuel Eason Way, M.D. 



S. C. Feldman, M.D. 



M. A. Fine, M.D. 



UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL DISPENSARY STAFF 

Medicine 

L. A. M. Krause, M.D., Chief of Clinic 

J. G. Feman, M.D. 



Z. Vance Hooper, M.D. 



W. H. Triplett, M.D. 



Joseph Sindler, M.D. 

Z. Morgan, M.D. 

C. Victor Richards, M.D 



Diseases of the Stomach and Intestines 
J. H. Ullrich, Ph.G., M.D., Chief of Clinic 



M. S. Koppelman, M.D. 
Z. Vance Hooper, M.D. 
Samuel Morrison, M.D, 



Neurology 

Irving J. Spear, M.D., Professor of Neurology 

G. M. Settle, M.D., Associate Professor of Neurology 

Leon Freedom, M.D., Chief of Clinic 

H. S. Rubinstein, M.D., Chief of Clinic 



22 UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL DISPENSARY STAFF 

Mental Hygiene 

Ralph P. Truitt, M.D., Director 

H. W. Newell, M.D. 

Diseases of the Lungs 

C. C. Habliston, M.D., Chief of Clinic 

H. C. Smith, M.D. 

Diseases of Metabolism 

H. M. Stein, M.D., Chief of Clinic 

L. P. Gundry, M.D. 

Cardiovascular Diseases 

William S. Love, Jr., M.D., Chief of Clinic 

Samuel J. Hankin, M.D. Frank J. Geraghty, M.D. 

Allergy Clinic 
H. M. Bubert, M.D., Chief of Clinic 

Pediatrics 

C. Loring Joslin, M.D., Professor of Clinical Pediatrics 

John H. Traband, M.D., Chief of Clinic 

Clarence E. Macke, M.D., Chief of Clinic 

Albert Jaffe, M.D. Elizabeth S. Sherman, M.D. 

William J. Todd, M.D. A. H. Finkelstein, M.D. 

F. Stratner Orem, M.D. M. Paul Byerly, M.D. 

William G. Geyer, M.D. Morris A. Fine, M.D. 

R. M. Hening, M.D. William G. Queen, M.D. 

Marie Kovner, M.D. Harry A. Rutledge, M.D. 

Clewell Howell, M.D. S. Kendig Wallace, M.D. 

Samuel S. Glick, M.D. Samuel T. Helms, M.D. 

Surgery 
Charles Reid Edwards, M.D., Chief of Clinic 

J. Willis Guyton, M.D. C. F. Karns, M.D. 

Thomas B. Aycock, M.D. A. C. Monninger, M.D. 

E. S. Johnson, M.D. W. W. Walker, M.D. 

W. R. Johnson, M.D. A. V. Buchness, M.D. 

J. Frank Hewitt, M.D. W. N. McFaul, Jr., M.D. 

Jas. C. Owings, M.D. Geo. H. Yaeger, M.D. 

Luther E. Little, M.D. C. W. Peake, M.D. 

Ortfwpaedic Surgery 

Allen Fiske Voshell, A.B., M.D., Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery 

Moses Gellman, B.S., M.D. I. H. Maseritz, M.D. 

J. G. Benesunes, M.D. 



UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL DISPENSARY STAFF 23 

Genito- Urinary 

W. H. Toulson, M.D., Chief of Clinic 

Samuel T. Helms, M.D. Milton C. Lang, M.D. 

L. K. Fargo, M.D. Lyle J. Millan, M.D. 

Roentgenology 

Henry J. Walton, M.D., Chief of Clinic 

Eugene L. Flippin, M.D. 

Dermatology 

H. M. Robinson, M.D., Chief of Clinic 

M. H. Goodman, M.D. Francis Ellis, M.D. 

A. C. Monninger, M.D. 

Nose and Throat 

Edward A. Looper, M.D., Professor of Diseases of the Nose and Throat 

Franklin B. Anderson, M.D., Chief of Clinic 

Thomas R. O'Rourk, M.D. Birckhead McGowan, M.D. 

Joseph Nurkin, M.D. Benjamin S. Rich, M.D. 

Colon and Rectum 
Monte Edwards, M.D., Chief of Clinic 

Gynecology 
J. M. Hundley, Jr., M.D. James J. Marston, M.D. 

William J. Fulton, M.D. Leo Brady, M.D. 

John T. Hibbitts, M.D. Kenneth Boyd, M.D. 

Joseph V. Castagna, M.D. E. Eugene Covington, M.D. 

Thomas S. Boyer, M.D. 

Obstetrics 
L. H. Douglas, M.D., Chief of Clinic 
J. G. M. Reese, M.D. M. Alexander Novey, M.D. 

Maxwell Mazer, M.D. Isadore A. Siegel, A.B., M.D. 

Margaret B. Ballard, M.D. S. K. Wallace, M.D. 

E. P. H. Harrison, A.B., M.D. Kenneth B. Boyd, M.D. 

George L. Wissig, M.D. 

Eye and Ear 

Clyde A. Clapp, M.D., Professor of Ophthalmology 

J. W. Downey, M.D., Professor of Otology 

John G. Runkel, M.D. H. F. Graff, A.B., M.D. 

Frank A. Pacienza, M.D. 

Social Service 
Miss Grace Pearson, Directress 



UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL DISPENSARY 

Report from October 1, 1931, to September 30, 1932 

Departments New Cases Old Cases Total 

Pediatrics 3,415 22,002 25,417 

Dermatology . . 7,263 14,288 21,551 

Surgery - 3,248 13,631 16,879 

Orthopedics '. 1,263 8,853 10,116 

Obstetrics 2,142 7,955 10,097 

Medicine 1,610 8,091 9,701 

Genito-Urinary 1,291 6,535 7,826 

Gynecology - 1,524 3,196 4,720 

Eye 1,161 3,196 4,357 

Nose and Throat 1,482 1,604 3,086 

Gastro-Intestinal 381 1,743 2,124 

Tuberculosis 490 1,305 1,795 

Neurology - 270 789 1,059 

Oncology 123 886 1,009 

Ear _ 423 494 917 

Cardiology 119 680 799 

Proctology 200 589 789 

Cystoscopy 56 306 362 

Mental Hygiene 599 524 1,123 

Total 27,060 96,667 123,727 



24 



MERCY HOSPITAL 

The Sisters of Mercy first assumed charge of the Hospital at 
the corner of Calvert and Saratoga Streets, then owned by the 
Washington University, in 1874. By the merger of 1878 the 
Hospital came under the control of the College of Physicians and 
Surgeons, but the Sisters continued their work of administering 
to the patients. 

In a very few years it became apparent that the City Hospital, 
as it was then called, was much too small to accommodate the 
rapidly growing demands upon it. However, it was not until 
1888 that the Sisters of Mercy, with the asistance of the Faculty 
of the College of Physicians and Surgeons, were able to lay the 
cornerstone of the present Hospital. This building was com- 
pleted and occupied late in 1889. Since then the growing de- 
mands for more space have compelled the erection of additions, 
until now there are accommodations for 275 patients. 

In 1909 the name was changed from The Baltimore City Hos- 
pital to Mercy Hospital. 

The clinical material in the free wards is under the exclusive 
control of the Faculty of the University of Maryland School of 
Medicine and College of Physicians and Surgeons. 

The Hospital adjoins the College building, and all surgical 
patients from the public wards are operated upon in the College 
operating rooms. This union of the Hospital and College build- 
ings greatly facilitates the clinical teaching. 

Mercy Hospital is the hospital of the United Railways and 
Electric Company of Baltimore City, and receives patients from 
the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad Company and from the Penn- 
sylvania Railroad Company and its branches. 



25 



26 MERCY HOSPITAL STAFF 

BOARD OF GOVERNORS 

Samuel M. Shoemaker, Esq., Chairman 
Mother M. Ricarda Dr. Alexius McGlannan 

Sister M. Helen Dr. Walter D. Wise 

Sister M. Hildegarde Dr. Charles E. Brack 

Sister M. Vincent Dr. Waitman F. Zinn 

Sister M. Cornelia Dr. Standish McCleary 

MERCY HOSPITAL STAFF 

SURGICAL DIVISION 

Alexius McGlannan, A.M., M.D., LL.D. Elliott Hutchins, A.M., M.D. 
W. D. Wise, M.D. A. M. Evans, M.D. 

C. F. Blake, M.D. F. L. Jennings, M.D. 

Associate Surgeons 

R. H. Locher, M.D. I. 0. Ridgely, M.D. 

T. R. Chambers, A.M., M.D. N. C. Marvel, M.D. 

D. J. Pessagno, M.D. H. F. Bongardt, M.D. 

J. J. Leyko, M.D. 

Assistant Surgeons 
Charles Maxson, M.D. Dwight Mohr, M.D. 

H. B. McElwain, M.D. J. W. Nelson, M.D. 

T. J. Touhey, M.D. John A. O.Connor, M.D. 

Simon Brager, M.D. 

OphtJialmologist and Otologist 
Harry Friedenwald, A.B., M.D. 

Associates 
H. K. Fleck, M.D. J. W. Downey, M.D. 

Rhinologists and Laryngolo gists 
Frank D. Sanger, M.D. George W. Mitchell, M.D. 

Waitman F. Zinn, M.D. Raymond McKenzie, M.D. 

Associates 
F. A. Pacienza, M.D. Birckhead McGowan, M.D. 

F. A. Kayser, M.D. 

Proctologist 
Charles F. Blake, M.D. 

Orthopaedic Surgeon 
Albertus Cotton, M.D. 

Associate 
H. L. Rogers, M.D. 



MERCY HOSPITAL STAFF 27 

Urologist 
Alexander J. Gillis 

Associate 
Kenneth B. Legge, M.D. 

Dentist 
J. D. Fusco, D.D.S. 

MEDICAL DIVISION 

Physicians 

Maurice C. Pincoffs, B.S., M.D. Gary B. Gamble, M.D. 

Standish McCleary, M.D. Harvey G. Beck, M.D. 

Associates 

Hubert C. Knapp, M.D. George McLean, M.D. 

C. C. W. Judd, M.D. A. A. Sussman, M.D. 

H. R. Peters, M.D. L. A. M. Krause, M.D. 

Bartus T. Baggott, M.D. John E. Legge, M.D. 

J. S. Eastland, M.D. 

Assistant Physicians 

Wetherbee Fort, M.D. J. M. Miller, M.D. 

S. A. Tumminello, M.D. 

Gastro-Entevologist 
Julius Friedenwald, A.M., M.D. 

Associates 
T. Frederick Leitz, M.D. Theodore Morrison, M.D. 

Assistants 
Maurice Feldman, M.D. Joseph Sindler, M.D. 

Pediatricians 
John Ruhrah, M.D. Edgar B. Friedenwald, M.D. 

Associate Pediatrician 
F. B. Smith, M.D. 

Assistant Pediatricians 
W. J. Schmitz, M.D. G. B. Mansdorfer, M.D. 

Neurologist and Psychiatrist 
Andrew C. Gillis, M.D. 

Associate 
Milford Levy, M.D. 

Dermatologist 
Melvin Rosenthal, M.D. 



28 MERCY HOSPITAL STAFF 

OBSTETRICAL DIVISION 
Charles E. Brack, M.D. E. P. Smith, M.D. 

A. Samuels, M.D. J. J. Erwin, M.D. 

W. S. Gardner, M.D. T. K. Galvin, M.D. 

G. A. Strauss, M.D. E. S. Edlavitch, M.D. 

Frank K. Morris, M.D. 



GYNECOLOGICAL DIVISION 

Gynecologists 

William S. Gardner, M.D. Abram Samuels, M.D. 

George A. Strauss, M.D. E. P. Smith, M.D. 

T. K. Galvin, M.D. 

Associate 
J. J. Erwin, M.D. 

Assistants 
E. S. Edlavitch, M.D. Frank K. Morris, M.D. 

PATHOLOGICAL DIVISION 
Standish McCleary, M.D. Hugh R. Spencer, M.D. 

Clinical Pathologists 

H. T. COLLENBERG, M.D. 

H. R. Peters, M.D. Emil G. Schmidt, Ph.D. 

Technicians 

Sister M. Joan, Ph.G., R.N. Eleanor Behr, R.N. 

Frances Donovan, R.N. 

X-RAY DEPARTMENT 

Radiographers 

Albertus Cotton, M.D. Harry L. Rogers, M.D. 

William Greenfield, M.D. 

Technician 
Sister M. Antonia, R.N. 



MERCY HOSPITAL STAFF 29 



MERCY HOSPITAL RESIDENT STAFF 

Residc7it Surgeon 
Reynoldson Butterworth, M.D. 

Assistant Resident Surgeons 

Raymond F. Helfrich, M.D. Joseph Jeppi, M.D. 

Howard Zupnik, M.D. 

Resident Physician 
Howard Burns, M.D. 

Assistant Resident Physician 
Arthur Karfgin, M.D. 

Resident Gynecologist 
W. Merle Warman, M.D. 

Interne Staff 193 '3-1 93 % 

Joseph A. Belz, M.D. Leon A. Kochman, M.D. 

Harold C. Dtehl, M.D. John M. Macken , M.D. 

Philip D. Flynn, M.D. Daniel R. Robinson, M.D. 

Frank A. Franklin, M.D. Maurice H. Schneiman, M.D. 

Meyer H. Zuravin, M.D. 



MERCY HOSPITAL DISPENSARY STAFF 

Surgery 
Supervisor Julius J. Leyko, M.D. 

Attending Surgeons 
D. H. Mohr, M.D. H. F. Bongardt, M.D. 

I. 0. RlDGLEY, M.D. T. J. TOUHEY, M.D. 

John O'Connor, M.D. J. w. Nelson, M.D. 

Geni to - Urinary Surg ery 
A. J. Gillis, M.D. K. 0. Legge, M.D. 

Orthopaedic Surgery 
Albertus Cotton, M.D. Harry L. Rogers, M.D. 

I. H. Maseritz, M.D. 

Medicine 
Supervisor M. C. Pincoffs, B.S., M.D. 

Attending Physicians 

Henry Sheppard, M.D. ) _ . , , _. , 
Earl L. Chambers, M.D. } Chiefs of Clinic 
J. M. Miller, M.D. S. Snyder, M.D. 

S. A. Tumminello, M.D. 

Cardiovascular Diseases 
T. C. Wolff, M.D., Chief of Clinic 

Diseases of the Lungs 
S. Snyder, M.D., Chief of Clinic 

Diseases of Metabolism 
J. S. Eastland, M.D., Chief of Clinic 

Allergic Diseases 

H. M. Bubert, M.D., Chief of Clinic 

S. Snyder, M.D. 

Diseases of Stomach 
Supervisor, Julius Friedenwald, A.M., M.D. 

Attending Physicians 
T. Frederick Leitz, M.D. Theodore H. Morrison, M.D. 

M. Feldman, M.D. Joseph Sindler, M.D. 

I. I. Levy, M.D. 

Esophagoscopist 
Waitman F. Zinn, M.D. 

30 



MERCY HOSPITAL DISPENSARY STAFF 31 

Nervous Diseases 
Supervisor, A. C. Gillis, M.D. 

Attending Physicians 
Milford Levy, M.D. Miriam F. Dunn, M.D. 

Pediatrics 

Supervisor, Edgar B. Friedenwald, M.D. 
Attending Physician, W. J. Schmitz, M.D. 



Gynecology 

Supervisors 

W. S. Gardner, M.D. A. Samuels, M.D. 

Attending Surgeons 

George A. Strauss, M.D. C. F. J. Coughlin, M.D. 

J. J. Erwin, M.D. E. Edlavitch, M.D. 

F. K. Morris, M.D. F. W. Gillis, M.D. 

Diseases of Nose and Throat 

W. F. Zinn, M.D. R. F. McKenzie, M.D. 

Benjamin S. Rich, M.D. Horace Strickland, M.D. 

B. McGowan, M.D. 

Diseases of Eye and Ear 
H. F. Fleck, M.D. M. Raskin, M.D. 

J. I. Kemler, M.D. F. A. Pacienza, M.D. 

Dermatology 
Melvin Rosenthal, M.D. Llewellyn Lord, M.D. 

Social Service Department 
Sister M. Hildegard Virginia Judge 



MERCY HOSPITAL DISPENSARY 

(1932) 

Old New Total 

Surgery _ 3,627 1,353 4,980 

Medicine 1,696 1,271 2,967 

Cardiac - 145 71 216 

Diabetic 219 8 227 

Gynecology .._ 781 433 1,214 

Eye and Ear 500 319 819 

Nose and Throat 948 733 1,681 

Neurology 501 131 632 

Pediatrics 255 283 598 

Gastro-Intestinal 329 75 404 

Dental 76 203 279 

Rectal _ 116 56 172 

Orthopedics - 1,443 404 1,847 

Skin - 564 338 902 

Genito-Urinary 2,463 476 2,939 

TOTAL 13,663 6,154 19,817 



OTHER CLINICAL FACILITIES 

THE BALTIMORE CITY HOSPITALS 

The clinical advantages of the University have been largely in- 
creased by the liberal decision of the Board of Supervisors of 
City Charities to allow the immense material of these hospitals 
to be used for the purpose of medical education. There are daily 
visits and clinics in medicine and surgery by the Staff of the Hos- 
pitals. The autopsy material is unsurpassed in this country in 
amount, thoroughness of study, and the use made of it in medi- 
cal teaching. 

The Baltimore City Hospitals consist of the following separate 
hospitals : 

The General Hospital, 209 beds. 
The Hospital for Chronic Cases, 427 beds. 
The Hospital for Tuberculosis, 172 beds. 
The Psychopathic Hospital, 325 beds. 
Infirmary (Home for Aged), 911 beds. 

32 



STAFF OF BALTIMORE CITY HOSPITALS 
R. E. Longan, Brig. Gen., Superintendent 

VISITING STAFF 
Thomas R. Boggs, S.B., M.D., Physician-in-Chief. 
Arthur M. Shipley, ScD., M.D., Surgeon-in-Chief. 
C. C. Habliston, M.D., Physician-in-Chief, Tuberculosis Hospital. 
Harry Goldsmith, M.D., Physician-in-Chief, Psychopathic Hospital. 
S. S. Blackman, A.B., M.D., Visiting Pathologist. 
Samuel A. Vest, M.D., Resident Pathologist. 

CONSULTING STAFF 

Gynecologists 

R. G. Willse, M.D. J. Mason Hundley, Jr., M.A., M.D. 

Urologist 

W. H. Toulson, A.B., M.D. 

Laryngologist 

Edward A. Looper, M.D. 

Pediatrician 

Lawson Wilkins, M.D. 

Neurological Surgeon 

Charles Bagley, M.D. 

Psychiatrist 

Esther L. Richards, M.D. 

Orthopaedist 

Allen Fiske Voshell, A.B., M.D. 

H. S. Wheeler, M.D. 

Proctologist 

Monte Edwards, M.D. 

Assisting Visiting Physician 

Charles R. Austrian, M.D. 

Assisting Visiting Surgeons 

Frank S. Lynn, M.D. C. A. Reifschneider, M.D. 

E. M. Hanrahan, A.B., M.D. T. B. Aycock, M.D. 

Assistant Neurologist 

0. R. Langworthy, M.D. 

Assistant Physician — Tuberculosis 

Henry C. Smith, M.D. 

Ophthalmologist 

Cecil Bagley, M.D. 

Obstetrician 

Louis H. Douglass, M.D. 

Dermatologist 

Isaac R. Pels, M.D. 

Roentgenologist 

John W. Pierson, M.D. 

33 



THE JAMES LAWRENCE KERNAN HOSPITAL AND INDUSTRIAL 
SCHOOL OF MARYLAND FOR CRIPPLED CHILDREN 

This institution is situated on an estate of 75 acres at Hillsdale. 
The site is just within the northwestern city limits and of easy 
access from the city proper. 

The location is ideal for the treatment of children, in that it 
affords all the advantages of sunshine and country air. 

A complete hospital unit, new in every respect, offers all mod- 
ern facilities for the care of any orthopaedic condition in chil- 
dren. 

The hospital is equipped with 82 beds — endowed, and city and 
state supported. 

The Children's Orthopaedic Dispensary at the University Hos- 
pital is maintained in closest affiliation and cares for the cases dis- 
charged from the Kernan Hospital. The physiotherapy depart- 
ment is very well equipped with modern apparatus and trained 
personnel. 

STAFF 

Surgeon-in-Chief and Medical Director 
Allen Fiske Voshell, A.B., M.D. 

Attending Orthopaedic Surgeon 
Albertus Cotton, A.M., M.D. 

Associate Orthopaedic Surgeons 
Moses Gellman, B.S., M.D. Harry L. Rogers, M.D. 

Resident Orthopaedic Surgeon 
E. L. Mortimer, Jr., A.B., M.D. 

Consulting Surgeons 

J. M. T. Finney, A.B., M.D., D.S.M., F.R.C.S. (Eng., Ire.) Hon. 

Arthur M. Shipley, Sc.D., M.D. 

Consulting Plastic Surgeon 
John Staige Davis, B.Sc, M.D. 

Consulting Neurological Surgeon 
Charles Bagley, Jr., A.B., M.D. 

Consulting Oculist 
Harry Friedenwald, M.D. 

34 



JAMES LAWRENCE KERNAN HOSPITAL 35 

Oculist 
F. A. Pacienza, M.D. 

Consulting Aurist and Lawjngologist 
Edward A. Looper, M.D. 

Aurist and Laryngologist 
F. B. Anderson, M.D. 

Consulting Dentist 
Harry B. McCarthy, D.D.S. 

Dentist 
M. E. Coberth, D.D.S. 

Consulting Physicians 

Thomas B. Futcher, A.B., M.D. Thomas R. Brown, A.B., M.D. 

Lewellys F. Barker, A.B., M.D. 

Pediatrist 
Benjamin Tappan, A.B., M.D. 

Dermatologists 
Harry M. Robinson, M.D. Leon Ginsberg, M.D. 

Consulting Pathologist 
Sydney M. Cone, A.B., M.D. 

Pathologist 
Hugh R. Spencer, M.D. 

Consulting Neurologist 
Irving J. Spear, M.D. 

Neurologist 
R. V. Seliger, M.D. 

Anesthetists 
J. A. Tompkins, M.D. J. D. Holly, M.D. 

Roentgenologist 
Albertus Cotton, A.M., M.D. 

Superintendent 
Miss C. Gertrude Forrester, R.N. 

Dispensary and Social Service Nurse 
Miss Mabel S. Brown, R.N. 

Physiotherapist and X-Ray Technician 
Mrs. Georgiana Wisong 

Instt~uctor in Grammar School 
Miss Laura Hampson 



ST. VINCENT'S INFANT ASYLUM 

The facilities of this institution, containing 150 infants and 
children, have been kindly extended to the University of Mary- 
land by the Sisters of Charity. This large clinic enables this 
school to present to its students liberal opportunities for the 
study of diseases of infants and children. 



Thos. K. Galvin, M.D. 



STAFF 

Obstetricians 



Frank K. Morris, M.D. 



W. C. Bacon, M.D. 
Clewell Howell, M.D. 



Pediatricians 



C. L. Joslin, M.D. 
Chas. R. Goldsborough, M.D. 



Surgeon 
N. Winslow, M.D. 

Dermatologist 
J. A. Buchness, M.D. 



C. A. Clapp, M.D. 



Oculists 



F. B. Anderson, M.D. 



Orthopaedic Surgeon 
H. L. Wheeler, M.D. 

Physician 
C. P. Clautice, M.D. 



3b 



LIBRARIES 

The University Library, founded in 1813 by the purchase of 
the collection of Dr. John Crawford, now contains 18,721 vol- 
umes, a file of 150 current medical journals, and several thousand 
pamphlets and reprints. It is well stocked with recent literature, 
including books and periodicals of general interest. The home of 
the library is Davidge Hall, a comfortable and commodious build- 
ing in close proximity to the classrooms and the laboratories of 
the Medical Department. The library is open daily during the 
year for use of members of the faculty, the students, and the 
profession generally. 

The Library of the Medical and Chirurgical Faculty of Mary- 
land, containing 45,000 volumes, is open to the students of the 
school. The leading medical publications of the world are re- 
ceived by the library, and complete sets of many journals are 
available. Other libraries of Baltimore are the Peabody (352,- 
000 volumes) and the Enoch Pratt Free Library (702,553 vol- 
umes). 

All these libraries are open to the students of the school with- 
out charge. 



37 



ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 

The following curriculum is the result of a thorough revision 
of teaching in this school in order to meet modern requirements. 
The multiplication of specialties in medicine and surgery necessi- 
tates a very crowded course and the introduction of electives will 
very soon be depended on to solve some of the difficulties . 

The curriculum is organized under eleven departments. 

1. Anatomy (including Histology and Embryology). 

2. Physiology. 

3. Bacteriology and Immunology. 

4. Biological Chemistry. 

5. Pharmacology and Materia Medica. 

6. Pathology. 

7. Medicine (including Medical Specialties). 

8. Surgery (including Surgical Specialties). 

9. Obstetrics. 

10. Gynecology. 

11. Ophthalmology and Otology. 

The instruction is given in four years of graded work. 

Several courses of study extend through two years or more, 
but in no case are the students of different years thrown together 
in the same course of teaching. 

The first and second years are devoted largely to the study of 
the structures and functions of the normal body. Laboratory 
work occupies most of the student's time during these two years. 

Some introductory instruction in Medicine and Surgery is 
given in the second year. The third and fourth years are almost 
entirely clinical. 

A special feature of instruction in the school is the attempt 
to bring together teacher and student in close personal relation- 
ship. In many courses of instruction the classes are divided into 
small groups and a large number of instructors insures attention 
to the needs of each student. 

In most courses the final examination as the sole test of pro- 
ficiency has disappeared and the student's final grade is deter- 
mined largely by partial examinations, recitations and assigned 
work carried on throughout the course. 

38 



ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 39 

DEPARTMENT OF ANATOMY, INCLUDING GROSS 
ANATOMY, HISTOLOGY AND EMBRYOLOGY 

Carl L. Davis, M.D - Professor of Anatomy 

Eduard Uhlenhuth, Ph.D _ Professor of Anatomy 

Thomas B. Aycock, S.B., M.D Assistant Professor of Anatomy 

John F. Lutz, M.D - Associate in Histology 

Monte Edwards, M.D Associate in Anatomy 

Frank H. Figge, B.S Instructor in Anatomy 

Joseph Pokorny, M.D Instructor in Histology 

J. Hulla, M. D , , ...Instructor in Histology 

H. S. Rubinstein, B.S., M.D Instructor in Histology 

Frank K. Morris, A.B., M.D _ Instructor in Anatomy 

Luther E. Little, M.D _ Assistant in Anatomy 

Gross Anatomy. First Year. Total number of hours 574. 
During the first semester, 5 lecture periods and 26 laboratory- 
hours per week. 

The entire course centers around the dissection of the human 
body. Each student is given opportunity to dissect an entire half 
(left or right) of the body. The dissection is supplemented by- 
lecture and informal discussions. (One lecture a week for live 
weeks.) 

Anatomy is taught as an independent science, emphasis being 
laid on the human species as contrasted with animal morphology. 
An attempt is made to familiarize the student with the elements 
of anthropometry, with systematic and regional anatomy, with 
the principles of topographical anatomy and with osteology. 

The actual dissection is preceded by a general examination of 
the body surface and superficial organs. Opportunity is provided 
for taking representative measurements of the head, face, trunk 
and limbs, and of acquiring a knowledge of the use of anthropo- 
metric instruments. Throughout the dissection the student is 
encouraged to take measurements and weights of all the major 
organs, including the brain and the endocrines, and to obtain a 
knowledge of the proportions of each organ to the body as a 
whole, as well as to the variability of these proportions. 

The dissection is undertaken in relation to topographical re- 
gions of the body, but systematic relations are continuously em- 
phasized and, wherever possible, brought out by actual dissection. 



40 ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 

Osteology is taught in conjunction with the dissection of the 
muscles and the study of the functional mechanism of the skeleto- 
muscular apparatus. Each student is provided with a set of 
bones to aid him in his homework. Fifty complete and perfect 
skeletons of the whole body and about as many of the limbs are 
available for reference and special advanced work. 

Second, Third and Fourth Years. Opportunity is provided 
for advanced special dissections and for research work in every 
branch of anatomy. Dr. Uhlenhuth. 

Histology and Embryology 

First Year. This course has three subdivisions: First, gen- 
eral histology ; second, organology ; and third, the central nervous 
system, the last being distinguished as neuro-anatomy. The first 
semester is divided equally between the study of the fundamental 
tissues and that of organs. Neuro-anatomy is taught during the 
first two months of the second year. Throughout the entire 
course the embryology of the part being studied precedes the 
study of the fully developed tissue. Thus embryology becomes a 
correlated part of the whole subject of microscopic anatomy and 
not an independent subject. 

A brief course in histological technic precedes the study of his- 
tological tissues, thus familiarizing the student with the princi- 
ples involved in the preparation of material for mocroscopic 
study. For the remainder of the course, students are furnished 
slides of the required tissues, previously prepared in our own 
laboratory, thus insuring a uniform and satisfactory quality of 
material for study and permitting the time of the student to be 
expended in the study of material rather than in the technic of 
its preparation. 

Neuro-anatomy embraces a study of the fundamental structure 
of the central nervous system as applied to its function. An 
abundance of material permits of individual dissection of the 
human brain. A series of appropriately stained sections of the 
human brain stem is furnished each student for the microscopic 
study of the internal structure of the nervous system. In addi- 
tion, each student is required to construct a model of the princi- 
pal tracts, comprising the central nervous system. Dr. Davis, 
Dr. Lutz, Dr. Rubinstein. 

Total assigned hours, Microscopic Anatomy 245. 



ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 41 

Graduate Courses 

Anat. 101 s. (Minor) . Human Gross Anatomy (10) — Total 
number of hours 574. Five lecture periods and 26 laboratory 
hours per week during the first semester. 

A complete dissection of the human body (exclusive of the 
central nervous system). Dr. E. Uhlenhuth and Dr. Thomas 
B, Aycock. 

Anat. 102 /. {Minor). Mammalian Histology (6) — Two lec- 
tures, 8 laboratory hours per week. 

A general survey of the histological structure of the organs of 
mammals and man. Opportunity is offered for examining and 
studying a complete collection of microscopical sections. Dr. 
Davis and Dr. Lutz. 

Anat. 103 s. (Minor). Human Neurology (4) — Three lec- 
tures, 6 laboratory hours for the first two months of the second 
year. 

This course provides a general survey of the structure of the 
human central nervous system, being mainly directed toward the 
fiber tracts and nuclei contained therein. It includes a brief 
study of the special senses. The laboratory work is based on a 
dissection of the human brain, together with the study of pre- 
pared microscopic sections of the brain stem. Anat. 102 f., or its 
equivalent, required to enter this course. Dr. Davis, Dr. Rubin- 
stein. 

Anat. 202 /. and s. (Major) . For work leading to a Ph. D. in 
Anatomy. A study of neurological problems based on 103 s. 
Only students who have had the preceding course in neurology 
are eligible for this work. Dr. Davis. 

Anat. 204 /. and s. (Major). Advanced Endocrinology. 
(Credit and time dependent upon the student's qualifications.) 

A study of the morphological equivalent of function. By means 
of proper experimentation the morphological responses of the 
endocrines to extrinsic and intrinsic factors are examined. This 
course will lead the student toward work for the Ph. D. in 
Anatomy. Dr. Uhlenhuth. 



42 ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 

DEPARTMENT OF PHYSIOLOGY 

Ferd. A. Ries, M.D., 

Associate Professor of Physiology and Acting Head of the Department 

O. G. Harne, A.B Assistant Professor of Physiology 

Elizabeth E. Painter, A.B _ Assistant in Physiology 

Second Year. Lectures, laboratory, and conferences are given 
in the physiology of muscle-nerve, central nervous system and 
special senses, followed by work on blood, circulation, respira- 
tion, internal secretions, metabolism and nutrition. 

Lectures and conferences 96 hours 

Laboratory _ 144 hours 

Total _ 240 hours 

For a description of the graduate courses offered, consult the 
catalog of the Graduate School. 



DEPARTMENT OF BACTERIOLOGY AND IMMUNOLOGY 

Frank W. Hachtel, M.D Professor of Bacteriology 

J. A. F. Pfeiffer, M.D. Instructor in Bacteriology 

Henry F. Buettner, M.D Instructor in Bacteriology 

H. Edmund Levin, M.D Assistant in Bacteriology 

H. M. Bubert, M.D _ Assistant in Bacteriology 

Instruction in bacteriology is given in the laboratory to the 
students of the second year during the first semester. This in- 
cludes the various methods of preparation and sterilization of 
culture media, the study of pathogenic bacteria, and the bacterio- 
logical examination of water and milk. The bacteriological diag- 
nosis of the communicable diseases is also included in this course. 
Animal inoculations are made in connection with the bacteria 
studied. The most important protozoa are also studied in the 
laboratory. The principles of general bacteriology are taught by 
quiz, conference and lecture. 

The principles of immunology are presented by means of 
quizzes, conferences and lectures to the second-year class 



ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 43 

throughout the second semester, and practical experiments are 
carried out by the class in laboratory sessions. 

Bacteriology Immunology 

Lectures and recitations 16 hours 16 hours 

Laboratory 128 hours 96 hours 

Total 144 hours 112 hours 

DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGICAL CHEMISTRY 

H. Boyd Wylie, M.D Professor of Biological 'Chemistry 

Frank N. Ogden, M.D _ Associate in Biological Chemistry 

Emil G. Schmidt, Ph.D Associate in Biological Chemistry 

Ruth C. Vanden Bosche, B.S Assistant in Biological Chemistry 

Maurice J. Schmulovitz, A.B Weaver Fellow in Biological Chemistry 

This course is designed to present the fundamental concepts of 
Biological Chemistry. The principal constituents and the phe- 
nomena of living matter are discussed in the lectures and con- 
ferences and studied in the laboratory. Training is afforded in 
routine biochemical methods of investigation. 

Lectures and Conferences 96 hours 

Laboratory 96 hours 

Total 192 hours 

DEPARTMENT OF PHARMACOLOGY 

John C. Krantz, Jr., Ph.D _ _ Professor of Pharmacology 

Ruth Musser, B.A., M.S Instructor in Pharmacology 

William Ellsworth Evans, M.S. Instructor in Pharmacology 

William Glenn Harne _ Demonstrator in Pharmacology 

C. Jelleff C'arr, B.S Isaac E. Emerson Fellow in Pharmacology 

This course is designed to include those phases of pharmacology 
necessary for an intelligent use of drugs in the treatment of 
disease. The didactic instruction includes materia medica, 
pharmacy, prescription-writing, toxicology, posology, pharmaco- 
dynamics, and experimental therapeutics. The laboratory exer- 
cises parallel the course of lectures and recitations. 

Lectures and Recitations 96 hours 

Laboratory 96 hours 

Total 192 hours 



44 ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 

Graduate Courses 

Students pursuing graduate instruction in the biological 
sciences may select graduate courses in pharmacology. The fore- 
going course in systematic pharmacology designed for medical 
students is a prerequisite for these courses. 

A general description of the specific courses offered are set 
forth in the bulletin of the Graduate School. 

Opportunity will be provided for graduate students to engage 
in research in pharmacology and certain cognate sciences leading 
to graduate degrees. 

DEPARTMENT OF PATHOLOGY 

Hugh R. Spencer, M.D - - Professor of Pathology 

Standish McCleary, M.D Professor of Pathology 

Sydney M. Cone, A.B., M.D Associate Professor of Pathology 

Robert B. Wright, M.D _ Assistant Professor of Pathology 



C. Gardner Warner, M.D . Associate 

Albert E. Goldstein, M.D. _ Associate 

Walter C. Merkel, M.D Associate 

M. Alexander Novey, M.D Instructor 

Wm. S. Love, Jr., M.D _ Instructor 

Leon Freedom, M.D. Instructor 

M. Harold Goodman, M.D Instructor 

Benjamin Abeshouse, M.D _ Instructor 

Christopher C. Shaw, M.D Instructor 

Ch as. J. Farinacci, M.D * Instructor 

W. R. Johnson, M.D _ Instructor 

Frank J. Geraghty, M.D _ Instructor 

James G. Arnold, M.D. _ Assistant 

Robert W. Johnson, M.D. _ _ Assistant 

Samuel A. Vest, M.D. Assistant 



n Pathology 

n Pathology 

n Pathology 

n Pathology 

n Pathology 

n Pathology 

n Pathology 

n Pathology 

n Pathology 

n Pathology 

n Pathology 

n Pathology 

n Pathology 

n Pathology 

n Pathology 



Courses of instruction in pathology are given during the sec- 
ond and third years. These courses are based on previous study 
of normal structure and function and aim to outline the natural 
history of disease. Instruction is made as practical as possible 
so that the student may become familiar with the appearance of 
tissues in disease and may be able to correlate anatomical lesions 
with clinical symptoms and signs. 

1. General Pathology. (Second Year.) This course in- 
cludes the study and demonstration of disturbances of the body 
fluids, disturbances of structure, nutrition and metabolism of 



ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 45 

cells, disturbances of fat, carbohydrate and protein metabolism, 
disturbances in pigment metabolism, inflammation and tumors. 

2. Applied Pathology. Including Gross Morbid Anatomy 
and Morbid Physiology. {Third Year.) In this course the spe- 
cial relation of lesions to clinical symptoms and signs is empha- 
sized. 

In the laboratory the class is divided into groups for the study 
of classified autopsy material. 

3. Autopsies. (Third Year). Small groups of students 
attend autopsies at the morgues of the University Hospital and 
Baltimore City Hospital. They are required to assist at autopsies 
and to prepare protocols. 

4. Clinical Pathological Conference. {Fourth Year) . In 
collaboration with the Department of Medicine. Material from 
autopsies is studied with reference to the correlation of the clini- 
cal aspects with the pathological findings. 

5. Advanced Work in Pathology. Properly qualified stu- 
dents will be permitted to carry out advanced or research work 
along the lines of experimental pathology. 

Summary 
Second Year 

Lectures 60 hours 

Laboratory 150 hours 

Total 210 hours 

Third Year 

Lectures 60 hours 

Laboratory 120 hours 

Total 180 hours 

Fourth Year 

Clinical Pathological Conference 30 hours 



46 



ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 



DEPARTMENT OF MEDICINE 

Maurice C. Pincoffs, B.S., M.D Professor of Medicine 

Standish McCleary, M.D Professor of Clinical Medicine 

Jos. E. Gichner, M.D., Prof, of Clinical Medicine and Physical Therapeutics 

G. Carroll Lockard, M. D Professor of Clinical Medicine 

Harvey G. Beck, Sc.D., M.D Professor of Clinical Medicine 

Harry M. Stein, M.D Professor of Clinical Medicine 

Paul W. Clough, B.S., M.D Associate Professor of Medicine 

C. C W. Judd, A.B., M.D Associate Professor of Medicine 

Sydney R. Miller, A.B., M.D Associate Professor of Medicine 

Walter A. Baetjer, A.B., M.D Associate Professor of Medicine 

William H. Smith, M.D _ Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine 

H. J. Maldeis, M.D Associate Professor of Medical Jurisprudence 

Charles C. Habliston, M.D Associate Professor of Medic 

S. Lloyd Johnson, A.B., L.L.B., M.D Assistant Professor of Medic 

John G. Huck, M.D Assistant Professor of Medic 

George McLean, M.D Assistant Professor of Medic 

L. A. M. Krause, M.D Assistant Professor of Medic 

H. R. Peters, M.D Assistant Professor of Medic 

H. M. Bubert, M.D Associate in Medic 



W. S. Love, Jr., A.B., M.D Associate 

J. S. Eastland, M.D Associate 

Thomas C. Wolff, M.D Associate 

T. Nelson Carey, M.D Associate 

M. G. Gichner, M.D Instructor 

Wm. A. Strauss, M.D. Instructor 

Henry Sheppard, M.D Instructor 

Wetherbee Fort, M.D Instructor 

Henry C. Smith, M.D Instructor 

Frank J. Geraghty, M.D Instructor 

L. P. Gundry, M.D Instructor 

Samuel T. Helms, M.D Instructor 

Nathaniel Beck, M.D Assistant 

Carl Benson, M.D Assistant 

A. Scagnetti, M.D Assistant 

Bernard J. Cohen, M.D Assistant 

W. H. Triplett, M.D Assistant 

David Tenner, M.D Assistant 

M. Paul Byerly, M.D Assistant 

Earl L. Chambers, M.D Assistant 

H. Edmund Levin, M.D Assistant 

J. Howard Burns, M.D Assistant 

Lawrence Serra, M.D Assistant 

J. G. Feman, M.D Assistant 

Morris Fine, M.D. Assistant 



n Medic 

n Medic 

n Medic 

n Medic 

n Medic 

n Medic 

n Medic 

n Medic 

n Medic 

n Medic 

n Medic 

n Medic 
n Medic 

n Medic 

n Medic 

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n Medic 

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n Medic 

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ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 47 

GENERAL OUTLINE 
Second Year 

Introduction to clinical medicine. 

(a) Introductory physical diagnosis. 

(1 hour a week, first semester: 2 hours a week, second semester.) 

(b) Medical clinics. 

(1 hour a week, second semester.) 

Third Year 
1. The methods of examination (13 hours a week). 

(a) History taking. 

(b) Physical diagnosis. 

(c) Clinical pathology. 

These subjects are taught and practiced in the out-patient depart- 
ment and in the clinical laboratory. 

II. The principles of medicine (7 hours a week). 

(a) Lectures, clinics and demonstrations in general medicine, 
neurology, pediatrics and preventive medicine. 

III. The principles of therapeutics (1 hour a week). 

Lectures and demonstrations in general therapeutics, physi- 
cal therapeutics and materia medica. 

Fourth Year 
The practice of medicine. 
I. Clinical clerkship on the medical wards. 
(26 hours a week for ten weeks.) 

(a) Responsibility, under supervision, for the history, physical 
examination, laboratory examinations and progress notes of 
assigned cases. 

(b) Ward classes in general medicine, the medical specialties, and 
therapeutics. 

II. Clinics in general medicine and the medical specialties. 
(6 hours a week.) 

III. Dispensary work in the medical specialties. 

IV. Clinical pathological conferences (1 hour a week.) 

Medical Dispensary Work 

The medical dispensaries of both the Mercy and the University- 
Hospitals are utilized for teaching in the third year. Each stu- 
dent spends two periods a week of two hours each in dispensary 



48 ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 

work. The work is done in groups of four to six students under 
an instructor. Systematic history-taking is especially stressed. 
Physical findings are demonstrated. The student becomes famil- 
iar with the commoner acute and chronic disease processes. 

Physical Diagnosis 

Second Year. Didactic lectures and practical demonstrations 
in topographical anatomy and normal physical signs. 

Third Year. The class is divided into small groups, and each 
section receives instruction for four hours a week for the entire 
session in the medical dispensaries of the hospitals. The large 
clinical material of the dispensaries and hospitals is utilized to 
give each student the opportunity to familiarize himself with the 
common types of bodily structure, with the normal variations in 
physical signs and with the physical signs of the chief pulmonary, 
circulatory and abdominal diseases. 

A course of lectures (1 hour a week) on physical diagnosis 
supplements the practical work in this subject. 

Therapeutics 

Third Year. General therapeutics and materia medica are 
taken up and an effort is made to familiarize the student with 
the practical treatment of disease. The special therapy of the 
chief diseases is then reviewed. One hour a week. Dr. Lockard. 

Fourth Year. Special consideration is given to the practical 
application of therapeutic principles in bedside teaching and the 
chief therapeutic methods are demonstrated. 

Students attend therapeutic ward rounds once a week through- 
out their medical trimester. 

Tuberculosis 
During the third year in connection with the instruction in 
physical diagnosis a practical coarse is given weekly to sections 
of the class at the Municipal Tuberculosis Hospital. Stress is 
laid upon the recognition of the physical signs of the disease, as 
well as upon its symptomatology and gross pathology. 

Cardiology 

During the fourth year an elective course in cardiology is 
offered at the Mercy Hospital. The course occupies one and one- 
half hours weekly. Physical diagnosis, electrocardiography and 
the therapeutic management of cardiac cases are stressed. 



ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 49 

Syphilis 

Third Year. During the third year the subject of syphilis is 
dealt with in the lecture course. 

Fourth Year. An elective course in the therapeutic manage- 
ment of syphilis is offered in the dispensary. 

CLINICAL PATHOLOGY 

John G. Huck, M.D Assistant Professor of Medicine 

Head of Department of Clinical Pathology 

H. J. Maldeis, M.D Associate Professor of Medical Jurisprudence 

William A. Strauss, M.D Instructor in Medicine 

Samuel T. Helms, M.D Instructor in Medicine 

E. M. Reese, M.S , _ Assistant in Medicine 

During the third year the student is thoroughly drilled in the 
technic of the usual clinical laboratory work, so that he is able 
to perform all routine examinations which may be called for dur- 
ing his fourth year, in connection with the work in the wards 
and dispensary. 

The practical work is supplemented by a series of didactic lec- 
tures and demonstrations in which the entire teaching staff of the 
department takes an active part. The microscopical and chemi- 
cal study of blood, exudates and transudates, gastric juice, spinal 
fluid, feces and urine are successively taken up, and special atten- 
tion directed to the clinical significance of the findings. 

Clinical parasitology from the standpoint of the infecting agent 
and the carrier is given careful consideration. 

The entire course is thoroughly practical. Each student has 
his own microscope and is provided with blood counters and 
hemoglobinometer for his exclusive use, and every two students 
are equipped with a special laboratory outfit for all routine pur- 
poses. 

During the fourth year the student applies what he has learned 
during the preceding year in the laboratories of the various affili- 
ated hospitals. He is also supplied with a laboratory outfit which 
is sufficiently complete to enable him to work independently of 
the general equipment. Special instructors are available during 
certain hours to give necessary assistance and advice. 

Lectures 32 hours 

Laboratory 96 hours 

Total 128 hours 



50 ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 

GASTRO-ENTEROLOGY 

Julius Friedenwald, A.M., M.D Professor of Gastro-Enterology 

T. Fred Leitz, M.D Clinical Professor of Gastro-Enterology 

J. Harry Ullrich, M.D Associate Professor of Gastro-Enterology 

Theodore H. Morrison, M.D Associate Professor of Gastro-Enterology 

Maurice Feldman, M.D. Assistant Professor of Gastro-Enterology 

Zachariah Morgan, M.D Associate in Gastro-Enterology 

Joseph Sindler, M.D Associate in Gastro-Enterology 

Samuel Morrison, M.D Instructor in Gastro-Enterology 

M. S. Koppelman, M.D Instructor in Gastro-Enterology 

Z. Vance Hooper, M.D Assistant in Gastro-Enterology 

C. Victor Richards, M.D Assistant in Gastro-Enterology 

H. William Primakoff, M.D Assistant in Gastro-Enterology 

Third Year. A series of 14 lectures is given covering the 
diseases of the digestive tract. 

Fourth Year. Clinics and demonstrations to the class for one 
hour a week throughout the session. Dispensary instruction to 
small groups throughout the entire session. Practical instruction 
is given in the use of modern methods of study of the diseases of 
the gastro-intestinal tract. 

PSYCHIATRY 

R. M. Chapman, M.D. Professor of Psychiatry 

Ralph P. Truitt, M.D Assistant Professor of Psychiatry 

Lewis B. Hill, M.D Associate in Psychiatry 

Harry Goldsmith, M.D Instructor in Psychiatry 

Third Year. In the third year the student attends fifteen 
clinical lectures and five clinics which are designed to be intro- 
ductory to the more intensive work in psychiatry in the fourth 
year. 

Fourth Year. The class is divided into sections for clinical 
conferences on selected groups of cases. Each student may work 
for a short period as assistant in the Mental Hygiene Clinic, and 
thus gain practical experience of the problems of history-taking, 
examination, and the care of psychiatric patients. 



ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 



51 



PEDIATRICS 

Edgar B. Friedenwald, M.D Professor of Clinical Pediatrics 

C. Loring Joslin, M.D Professor of Clinical Pediatrics 

John H. Traband, M.D Assistant Professor of Pediatrics 

Clarence E. Macke, M.D Assistant Professor of Pediatrics 

Albert Jaffe, M.D Assistant Professor 

William J. Todd, M.D Associate 

William G. Geyer, M.D Associate 

Clevell Howell, M.D _ Associate 

Samuel S. Glick, M.D Associate 

Frederick B. Dart, M.D Associate 

A. H. Finkelstein, M.D Associate 

F. Stratner Orem, M.D Instructor 

Frederick Smith, M.D Instructor 

R. M. Hening, M.D Instructor 

Marie Kovner, M.D Instructor 

Elizabeth Sherman, M.D. Instructor 

William G. Queen, M.D Instructor 

W. J. Schmitz, M.D Assistant 

M. Paul Byerly, M.D Assistant 

Harry A. Rutledge, M.D Assistant 

S. Kendig Wallace, M.D. Assistant 

Morris Fine, M.D Assistant 

Samuel T. Helms, M.D Assistant 

Third Year. Instruction during the third year consists of a 
weekly lecture. The more important diseases of infancy and 
childhood are reviewed. The principles of infant feeding are pre- 
sented in brief form. 

Fourth Year. Weekly clinical lectures are given at which 
patients are shown to demonstrate the chief features of the dis- 
eases discussed. The students attend a w T eekly ward round on 
the pediatric service throughout their medical trimester. A spe- 
cial course on physical diagnosis in children is given. Sections 
of the class work daily in the Babies' and Children's Clinic. 



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Pediatrics 


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Pediatrics 


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Pediatrics 


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Pediatrics 


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Pediatrics 


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Pediatrics 


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Pediatrics 


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Pediatrics 


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Pediatrics 


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Pediatrics 


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Pediatrics 



52 ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 

NEUROLOGY 

Irving J. Spear, M.D ....._ Professor of Neurology 

Andrew C. Gillis, A.M., M.D., LL.D Professor of Neurology 

G. M. Settle, A.B., M.D., 

Associate Professor of Neurology and Clinical Medicine 

Milford Levy, M.D Assistant Professor of Neurology 

Leon Freedom, M.D _ Associate in Neurology 

H. S. Rubinstein, M.D. „ „ Assistant in Neurology 

Frederick Wolf, M.D. Assistant in Neurology 

Third Year. Lectures and recitations one hour each, week to 
the entire class. Instruction in clinical neurology two hours a 
week at the City Hospital to small groups. By means of didactic 
lectures and clinical conferences, there are considered the com- 
moner types of diseases of the nervous system, the methods of 
neurological examination, and the relationship of signs and 
symptoms to pathological conditions. The material at the Uni- 
versity and Mercy Hospitals is available. 

Fourth Year. Clinical conference one hour each week to the 
entire class. This subject is taught at the University and Mercy 
Hospitals. All patients presented at these clinics are carefully 
examined; complete written records are made by the students 
who demonstrate the patients before the class. The patients are 
usually assigned one or two weeks before they are presented, and 
each student in the class must prepare one or more cases during 
the year. 

Ward Class Instruction. In small sections at the University 
and Mercy Hospitals. In these classes the students come in close 
personal contact with the patients in the wards under the super- 
vision of the instructor. 

Dispensary Instruction. Small sections are instructed in the 
dispensaries of the University and Mercy Hospitals four after- 
noons each week. In this way students are brought into contact 
with nervous diseases in their early and late manifestations. 



ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 53 

HYGIENE AND PREVENTIVE MEDICINE 

Professor of Hygiene and Public Health 

Instructor in Hygiene and Public Health 

M. G. Tull, M.D Instructor in Hygiene and Public Health 

Third Year. Two lectures a week throughout the session. The 
lectures will encompass the fundamental subjects : air, water, 
soil, food, disposal of wastes, communicable diseases, state and 
federal public health laws, and industrial diseases. Small groups 
visit the Sydenham Hospital weekly and are given practical in- 
struction in the diagnosis, treatment, and isolation of the con- 
tagious diseases. 

Fourth Year. Demonstrations and discussion of Health De- 
partment work with emphasis on those phases which concern 
the practicing physician. The class is divided into small groups, 
each group making five visits to the Health Department of one 
and a half hours each. 

MEDICAL JURISPRUDENCE 

H. J. Maldeis, M.D Associate Professor of Medical Jurisprudence 

Baltimore City Post Mortem Physician 

Third Year. One hour each week for six weeks. 

This course embraces a summary of the following: Proceed- 
ings in criminal and civil prosecution ; medical evidence and testi- 
mony; identity and its general relations; sexual abnormalities; 
personal identity; impotence and sterility; rape; criminal abor- 
tions; signs of death; wounds in their medico-legal relations, 
death, natural and homicidal ; malpractice ; insanity ; and medico- 
legal autopsies. 



54 



ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 



DEPARTMENT OF SURGERY 

Arthur M. Shipley, Sc.D., M.D ...... Professor of 

Alexius MoGlannan, A.M., M.D., LL.D Professor of 

Nathan Winslow, A.M., M.D. Professor of Clinical 

Page Edmunds. M.D _ Professor of Traumatic 

Walter D. Wise, M.D Professor of Clinical 

Frank S. Lynn, M.D Professor of Clinical 

Elliott H. Hutchins, A.M., M.D Professor of Clinical 

Charles Reid Edwards, M.D. Professor of Clinical 

Charles Bagley, Jr., A.B., M.D Professor of Neurological 

F. L. Jennings, M.D Professor of Clinical 

Thomas R. Chambers, A.M., M.D Associate Professor of 

R. W. Locher, M.D Associate Professor of Clinical 

A. M. Evans, M.D _ Associate Professor of 

Edward S. Johnson, M.D Associate Professor of 

D. J. Pessagno, M.D Associate Professor of 

E. H. Hayward, M.D _ _ _ Associate in 

C. A. Reifschneider, M.D .....Associate in 

C. F. Horine, M.D. Associate in 

I. 0. Ridgley, M.D Associate in 

H. F. Bongardt, M.D _ Associate in 

Thomas B. Ay cock, B.S., M.D _ Associate in 

Monte Edwards, M.D. Associate in 

Richard G. Coblentz, M.D Associate in Neurological 

N. Clyde Marvel, M.D Associate in 

W. R. Johnson, M.D _ Instructor in 

E. M. Hanrahan, A.B., M.D _ Instructor in 

S. Demarco, M.D Instructor in 

Karl J. Steinmueller, A.B., M.D Instructor in 

W. W. Walker, M.D Instructor in 

J. J. Leyko, M.D Instructor in 

Dwight Mohr, M.D. _ „ Assistant in 

William R. Geraghty, B.S., M.D _ Assistant in 

H. B. McElwain, M.D Assistant in 

J. G. Onnen, M.D Assistant in 

A. V. Buchness, M.D _ Assistant in 

T. J. Touhey, M.D Assistant in 

Clyde F. Karns, M.D Assistant in 

Paul Schenker, M.D Assistant in 

Robert W. Johnson, M.D ...Assistant in 

Frank K. Morris, A.B., M.D Assistant in 

J. Willis Guyton, M.D. _ _ _ Assistant in 

Luther E. Little, M.D Assistant in 

Wm. N. McFaul, Jr., M.D _ Assistant in 

Samuel H. Culver, M.D Assistant in 

Simon H. Brager, M.D. Assistant in 



Surgery 
Surgery 
Surgery 
Surgery 
Surgery 
Surgery 
Surgery 
Surgery 
Surgery 
Surgery 
Surgery 
Surgery 
Surgery 
Surgery 
Surgery 
Surgery 
Surgery 
Surgery 
Surgery 
Surgery 
Surgery 
Surgery 
Surgery 
Surgery 
Surgery 
Surgery 
Surgery 
Surgery 
Surgery 
Surgery 
Surgery 
Surgery 
Surgery 
Surgery 
Surgery 
Surgery 
Surgery 
Surgery 
Surgery 
Surgery 
Surgery 
Surgery 
Surgery 
Surgery 
Surgery 



ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 55 

The teaching is done in the anatomical laboratory, the dis- 
pensaries, wards, clinical laboratories and operating rooms of the 
University and Mercy Hospitals, and in the wards and operating 
rooms of the Baltimore City Hospitals. 

Instruction is given by means of lectures, recitations, dispen- 
sary work, bedside instruction, ward classes, and clinics. The 
work begins in the second year, and continues throughout the 
third and fourth years. 

Second Year 

Topographic and Surgical Anatomy. The course is designed 
to bridge the gap between anatomy in the abstract, and clinical 
anatomy as applied to the study and practice of medicine and 
surgery. 

The teaching is done in the anatomical laboratory, and students 
are required to demonstrate all points, outlines, and regions on 
the cadaver. Underlying regions are dissected when necessary 
to bring out outlines and relations of structures. 

Didactic Lectures. Two hours a w r eek for one semester, aug- 
mented by demonstrations with specimens, charts, and cross sec- 
tions. Dr. Monte Edwards. 

Laboratory. Five hours a week for 16 weeks. Dr. Monte 
Edw T ards assisted by Drs. Ward, Morris and Little. 

Principles of Surgery. This course includes history-taking, 
records of physical examinations and of operations and progress 
notes ; the preparation of surgical dressing, suture materials and 
solutions. It includes inflammation, infections, ulcers, gangrene, 
fistulae and sinuses, hemorrhage, shock and tumors; the use of 
splints, bed frames, bone plates, bone grafts, etc., local anaes- 
thesia and the preparation of patients for operation. Lectures 
and conferences, two hours per week for one semester, to the 
entire class. Dr. C. R. Edwards. 

Third Year 

General and Regional Surgery. Principles of surgery and 
general surgery, three hours a week throughout the year to the 
entire class, lectures, recitations and clinics. Drs. Shipley and 
Wise. 

The class is divided into groups and receives instruction in 
history-taking, gross pathology, and surgical diagnosis — at the 



56 ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 

bedside and in the dead-house of the Baltimore City Hospitals. 
Drs. Shipley, Lynn, Reifschneider and Aycock. 

Operative Surgery. Instruction is given in operative surgery 
upon the cadaver and on dogs. The class is divided into sections, 
and each section is given practical and individual work under the 
supervision of the instructors. Dr. Lynn, assisted by Drs. Wins- 
low, E. S. Johnson, Aycock, Demarco, Horine, Pessagno, Onnen, 
W. R. Johnson, Steinmueller, R. W. Johnson, McFaul, Culver 
and Brager. 

Fractures and Dislocations. This course consists of in- 
struction in the various forms of fractures, dislocations and their 
treatment. There is a regular schedule of didactic lectures, which 
is supplemented by practical demonstrations in diagnosis and 
treatment. This practical work is given at the Mercy, University 
and Baltimore City Hospitals. Drs. Lynn and Jennings. 

Surgical Dispensary. Under supervision, the student takes 
the history, makes the physical examinations, attempts the diag- 
nosis, and, as far as possible, carries out the treatment of the 
ambulatory surgical patients in the University and in the Mercy 
Hospitals. Mercy Hospital — Drs. Dwight Mohr, Ridgely, Touhey, 
Bongardt and McElwain. University Hospital — Drs. Lynn, 
Winslow, Edwards and E. S. Johnson. 

Fourth Year 

Clinics. A weekly clinic is given at the Mercy and at the 
University Hospitals to one-half the class throughout the year. 
As far as possible this is a diagnostic clinic. Mercy Hospital — 
Dr. McGlannan. University Hospital — Dr. Shipley. 

Surgical Pathology. A weekly exercise of one hour at Mercy 
Hospital for one semester, at which specimens from the operat- 
ing room and museum are studied in the gross and microscopi- 
cally, in relation to the case history. Dr. McGlannan. 

Traumatic Surgery. Operative and post-operative treatment 
of accident cases, with instructions as to the relationship between 
the state, the employee, the employer, and the physician's duty 
to each. One hour a week to sections of the class throughout the 
year. Dr. Edmunds. 

Clinical Clerkship. The personal study of assigned hospital 
patients, under supervision of the staffs of the University and 
Mercy Hospitals, history-taking, and physical examination of 



ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 57 

patients, laboratory examinations, attendance at operations and 
observation of post-operative treatment. 

Ward Classes. Ward class instruction in small groups will 
consist of ward rounds, surgical diagnosis, treatment and the 
after-care of operative cases. Mercy Hospital — Drs. McGlannan, 
Wise, Elliot Hutchins, Evans and Jennings. University Hos- 
pital — Drs. Shipley, Edmunds, Lynn and Edwards. 

ANAESTHESIA 

S. Griffith Davis, A.B., M.D - Professor of Anaesthesia 

George H. Yeager, B.S., M.D. _ Instructor in Anaesthesia 

E. Hollister Davis, A.B., M.D , Assistant in Anaesthesia 

Mary J. O'Brien, R.N _ Anaesthetist 

Third Year 

Lectures on the general physiology of anaesthesia, with con- 
sideration of special physiology of each anaesthetic agent. 
Methods of induction and administration of anaesthesia. Factors 
influencing the selection of the anaesthetic and types of anaesthe- 
tic agents. Preparation and care of the anaesthetized patient. 

The lectures are correlated with practical demonstrations dur- 
ing operative clinics at the City Hospitals. 

Fourth Year 

During operative clinics in both surgery and gynecology each 
student will be given practical instruction in the administration 
of anaesthetics and will be required to record such changes as 
take place in blood pressure, pulse and respiration. 

DERMATOLOGY 

Melvin Rosenthal, M.D Professor of Dermatology 

Harry M. Robinson, M.D Professor of Clinical Dermatology 

John R. Abercrombie, A.B., M.D * Associate in Dermatology 

Francis Ellis, A.B., M.D. Instructor in Dermatology 

A. C. Monninger, M.D Instructor in Dermatology 

M. Harold Goodman, A.B., M.D Instructor in Dermatology 

Clinical conferences one hour each week to the entire class. 
This course will consist of demonstrations of the common dis- 
eases of the skin, in addition to a number of lectures on the gen- 
eral principles of Dermatology. 



58 ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 

Dispensary instruction, University Hospital daily, in the diag- 
nosis and treatment of skin lesions, Drs. Robinson, Ellis, Good- 
man, Monninger. Mercy Hospital, Mondays, Wednesdays and 
Saturdays, Dr. Rosenthal. 

ORTHOPAEDIC SURGERY 

Allen Fiske Voshell, A.B., M.D Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery 

Albertus Cotton, A.M., M.D. Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery 

Compton Riely, M.D Clinical Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery 

Moses Gellman, B.S., M.D Associate Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery 

Harry L. Rogers, M.D Associate Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery 

I. H. Maseritz, M.D Assistant in Orthopaedic Surgery 

J. G. Benesunes, M.D Assistant in Orthopaedic Surgery 

In this course didactic, clinical, bedside and out-patient instruc- 
tion is given. This instruction is provided in the University 
Hospital Amphitheatre, Mercy Hospital and Dispensary, Kernan 
Hospital and Industrial School for Crippled Children at "Radnor 
Park" and in the Dispensary of the University Hospital. 

Lectures or clinics are held once a week at each of the hos- 
pitals named in town. In addition, a weekly bedside clinic is held 
for small sections of the class at "Radnor Park" and Mercy Hos- 
pital. Daily teaching in the Dispensary is stressed. 

The course covers instruction in the special methods of exami- 
nation, pathology, diagnosis and treatment in this specialty. 

Brief outlines and demonstrations are also given of the appa- 
ratus employed in Physiotherapy, Muscle Training and Correc- 
tive Gymnastics. 

ROENTGENOLOGY 

Henry J. Walton, M.D. - Professor of Roentgenology 

Albertus Cotton, A.M., M.D _ Professor of Roentgenology 

Eugene L. Flippin, M.D. Associate in Roentgenology 

During the academic year small groups of the fourth year 
class are given weekly demonstrations in the diagnostic and 
therapeutic uses of the Roentgen rays. An effort is made to 
familiarize the student with the appearance of normal Roentgen- 
ograms, after which instruction is given in the interpretation of 
the more common pathological lesions seen on the Roentgen films 
and fluoroscopic screen. The history, physics and practical ap- 



ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 59 

plication of the Roentgen rays are alluded to, but not stressed. 
Two conferences are held each week with the medical and path- 
ological departments, which are also open to members of the 
fourth year class. 

DISEASES OF THE NOSE AND THROAT 

Edwakd R. Looper, M.D., D.Oph., 

Professor of Diseases of the Nose and Throat 
Waitman F. Zinn, M.D., 

Clinical Professor of Diseases of the Nose and Throat 
Franklin B. Anderson, M.D., 

Associate in Diseases of the Nose and Throat 

R. F. McKenzie, M.D Associate in Diseases of the Nose and Throat 

Thomas O'Rourk, M.D ...Instructor in Diseases of the Nose and Throat 

Birckhead McGowan, M.D Assistant in Diseases of the Nose and Throat 

Third Year. Instruction to entire class is given in the common 
diseases of the nose and throat, attention being especially di- 
rected to infections of the accessory sinuses, the importance of 
focal infections in the etiology of general diseases and modern 
methods of diagnosis. Lectures illustrated by lantern slides are 
given one hour weekly throughout the second semester by Dr. 
Looper. 

Fourth Year. Dispensary instruction one and one-half hours 
daily, to small sections at the University and the Mercy Hos- 
pitals. The student is given opportunity to study, diagnose and 
treat patients under supervision. Ward classes and clinical dem- 
onstrations are given in periods of one and one-half hours weekly 
throughout the session in the University and the Mercy Hos- 
pitals. 

The Looper Clinic, recently established in the University Hos- 
pital for bronchoscopy and esophagoscopy, affords unusual op- 
portunities for students to study diseases of the larynx, bronchi 
and esophagus. The clinic is open to students daily from 2 to 4 
P. M., under direction of Dr. Looper. 

The Mercy Hospital Clinic for bronchoscopy and esophagos- 
copy is under the direction of Dr. Zinn. In these two clinics the 
etiology, symtomatology, diagnosis and treatment of foreign 
bodies in the air and food passages, as well as bronchoscopy, are 
taught to students, as an aid in the diagnosis and treatment of 
diseases of the lungs. 



60 ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 

GENITO-URINARY SURGERY 

W. H. Toulson, A.B., M.Sc, M.D Professor of Genito-Urinary Surgery 

A. J. Gillis, M.D Clinical Professor of Genito-Urinary Surgery 

Austin H. Wood, M.D Associate in Genito-Urinary Surgery 

L. J. Millan, M.D Associate in Genito-Urinary Surgery 

K. D. Legge, M.D Associate in Genito-Urinary Surgery 

L. K. Fargo, M.D Instructor in Genito-Urinary Surgery 

Samuel T. Helms, M.D Instructor in Genito-Urinary Surgery 

Third Year. Eight hours to the entire class. This is a diadactic 
course in the principles of Genito-Urinary Surgery. Dr. Toulson. 

Fourth Year. The course includes urethroscopy, cystoscopy, 
ureter catheterization, renal function tests, urography, urine 
cultures, etc. The teaching consists of clinics in the amphithea- 
ter, ward rounds, and attendance by members of the senior class 
upon out-patients in the dispensary. The dispensary classes are 
carried on both at the Mercy and the University Hospital dis- 
pensaries. Every variety of venereal disease is here encountered 
and this rich wealth of material is available for teaching pur- 
poses. In addition to this, a cystoscopic clinic is conducted in 
another part of the dispensary, where the students are given 
practical instruction in the modern diagnostic methods. 

DISEASES OF THE RECTUM AND COLON 

G. Milton Linthicum, A.M., M.D., 

Professor of Diseases of Rectum and Colon 
Charles F. Blake, A.M., M.D., 

Professor of Diseases of Rectum and Colon 
J. Dawson Reeder, M.D., 

Clinical Professor of Diseases of Rectum and Colon 
Monte Edwards, M.D Associate in Diseases of Rectum and Colon 

Third Year. Six hours to the entire class. This course is for 
instruction in the diseases of the colon, sigmoid flexure, rectum 
and anus, and will cover the essential features of the anatomy 
and physiology of the large intestine as well as the various dis- 
eases to which it is subject. Dr. Linthicum and Dr. Edwards. 

Fourth Year. Ward and dispensary instruction is given in 
the University and Mercy Hospitals, where different phases of 
the various diseases are taught by direct observation and exami- 
nation. The use of the proctoscope and sigmoidoscope in the 



ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 61 

examination of the rectum and sigmoid is made familiar to each 
student. Mercy Hospital — Dr. Blake. University Hospital — 
Drs. Linthicum, Reeder and Monte Edwards. 

OTOLOGY 

J. W. Downey, M.D , Professor of Otology 

Franklin B. Anderson, M.D Associate in Otology 

F. A. Holden, M.D Instructor in Otology 

Benjamin S. Rich, M.D Assistant in Otology 

Birckhead McGowan, M.D Assistant in Otology 

The course in otology is planned to give a practical knowledge 
of the anatomy and physiology of the ear, and its proximity and 
relationship to the brain and other vital structures. The inflam- 
matory diseases, their etiology, diagnosis, treatment and compli- 
cations are particularly stressed, with emphasis upon their rela- 
tionship to the diseases of children, head-surgery and neurology. 

Third Year. The entire class is given instruction by means of 
talks, anatomical specimens and lantern slides. 

Fourth Year. Small sections of the class receive instruction 
and make personal examinations of patients under the direction 
of an instructor. The student is urged to make a routine exami- 
nation of the ear in his ward work in general medicine and 
surgery. 

NEUROLOGICAL SURGERY 

Charles Bagley, Jr., A.B., M.D Professor of Neurological Surgery 

Richard G. Coblentz, M.D Associate in Neurological Surgery 

William R. Geraghty, B.S., M.D. Instructor in Neurological Surgery 

James G. Arnold, Jr., A.B., M.D., 

Hitchcock Fellow in Neurological Surgery 

Third Year. The course covers instruction in diagnosis and 
treatment of surgical conditions of the brain, spinal cord, and 
the peripheral nerves. Eight lectures are given to the entire 
class and conferences are held from time to time. Dr. Bagley. 

Fourth Year. Weekly ward rounds and conferences are given 
at the University Hospital. Drs. Bagley and Coblentz. 



62 ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 

ONCOLOGY 

J. Mason Hundley, Jr., M.A., M.D Associate in Gynecology 

Grant E. Ward, A.B., M.D Instructor in Surgery 

Every facility for the diagnosis and treatment of neoplastic 
diseases is available; this includes electro-surgery, radium the- 
rapy and deep X-ray therapy. 

An out-patient clinic is held twice weekly which affords an 
opportunity for instruction to a limited number of students. 
The gynecological problems are under the supervision of Dr. 
Hundley, and the general surgical conditions are under the direc- 
tion of Dr. Ward. 

Instruction, other than dispensary teaching, is given to small 
groups of students, for one hour a week, in the history, physics 
and practical application of radium. Dr. Ward. 

DEPARTMENT OF OBSTETRICS 

J. M. H. Rowland, M.D Professor of Obstetrics 

L. H. Douglass, M.D Professor of Clinical Obstetrics 

J. McFarland Bergland, M.D. Associate Professor of Obstetrics 

Emil Novak, M.D Associate Professor of Obstetrics 

E. P. Smith, M.D - - Associate in Obstetrics 

J. G. M. Reese, M.D . _ Associate in Obstetrics 

M. A. Novey, A.B., M.D Associate in Obstetrics 

John G. Murray, Jr., A.B., M.D Associate in Obstetrics 

Isadore A. Siegel, A.B., M.D Associate in Obstetrics 

E. P. H. Harrison, A.B., M.D - _ Associate in Obstetrics 

Margaret B. Ballard, M.D . Assistant in Obstetrics 

E. S. Edlavitch, M.D _ Assistant in Obstetrics 

Kenneth B. Boyd, M.D _ _ Assistant in Obstetrics 

George L. Wissig, M.D , _ Assistant in Obstetrics 

Third Year. Three lectures and recitations each week by Drs. 
Bergland, Novak, Murray, Douglass and Rowland to entire class. 

Manikin Work. Drs. Smith and Edlavitch to sections of class 
at Mercy Hospital, and Drs. Douglass, Siegel, Harrison and Row- 
land at University Hospital. 

Fourth Year. Clinical Conference. One hour each week. Drs. 
Rowland, Douglass and Murray. 

Ward Classes. Six hours per week for five weeks to sections 
of class at University Hospital. Drs. Douglass, Reese and Novey. 

Each member of the Senior class is required to deliver ten 
women in their homes under supervision of the teaching and 
resident staff. 



ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 63 

DEPARTMENT OF GYNECOLOGY 

William S. Gardner, M.D. . Professor of Gynecology 

Hugh Brent, M.D _ Professor of Clinical Gynecology 

Abram S. Samuels, M.D Associate Professor of Gynecology 

George A. Strauss, Jr., M.D. _ Associate in Gynecology 

R. G. Willse, M.D _ _ Associate in Gynecology 

Thomas K. Galvin, M.D _ Associate in Gynecology 

J. Mason Hundley, Jr., M.A., M.D Associate in Gynecology 

Leo Brady, M.D. _ , _ Associate in Gynecology 

E. S. Edlavitch, M.D Assistant in Gynecology 

Third Year. Diadactic Work. A course of thirty lectures 
and recitations. 

Fourth Year. Clinical Work. Six hours weekly for one 
trimester. In this course the student writes the clinical history 
of each patient in the ward and makes a general physical exami- 
nation, including the blood and urine, before the patient is 
brought before the class. A pelvic examination is made by six 
students, and any operation required is then done before a section 
of the class small enough to see clearly what is being done and 
how it is done. On a subsequent day the whole group examines, 
microscopically, sections prepared from material removed from 
patients that have been before them. 

DEPARTMENT OF OPHTHALMOLOGY 

Clyde A. Clapp, M.D. _ Professor of Ophthalmology 

M. Randolph Kahn, M.D Clinical Professor of Ophthalmology 

H. K. Fleck, M.D Associate Professor of Ophthalmology 

R. D. West, M.D Associate in Ophthalmology 

Jonas Friedenwald, A.B., M.D „....„ Lecturer in Ophthalmic Pathology 

Joseph I. Kemler, M.D _ Associate in Ophthalmology 

F. A. Holden, M.D Instructor in Ophthalmology 

Henry F. Graff, A.B., M.D. Instructor in Ophthalmology 

Frank A. Pacienza, M.D Instructor in Refraction 

John G. Runkle, M.D. Assistant in Ophthalmology 

Thomas O'Rourk, M.D Assistant in Ophthalmology 

Third Year. Second semester. Dr. Kahn will give a course re- 
viewing the anatomy and physiology of the eye and the methods 
used in making the various examinations. Errors of refraction 
and their effect upon the general system will be explained. 
Weekly section work, demonstrating the use of the ophthalmo- 
scope, will be carried on during the entire session. 



64 ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 

Fourth Year. Clinics and demonstrations in diseases of the 
eye, weekly, for one year. Dr. Clapp. 

This course consists of lectures upon the diseases of the eye, 
with particular reference to their diagnosis and relation to gen- 
eral medicine. Special lectures will be given upon vascular 
changes in the eye and upon the pathology of the eye. Some oper- 
ations will be demonstrated by motion pictures. 

Weekly ward classes at the University and the Baltimore Eye, 
Ear and Throat and Mercy Hospitals during which the eye 
grounds in the various medical and surgical conditions are dem- 
onstrated. Drs. Fleck, West, Kemler and Graff. 

Also daily demonstrations in the taking of histories and the 
diagnosis and treatment of the various conditions as seen in the 
dispensary. 

Third Year- 
Lectures - _ 20 hours 

Laboratory _ 10 hours 

Total - - 30 hours 

Fourth Year — 

Lectures and demonstrations _ - ....- 26 hours 

Clinical work _ 20 hours 

Total 46 hours 



ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 65 

HISTORY OF MEDICINE 

John Rathbone Oliver, M.D., Ph.D. 

Professor of the History of Medicine 

In this Department a series of weekly lectures is given each 
year in March, April and May. The course is planned so that 
the entire field of medical history may be covered in four years. 
In this way any medical student who has attended the lectures 
during his four years course at the medical school has been given 
at least an outline of the history of his profession. During the 
past academic year the lectures have been devoted to Primitive 
and Ancient Medicine, beginning with the medicine of primitive 
mankind and ending with the development of medicine among 
the Greek people. The lectures are illustrated with lantern slides 
and all the important books on the subjects presented are pro- 
duced and passed around among the students. During session 
1932-33 the department was especially fortunate in being able 
to have one lecture from Dr. Henry E. Sigerist, Professor of the 
History of Medicine at the Johns Hopkins University, and an- 
other lecture from Dr. Owsei Temkin, Associate in the History 
of Medicine at the same University. Dr. Sigerist delivered the 
first lecture in the course with a general introduction to medical 
history, while Dr. Temkin presented the results of his researches 
in connection with the great Medical School of Alexandria. 

With the session of 1933-34 the lectures will begin with 
Greek Medicine and will carry on the development of medicine 
down to the end of the Middle Ages. 

Thanks to the kindness of Dr. Sigerist, any students of our 
own medical school who are interested in medical history are 
invited to attend as visitors, the lectures that are to be given 
during 1933-34 at the Institute of the History of Medicine of the 
Johns Hopkins University. These lectures are all held in the 
rooms of the Institute on the third floor of the Welch Medical 
Library. Advance notices of them will be posted in due time on 
our own notice board. The members of the staff of the Institute 
will welcome any student who is interested in medical history 
and will be glad to advise him as to his reading or to suggest 
subjects for special study. 



FIRST YEAR SCHEDULE 



E1H 


-ST SEMES' 


1ER, SEFTJ 


EMBER 25, 


1933, TO J J 


LNUARY 27 


, 1934 


Hours 


Monday 


Tuesday 


Wednesday 


Thursday 


Friday 


Saturday 


9.00— 
11.00 




Laboratory 

Biological 
Chemistry 

Section A 


Laboratory 

Biological 
Chemistry 

Section B 


Laboratory 

Biological 
Chemistry 

Section A 


Laboratory 

Biological 
Chemistry 

Section B 




11.00— 
12.00 


Biological 

Chemistry 

C. H. 


12.00 to 
12.50 


Lunch 


Lunch 


Lunch 


Lunch 


Lunch 


12.50 

to 

1.50 


Biological 

Chemistry 

C. H. 


Biological 

Chemistry 

C.H. 


Biological 

Chemistry 

C.H. 


Biological 

Chemistry 

C.H. 


Biological 

Chemistry 

C.H. 


2.00 
to 
5.00 


Laboratory 

Histology and 
Embryology 


Laboratory 

Histology and 
Embryology 




Laboratory 

Histology and 
Embryology 


Laboratory 

Histology and 
Embryology 



SECOND SEMESTER, JANUARY 30 TO MAY 26, 1934 



Hours 


Monday 


Tuesday 


Wednesday 


Thursday 


Friday 


Saturday 


9.00 

to 

12.00 


Laboratory 
*Anatomy 


Laboratory 
Anatomy 


Laboratory 
Anatomy 


Laboratory 
Anatomy 


Laboratory 
Anatomy 


Laboratory 
Anatomy 


12.00 
to 
1.00 


Lunch 


Lunch 


Lunch 


Lunch 


Lunch 




1.00 

to 

2.00 


Anatomy 
Adm. & A. H. 


Anatomy 
C. H. & A. H. 


Anatomy 
C. H. & A. H. 


Anatomy 
C. H. & Adm. 


Anatomy 
C. H. & A. H. 




2.00 
to 
5.00 


Laboratory 
Anatomy 


Laboratory 
Anatomy 


Laboratory 
Anatomy 


Laboratory 
Anatomy 


Laboratory 
Anatomy 



* Anatomy includes both Gross and Neural Anatomy. 

LOCATIONS OF LECTURE HALLS AND LABORATORIES: 

Adm. — Lower Hall, Administration Building, N. E. Cor. Lombard and Greene Streets. 
A. H. — Anatomical Hall — Upper Hall, N. E. Cor. Lombard and Greene Streets. 
C. H. — Chemical Hall, Lower Hall, N. E. Cor. Lombard and Greene Streets. 
Anatomy Laboratory — Third Floor, Gray Laboratory, Lombard and Greene Streets. 
Biological Chemistry Laboratory — Third Floor, 31 S. Greene Street. 
Histology and Embryology Laboratory — 32-34 S. Paca Street. Sixth Floor. 
Neural Anatomy Laboratory — 32-34 S. Paca Street, Sixth Floor. 

Mid-Year Examinations — January 22 to January 27, 1934. 
Final Examinations — May 21 to May 26, 1934. 

(This schedule is subject to revision for 1933-1934) 



SECOND YEAR SCHEDULE 

FIRST SEMESTER, SEPTEMBER 25, 1933, TO JANUARY 27 


, 1934 


Hours 


Monday 


Tuesday 


Wednesday 


Thursday 


Friday 




9.00 to 
10.00 


Pharmacology 
Adm. 


Pharmacology 
Adm. 


Medicine 
Adm. 


Laboratory 
Physiology 

Section A 


Laboratory 
Physiology 

Section B 




10.00 
to 

11.00 


Physiology 
Adm. 


Physiology 
Adm. 


Physiology 
Adm. 




11.00 

to 
12.00 


Pathology 
A. H. 


Pathology 
A. H. 


Bacteriology 
A. H. 




12.00 to 
12.30 


Lunch 


Lunch 


Lunch 


Lunch 


(12-1) 
Lunch 




12.30 
to 
2.30 


Laboratory 
Bacteriology 


Laboratory 
Bacteriology 


Laboratory 
Bacteriology 


Laboratory 
Bacteriology 


(1-2) 

Surgical 
Anatomy 

Adm. 




(2-3) 

Physiology 
Adm. 




2.30 
to 
3.30 


Laboratory 

Physiology 
Section A 

Pharmacology 
Section B 


Laboratory 

Physiology 
Section B 

Pharmacology 
Section A 


Laboratory 
Surgical 
Anatomy 


Surgical 

Anatomy 

C. H. 




3.30 

to 

5.30 


Laboratory 

Surgical 
Anatomy 







67 



SECOND YEAR SCHEDULE 

SECOND SEMESTER, JANUARY 30 TO MAY 26, 1934 



Hours 


Monday 


Tuesday 


Wednesday 


Thursday 


Friday 


Saturday 


8.30 to 
9.30 


Pharmacology 
Adm. 


Pharmacology 
Adm. 


* Physiology 
Adm. 


Laboratory 

Physiology 
Section A 

Pharmacology 
Section B 


Laboratory 

Physiology 
Section B 

Pharmacology 
Section A 




9.30 
to 

10.30 


Surgery 
A. H. 


Surgery 
A. H. 


Immunology 
Adm. 


10.30 

to 
11.30 


Pathology 
A. H. 


Pathology 
A. H. 


Physiology 
Adm. 


11.30 

to 
12.00 


Lunch 


Lunch 


Lunch 


Lunch 


Lunch 


(11-12) 

Physiology 

Adm. 


12.00 
to 

2.00 


Laboratory 
Pathology 


Laboratory 
Pathology 


Laboratory 
Pathology 


Laboratory 
Pathology 


Laboratory 
Pathology 


(12-1) 

Medical 

Clinic 

Amp. 


2.00 
to 
3.00 


Physiology 
Adm. 


Laboratory 
Immunology 


Laboratory 
Immunology 


Laboratory 

Physiology 
Section B 

Pharmacology 
Section A 


Laboratory 

Physiology 
Section A 

Pharmacology 
Section B 




3.00 
to 
4.00 


Physical 

Diagnosis 

Univ. Hosp. 

Disp. 


4.00 
to 
5.00 


Ad 
A. 
C. 
Ar 
Labora 
Ba 
Im 
Fa 
Ph 
Ph 
Su 
Ur 
* Ph 


LOCAT 

m. — Lower Hal 
H. — Anatomies 
H. — Chemical 
np. — Amphithea 
tories : 

cteriology — Sec 
munology — Sec 
thology — Secon 
armacology— S< 
ysiology — First 
rgical Anatomj 
liv. Hospital Di 
ysiology Course 

Mid-^ 

C 


IONS OF LEC 

1, Administrati 
il Hall— Upper 
Hall, Lower Hj 
tre, University 

and Floor, 31 S 
and Floor, 31 £ 
i Floor, 31 S. ( 
?cond Floor, Gr 

Floor, Gray L 
—Third Floor, 
sp. — Dispensarj 

Terminates M 

fear Examinat 

Final Examin 

rhis schedule i 


TURE HALLS 

on Building, N 
Hall, N. E. Cc 

ill, N. E. Cor. 
Hospital, Lorn 

. Greene Street 
. Greene Street 
Greene Street, 
ay Laboratory, 
aboratory, Lorn 
Gray Laborato 
', University H( 
arch 30, 1934. 

ons — January \ 
ations — May 21 
3 subject to re 

68 


AND LABOR 

E. Cor. Lomb 
>r. Lombard an 
Lombard and C 
bard and Greer 

Lombard and ( 
bard and Greer 
ry, Lombard ai 
aspital, Lombar 

J2 to January 
to May 26, 19 
vision for 1933 


ATORIES: 

ard and Greene 
d Greene Stree 
rreene Streets. 
e Streets. 

Greene Streets, 
le Streets, 
id Greene Stre 
d and Greene £ 

27, 1934. 

14. 

-1934) 


Streets, 
ts. 

ets. 
treets. 



THIRD YEAR SCHEDULE 

SEPTEMBER 25, 1933, TO MAY 26, 1934 



Hours 


Monday 


Tuesday 


Wednesday 


Thursday 


Friday 


Saturday 


8.30 

to 

9.30 


Therapeutics 
C. H. 


Pathology 
C. H. 


Medicine 
C. H. 


Medicine 
C. H. 


Pathology 
C. H. 


Medicine 
C. H. 


9.30 to 
10.30 


Obstetrics 
C. H. 


Surgery 
C. H. 


Obstetrics 
C. H. 


Surgery 
C. H. 


Medicine 
C. H. 


Surgery 
C. H. 


10.30 
to 
1.00 


Physical 
Diagnosis 

Operative 
Surgery 

Dispensary 

Lunch and 
Transfer 


Physical 
Diagnosis 

Operative 
Surgery 

Dispensary 

Lunch and 
Transfer 


Physical 
Diagnosis 

Operative 
Surgery 

Dispensary 

Lunch and 
Transfer 


Physical 
Diagnosis 

Operative 
Surgery 

Dispensary 

Lunch and 
Transfer 


Physical 
Diagnosis 

Operative 
Surgery 

Dispensary 

Lunch and 
Transfer 


Physical 
Diagnosis 

Operative 
Surgery 

Dispensary 

Lunch 


1.00 
to 
2.00 


Surgical 

Clinic 

Amp. 

**Nose-Throat 

C. H. 


Medical 
Clinic 
Amp. 


Neurology 
P. & S. 34 


(12.45-1.45) 
Gynecology 
29 S. Greene 


Obstetrics 
A. H. 


Transfer 


2.15 
to 
3.15 


Pathology 
Laboratory 


Pathology 
Laboratory 


(2.30-4.30) 

Section A 

Clinical 

Medicine 

Surgery 

Gross 

Pathology 

at Baltimore 

City Hospitals 


(2-3) 

Clinical 

Pathology 

29 S. Greene 


2.15 

to 

5.15 

Clinical 

Pathology 

Laboratory 


(2-4) 
Section B 
Clinical 
Medicine 
Surgery 


3.15 
to 
4.15 


*(3-4) 
Eye and Ear 
29 S. Greene 


Gross 

Pathology 

at Baltimore 

City Hospitals 


4.15 

to 

5.15 


Preventive 

Medicine 

C. H. 


Pediatrics 
C. H. 


(2.15-4.15) 
Section B 
Group Work 
Ophthalmos- 
copy 
B. E. H. 
Practical 
Obstetrics 
Univ. Hosp. 


(4-5) 
Preventive 
Medicine 

Legal 

Medicine 

Mental 

Hygiene 

29 S. Greene 





From 10.30 A. M. to 1.00 P. M. the class is divided into two sections, one section report- 
ing at Calvert and Saratoga Streets, the other at Lombard and Greene Streets. 
C. H. — Chemical Hall — N. E. Cor. Lombard and Greene Streets. 

A. H. — Anatomical Hall — N. E. Cor. Lombard and Greene Streets. 

Amp. — Amphitheatre — University Hospital, S. W. Cor. Lombard and Greene Streets. 
P. & S. — N. W. Cor. Calvert and Saratoga Streets. Rooms indicated on Second Floor. 

B. E. H.— Baltimore Eye, Ear and Throat Hospital, 1214 Eutaw Place. 

At the beginning of the second semester Section "A" at Baltimore City Hospital on 
Saturdays, 2-4 P. M., and University Hospital on Wednesdays, 2.15-4.15 P. M. ; Section "B" 
at Baltimore City Hospital on Wednesdays, 2.30-4.30 P. M. 

Mid-Year Examinations — January 22 to January 27, 1934. 
Final Examinations — May 14 to May 26, 1934. 

* Ear — First semester. 

* Eye — Second semester. 

** Nose-Throat — Second semester. 

(This schedule is subject to revision for 1933-1934) 

69 



FOURTH YEAR SCHEDULE 

SEPTEMBER 25, 1933, TO MAY 26, 1934 



Hours 


Monday 


Tuesday 


Wednesday 


Thursday 


Friday 


Saturday 




Ward Classes 


Ward Classes 


Ward Classes 


Ward Classes 


Ward Classes 


Ward Classes g 


9.00 to 


Medicine 


Medicine 


Medicine 


Medicine 


Medicine 


Medicine 


11.00 


Surgery 


Surgery 


Surgery 


Surgery 


Surgery 


Surgery 




Obstetrics 


Gynecology 


Obstetrics 


Gynecology 


Obstetrics 


Gynecology 






Medical 












Orthopaedic 


Clinic 


Clinical 


Surgical 


Medical 


Pediatric 


11.00 
to 


Surgery 


Univ.Sec.Amp 


Pathological 


Clinic 


Clinic 


Clinic 


12.00 


Univ.Sec.Amp. 


Surgical 


Conference 










P. & S. Sec. 51 


Pathology 


Univ.Sec.C.H. 


Univ.Sec.Amp. 


Univ.Sec.Amp 


Univ.Sec.Amp. ^ 






P. & S. Sec. 40 


P. & S. Sec. 34 


P. & S. Sec. 51 


P. & S. Sec. 34 


P. &.S. 34 


12.00 


Dispensary 


Dispensary 


Dispensary 


Dispensary 


Dispensary 


j 


to 


Lunch and 


and 


Lunch and 


and 


Lunch and 


Dispensary 


2.00 


Transfer 


Lunch 


Transfer 


Lunch 


Transfer 






Dermatology 




Eye and Ear 


Obstetrical 


Gastro-Enter- 








Neurology 


Clinic 


Clinic 


ology Clinic 


Genito- 


2.15 
to 


(Full Class at 


Clinic 


(Full Class at 


(Full Class at 


(Full Class at 


urinary 
Clinic 


3.15 


Univ. Hosp.) 


Univ.Sec.Amp. 


Univ. Hosp.) 


Univ. Hosp.) 


Univ. Hosp.) 






P. & S. Sec. 34 








P. & S. Sec. 51 




Amp. 




Amp. & C. H. 


Amp. 


Amp. 














Ward Classes 


1 




P. & S. Sec. 


Ward Classes 


P. & S. Sec. 


Ward Classes 


Neurology 




3.30 
to 


Ward Classes 




Ward Classes 


Medicine 


Psychiatry 




Medicine 


Therapeutics 


Medicine 
Roentgenology 


Nose & Throat 


- U. H. 

Orthopaedic 


! 




Urology 


Proctology 




Physical 


Surgery 










Preventive 


Kernan 








Radiotherapy 


Medicine 


Therapeutics 


Hospital 












(5 to 6 P.M.) 








Univ. Sec. 




Univ. Sec. 


March, 






3.30 


Ward Classes 




Ward Classes 


April and 






to 








May 






5.00 


Medicine 
Roentgenology 




Medicine 

Urology 

Eye and Ear 


History of 

Medicine 

C. H. 







SECOND SEMESTER 

1st period Jan. 31-Mch. 3 

2nd period Mch. 5-Apr. 7 

3rd period Apr. 9-May 12 



The Senior Class is divided into two sections, which report, one at Lombard and Greene 
Streets, the other at Calvert and Saratoga Streets, for one semester each, then rotate. 

Each section of the class is divided into three groups — Medical, Surgical, and Special. 
These groups will rotate on the following dates : 
FIRST SEMESTER 

1st period Sept. 25-Oct. 28 

2nd period Oct. 30-Dec. 2 

3rd period _ _...Dec. 4-Jan. 20 

C. H. — Chemical Hall — N. E. Cor. Lombard and Greene Streets. 
Amp. — Amphitheatre — University Hospital. 
P. & S., 34 — Second Floor, Calvert and Saratoga Streets. 
P. & S., 40, 51 — Fourth Floor, Calvert and Saratoga Streets. 

For sub-sections of P. & S. ward classes, 3.30 to 5.00 P. M., see supplementary schedule 
at Mercy Hospital. For sub-sections of U. H. ward classes, 3.30 to 5.00 P. M., see Medical 
School bulletin board. 

Mid-Year Examinations — January 22 to January 27, 1934. 

Final Examinations — May 14 to May 19, 1934. 

(This schedule is subject to revision for 1933-1934) 

70 



REQUIREMENTS FOR MATRICULATION 

Admission to the course in medicine is by a completed Medical 
Student Certificate issued by the Registrar of the University of 
Maryland. This certificate is obtained from the Registrar on 
the basis of satisfactory educational credentials, and is essential 
for admission to any class. 

The minimum requirements for the issuance of the Medical 
Student Certificate are : 

(a) The completion of a standard four-year secondary school 
curriculum (it is advisable that a student take besides four years 
of English, courses in Latin; chemistry; physics; mathematics, 
including trigonometry; biology; and either French or German), 
or the equivalent in entrance examinations, and at least : 

(b) Two years or sixty semester hours of college credits 
(exclusive of military science and physical education), including 
chemistry, physics, biology, English, and a modern foreign lan- 
guage. (See details below.) 

Women are admitted to the School of Medicine of this Uni- 
versity. 

DETAILS OF THE COLLEGE REQUIREMENT 

a. The preliminary college course shall extend through two 
college sessions of at least thirty-two weeks each, exclusive of 
holidays. 

b. In excellence of teaching and in content, the work of this 
preliminary college course shall be equal to the work done in the 
freshman and sophomore years in standard colleges and uni- 
versities. 

c. This preliminary college course shall include courses in 
chemistry, physics, biology, English, and a modern foreign lan- 
guage, each course to embrace at least the credit shown in the 
schedule following: 



71 



72 REQUIREMENTS FOR MATRICULATION 

SCHEDULE OF SUBJECTS OF THE TWO-YEAR 

PREMEDICAL COLLEGE COURSE 

Sixty Semester Hours Required 

Semester 
Required Courses: Hours 

Chemistry ( a ) - 12 

Physics (b) .. 8 

Biology (c) _ - , - 8 

English Composition and Literature (d) 6 

Modern Foreign Language (e) 6 

Other Non-Science Subjects 6 

Courses Strongly Urged : 

Additional English 

Additional Foreign Language. 

Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy, Embryology, Histological Technique. 

Quantitative Analysis or other Advanced Chemistry. 

Advanced Mathematics, including Algebra and Trigonometry. 

Psychology, Logic, Social Science, Economics, History, Political Science. 

A semester hour is the credit value of sixteen weeks' work consisting of 
one lecture or recitation period per week, each period to be of not less than 
fifty minutes' duration net, at least two hours of laboratory work to be 
considered as the equivalent of one lecture or recitation period. 

(a) Chemistry. Twelve semester hours required of which at 
least eight semester hours must be in general inorganic chem- 
istry, including four semester hours of laboratory work ; and four 
semester hours in organic chemistry, including two semester 
hours of laboratory work. In the interpretation of this rule, 
work in qualitative analysis may be counted as general inorganic 
chemistry. 

(b) PHYSICS. Eight semester hours required, of which at 
least two must be laboratory work. This course presupposes a 
knowledge of plane trigonometry. 

(c) Biology. Eight semester hours required, of which four 
must be laboratory work. This requirement may be satisfied 
by a course of eight semester hours in either general biology or 
zoology, or by courses of four semester hours each in zoology 
and botany, but not by botany alone. 



REQUIREMENTS FOR MATRICULATION 73 

(d) English Composition and Literature. The usual in- 
troductory college course of six semester hours, or its equivalent, 
is required. 

(e) Foreign Language. Six semester hours minimum re- 
quirement. A reading knowledge of a modern foreign language 
is very strongly urged. French and German have the closest 
bearing upon modern medical literature. 






74 REQUIREMENTS FOR MATRICULATION 

COMBINED COURSE IN ARTS AND SCIENCES, AND 

MEDICINE 

A combined seven years' curriculum is offered leading to the 
degrees of Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science and Doctor 
of Medicine. The first three years are taken in residence in the 
College of Arts and Sciences at College Park, and the last four 
years in the School of Medicine in Baltimore. (See University 
catalogue for details of quantitative and qualitative premedical 
course requirements.) 

Upon the successful completion of the first year in the School 
of Medicine, and upon the recommendation of the Dean, the de- 
gree of Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science may be con- 
ferred by the College of Arts and Sciences. 

Students are urged to consider carefully the advantages this 
combination course offers over the minimum requirements of 
two years. By completing three years the training may be grad- 
ually broadened by a wider latitude in the election of courses in 
the arts subjects. 

POST-GRADUATE STUDENTS 

Graduates in medicine desiring to take the work of the senior 
year without being candidates for the degree, and, therefore, 
without examination, may receive a certificate of attendance on 
completing the full course satisfactorily. 

The requirements for graduates in medicine admitted to the 
fourth-year class as candidates for the degree of Doctor of Medi- 
cine are the same as those enforced against undergraduates ad- 
mitted to advanced standing. 

RULES 

1. All students are required to take the spring examinations 
unless excused by the Dean. No student will be permitted to 
advance from a lower to a higher class with conditions. 

2. Should a student be required to repeat any year in the 
course, he must pay regular fees. 

3. A student failing in final examinations for graduation at 
the end of the fourth year will be required to repeat the entire 



RULES AND FEES 75 

course of the fourth year and to take examination in such other 
branches as may be required should he again be permitted to 
enter the school as a candidate for graduation. 

4. The general fitness of a candidate for graduation as well 
as the results of his examinations will be taken into consideration 
by the Faculty. 

5. All students entering the School of Medicine of the Uni- 
versity of Maryland are required to provide themselves with 
microscopes of a satisfactory type. 

A standard microscope of either Bausch & Lomb, Leitz, Spen- 
cer, or Zeiss make, fitted with the following attachments, will fill 
the requirements: 

Triple nose piece 10 x and 5 x Oculars 

Wide aperture stage 16mm. and 4mm. Objectives 

Quick Screw condenser (Abbe) 1.9mm. 125 N.A. Oil Immersion Lens 

STUDENTS MUST BE PREPARED TO PURCHASE MICROSCOPES 
AT THE BEGINNING OF THE FIRST YEAR 

All the above rules, as well as the fees stated below, relate to 
the year ending June 6th, 1934, only. The right is reserved to 
make changes in the curriculum, the requirements for gradua- 
tion, the fees and in any of the regulations whenever the Faculty 
deems it expedient. 

FEES 

Matriculation fee (paid once) - $10.00 

Tuition fee (each year) for residents of Maryland _ _ 350.00 

Tuition fee (each year) ) for non-residents 500.00 

Laboratory fee (each year) _ _ 25.00 

Special and re-examination fee _ _ 5.00 

Graduation fee _ _ < _ 15.00 

No fees are returnable. 

The above fees apply to all students who matriculate in the 
School of Medicine in any class for the session beginning Sep- 
tember 25th, 1933. 

All students, after proper certification, are required to register 
at the Office of the Registrar. (See calendar in front part of 
this bulletin for dates for the payments of fees, and the note 
regarding late registration fee.) 



76 DEFINITION OF RESIDENCE STATUS OF STUDENTS 

The matriculation fee is payable at the time the applicant is 
offered acceptance as a student. 

The laboratory fee and one-half of the tuition fee for the year 
shall be paid at the time of the first semester registration, and 
one-half of the tuition fee shall be paid at the second semester 
registration date. 

Failure to meet these conditions will automatically debar the 
student from attendance on classes and other privileges of the 
University. 

When offering checks in payment of tuition and other fees, 
students are requested to have them drawn in the exact amount 
of such fees. Personal checks whose face value is in excess of 
the fees due will be accepted for collection. 

DEFINITION OF RESIDENCE STATUS OF STUDENTS* 

Students who are minors are considered to be resident students 
if, at the time of their registration, their parents* have been resi- 
dents of this State for at least one year. 

Adult students are considered to be resident students if, at the 
time of their registration, they have been residents of this State 
for at least one year; provided such residence has not been 
acquired while attending any school or college in Maryland. 

The status of the residence of a student is determined at the 
time of his first registration in the University and may not there- 
after be changed by him unless, in the case of a minor, his 
parents* move to and become legal residents of this State by 
maintaining such residence for at least one full calendar year. 
However, the right of the student (minor) to change from a non- 
resident to a resident status must be established by him prior to 
registration for a semester in any academic year. 



* The term "parents" includes persons who, by reason of death or other 
unusual circumstances, have been legally constituted the guardians of or 
stand in loco parentis to such minor students. 



MEDICAL CARE OF STUDENTS 77 

STATE MEDICAL STUDENT QUALIFYING CERTIFICATES 

Candidates for admission who live in or expect to practice 
medicine in Pennsylvania, New Jersey or New York, and who 
are accepted as students by the University of Maryland, must 
apply, immediately after having been accepted, to their respective 
state board of education for a medical student qualifying certifi- 
cate (Pennsylvania and New Jersey), or an approval of applica- 
tion for a medical student qualifying certificate (New York). 

These certificates are to be on file in the Office of the Registrar, 
University of Maryland, during the period of attendance in the 
School of Medicine. 

MEDICAL CARE OF STUDENTS 

The Medical Council has made provision for the systematic 
care of students in the Medical School, according to the following 
plan: 

1. Preliminary Examination — All new students will be exam- 
ined during the first week of the semester. Notice of the date, 
time, and place of the examination will be announced to the 
classes on the bulletin board. The passing of this physical exami- 
nation is necessary before final acceptance of any student. 

2. Medical Attention — Students in need of medical attention 
will be seen by the School Physician, Dr. T. N. Carey, in his 
office at the Medical School, between 4 and 5 P. M., daily, except 
Saturday and Sunday. In cases of necessity, students will be 
seen at their homes. 

3. Hospitilization — If it becomes necessary for any student 
to enter the hospital during the school year, the Medical Council 
has arranged for the payment of part or all of his hospital ex- 
penses, depending on the length of his stay and special expenses 
incurred. This applies only to students admitted through the 
School Physician's Office. 

4. Prospective students are advised to have any known physi- 
cal defects corrected before entering school in order to prevent 
loss of time which later correction might incur. As minor visual 
defects are frequently unrecognized until detected by an ophthal- 
mologist, it is especially urged that all new students have their 
eyes examined and any error of refraction corrected before be- 
ginning the course. 



78 PRIZES AND SCHOLARSHIPS 



PRIZES AND SCHOLARSHIPS 

FACULTY PRIZE 

To stimulate study among the candidates for graduation, the 
Faculty offers a Gold Medal to the candidate who secures the 
highest average during the four years of his course. Certificates 
of Honor are awarded to the five candidates standing next 
highest. 

DR. A. BRADLEY GAITHER MEMORIAL PRIZE 

A prize of $25.00 is given each year by Mrs. A. Bradley Gaither 
as a memorial to the late Dr. A. Bradley Gaither, to the student 
in the senior class doing the best work in Genito-Urinary Sur- 
gery. 



SCHOLARSHIPS* 
The Dr. Samuel Leon Frank Scholarship 

(Value $125.00) 

This scholarship was established by Mrs. Bertha Rayner Frank 
as a memorial to the late Dr. Samuel Leon Frank, an alumnus of 
this University. 

It is awarded by the Trustees of the Endowment Fund of the 
University each year upon nomination by the Medical Council 
"to a medical student of the University of Maryland, who in 
the judgment of said Council, is of good character and in need 
of pecuniary assistance to continue his medical course." 

This scholarship is awarded to a second, third or fourth year 
student who has successfully completed one year's work in this 
school. No student may hold such scholarship for more than two 
years. 



* Note : Scholarships, unless specifically renewed on consideration of ap- 
plication, are for one year only. 



SCHOLARSHIPS 79 

The Charles M. Hitchcock Scholarships 

(Value $125.00 each) 

Two scholarships were established from a bequest to the School 
of Medicine by the late Charles M. Hitchcock, M.D., an alumnus 
of the University. 

These scholarships are awarded annually by the Trustees of 
the Endowment Fund of the University, upon nomination by the 
Medical Council, to students who have meritoriously completed 
the work of at least the first year lof the course in medicine, 
and who present to the Council satisfactory evidence of a good 
moral character and of inability to continue the course without 
pecuniary assistance. 

The Randolph Winslow Scholarship 

(Value $125.00) 

This scholarship was established by Prof. Randolph Winslow, 
M.D., LL.D. 

It is awarded annually by the Trustees of the Endowment 
Fund of the University, upon nomination by the Medical Coun- 
cil, to a "needy student of the Senior, Junior, or Sophomore Class 
of the Medical School. ,, 

"He must have maintained an average grade of 85% in all his 
work up to the time (of awarding the scholarship. " 

"He must be a person of good character and must satisfy the 
Medical Council that he is worthy of and in need of assistance." 

The Dr. Leo Karlinsky Scholarship 

(Value $200.00) 

This scholarship was established by Mrs. Ray Mintz Karlinsky 
as a memorial to her husband, the late Dr. Leo Karlinsky, an 
alumnus of this University. 

The scholarship is awarded to a second-year student who at the 
end of the first year has passed the best examination in Anat- 
omy, Histology, Embryology, and Biological Chemistry. 



80 SCHOLARSHIPS 

The University Scholarships 

Two scholarships are awarded by the University: One to a 
student of the College of Arts and Sciences appointed by the 
President, to be held for only one year ; the other, which entitles 
the holder to exemption from payment of the tuition fee of the 
year, is awarded annually by the Medical Council to a student 
of the senior class who presents to the Medical Council satis- 
factory evidence that he is of good moral character and is worthy 
of and in need of assistance to complete the course. 

Frederica Gehrmann Scholarship 

This scholarship was established by the bequest of the late 
Mrs. Frederica Gehrmann and entitles the holder to exemption 
from payment of tuition fees. The scholarship is awarded to 
a third-year student who at the end of the second year has passed 
the best practical examinations in Anatomy, Physiology, Biologi- 
cal Chemistry, Pharmacology, Pathology. Bacteriology, Im- 
munology, and Serology. 

The Clarence and Genevra Warfield Scholarships 

(Value $300.00 each) 

There are five scholarships established by the Regents from 
the income of the fund bequeathed by the will of Dr. Clarence 
Warfield. 

Terms and Conditions: These scholarships are available to 
students of any of the classes of the course in medicine. Prefer- 
ence is given to students from the counties of the State of Mary- 
land which the Medical Council may from time to time determine 
to be most in need of medical practitioners. 

Any student receiving one of these scholarships must agree, 
after graduation and a year's interneship, to undertake the prac- 
tice of medicine, for a term of two years, in the county to which 
the student is accredited, or in a county selected by the Council. 
In the event that a student is not able to comply with the condi- 
tion requiring him to practice in the county to which he is ac- 
credited by the Council, the money advanced by the Regents shall 
be refunded. 



HOSPITAL APPOINTMENTS 81 

Israel and Cecelia E. Cohen Scholarship 

(Value $250.00) 

This scholarship was established by Miss Eleanor S. Cohen in 
memory of her parents, Israel and Cecelia E. Cohen. Terms and 
conditions : This scholarship will be available to students of any 
one of the classes of the course in Medicine ; preference is given 
to students of the counties in the State of Maryland which the 
Medical Council may from time to time determine to be most in 
need of medical practitioners. Any student receiving one of 
these scholarships must, after graduation and a year's interne- 
ship, agree to undertake the practice of medicine for a term of 
two years in the county to which the student is accredited, or in 
a county selected by the Council. In the event that a student is 
not able to comply with the condition requiring him to practice 
in the county to which he is accredited by the Council, the money 
advanced by the Regents shall be refunded. 



ANNUAL HOSPITAL APPOINTMENTS 

On February 1st of each session the following annual appoint- 
ments are made from among the graduates of the school : 



TO THE UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL 

Two Resident Surgeons Two Resident Obstetricians 

Two Resident Physicians Thirteen Junior Residents on a Rota- 

One Resident Gynecologist ting Service 

A number of students are appointed each year, at the close of 
the session, as Clinical Assistants in the University Hospital for 
the summer months. 



TO THE MERCY HOSPITAL 

Chief Resident Physician One Resident Gynecologist 

One Assistant Resident Physician One Resident Obstetrician 

Chief Resident Surgeon Eight Junior Residents on a Rotating 

Five Assistant Resident Surgeons Service 



NOTICE TO STUDENTS 

The personal expenses of the students are at least as low in 
Baltimore as in any large city in the United States. The follow- 
ing estimates of a student's personal expenses for the academic 
year of eight months have been prepared by students, and are 
based upon actual experience. In addition to these the student 
must bear in mind the expenditure for a microscope. 

Items Low 

Books _....- $50 

College Incidentals — - 20 

Board, eight months - 200 

Room rent . _ 64 

Clothing and laundry _ 50 

All other expenses _ _ 25 

Total $409 $556 $720 

Students will save time and expense upon their arrival in the 
city by going directly to the School of Medicine on the University 
grounds, N. E. Corner Lombard and Greene Streets. Here may 
be found a list of comfortable and convenient boarding houses 
suitable to their means and wishes. 

For further information, apply to 

J. M. H. Rowland, M.D., Dean, 

Lombard and Greene Streets. 



Average 


Liberal 


$75 


$100 


20 


20 


250 


275 


80 


100 


80 


150 


50 


75 



82 



GRADUATES, UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND SCHOOL OF 

MEDICINE AND COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS 

AND SURGEONS, JUNE 4, 1932 



Abrashkin, Mortimer Dick, B.S., 

Connecticut 
Ahroon, Carl Richard, A.B., Maryland 

Ashman, Leon, B.S Maryland 

Bell, Charles Raymond, B.S., 

Pennsylvania 

Bell, James Russell Pennsylvania 

Bercovitz, Nathan New York 

Berger, Herbert, B.S New York 

Blum, Samuel Daniel, B.S., New York 

Bogorad, Daniel Emil Maryland 

Brown, William Edward California 

Byer, Jacob, M.A. „ New York 

Cannon, Martin Ohio 

Chimacoff, Hyman New Jersey 

Clayman, David Stanford Maryland 

Crecca, Anthony Daniel New Jersey 

Currie, Dwight Mclver, A.B. 

North Carolina 

Davis, Carroll Kalman New York 

Demarco, Salvatore Joseph, A.B., 

Maryland 
Diamond, Joseph George, B.S., 

New Jersey 
Dumler, John Charles, B.S., Maryland 

Eichert, Herbert Maryland 

Eisenbrandt, William Henry, A.B., 

Maryland 

Fein, Jack, B.S _ New York 

Fishbein, Elliot, M.S New Jersey 

Flom, Charles Maryland 

France, Andrew Menaris, B.S., 

Maryland 
Ganz, Samuel Evans, M.A., New York 

Geller, Samuel, B.S New Jersey 

Gershenson, David Abraham, A.B., 

Maryland 
Gittleman, Solomon Ellman, B.S., 

New York 

Glass, Albert Julius Maryland 

Gluckman, Albert Gerson, B.S., 

Delaware 
Gorenberg, Harold, A.B., New Jersey 
Grosh, Joseph Walter, B.S., 

Pennsylvania 
Hall, Joseph Edwin, B.S., 

West Virginia 

Halperin, David, B.S New Jersey 

Hammell, Frank Mull New Jersey 

Hantman, Irvin Maryland 

Harris, Jacob, A.B New York 

Hecht, Manes Scheuer, A.B., Maryland 

Hendler, Hyman Bernard ...Maryland 

Hull, Harry Clay Maryland 



Jacobson, Meyer William, A.B., 

Maryland 
Kaplan, Abraham Nathan, M.S., 

New York 

Karfgin, Arthur, B.S Maryland 

Katz, Abraham, B.S New York 

Katz, Leonard Maryland 

Katzenstein, Lawrence, B.S., 

Maryland 

Keiser, Sylvan - New York 

Klein, Henrietta Estelle, Ph.B., 

Maryland 

KorostorT, Bernard, B.S New York 

Kress, Milton Bernard Maryland 

Krieger, Alexander Allan, 

Pennsylvania 
Lechner, Sidney Israel, M.A., 

New York 

Leffert, Jacob, B.S New York 

Legum, Samuel, A.B Maryland 

Lerner, George, M.A New York 

Lieberman, Samuel, M.S New York 

Louft, Reuben Richard, A.B., 

Maryland 
Markman, Harry David, B.S., 

New York 
McGovern, William Joseph, B.S., 

Pennsylvania 
McMillan, William Owen, 

West Virginia 
Mebane, William Carter, 

North Carolina 
Mickley, John Hoke, B.S., 

Pennsylvania 
Miller, Myron Joseph, M.A., 

New York 

Moores, John Duer, B.S. Maryland 

Nachlas, Arthur, A.B Maryland 

Newnam, Alpheus Carlton Maryland 

Panebianco, Richard Robert, B.S., 

New York 

Pear, Henry Robert Maryland 

Philip, Arthur Jay, B.S New York 

Pink, Solomon Harris, B.S., 

New Jersey 
Prigal, Samuel Jeremiah, B.S., 

New York 
Proctor, Samuel Edward, A.B., 

Maryland 

Reckson, Morris Murray New York 

Roberts, Marion Butler, A.B., 

North Carolina 
Rohm, Jack Zeth Pennsylvania 



83 



84 GRADUATES, 1932 

Rosenthal, Stephen Isaiah, A.B., Stein, Charles, A.B Maryland 

Pennsylvania Stephenson, Frank RicharcLMaryland 

Rubenstein, Robert, B.S., New Jersey Taylor, Francis Nicholson, A.B. , 

Sanchez, Robert Luis, A.B Mexico Virginia 

Saunders, Thomas Sewell Maryland Thompson, Harry Goff Illinois 

Savage, John Edward, B.S., Tomlinson, Thomas H., 

District of Columbia North Carolina 

Schwartz, David Israel Maryland Whicker, Max Evans North Carolina 

Shack, Max Herman New Jersey Wilson, Frank, B.S North Carolina 

Shaw, John Jacob, A.B New Jersey Wirts, Carl Alexander, B.S., 

Siegel, Sidney Leon, B.S., New Jersey Pennsylvania 

Silverstein, George, A.B Connecticut Zupnik, Howard Lester, B.S., 

Simmons, John Frederick Maryland Pennsylvania 

Snyder, Jerome Maryland Zuravin, Meyer Harry, B.S., 

Sollod, Aaron Charles Maryland New Jersey 

Statman, Arthur James, B.S., 

New Jersey 

Graduated September 15, 1932 

Louis Frank Klimes , Maryland 

Honors 

University Prize Gold Medal _ - Charles Raymond Bell, Jr. 

Certificates of Honor 

David Stanford Clayman Samuel Legum 

John Edward Savage John Charles Dumler 

Solomon Ellman Gittleman 

Prizes 

The Dr. A. Bradley Gaither Memorial Prize of $25.00 for the best work 

in Genito-Urinary Surgery during the senior year _..John Hoke Mickley 

The Dr. Leo Karlinsky Memorial Scholarship for the highest standing 

in the Freshman Class Karl Frederick Mech 



INTERNESHIPS— CLASS OF 1932 

Graduates of the Class of 1932 are serving interneships as follows : 

Abrashkin, Mortimer Dick King's County Hospital, Brooklyn, New York 

Ahroon, Carl Richard University Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland 

Ashman, Leon West Baltimore General Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland 

Bell, Charles Raymond Mercy Hospital, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

Bell, James Russell Mercy Hospital, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

Bercovitz, Nathan - Bronx Hospital, Bronx, New York 

Berger, Herbert _ Morrisania City Hospital, Bronx, New York 

Blum, Samuel Daniel Beth David Hospital, New York, New York 

Bogorad, Daniel Emil Sinai Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland 

Brown, William Edward University Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland 

Byer, Jacob Montefiore Hospital, New York, New York 

Cannon, Martin Baltimore City Hospitals, Baltimore, Maryland 

Chimacoff, Hyman Newark Beth Israel Hospital, Newark, New Jersey 

dayman, David Stanford Sinai Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland 

Crecca, Anthony Daniel Newark City Hospital, Newark, New Jersey 

Currie, Dwight Mclver University Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland 

Davis, Carroll Kalman Beth-El Hospital, Brooklyn, New York 

Demarco, Salvatore Joseph University Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland 

Diamond, Joseph George Muhlenberg Hospital, Plainfield, New Jersey 

Dumler, John Charles University Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland 

Eichert, Herbert Union Memorial Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland 

Eisenbrandt, William Henry.Union Memorial Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland 

Fein, Jack Bronx Hospital, Bronx, New York 

Fishbein, Elliot Beth Israel Hospital, Newark, New Jersey 

Flom, Charles , , 

France, Andrew Menaris University Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland 

Ganz, Samuel Evans _ Metropolitan Hospital, Welfare Island, New York 

Geller, Samuel Jersey City Hospital, Jersey City, New Jersey 

Gershenson, David Abraham.. .Baltimore City Hospitals, Baltimore, Maryland 
Gittleman, Solomon Ellman, 

Brownsville and East New York Hospital, New York, New York 

Glass, Albert Julius Gouverneur Hospital, New York, New York 

Gluckman, Albert Gerson Jewish Hospital, St. Louis, Missouri 

Gorenberg, Harold Jersey City Hospital, Jersey City, New Jersey 

Grosh, Joseph Walter Lancaster General Hospital, Lancaster, Pennsylvania 

Hall, Joseph Edwin Ohio Valley General Hospital, Wheeling, West Virginia 

Halperin, David Jersey City Medical Center, Jersey City, New Jersey 

Hammell, Frank Mull Mercer Hospital, Trenton, New Jersey 

Hantman, Irvin West Baltimore General Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland 

Harris, Jacob Beth-El Hospital, Brooklyn, New York 

Hecht, Manes Scheuer Union Memorial Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland 

Hendler, Hyman Bernard Baltimore City Hospitals, Baltimore, Maryland 

Hull, Harry Clay University Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland 

Jacobson, Meyer William Baltimore City Hospitals, Baltimore, Maryland 

85 



86 INTERNESHIPS— CLASS OF 1932 

Kaplan, Abraham Nathan, 

Brownsville and East New York Hospital, New York, New York 

Karfgin, Arthur Mercy Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland 

Katz, Abraham Morrisania Hospital, Bronx, New York 

Katz, Leonard South Baltimore General Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland 

Katzenstein, Lawrence Sinai Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland 

Keiser, Sylvan United Israel Zion Hospital, Brooklyn, New York 

Klein, Henrietta R Gallinger Municipal Hospital, Washington, D. C. 

Korostoff, Bernard Mercy Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland 

Kress, Milton Bernard, 

West Baltimore General Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland 

Krieger, Alexander Allan Passavant Hospital, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

Lechner, Sidney Israel Jewish Memorial Hospital, New York, New York 

Leffert, Jacob Cumberland Hospital, Brooklyn, New York 

Legum, Samuel Sinai Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland 

Lerner, George, 

Brownsville and East New York Hospital, New York, New York 

Lieberman, Samuel Queensboro Contagious Hospital, Queens, New York 

Louft, Reuben Richard University Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland 

Markman, Harry David Gouverneur Hospital, New York, New York 

McGovern, William Joseph St. Joseph's Hospital, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

McMillan, William Owen ...University Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland 

Mebane, William Carter St. Luke's Hospital, Bethlehem, Pennsylvania 

Mickley, John Hoke St. Luke's Hospital, Bethlehem, Pennsylvania 

Miller, Myron Joseph _ Morrisania Hospital, Bronx, New York 

Moores, John Duer _ University Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland 

Nachlas, Arthur Sinai Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland 

Newnam, Alpheus Carlton. -..Wheeling Hospital, Wheeling, West Virginia 

Panebianco, Richard Robert, 

Metropolitan Hospital, Welfare Island, New York 

Pear, Henry Robert _....„ _ _ „ _..... 

Philip, Arthur Jay United Israel Zion Hospital, Brooklyn, New York 

Pink, Solomon Harris Barnett Memorial Hospital, Paterson, New Jersey 

Prigal, Samuel Jeremiah _ Beth David Hospital, New York, New York 

Proctor, Samuel Edward Maryland General Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland 

Reckson, Morris Murray United Israel Zion Hospital, Brooklyn, New York 

Roberts, Marion Butler Baltimore City Hospitals, Baltimore, Maryland 

Rohm, Jack Zeth Western Pennsylvania Hospital, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

Rosenthal, Stephen Isaiah Scranton State Hospital, Scranton, Pennsylvania 

Rubenstein, Robert Metropolitan Hospital, Welfare Island, New York 

Sanchez, Robert Luis Mercy Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland 

Saunders, Thomas Sewell University Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland 

Savage, John Edward University Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland 

Schwartz, David Israel Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland 

Shack, Max Herman St. Elizabeth Hospital, Elizabeth, New Jersey 

Shaw, John Jacob Newark City Hospital, Newark, New Jersey 

Siegel, Sidney Leon Jersey City Hospital, Jersey City, New Jersey 



INTERNESHIPS— CLASS OF 1932 87 

Silverstein, George Hospital of St. Raphael, New Haven, Connecticut 

Simmons, John Frederick University Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland 

Snyder, Jerome 
Sollod, Aaron Charles, 

South Baltimore General Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland 

Statman, Arthur James Newark City Hospital, Newark, New Jersey 

Stein, Charles Mercy Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland 

Stephenson, Frank Richard Union Memorial Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland 

Taylor, Francis Nicholson Mercy Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland 

Thompson, Harry GofF Good Samaritan Hospital, Cincinnati, Ohio 

Tomlinson, Thomas H Maryland General Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland 

Whicker, Max Evans Virginia Baptist Hospital, Lynchburg, Virginia 

Wilson, Frank University Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland 

Wirts, Carl Alexander 

St. John's General Hospital, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

Zupnik, Howard Lester Mercy Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland 

Zuravin, Meyer Harry Curtis Bay Hospital, Curtis Bay, Maryland 



GRADUATES, UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND SCHOOL OF 

MEDICINE AND COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS 

AND SURGEONS, JUNE 3, 1933. 



Aaron, Harold Henry, B.S New York 

Baker, George Stansbury, M.A., 

Maryland 
Barnhardt, Albert Earl, A.B., 

North Carolina 

Beanstock, Sam, B.S New Y^ork 

Becker, Martin, M.S New Jersey 

Bellin, David Elias, M.A New York 

Bernstein, Joseph Cecil Maryland 

Blitzman, Louis, B.S New York 

Bowman, Harry Daniel, B.S., Maryland 
Cohen, Marvin Meyer, B.S., 

New Jersey 
Comegys, Richard Williamson, A.B., 

Maryland 
Diehl, Harold Clayton, B.S., Maryland 

Di Stasio, Frank, B.S Connecticut 

Drucker, Victor, B.S New York 

Emanuel, Meyer, B.S New York 

Espinosa, Manuel, B.S. Porto Rico 

Etkind, Meyer George, B.S., 

Connecticut 

Fineman, Jerome _ - Marvland 

Fox, Haskell Wright, B.S., 

North Carolina 
Franklin, Frank Anthony, B.S., 

New Jersey 
Garrison, Ralph Bernard, B.S., 

North Carolina 
Goldman, Alexander Blodnick, B.S., 

New York 

Goldman, Meyer Leo, A.B New York 

Gorrell, James Stanley, A.B., Maryland 
Griggs, William Lemuel, Jr., B.S., 

North Carolina 

Harris, Earle Harold New York 

Hedgpeth, Louten Rhodes, B.S., 

North Carolina 
Hemminger, Earl Wentworth, B.S., 

Pennsylvania 

Highstein, Gustav Maryland 

Himelfarb, Albert Joseph, A.B., 

Maryland 
Hoover, William Alonzo, B.S., 

North Carolina 
Hurwitz, George Hillel, A.B., 

Connecticut 

Hyman, Joseph Jay, B.S New York 

Hyman, Morris, A.B Connecticut 

Kenler, Myron Lewis, A.B Maryland 

Kent, Ann Patrick, A.B., 

District of Columbia 
Keown, Lauriston Livingston, A.B., 

Marvland 



Kimmel, Charles, B.S. New Jersey 

Kochman, Leon Arthur Maryland 

Konigsberg, Wilfred Kane, A.B., 

New York 
Lentz, George Ellard, B.S., 

Pennsylvania 
Lifland, Bernard Daniel, B.S., 

New Jersey 
Lowman, Milton Edward, A.B., 

Maryland 

Malinoski, Wallace Henry Maryland 

Matheke, George Adolph, B.S., 

New Jersey 

Miller, Benjamin, B.S New York 

Miller, Meyer George, B.S., New York 

Moore, James Irving, A.B Maryland 

Novenstein, Sidney, A.B Connecticut 

Osserman, Kermit Edward, A.B., 

New York 

Peer, George Foster West Virginia 

Pico, Jose Teodoro, B.S Porto Rico 

Racusin, Nathan - Maryland 

Robinson, Daniel Robert, B.S., 

New York 

Rosenberg, Arthur, B.S New York 

Rosenfeld, David Herman Maryland 

Rubin, Samuel S. Marvland 

Rutland, Hedley Ethelbert, B.S., 

Pennsylvania 

Sager, Harold, B.S New Jersey 

Scarborough, Asa Mark, 

South Carolina 

Schiff, Hyman, A.B Maryland 

SchirT, Joseph, A.B _ Maryland 

Schindler, Blane Markwood, Maryland 
Schneiman, Maurice Harris, A.B., 

Pennsylvania 

Schochet, George Maryland 

Schwartz, Alec Robert, B.S., 

Pennsylvania 

Schwartz, Paul M Maryland 

Sewell, Stephen, Ph.M New Jersey 

Shea, Cornelius Joseph Connecticut 

Shinn, George Clyde North Carolina 

Smith, Ashby Wade _ Virginia 

Stackhouse, Howard New Jersey 

Stern, Maurice Lee, A.B New York 

Taylor, Clifford Morrison.' Marvland 

Thumim, Mark, B.S New York 

Turano, Leonard Francis, B.S., 

New York 
Van Metre, John Lee, A.B., 

West Virginia 



GRADUATES, 1933 



89 



Way, Samuel Eason, A.B., 

North Carolina 

Weisman, Samuel Maryland 

Wieciech, Michael Joseph Soltis, A.B., 

Maryland 
Wolbert, Frank Olaf Maryland 



Woodard, Barney Lelon, B.S., 

North Carolina 
Woodford, Thomas Larry, A.B., B.S., 

West Virginia 
Zager, Saul, B.S. New Jersey 



Honors 

University Prize Gold Medal James Irving Moore 



Certificates of Honor 



Manuel Espinosa 
Meyer Leo Goldman 



Harold Henry Aaron 
Meyer George Etkind 



Kermit Edward Osserman 
Prizes 

The Doctor A. Bradley Gaither Memorial Prize of $25.00 for the best 

work in genito-urinary surgery during the senior year Samuel Weisman 



MATRICULATES 

1932-1933 
FOURTH YEAR CLASS, 1932-1933 



Aaron, Harold Henry, B.S....New York 
Baker, George Stansbury, M.A., 

Maryland 
* Baldwin, Kenneth Malison.Maryland 
Barnhardt, Albert Earl, A.B., 

North Carolina 

Beanstock, Sam., B.S New York 

Becker, Martin, M.S. New Jersey 

Bellin, David Elias, M.A New York 

Bernstein, Joseph Cecil Maryland 

Blitzman, Louis, B.S New York 

Bowman, Harry Daniel, B.S., 

Maryland 
Cohen, Marvin Meyer, B.S., 

New Jersey 
Comegys, Richard Williamson, A.B., 

Maryland 
Diehl, Harold Clayton, B.S....Maryland 

Di Stasio, Frank, B.S. Connecticut 

Drucker, Victor, B.S New York 

Emanuel, Meyer, B.S New York 

Espinosa, Manuel, B.S Porto Rico 

Etkind, Meyer George, B.S. 

Connecticut 

Fineman, Jerome Maryland 

Fox, Haskell Wright, B.S., 

North Carolina 
Franklin, Frank Anthony, B.S., 

New Jersey 
Gai^rison, Ralph Bernard, B.S., 

North Carolina 



Goldman, Alexander Blodnick, B.S., 

New York 
Goldman, Meyer Leo, A.B., 

New York 
Gorrell, James Stanley, A.B., 

Maryland 
Griggs, William Lemuel, Jr., B.S., 

North Carolina 

Harris, Earle Harold New York 

Hedgpeth, Louten Rhodes, B.S., 

North Carolina 
Hemminger, Earl Wentworth, B.S., 

Pennsylvania 

Highstein, Gustav _ Maryland 

Himelfarb, Albert Joseph, A.B., 

Maryland 
Hoover, William Alonzo, B.S., 

North Carolina 
Hurwitz, George Hillel, A.B., 

Connecticut 

Hyman, Joseph Jay, B.S New York 

Hyman, Morris, A.B Connecticut 

Kenler, Myron Lewis, A.B Maryland 

Kent, Ann Patrick, A.B., 

District of Columbia 
Keown, Lauriston Livingston, A.B., 

Maryland 

Kimmel, Charles, B.S New Jersey 

Kochman, Leon Arthur Maryland 

Konigsberg, Wilfred Kane, A.B., 

New York 



FOURTH YEAR CLASS, 1932-1933— Continued 



Lentz, George Ellard, B.S., 

Pennsylvania 
Lifland, Bernard Daniel, B.S., 

New Jersey 
Lowman, Milton Edward, A.B., 

Maryland 

Malinoski, Wallace Henry Maryland 

Matheke, George Adolph, B.S., 

New Jersey 

Miller, Benjamin, B.S New York 

Miller, Meyer George, B.S New York 

Moore, James Irving, A.B Maryland 

Novenstein, Sidney, A.B Connecticut 

Osserman, Kermit Edward, A.B., 

New York 

Peer, George Foster West Virginia 

Pico, Jose Teodoro, B.S. Porto Rico 

Racusin, Nathan Maryland 

Robinson, Daniel Robert, B.S., 

New York 

Rosenberg, Arthur, B.S New York 

Rosenfeld, David Herman Maryland 

Rubin, Samuel S Maryland 

Rutland, Hedley Ethelbert, B.S., 

Pennsylvania 

Sager, Harold, B.S - New Jersey 

Scarborough, Asa Mark, 

South Carolina 

Schiff, Hyman, A.B Maryland 

Schiff, Joseph, A.B Maryland 

Schindler, Blane Markwood...Maryland 



Schneiman, Maurice Harris, A.B., 

Pennsylvania 

Schochet, George _ Maryland 

Schwartz, Alec Robert, B.S., 

Pennsylvania 

Schwartz, Paul M Maryland 

Sewell, Stephen, Ph.M New Jersey 

Shea, Cornelius Joseph Connecticut 

Shinn, George Clyde North Carolina 

Smith, Ashby Wade _ Virginia 

Stackhouse, Howard, Jr New Jersey 

Stern, Maurice Lee, A.B., New York 

Taylor, Clifford Morrison Maryland 

Thumim, Mark, B.S New York 

Turano, Leonard Francis, B.S., 

New York 
Van Metre, John Lee, A.B., 

West Virginia 
iVay, Samuel Eason, A.B., 

North Carolina 

Weisman, Samuel Maryland 

Wieciech, Michael Joseph Soltis, A.B., 

Maryland 

Wolbert, Frank Olaf ...Maryland 

Woodard, Barney Lelon, B.S., 

North Carolina 
Woodford, Thomas Larry, A.B., B.S., 

West Virginia 
Zager, Saul, B.S New Jersey 



* Did not complete the year. 



THIRD YEAR CLASS, 1932-1933 



Abramovitz, Leonard Jerome, A.B., 

Maryland 
Adams, Thurston Ray... North Carolina 

Austraw, Henry Harrison Maryland 

Bayer, Ira Eugene Maryland 

Bayley, George Schwing...Pennsylvania 
Berenstein, Stanley Harry, B.S., 

Maryland 

Blum, Louis Vardee, A.B., Delaware 

Brodey, David Franklin, A.B., 

New York 
Burgtorf, George Edward, B.S., 

Maryland 
Campbell, Edgar Thrall, A.B., 

Maryland 

Caples, Delmas Maryland 

Carliner, Paul Elliott Maryland 

Cassidy, William Adrian, A.B Maine 

Coates, Stephen Paul, A.B. ...New York 

Cohen, Lawrence Jack Maryland 

Cooper, Jules New Jersey 

Deitz, Joseph Robert, A.B. ...New Jersey 

Diener, Samuel Maryland 

Dorman, George Edward, B.S., 

Pennsylvania 



Downey, Regis Fallon, B.S., 

Pennsylvania 
Dreher, Robert Hering, B.S., 

Pennsylvania 

Dunbar, John Charles Pennsylvania 

Echols, John Edward West Virginia 

Farr, Robert Wilbur, B.S Maryland 

Fearing, William Lumsden 

North Carolina 

Feldman, Leon Henry..... - Maryland 

Finegold, Joseph, B.S. Pennsylvania 

Gaskel, Jason Howard, A.B....Maryland 

Gelb, Jerome, B.S - New Jersey 

Gelman, Sidney New Jersey 

Goldstone, Herbert -....- Maryland 

Goodhand, Charles Luther, A.B., 

Maryland 

Goodman, Howard Maryland 

Gordon, Joseph Maryland 

Gutman, Isaac - Maryland 

Hanigsberg, Murray Joseph, B.S.j 

New York 
Healy, Robert Fairbank, B.S., 

Maryland 



90 



THIRD YEAR CLASS, 1932-1933— Continued 



Hoffman, Edward Sayer, A.B., 

New York 
Horan, William Henry, A.B., 

Pennsylvania 
Howard, William Lawrence, B.S., 

Maryland 

Hummel, Leonard Malcolm Maryland 

Hunt, Josiah Arnold, B.S Maryland 

Hurwitz, Abraham Maryland 

Insley, Philip Asbury, B.S Maryland 

Janousky, Nathan Bonny Maryland 

Jerardi, Joseph Victor, B.S. ...Maryland 

Johnson, Thorwald _ California 

Kafer, Oscar Adolph North Carolina 

Kallins, Edward Selig Maryland 

Katz, Simon, A.B. New York 

Ketz, Wesley John _ Pennsylvania 

Knoll, William, B.S New York 

Lawler, Thomas Gorman, A.B., 

California 

Leass, Reuben, R.S _ New York 

Leavitt, Abraham Charles, B.S., 

Massachusetts 

Levin, Manuel, A.B Maryland 

Levin, Milton Maryland 

Maginnis, Helen Irene, A.B., 

Maryland 
Mains, Marshall Paul, A.B....Wisconsin 
Marlett, Neumann Clyde, Mus.B., 

New Jersey 

McNally, Hugh Bernard Maryland 

Millett, Joseph _ Pennsylvania 

Mirow, Richard Raymond New York 

Moore, Alfred Charles, A.B....Maryland 

Moulton, Olin Cates, A.B Maine 

Mund, Maxwell Herschel ....Maryland 

Needleman, Max, B.S. _ New York 

O'Connor, Raymond Francis, 

Pennsylvania 
Orans, Alfred Abraham, A.B., 

New York 
Rabinowitz, Jacob Herbert, B.S., 

New Jersey 

Ray, William Turner North Carolina 

Reardon, William Thomas, A.B., 

Delaware 



Roberson, Edward Leon, B.S., 

North Carolina 

Rosen, Morris, A.B Pennsylvania 

Rosenthal, Charles Morton, B.S., 

New York 

Rudo, Nathan Maryland 

Sacks, Milton Samuel Maryland 

Sasscer, James Ghiselin, B.S., 

Maryland 
Satulsky, Emanuel Milton, 

New Jersey 

Schwartz, Daniel James Maryland 

Schwartz, Theodore Allison...Maryland 

Sedlacek, Joseph Arthur Maryland 

Sekerak, Richard John Stephen, 

Connecticut 

Siegel, Benjamin Israel Maryland 

Siegel, Milton, B.S New York 

Smith, William Benjamin Maryland 

Snyder, John Newcomer...Pennsylvania 
Sollod, Bernard Walter, A.B., 

Maryland 

Soltz, William Boyer, B.S New York 

Sproul, Dorothy Gertrude, B.S., 

M.S.S Massachusetts 

Stein, Milton Robert Maryland 

Stephens, Wilson Paschall, B.S., 

Virginia 
Stutzman, Clyde Malverne, B.S., 

Pennsylvania 

Sugar, Samuel Jacob, B.S Maryland 

Sutton, Harold Lawrence, A.B., 

New Jersey 
Taylor, Andrew Dn Val, 

North Carolina 

Terman, Irving, A.B New York 

Timberlake, Landon, A.B Virginia 

Tuerk, Isadore Maryland 

Udkow, Samuel, B.S _ New York 

Wagner, Richard, A.B New Jersey 

Warshawsky, Harry, B.S New York- 
Wilder, Earle Maurice _ Maryland 

Wolfe, William David, A.B....Maryland 
Zurawski, Charles, Ph.B., 

Rhode Island 



SECOND YEAR CLASS, 1932-1933 



Adelman, Milton Harris, B.S., 

New York 
Albrittain, John Warren, B.S., 

Maryland 

Alessi, Edward James Maryland 

Alonso, Miguel, B.S Porto Rico 

Alpert, George, A.B Massachusetts 

Aungst, Melvin Rauch.... Pennsylvania 
Battaglia, Dominic Thomas, B.S., 

Maryland 



Bierer, Dan George, B.S., 

Pennsylvania 
Bock, Charles Aloysius, B.S., 

Pennsylvania 
Booth, Harold Thomas, A.B., 

New York 
Brouillet, George Hector, 

Massachusetts 
Cohen, Philip New Jersey 



91 



SECOND YEAR CLASS, 1932-1933— Continued 



Coplin, George Joseph, B.S., 

New Jersey 
Cornbrooks, Ernest Ivon, Jr., A.B., 

New Jersey- 
Cotter, Edward Francis Maryland 

Davidson, Nachman, A.B Maryland 

Dickey, Francis George, A.B., 

Maryland 

Diehl, Earl Henry Maryland 

Dodge, Douglas Rude Michigan 

Doerner, Alexander Andrew, A.B., 

New York 

Du Bois, Robert Lionel Connecticut 

Dunnigan, William Charles, A.B., 

Maryland 
Einhorn, Samuel Edward. .New Jersey 
Ewald, August Ludwig, B.S., 

Maryland 

Fader, Ferdinand, A.B New Jersey 

Freeman, Irving, B.S Maryland 

Fruchtbaum, Robert Pearson, B.S., 

New Jersey 

Galitz, Philip Jacob, A.M New York 

Gerwig, Walter Henry, Jr., 

West Virginia^ 
Godbey, John Randolph, 

West Virginia 
Grenzer, William Howard, A.B., 

Maryland 

Gross, Joseph Bernard Maryland 

Hammill, Gerard Paul, B.S., 

Pennsylvania 

Harris, Aaron Maryland 

Hartman, Ira Frank, A.B., B.S.. 

West Virginia 
Heghinian, Jeannette Rosaline E., 

Maryland 
Helfrich, William Goldsborough, B.S.. 

Maryland 

Herald, James Kennedy Ohio 

Herrold, Lewis Charles, B.S., 

Pennsylvania 

Hollander, Arthur, B.S New York 

Hugg, John Henry, B.S. ..Pennsylvania 
Kaminsky, Aaron Louis, B.S., 

New Jersey 
Kane, Harry Francis, A.B. ..Maryland 
Keller, Michael Lawrence. .New Jersey 

Klein, Harold Henry Pennsylvania 

Klompus, Irving, A.B New Jersey 

Knowles, Frederick Edwin, Jr., B.S., 

New Jersey 
Laino, Frank Armento, B.S., Maryland 

Layton, Caleb Rodney New York 

Lewis, Archie Clifton Maryland 

Lichtenberg, Walter, A.M. ..New York 

Lieb, Saul, A.B New Jersey 

Llewelyn, Louis Grandin, A.B., 

Maryland 



MacLaughlin, Donald Clay, A.B., 

Maryland 

Marek, Charles Bernard Maryland 

Mays, Howard Brooks Maryland 

McDonough, Oscar Tracy, Jr., A.B., 
Pennsylvania 

McGregor, Alpine Watson Utah 

McGregor, Lorenzo Watson Utah 

McHenry, DeArmond John, B.S., 

Pennsylvania 

Mech, Karl Frederick Maryland 

Montgomery, Bruce Pennsylvania 

Noon, Milton A Maryland 

Pepe, Anthony James, B.S., 

Connecticut 

Pugatsky, David Maryland 

Raffel, William Maryland 

Reier, Charles Henry Maryland 

Robinson, Harry Maximilian, Jr., 

Maryland 

Robinson, Milton Irving New York 

Rodgers, Leo David Maryland 

Rosen, Israel, A.B Maryland 

Rosen, Sol Hyman New Jersey 

Rosenberg, Harold William, B.S., 

New York 

Russell, John Carroll Maryland 

Schmitt, George Frederick, Jr., 

Maryland 
Schmulovitz, Maurice Jacob, A.B., 

Maryland 

Schonfeld, Paul Maryland 

Shapiro, Joseph, A.B New York 

Shapiro, Sydney Harold New York 

Shaul, John Melvin, A.B New York 

Shub, Morris Maryland 

Siscovick, Milton Maryland 

Spitznagle, Vernon Edward, B.S., 

Maryland 
Stein, Benjamin Maxwell, B.S., 

New York 

Teitel, Louis, B.S New York 

Tuby, Joseph, B.S New York 

Vozel, Luther F Maryland 

Waghelstein, Julius Meyer.. Maryland 
Warren, John McCullen, 

North Carolina 
Williams, Jesse Frank, B.S., 

West Virginia 
Williamson, Charles Vernon, 

Maryland 
Wilson, Norman James, B.S., 

Maryland 
Wode, Alvin Eugene William, 

Maryland 
Wood, Everet Hardenbergh, A.B., 

New Jersey 
Woodward, Lewis Klair, Jr., A.B., 

Maryland 



92 



FIRST YEAR CLASS, 1932-1933 



Aites, James William Pennsylvania 

Balles, Edward Samuel, A.B., 

New Jersey 
*Barry, James Francis, Jr., B.S., 

Pennsylvania 
Batalion, Abraham Louis ....Maryland 

Bernstein, Milton, A.B Maryland 

Bieren, Roland Essig Maryland 

Bowie, Harry Clay Maryland 

Bricker, John Samuel, B.S... Maryland 

Burka, Irving District of Columbia 

Burns, Harold Hubert. ...Pennsylvania 

Burton, Jerome Kermit Maryland 

Bush, Joseph Edgar, A.B Maryland 

Carlson, Carl Edwin Connecticut 

Cocimano, Joseph Michael, 

District of Columbia 
Connolly, John Calhoun, 

North Carolina 
Cranage, Bidwell Chapman, A.B., 

Michigan 
Ctibor, Vladimir Frantisek, A.B., 

New Jersey 

Czekaj', Leo Michael Maryland 

Dabrowski, Benjamin Anthony, A.B., 

Maryland 
Davis, George Howey, B.S. ..Maryland 

Deehl, Seymour Ralph New Jersey 

Deradorian, Neshon Edward, B.S., 

Connecticut 
Dixon, Darius McClelland, B.S., 

Maryland 

Drozd, Joseph Maryland 

Ensor, Bennett. Scott, A.B... Maryland 
Evans, Cornelius George ..New Jersey 
Feirer, Edward Wendelin, A.B., 

New Jersey 

Feldman, Jerome Maryland 

Feldman, Philip Michael New York 

Fichtner, Alborr Russell. .Pennsylvania 
Finn, John Hannon, A.B., 

Massachusetts 

Fissel, John Edward Maryland 

*Flannery, Vern Lester Maryland 

Frich, Michael Garland. .Pennsylvania 

Gillis, Marion Howard Maryland 

Gimbel, Harry Solomon, A.B., 

Maryland 

Glassner, Frank Maryland 

Gordner, Jesse Walter, Jr., B.S., 

Pennsylvania 
Graf, Emil Theodore, B.S., 

Pennsylvania 
Greengold, David Bernard, A.B., 

Maryland 

* Did not complete the year. 



Gregory, Philip Orson Maine 

Greifinger, William, A.B. ..New Jersey 
Gresham, Francis Rhett, A.B., 

Maryland 

Grollman, Jaye Jacob Maryland 

Hannon, Neil Joseph, Jr., A.B., 

New York 

Heneson, Henry Maryland 

Herman, Daniel Loeb, A.B. ..Maryland 
Insley, James Knox, Jr., A.B., 

Maryland 
Isaacs, Benjamin Herbert, A.B., 

Maryland 
Jones, Ceirianog Henry, 

Pennsylvania 
Jones, Emory Ellsworth, Jr., 

West Virginia 

Jones, James Porter West Virginia 

Jules, Bernard Charles Maryland 

Kagen, Gordon Arthur, A.B., 

Pennsylvania 
Karfgin, Walter Esselman, B.S., 

Maryland 

Karpel, Saul, B.S New York 

Katz, Joseph Maryland 

Kleiman, Norman, A.B Maryland 

Klemkowski, Irvin Philip, A.B., 

Maryland 
Knobloch, Howard Thomas, 

Pennsylvania 

Kolodner, Louis Joseph Maryland 

Krajcovic, Jesse John Maryland 

Kroll, Louis Joseph, A.B Maryland 

Lipin, Raymond Joseph Maryland 

Lowman, Morris Robert Maryland 

Mansfield, William Kenneth, 

Pennsylvania 

Marino, Irene Thelma New York 

Maser, Louis Robert Maryland 

McCauley, Arthur Franklin, 

Maryland 
McKnew, Hector Caldwell, Jr., 

Maryland 
McNinch, Eugene Robinson, B.S., 

Pennsylvania 
Moran, James Blessing, Ph.B., 

Rhode Island 
Moran, James Patrick, B.S., 

New York 
Moses, Benjamin Bernard. ...Maryland 
Myerovitz, Joseph Robert ....Maryland 
Myers, Lyndon Beaver. .Pennsylvania 

Myers, William, B.S Pennsylvania 

Nestor, Thomas Agnew, Ph.B., 

Rhode Island 



93 



FIRST YEAR CLASS, 1932-1933— Continued 



Nicholson, Morris John Maryland 

Nowak, Sigmund Roman, B.S., 

Maryland 
O'Brien, William Aloysius, Jr., A.B., 

New Jersey 
*Owens, Maurice E. Broadas, Jr., 

Maryland 
Pannoni, Nicholas Albert, Ph.B., 

Massachusetts 

Parr, William Andrew Maryland 

Pastrick, William Stephen, B.S., 

New Jersey 
*Paye, Emerson Charles, A. B., 

New York 
Pembroke, Richard Heber, Jr., A.B., 

Maryland 
Pentecoste, Salvador Dante, 

New Jersey 
Reagle, Charles Donald, A.B., 

Maryland 
Reichel, Samuel Marvin, A.B., 

Maryland 
Reynolds, John Henry, Jr., 

Pennsylvania 

Rochlin, Narcisse Maryland 

Roseman, Ralph Bernard, A.B., 

Pennsylvania 

Rosenthal, Victor, B.S New York 

Ruland, Louis Joseph Maryland 

Schmieler, George Peter, B.S., 

Pennsylvania 
Selby, George Durward, A.B., 

Maryland 
Shimanek, Lawrence Joseph, 

Maryland 



Solomon, Cyril Maryland 

Sorin, Matthew Maryland 

Spain, David Michael New York 

Squires, Millard Fillmore, Jr., 

Maryland 
Stapen, Milton Honore, B.S., 

New York 
*Statman, Bernhardt Joseph, 

New Jersey 

Steelier, Joseph Louis Maryland 

Steinberg, Samuel Maryland 

Stern, Morris Harold New Jersey 

Sunday, Stuart Dos Passos, A.B., 

Maryland 

Terr, Isaac, B.S New York 

Thomas, Anthony Joseph, Ph.B., 

Massachusetts 
Tierney, Lawrence Matthew, 

Connecticut 
Waller, William Kennedy, A.B., 

Maryland 
Weems, George Jones, A. B... Maryland 

Wehner, Daniel George Maryland 

W T einstein, Jack Joseph Maryland 

Wells, Gibson Jackson, A.B., 

Maryland 

Wilfson, Daniel, Jr., A.B Maryland 

Wilkinson, Arthur Gilbart, A.B., 

Connecticut 

Wolf, Nathan Maryland 

Yavelow, Charles Sidney, A.B., 

New York 
Zimring, Joseph George, B.S., 

New York 



* Did not complete the year. 



94 



GENERAL SUMMARY 95 

SUMMARY OF STUDENT ENROLLMENT AS OF 
MARCH 15, 1933 

Resident Collegiate Courses — Academic College 

Year, 1932-33. Park Baltimore Totals 

College of Agriculture 200 200 

College of Arts and Sciences 793 793 

School of Dentistry 431 431 

'College of Education 225 225 

College of Engineering 411 411 

Graduate School 251 251 

College of Home Economics 114 114 

School of Law 188 188 

School of Medicine 413 413 

School of Nursing _ Ill 111 

School of Pharmacy '. 365 365 



Total 1,994 1,508 3,502 

Summer School, 1932 1,033 1,033 

Extension Courses: 

Industrial Education 

(Collegiate Credit) 200 200 

Mining (Sub-Collegiate Credit) 520 520 



Grand Total 3,747 1,508 5,255 

Less Duplications _ 295 



Net Total 4,960 

Enrollment in Short Courses of from two to seven days; Rural Women, 
543; Boys' and Girls' Club, 266; Volunteer Firemen, 90; Canners, 110; 
Florists, 225 ; Nurserymen, 88 ; Practice School in the Summer Session, 38. 



ALUMNI ASSOCIATION SECTION 

OFFICERS 
W. Houston Toulson, M.D., President 

Vice Presidents 

Rear- Admiral Perceval S. Rossiter Edward P. Thomas, M.D. 

Eldridge E. Wolff, M.D. 

Secretary 
Kenneth B. Boyd, M.D. 

Assistant Secretary 
Frank K. Morris, M.D. 

Treasurer 
D. J. Pessagno, M.D. 



Board of Directors 
Chas. R. Foutz, M.D., Chairman 
John Evans, M.D. 
Alfred Gundry, M.D. 
Charles Bagley, M.D. 
T. B. Aycock, M.D. 
W. Houston Toulson, M.D. 
Frank Morris, M.D. 
Kenneth Boyd, M.D. 
D. J. Pessagno, M.D. 

Advisory Committee 
F. A. Ries, M.D., Chair'man 
Edgar Friedenwald, M.D. 
Charles A. Waters, M.D. 
Salvatore Demarco, M.D. 
Frank Jennings, M.D. 



Editors 
Emil Novak, M.D. 
E. S. Johnson, M.D. 

Library Committee 
Nathan Winslow, M.D. 

Hospital Council 
Frank Keating, M.D. 
George Sargent, M.D. 

Alumni Council 
W. H. Triplett, M.D. 
W. Houston Toulson, M.D. 



The names listed above are officer- 
June 30, 1934. 



for the term beginning July 1, 1933, and ending 



9G 



ENDOWMENT FUND 

The following constitute the Board of Trustees of this Fund: 

E. F. Kelly, Ph.G., Chairman Horace M. Davis, D.C.D. 

J. M. H. Rowland, M.D. Daniel Baker, Jr. 

Harry Adler, M.D. Stuart Janney 

Randolph Winslow, A.M., M.D., LL.D. Robertson Griswold 
Arthur M. Shipley, Sc.D., M.D. 

This Board is incorporated by act of the Legislature of the 
State, its legal title being "The Trustees of the Endowment Fund 
of the University of Maryland," and is independent and self -per- 
petuating. Its powers are limited to the expenditure of the in- 
terest derived from the various funds, which is applied as 
directed by donors for the benefit of the University. Contribu- 
tions, donations and bequests are solicited from Alumni and 
friends. They may be made to the general or University Fund, to 
the Medical Fund or to any other department of the University. 
If intended for the School of Medicine, they may be given to the 
general medical fund or to some special object, as building, re- 
search, library, pathology, hospital, publication, laboratories, 
gymnasium, scholarship, medal, prize, etc., in which case the 
wishes of the donor will be strictly regarded. Attention is in- 
vited to the "Charles Frick Research Fund," already established 
in memory of that distinguished investigator. Checks should be 
made payable to Endowment Fund of the University of Mary- 
land, J. M. H. Rowland, Treasurer, Lombard and Greene Streets, 
Baltimore, Md. 

FORMS OF DEVISE OR BEQUEST 
To School of Medicine 

I give, devise and bequeath to the Regents of the University of Maryland, 
a corporation incorporated under the laws of the State of Maryland, for the 

benefit of the Faculty of Physic 

(Here state amount or describe property) 

To Endowment Fund 

I give, devise and bequeath to the Trustees of the Endowment Fund of the 
University of Maryland, a corporation incorporated under the laws of the 

State of Maryland, for the benefit of the Faculty of Physic 

(Here state amount or describe property) 



97 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 
SCHOOL OF NURSING 

FACULTY AND INSTRUCTORS 

Superintendent of Nurses and Director of School of Nursing, 
Annie Crighton, R.N. 

Assistant Superintendent of Nurses, 
Vesta Swartz, R.N. 

Instructor in Nursing, 
Lillie Hoke, R.N. 

Instructor of Nursing and Supervisor of Wards, 
Helen Wright, R.N. 

Instructor in Surgical Technique for Nurses and 

Supervisor of Operating Pavilion, 

Elizabeth Aitkenhead, R.N. 

Instructor in Dietetics, 
Miriam Connelly. 

Instructor in Massage, 
Edith Walton. 

Assistant Instructor in Nursing and 

Supervisor of Wards, 

Bertha Hoffman, R.N. 

Marie Olga Cox, R.N Night Supervisor 

Eva Holloway, R.N Supervisor — Dispensary 

Beatrice Krause, R.N Head Nurse — Obstetrical Ward 

Estella Baldwin, R.N Head Nurse — Children's Ward 

Grace Dick, R.N Head Nurse — Men's Medical Ward 

Naomi Allen, R.N Head Nurse — Men's Surgical Ward 

Elizabeth Cannon, R.N. Head Nurse — Men's Surgical Ward 

Freda Fazenbaker, R.N Head Nurse — Women's Medical and 

Surgical Ward 

Lucy A. Brude, R.N Head Nurse — Private Hall 

Eva Laigoneil, R.N Head Nurse — Private Hall 

Cora M. Wilson, R.N Head Nurse — Surgical Supply Room 

Tillie Mohan _.... Supervisor — Nurse's Home 

Josephine Toms, R.N Assistant Head Nurse — Operating Room 

Carrie Miller, R.N Assistant Head Nurse — Operating Room 

Emma Winship, R.N Supervisor — Accident Department 

Catherine Rodenwald, R.N Outside Obstetrical Service — Prenatal 

Stella U. Ricketts, R.N Outside Obstetrical Service — Prenatal 

Ruth Young, R.N Outside Obstetrical Service — Delivery 

Elizabeth Trice, R.N Outside Obstetrical Service — Delivery 

Harriet Schroeder, R.N Outside Obstetrical Service — Post-partum 

Evelyn Zapf, R.N ...Outside Obstetrical Service — Post-partum 

Luella Rodes, R.N Assistant Night Supervisor 

98 



SCHOOL OF NURSING 99 

LECTURERS FROM THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 

Anatomy, 
C. L. Davis, M.D. 

Physiology, 
Ferd. A. Ries, M.D. 

Ba-cteriology, 
F. W. Hachtel, M.D. 

Materia Medica, 
John C. Krantz, Jr., Ph.D. 

Chemistry, 

Emil G. Schmidt, Ph.D. 

Ruth C. Vanden Bosche, B.S. 

Medicine, 

H. C. Smith, M.D. 

C. C. Habliston, M.D, Myron Tull, M.D. 

Surgery, 
Cyrus Horine, M.D. 

Obstetrics, 
L. H. Douglass, M.D. 

Gynecology, 
J. M. H. Hundley, Jr., M.D. 

Pediatrics. 
Loring C. Joslin, M.D. 

Psychiatry and Neurology, 



R. M. Chapman, M.D. 

Skin and Venereal Diseases, 
Harry M. Robinson, M.D. 

Otology and Opthalmology, 
Clyde A. Clapp, M.D. 

Laryngology and Rhinology, 
E. A. Looper, M.D. 

Orthopedic Surgery, 
Allen Fiske Voshell, M.D. 

Social Service, 
Special Lectures. 

Dental, 
Harry B. McCarthy, D.D.S. 



100 SCHOOL OF NURSING 

STUDENT ENROLLMENT 

Seniors 24 

Intermediates 30 

Juniors and Preparatory. 50 

Total 104 

GENERAL INFORMATION 

The University of Maryland School for Nurses was established 
in the year 1889. 

Since that time it has been an integral part of the University 
of Maryland, coming under the same government. 

The school is non-sectarian, the only religious services being 
morning prayers. 

The University Hospital is a general hospital containing about 
250 beds. It is equipped to give young women a thorough course 
of instruction and practice in all phases of nursing. 

Programs Offered: The program of study of the school is 
planned for two groups of students: (a) the three-year group 
and (b) the five-year group. 

Requirements for Admission : A candidate for admission to 
the School of Nursing must be a graduate of an accredited high 
school or other recognized preparatory school, and must present 
record showing that she has completed satisfactorily the required 
amount of preparatory study. Preference will be given to stu- 
dents who rank in the upper third of the graduating class in their 
preparatory schools. 

Candidates are required to present 15 units for entrance. Re- 
quired (7), and Elective (8) units for entrance. 

Required: English (I, II, III, IV), 3 units; algebra to quad- 
ratics, 1 unit; plane geometry, 1 unit; history, 1 unit; science, 1 
unit. Total, 7 units. 

Elective: Astronomy, biology, botany, chemistry, civics, 
drawing, economics, general science, geology, history, home eco- 
nomics, vocational subjects, languages, mathematics, physical 
geography, physics, zoology, or any other subject offered in a 
standard high school or preparatory school for which graduation 



SCHOOL OF NURSING 101 

credit is granted toward college or university entrance. Eight 
units must be submitted from this group, of which not more than 
four units may pertain to vocational subjects. 

In addition to the above requirements, students must meet cer- 
tain other definite requirements in regard to health, age and per- 
sonal fitness for nursing work. 

The preferable age for students registering for the three-year 
course is 20 to 35 years, although students may be accepted at the 
age of 18. Women of superior education and culture are given 
preference, provided they meet the requirements in other particu- 
lars. If possible, a personal interview with the Director of the 
School should be arranged on Tuesday or Friday from 11 :00 
A. M. to 12 :00 M. 

Blank certificates will be furnished upon application to the 
Director of the School of Nursing, University of Maryland Hos- 
pital, Baltimore, Maryland. 

Registration With Maryland State Board of Examiners 
of Nurses : By regulation of the Maryland State Board of 
Examiners of Nurses, all students entering schools of nursing in 
Maryland must, at the beginning of their course, register with 
the Board in order to be eligible for examination and license on 
completion of this course. Blanks necessary for this purpose 
will be sent with application forms. A fee of $2 is charged for 
registration. 

The fitness of the applicant for the work and the propriety of 
dismissing or retaining her at the end of her term of probation 
are left to the decision of the Director of the School. Miscon- 
duct, disobedience, insubordination, inefficiency, or neglect of duty 
are causes for dismissal at any time by the President of the 
University. 

The requirements for admission to the five-year program of 
the School of Nursing are the same as for other colleges. (Spe- 
cial catalog will be sent upon request.) The three-year program 
is designed to meet the requirements for the diploma in Nursing 
and comprises the work of the first, second, and third hospital 
years. 

Admission to the School : Students for the spring term are 
admitted in February and those for the fall term in September or 
October, and the five-year course in September. 



102 SCHOOL OF NURSING 

Hours of Duty : During the preparatory period the students 
are engaged in class work for the first four months with no gen- 
eral duty in the hospital; for the remainder of this period 
they are sent to the wards on eight-hour duty. During the first, 
second, and third years the students are on eight-hour day duty 
and nine-hour night duty, with six hours on holidays and Sun- 
days. The night-duty periods are approximately two months 
each, with one day at the termination of each term for rest and 
recreation. The period of night duty is approximately five to six 
months during the three years. 

The first four months of the preparatory period are devoted 
to theoretical instruction given entirely in the lecture and demon- 
stration rooms of the training school, hospital, and medical school 
laboratories. The average number of hours per week in formal 
instruction, divided into lecture and laboratory periods, is 30 
hours, and includes courses in Anatomy, Physiology, Cookery and 
Nutrition, Dosage and Solution, Hygiene, Bacteriology, Chemis- 
try, Materia Medica, Practical Nursing, Bandaging, Ethics, and 
History of Nursing. During the last two months of the proba- 
tion period the students are placed on duty in the hospital wards 
for instruction in bedside nursing, and are expected to perform 
the duties assigned to them by the Director of the School. At the 
close of the first semester the students are required to pass satis- 
factorily both the written and practical tests. Failure to do so 
will be sufficient reason for terminating the course at this point. 

Sickness : A physician is in attendance each day, and when 
ill, all students are cared for gratuitously. The time lost through 
illness in excess of two weeks, during the three years, must be 
made up. Should the authorities of the school decide that through 
the time lost the theoretical work has not been sufficiently cov- 
ered to permit the student to continue in that year, it will be nec- 
essary for her to continue her work with the next class. 

Vacations: Vacations are given between June and Septem- 
ber. A period of three weeks is allowed the student at the com- 
pletion of the first year, and four weeks at the completion of the 
second year. 

Expenses: A fee of $50.00, payable on entrance, is required 
from all students. This will not be returned. A student receives 
her board, lodging, and a reasonable amount of laundry from the 



SCHOOL OF NURSING 103 

date of entrance. During her period of probation she provides 
her own uniforms, obtained through the hospital at a nominal 
cost. After being accepted as a student nurse she wears the 
uniform supplied by the hospital. The student is also provided 
with text-books and shoes. Her personal expenses during the 
course of training and instruction will depend entirely upon her 
individual habits and tastes. 



FIVE-YEAR PROGRAM 

In addition to the regular three-year course of training, the 
University offers a combined Academic and Nursing program 
leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science and a Diploma in 
Nursing. 

The first two years of the course (or pre-hospital period) , con- 
sisting of 68 semester hours, are spent in the College of Arts and 
Sciences of the University, during which period the student has 
an introduction to the general cultural subjects which are consid- 
ered fundamental in any college training. At least the latter of 
these two years must be spent in residence at College Park, in 
order that the student may have her share in the social and cul- 
tural activities of college life. The last three years are spent in 
the School of Nursing in Baltimore. 

Degree and Diploma 
The degree of Bachelor of Science and the Diploma in Nursing 
are awarded to students who complete successfully the prescribed 
combined academic and nursing program. 

MERCY HOSPITAL SCHOOL OF NURSING 

The Mercy Hospital School of Nursing was established in 1899 
and incorporated under the laws of the State of Maryland in 
1901. It has developed the art of the profession according to 
the high standard requisite to qualify for Registered Nurse. 
Requirements for Admission. 

A candidate desiring to enter the School of Nursing should 
apply to the Superintendent of Nurses by letter or in person at 
least six weeks before the entrance date. It is preferred that 



104 SCHOOL OF NURSING 

she apply in person accompanied by her mother or guardian. If 
a personal interview is not possible, a written application may be 
submitted. 

Age. 

Candidates should be between the ages of eighteen and thirty- 
five years. 

Physique. 

Applicants should be of average height and good physique. 
Teeth and eyes should be attended to before entering the School, 
and tonsils removed if not in good condition. Every applicant 
is required to send in a certificate of health by her family physi- 
cian. A physical examination is also made by the school physi- 
cian during the preliminary period. 

Education. 

Applicants for admission should present at least high school 
certificate of graduation or its equivalent in educational values. 
The credits of preliminary education are fully accounted and the 
nurse who is the better qualified finds such a foundation more to 
her advantage as she progresses through the years of study. 

Calendar. 

Students are admitted September 1st and February 1st. 

Length of Course. 

The course of instruction covers three years. It is divided into 
a preliminary term of four months, a freshman term of eight 
months, a junior term of one year, and a senior term of one year. 

Conditions of Acceptance. 

The Superintendent of Nurses decides as to the fitness for the 
work and the propriety of retaining or dismissing a student at 
the end of the term of probation or during its course. She may 
also, with the approval of the faculty, terminate the connection 
of a student with the School in any justifiable instance. At the 
end of the preliminary period, if the student's health, general 
education, and natural aptitude prove satisfactory to the Director 
of the School and the Sister Superior, she shall be appointed for 
enrollment as a student nurse. 



SCHOOL OF NURSING 105 

Expenses. 

An admission fee of fifty dollars is required from all students. 
This covers the cost of uniforms and books required during the 
preliminary course. 

Should the student for any reason leave the school before com- 
pleting the course, this fee will not be returned, nor may she take 
with her any part of the equipment. 

After four months' probation, candidates, if they possess the 
necessary qualifications, are admitted to the School of Nursing 
proper. They receive ten dollars per month to help defray inci- 
dental expenses. No other compensation is given, the education 
received being considered sufficient return for service rendered. 
Board, laundry, etc., are furnished by the institution. 

Four weeks before admission candidates should forward the 
fifty-dollar entrance fee, and measurements for uniforms and 
aprons, which will be in readiness upon their arrival. . No orders 
will be considered until this fee is received. 

THE FIVE-YEAR COURSE 

Leading to B.S. -Degree and Diploma of Graduate Nurse 

The University of Maryland, in affiliation with the Mercy Hos- 
pital School of Nursing, offers a combined Academic and Nursing 
program. 

The completion of this course entitles the student to the degree 
of Bachelor of Science from the University of Maryland, and to 
the diploma of the Mercy Hospital School of Nursing. 

Graduate nurses who hold college degrees are greatly in de- 
mand, especially for positions in administration and teaching. 
This program consequently offers a distinct advantage. 

Outline of Course. 

Two years of this course (pre-nursing or post-nursing period) 
consisting of 70 semester hours are spent in the College of Arts 
and Sciences of the University, with the usual College vacations. 
At least the latter of these two years must be spent in residence 
at College Park in order that the student may have her share 
in the social and cultural activities of college life. 



106 SCHOOL OF NURSING 

Requirements fw Admission. 

Students electing such a course must, before entering the 
School of Nursing, satisfy the entrance requirements of the Uni- 
versity of Maryland. Applicants must be personally adapted to 
professional nursing. 

Fees and Other Expenses. 

During the two years which the students spend at College Park 
they maintain themselves, and pay their own College fees. (See 
University of Maryland bulletin.) 

Throughout the Nursing School Course the hospital provides, 
without expense to the student, maintenance and care during 
temporary illness. 



VOLUME XVIII NUMBER 5 



BULLETIN 



OF THE 



SCHOOL of MEDICINE 

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



MAY, 1934 




PUBLISHED FIVE TIMES A YEAR 
(JANUARY, APRIL, MAY, JULY AND OCTOBER) 



Lombard and Greene Streets 
Baltimore, Md. 



Entered as second-class matter June 16, 1916, at the Postoffice at Baltimore, Maryland, 
under the Act of August 24, 1912. 



BULLETIN 



OF THE 



University of Maryland School of Medicine 
and College of Physicians and Surgeons 

Successor to The Hospital Bulletin of the University of Maryland, 

Baltimore Medical College News, and the Journal of the 

Alumni Association of the College of 

Physicians and Surgeons 




Annual Announcement 
Session 1934-35 



VOLUME XVIII, NO. 5 
MAY, I934 



CALENDAR, 1934-35 
SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 

FIRST SEMESTER 



*Registration for first-and second-year students. 
*Registration for all other students. 

Instruction begins with the first scheduled period. 

Thanksgiving Day. Holiday. 

Christmas recess begins after the last scheduled period. 

Instruction resumed with the first scheduled period. 
First Semester ends after the last scheduled period. 

SECOND SEMESTER 

*Registration for first- and second-year students. 
*Registration for all other students. 

Instruction begins with the first scheduled period for first- 
and second-year students. 

Instruction begins with the first scheduled period for all 
other students. 

Washington's Birthday. Holiday. 

Easter recess begins after the last scheduled period. 

Instruction resumed with the first scheduled period. 

Commencement. 

* A student who neglects or fails to register prior to or within the day or days specified 
for his or her school will be called upon to pay a fine of five dollars ($5.00). The last day 
of registration with fine added to regular fees is Saturday at noon of the week in which 
instruction begins following the specified registration period. (This rule may be waived 
only upon the written recommendation of the dean.) 

* The offices of the registrar and comptroller are open daily, not including Saturday, 
from 9:00 a. m. to 5:00 p. m., and on Saturday from 9:00 a. m. to 12:30 p. m., with the 
following exceptions: Monday, September 10, 1934, until 8:00 p. m.; Saturday, Sep- 
tember 22, 1934, until 5 : 00 p. m. ; and on Monday, January 28, 1935, until 8 : 00 p. m. 

Advance registration is encouraged. 



1934 




September 21 


Friday 


September 22 


Saturday 


September 24 


Monday 


November 29 


Thursday 


December 22 


Saturday 


1935 




January 7 


Monday 


January 26 


Saturday 


January 28 


Monday 


January 29 


Tuesday 


January 29 


Tuesday 


January 30 


Wednesda 


February 22 


Friday 


April 18 


Thursday 


April 23 


Tuesday 


June 1 


Saturday 



ORGANIZATION 

THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Control of the University of Maryland is vested in a Board of nine 
Regents, appointed by the Governor and confirmed by the Senate for terms 
of nine years each. The general administration of the University is vested 
in the President. The University Council is an advisory body, composed 
of the President, the Vice-President, the Director of the Agricultural Experi- 
ment Station, the Director of the Extension Service, and the Deans. The 
University Council acts upon all matters having relation to the University 
as a whole or to cooperative work between the constituent groups. Each 
school has its own Faculty Council, composed of the Dean and members of 
its Faculty; each Faculty Council controls the internal affairs of the group 
it represents. 

The University has the following educational organization: 

The College of Agriculture, 

The College of Engineering, 

The College of Arts and Sciences, 

The School of Medicine, 

The School of Law, 

The School of Dentistry, 

The School of Pharmacy, 

The College of Education, 

The College of Home Economics, 

The Graduate School, 

The Summer School, 

The Department of Physical Education and Recreation. 

The Schools of Medicine, Law, Dentistry and Pharmacy are located in 
Baltimore; the others in College Park, Maryland. 

BOARD OF REGENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Term 
expires 

George M. Shriver, Chairman, Pikesville, Baltimore County 1942 

John M. Dennis, Treasurer, Riderwood, Baltimore County 1941 

W. W. Skinner, Secretary, Kensington, Montgomery County 1936 

William P. Cole, Jr., Towson, Baltimore County 1940 

Henry Holzapfel, Jr., Hagerstown, Washington County 1934 

John E. Raine, Towson, Baltimore County 1939 

Clinton L. Riggs, Latrobe Apartments, Baltimore 1942 

Mrs. John L. Whitehurst, 3902 St. Paul Street, Baltimore 1938 

Raymond A. Pearson, M.S., D.Agr., LL.D., President and Executive Officer 

3 



4 BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, U. OF MD. 

THE UNIVERSITY COUNCIL 

Raymond A. Pearson, M.S., D.Agr., LL.D President 

H. C. Byrd, B.S Vice-President 

H. J. Patterson, D.Sc Dean of the College of Agriculture and 

Director of the Experiment Station 

A. N. Johnson, S.B., D.Eng Dean of the College of Engineering 

T. H. Taliaferro, C.E., Ph.D Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences 

Roger Howell, A.B., LL.D., Ph.D Dean of the School of Law 

J. M. H. Rowland, M.D Dean of the School of Medicine 

A. G. Du Mez, Ph.D Dean of the School of Pharmacy 

T. O. Heatwole, M.D., D.D.S Secretary of the Baltimore Schools 

W. S. Small, Ph.D Dean of the College of Education 

M. Marie Mount, M.A Dean of the College of Home Economics 

C. 0. Appleman, Ph.D Dean of the Graduate School 

Thomas B. Symons, M.S., D.Agr Director of Extension Service 

J. Ben Robinson, D.D.S., F.A.C.D Dean of the School of Dentistry 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND SCHOOL OF 

MEDICINE 

AND 

COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS 

MEDICAL COUNCIL 

Arthur M. Shipley, M.D., Sc.D. H. Boyd Wylie, M.D. 

William S. Gardner, M.D. Carl L. Davis, M.D. 

Standish McCleary, M.D. Maurice C. Pincoffs, B.S., M.D. 

Julius Friedenwald, A.M., M.D. Frank W. Hachtel, M.D. 

J. M. H. Rowland, M.D. Eduard Uhlenhuth, Ph.D. 

Alexius McGlannan, A.M., M.D., LL.D. Clyde A. Clapp, M.D. 

Hugh R. Spencer, M.D. John C. Krantz, Jr., Ph.D. 

FACULTY OF PHYSIC 

Randolph Winslow, A.M., M.D., LL.D Professor Emeritus of Surgery 

Samuel K. Merrick, M.D Professor Emeritus of Rhinology and Laryngology 

J. Frank Crouch, M.D Professor Emeritus of Clinical Ophthalmology and Otology 

John R. Winslow, A.B., M.D Professor Emeritus of Rhinology and Laryngology 

L. E. Neale, M.D., LL.D Professor Emeritus of Obstetrics 

Frank Dyer Sanger, M.D Professor Emeritus of Rhinology and Laryngology 

Harry Friedenwald, A.B., M.D Professor Emeritus of Ophthalmology 

BOARD OF INSTRUCTION 

•'Arthur M. Shipley, M.D., Sc.D., Professor of Surgery. 
William S. Gardner, M.D., Professor of Gynecology. 
Standish McCleary, M.D., Professor of Pathology and Clinical Medicine. 
Julius Friedenwald, A.M., M.D., Professor of Gastro-Enterology. 



FACULTY OF PHYSIC 

J. M. H. Rowland, M.D., Professor of Obstetrics and Dean of the Faculty. 
x/Alexius McGlannan, A.M., M.D., LL.D., Professor of Surgery. 
Hugh R. Spencer, M.D., Professor of Pathology. 
H. Boyd Wylie, M.D., Professor of Biological Chemistry. 
Carl L. Davis, M.D., Professor of Anatomy. 
Maurice C. Pincoffs, B.S., M.D., Professor of Medicine. 
Frank W. Hachtel, M.D., Professor of Bacteriology. 
Clyde A. Clapp, M.D., Professor of Ophthalmology. 
John C. Krantz, Jr., Ph.D., Professor of Pharmacology. 
Eduard Uhlenhuth, Ph.D., Professor of Anatomy. 

William H. Schultz, Ph.B., Ph.D., Research Professor of Pharmacology. 
G. Milton Linthicum, A.M., M.D., Professor of Diseases of the Rectum and Colon. 
Joseph E. Gichner, M.D., Professor of Clinical Medicine and Physical Therapeutics. 
Irving J. Spear, M.D., Professor of Neurology. 
John Ruhrah, M.D., Professor of Pediatrics. 
Charles F. Blake, A.M., M.D., Professor of Proctology. 
S. Griffith Davis, A.B., M.D., Professor of Anaesthesia. 
G. Carroll Lockard, M.D., Professor of Clinical Medicine. 
Harvey G. Beck, M.D., Sc.D., Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

Albertus Cotton, A.M., M.D., Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery and Roentgenology. 
Andrew C. Gillis, A.M., M.D., LL.D., Professor of Neurology. 
Henry J. Walton, M.D., Professor of Roentgenology. 
R. M. Chapman, M.D., Professor of Psychiatry. 

John Rathbone Oliver, A.B., M.D., Ph.D., Professor of the History of Medicine. 
L. H. Douglass, M.D., Professor of Clinical Obstetrics. 
Edgar B. Friedenwald, M.D., Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. 
Edward A. Looper, M.D., D.Oph., Professor of Diseases of the Nose and Throat. 
C. Loring Joslin, M.D., Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. 
Melvin S. Rosenthal, M.D., Professor of Dermatology. 
J. W. Downey, M.D., Professor of Otology. 
Harry M. Stein, M.D., Professor of Clinical Medicine. 
W. H. Toulson, A.B., M.Sc, M.D., Professor of Genito-Urinary Surgery. 
Charles Bagley, A.B., M.D., Professor of Neurological Surgery. 
Allen Fiske Voshell, A.B., M.D., Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery. 
Nathan Winslow, A.M., M.D., Professor of Clinical Surgery. 
Page Edmunds, M.D., Professor of Traumatic Surgery. 
Walter D. Wise, M.D., Professor of Clinical Surgery. 
Frank S. Lynn, M.D., Professor of Clinical Surgery. 
Elliott H. Hutchins, A.M., M.D., Professor of Clinical Surgery. 
Charles Reid Edwards, M.D., Professor of Clinical Surgery. 
Harry M. Robinson, M.D., Professor of Clinical Dermatology. 
F. L. Jennings, M.D., Professor of Clinical Surgery. 

Huntington Williams, M.D., Dr.P.H., Professor of Hygiene and Public Health. 
Robert P. Bay, M.D., Professor of Oral Surgery. 
Horace M. Davis, D.D.S., Professor of Exodontia. 
Compton Riely, M.D., Clinical Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery. 
W. S. Smith, M.D., Clinical Professor of Gynecology. 
T. Fred Leitz, M.D., Clinical Professor of Gastro-Enterology. 
M. Randolph Kahn, M.D., Clinical Professor of Ophthalmology. 
Waitman F. Zinn, M.D., Clinical Professor of Diseases of the Nose and Throat. 



6 BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, U. OF MD. 

J. Dawson Reeder, M.D., Clinical Professor of Diseases of the Colon and Rectum. 

A. J. Gillis, M.D., Clinical Professor of Geni to-Urinary Diseases. 

R. W. Locher, M.D., Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery. 

Sydney M. Cone, A.B., M.D., Associate Professor of Pathology. 

Abram S. Samuels, M.D., Associate Professor of Gynecology. 

H. J. Maldeis, M.D., Associate Professor of Medical Jurisprudence. 

G. M. Settle, A.B., M.D., Associate Professor of Neurology and Clinical Medicine. 

C. C. W. Judd, A.B., M.D., Associate Professor of Medicine. 
Thomas R. Chambers, A.M., M.D., Associate Professor of Surgery. 
William H. Smith, M.D., Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine. 
Paul W. Clough, B.S., M.D., Associate Professor of Medicine. 
Sydney R. Miller, A.B., M.D., Associate Professor of Medicine. 

J. McFarland Bergland, M.D., Associate Professor of Obstetrics. 

Walter A. Baetjer, A.B., M.D., Associate Professor of Medicine. 

A. M. Evans, M.D., Associate Professor of Surgery. 

Ferd. A. Ries, M.D., Associate Professor of Physiology. 

Theodore H. Morrison, M.D., Associate Professor of Gastro-Enterology. 

Edward S. Johnson, M.D., Associate Professor of Surgery. 

H. K. Fleck, M.D., Associate Professor of Ophthalmology. 

Emil Novak, M.D., Associate Professor of Obstetrics. 

Charles C. Habliston, M.D., Associate Professor of Medicine. 

Ralph P. Truitt, M.D., Associate Professor of Psychiatry. 

D. J. Pessagno, M.D., Associate Professor of Surgery. 

Moses Gellman, B.S., M.D., Associate Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery. 
Harry L. Rogers, M.D., Associate Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery. 
O. G. Harne, A.B., Associate Professor of Physiology. 

Charles A. Reifschneider, M.D. , Associate Professor of Surgery and Oral Surgery. 
S. Lloyd Johnson, A.B., LL.B., M.D., Assistant Professor of Medicine. 
John G. Huck, M.D., Assistant Professor of Medicine. 
George McLean, M.D., Assistant Professor of Medicine. 
Maurice Feldman, M.D., Assistant Professor of Gastro-Enterology. 
Robert B. Wright, M.D., Assistant Professor of Pathology. 
L. A. M. Krause, M.D., Assistant Professor of Medicine. 
H. R. Peters, M.D., Assistant Professor of Medicine. 
Milford Levy, M.D., Assistant Professor of Neurology. 
John H. Traband, M.D., Assistant Professor of Pediatrics. 
Clarence E. Macke, M.D., Assistant Professor of Pediatrics. 
Albert Jaffe, M.D., Assistant Professor of Pediatrics. 

Thomas B. Aycock, B.S., M.D., Assistant Professor of Anatomy and Associate in Surgery. 
Emil G. Schmldt, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Biological Chemistry. 
C. Gardner Warner, M.D., Assistant Professor of Pathology. 

W. S. Love, Jr., A.B., M.D., Assistant Professor of Medicine and Instructor in Pathology. 
Harry Goldsmith, M.D., Assistant Professor of Psychiatry. 
Lawrence F. Woolley, M.D., Assistant Professor of Psychiatry. 
H. W. Newell, M.D., Assistant Professor of Psychiatry. 

Leon Freedom, M.D., Assistant Professor of Neurology and Instructor in Pathology. 
-Jonas Friedenwald, A.B., M.D., Lecturer in Ophthalmic Pathology. 
John R. Abercrombie, A.B., M.D., Associate in Dermatology. 

E. H. Hay ward, M.D., Associate in Surgery. 

George A. Strauss, Jr., M.D., Associate in Gynecology. 



FACULTY OF PHYSIC 7 

Joseph I. Kemler, M.D., Associate in Ophthalmology. 
R. G. Willse, M.D., Associate in Gynecology. 
"Frank N. Ogden, M.D., Associate in Biological Chemistry. 
E. P. Smith, M.D., Associate in Obstetrics. 
Thomas K. Galvin, M.D., Associate in Gynecology. 

Franklin B. Anderson, M.D. , Associate in Diseases of the Nose and Throat and Otology. 
Austin H. Wood, M.D., Associate in Genito-Urinary Surgery. 
Albert E. Goldstein, M.D., Associate in Pathology. 
H. M. Bubert, M.D., Associate in Medicine and Assistant in Bacteriology. 
Zachariah Morgan, M.D., Associate in Gastro-Enterology. 
J. Mason Hundley, Jr., M.A., M.D., Associate in Gynecology. 
--Leo Brady, M.D., Associate in Gynecology. 
J. G. M. Reese, M.D., Associate in Obstetrics. 

M. A. Novey, A.B., M.D., Associate in Obstetrics and Instructor in Pathology. 
Samuel S. Glick, M.D., Associate in Pediatrics. 
Cyrus F. Horine, M.D., Associate in Surgery. 
W. J. Todd, M.D., Associate in Pediatrics. 
William G. Geyer, M.D., Associate in Pediatrics. 
Clewell Howell, M.D., Associate in Pediatrics. 
Walter C. Merkel, M.D., Associate in Pathology. 
Monte Edwards, M.D., Associate in Surgery, Anatomy and Diseases of the Colon and 

Rectum. 
Joseph Sindler, M.D., Associate in Gastro-Enterology. 
John F. Lutz, M.D., Associate in Histology. 
Isadore A. Siegel, A.B., M.D., Associate in Obstetrics. 
H. F. Bongardt, M.D., Associate in Surgery. 
I. O. Ridgley, M.D., Associate in Surgery. 
R. D. West, M.D., Associate in Ophthalmology. 
A. H. Finkelstein, M.D., Associate in Pediatrics. 
Eugene L. Flippin, M.D., Associate in Roentgenology. 
Richard G. Coblentz, M.D., Associate in Neurological Surgery. 
J. S. Eastland, M.D., Associate in Medicine. 
Thomas C. Wolff, M.D., Associate in Medicine. 
N. Clyde Marvel, M.D., Associate in Surgery. 
L. J. Millan, M.D., Associate in Genito-Urinary Surgery. 
R. F. McKenzie, M.D., Associate in Diseases of the Nose and Throat. 
T. Nelson Carey, M.D., Associate in Medicine and Physician in Charge of Medical Care 

of Students. 
<-4C. D. Legge, M.D., Associate in Genito-Urinary Surgery. 
E. P. H. Harrison, A.B., M.D., Associate in Obstetrics. 
Frank H. Figge, A.B., Ph.D., Associate in Anatomy. 
H. S. Rubinstein, B.S., M.D., Ph.D., Associate in Neuro-Anatomy and Instructor in 

Neurology. 
Samuel Morrison, M.D., Associate in Gastro-Enterology. 
William H. F. Warthen, M.D., Associate in Hygiene and Public Health. 
Francis Ellis, A.B., M.D., Associate in Dermatology. 
L. K. Fargo, M.D., Associate in Genito-Urinary Surgery. 
Henry F. Graff, A.B., M.D., Associate in Ophthalmology. 
Carl Dame Clarke, Associate in Art as Applied to Medicine. «*~~ 
Henry F. Buettner, M.D., Instructor in Bacteriology. 



8 BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, U. OF MD. 

J. A. F. Pfeiffer, M.D., Instructor in Bacteriology. 

M. Koppelman, M.D., Instructor in Gastro-Enterology. 

F. Stratner Orem, M.D., Instructor in Pediatrics. 

M. G. Gichner, M.D., Instructor in Medicine. 

M. G. Tull, M.D., Instructor in Hygiene and Public Health. 

W. R. Johnson, M.D., Instructor in Surgery and Pathology. 

E. M. Hanrahan, A.B., M.D., Instructor in Surgery. 
R. M. Hening, M.D., Instructor in Pediatrics. 
Marie Kovner, M.D., Instructor in Pediatrics. 
Wetherbee Fort, M.D., Instructor in Medicine. 
Henry Sheppard, M.D., Instructor in Medicine. 
Ruth Musser, B.A., M.S., Instructor in Pharmacology. 
Benjamin Abeshouse, M.D., Instructor in Pathology. 
Joseph Pokorney, M.D., Instructor in Histology 
Jaroslav Hulla, B.S., M.D., Instructor in Histology. 

M. Harold Goodman, M.D., Instructor in Dermatology and Pathology. 

A. C. Monninger, M.D., Instructor in Dermatology. 

S. Demarco, M.D., Instructor in Surgery. 

Karl J. Steinmueller, A.B., M.D., Instructor in Surgery. 

Frank J. Geraghty, M.D., Instructor in Pathology and Medicine. 

William Ellsworth Evans, M.S., Instructor in Pharmacology. 

Frank A. Pacienza, M.D., Instructor in Refraction. 

Henry C. Smith, M.D., Instructor in Medicine. 

L. P. Gundry, M.D., Instructor in Medicine. 

Samuel T. Helms, M.D., Instructor in Medicine and Genito-Urinary Surgery and 

Assistant in Pediatrics. 
Elizabeth Sherman, M.D., Instructor in Pediatrics. 
W. W. Walker, M.D., Instructor in Surgery. 
J. J. Leyko, M.D., Instructor in Surgery. 
William R. Geraghty, M.D., Instructor in Neurological Surgery and Assistant in 

Surgery. 
Thomas R. O'Rourk, M.D., Instructor in Diseases of the Nose and Throad and Assistant 

in Ophthalmology. 
George H. Yeager, B.S., M.D., Instructor in Surgery. 
Grant E. Ward, A.B., M.D., Instructor in Surgery. 
William G. Queen, M.D., Instructor in Pediatrics. 

F. A. Holden, M.D., Instructor in Ophthalmology and Otology. 

Frank K. Morris, A.B., M.D., Instructor in Anatomy and Assistant in Surgery and 

Obstetrics. 
Frederick Smith, M.D., Instructor in Pediatrics. 
Martin J. Hanna, M.D., Instructor in Histology. 
Elizabeth E. Painter, A. B., Instructor in Physiology. 
Marius P. Johnson, A.B., M.D., Instructor in Physiology. 
Ervin F. Lyon, M.D., Instructor in Pathology. 
Bernard J. Cohen, M.D., Instructor in Medicine. 
Earl L. Chambers, M.D., Instructor in Medicine. 
Lawrence Serra, M.D., Instructor in Medicine. 
Z. Vance Hooper, M.D., Instructor in Gastro-Enterology. 
C. Victor Richards, M.D., Instructor in Gastro-Enterology. 
M. Paul Byerly, M.D., Instructor in Pediatrics and Assistant in Medicine. 



FACULTY OF PHYSIC 9 

John F. Hogan, M.D., Instructor in Genito-Urinary Surgery. 

Brice M. Dorsey, D.D.S., Instructor in Exodontia. 

Dwight Mohr, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

J. G. Onnen, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

H. B. McElwain, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

Robert W. Johnson, M.D., Assistant in Pathology and Surgery. 

A. V. Buchness, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

T. J. Touhey, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

Nathaniel Beck, M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 

Carl Benson, M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 

A. Scagnetti, M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 

I. H. Maseritz, M.D., Assistant in Orthopaedic Surgery. 

W. J. Schmitz, M.D., Assistant in Pediatrics. 

H. Edmund Levin, M.D., Assistant in Bacteriology and Medicine. 

John G. Runkle, M.D., Assistant in Ophthalmology. 

Margaret B. Ballard, M.D., Assistant in Obstetrics. 

E. S. Edlavitch, M.D., Assistant in Gynecology and Obstetrics. 

Birckhead McGowan, M.D., Assistant in Diseases of the Nose and Throat and Otology. 

J. G. Benesunes, M.D., Assistant in Orthopaedic Surgery. 

Clyde F. Karns, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

Paul Schenker, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

Harry A. Rutledge, M.D., Assistant in Pediatrics. 

S. Kendig Wallace, M.D., Assistant in Pediatrics. 

Morris Fine, M.D., Assistant in Medicine and Pediatrics. 

Samuel H. Culver, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

J. Willis Guyton, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

J. Howard Burns, M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 

Luther E. Little, M.D., Assistant in Surgery and Anatomy. 

Benjamin S. Rich, M.D., Assistant in Otology. 

W. H. Triplett, M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 

David Tenner, M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 

J. G. Feman, M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 

E. M. Reese, M.S., Assistant in Medicine. 

H. William Primakoff, M.D., Assistant in Gastro-Enteriology. 

William N. McFaul, Jr., M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

Simon H. Brager, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

C. W. Peake, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

E. Hollister Davis, A.B., M.D., Assistant in Anaesthesia. 

J. Frank Hewitt, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

James C. O wings, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

James G. Arnold, A.B., M.D., Assistant in Pathology. 

Kenneth B. Boyd, M.D., Assistant in Obstetrics. 

George L. Wissig, M.D., Assistant in Obstetrics. 

Ralph Stevenson, M.D., Assistant in Pathology. 

Conrad B. Acton, M.D., Assistant in Pathology. 

R. B. Mitchell, Jr., M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 

George H. Carr, Jr., M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 

Walter Kohn, M.D., Assistant in Gastro-Enterology. 

Aaron C. Sollod, M.D., Assistant in Gastro-Enterology. 

Eli Contract, M.D., Assistant in Gastro-Enterology. 



10 BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, U. OF MD. 

G. Bowers Mansdorfer, M.D., Assistant in Pediatrics. 

Walter A. Anderson, M.D., Assistant in Pediatrics. 

Israel P. Meraxski, M.D., Assistant in Pediatrics. 

H. D. Franklin, M.D., Assistant in Pediatrics. 

Ruth Foster, M.D., Assistant in Neurology. 

Albert R. Wilkerson, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

J. W. Nelson, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

Julius Goodman, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

I. R. Trimble, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

Egbert L. Mortimer, Jr., M.D., Assistant in Orthopaedic Surgery. 

Dudley P. Bowe, M.D., Assistant in Obstetrics. 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND SCHOOL OF 
MEDICINE 

AND 

college of physicians and surgeons 

As a result of the merger accomplished in 1915 the combined schools 
offer the student the abundant resources of both institutions, and, in addi- 
tion, by earlier combination with the Baltimore Medical College, the entire 
equipment of three large medical colleges. 

The School of Medicine of the University of Maryland is one of the oldest 
foundations for medical education in America, ranking fifth in point of 
age among the medical colleges of the United States. It was organized in 
1807, and chartered in 1808, under the name of the College of Medicine 
of Maryland, and its first class was graduated in 1810. In 1812 the College 
was empowered by the Legislature to annex three other colleges or facul- 
ties: Divinity, Law, and Arts and Sciences; and the four colleges thus 
united were ''constituted an University by the name and under the title of 
the University of Maryland." 

The beautiful college building at Lombard and Greene Streets, erected 
in 1812, is the oldest structure in America devoted to medical teaching. 
Here was founded one of the first medical libraries and the first medical 
college library in the United States. 

Here for the first time in America dissecting was made a compulsory 
part of the Curriculum; here instruction in Dentistry was first given (1837) 
and here were first installed independent chairs for the teaching of Diseases 
of Women and Children (1867), and of Eye and Ear Diseases (1873). 

The School of Medicine was one of the first to provide for adequate 
clinical instruction by the erection in 1823 of its own hospital, and in this 
hospital intramural residency for the senior student was first established. 

In 1913, juncture was brought about with the Baltimore Medical College, 
an institution of thirty-two years' growth. By this association the facilities 



LABORATORY FACILITIES 11 

of the School of Medicine were enlarged in faculty, equipment and hospital 
connection. 

The College of Physicians and Surgeons was incorporated in 1872, and 
established on Hanover Street in a building afterwards known as the Mater- 
nite, the first obstetrical hospital in Maryland. In 1878 union was affected 
with the Washington University School of Medicine, in existence since 
1827, and the college was removed to Calvert and Saratoga streets. By 
this arrangement medical control of the City Hospital, now the Mercy 
Hospital, was obtained. 

ORGANIZATION OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 
LABORATORY FACILITIES 

The laboratories are located at two centers, the group of buildings at 
Greene and Lombard Streets, and at 32 and 34 South Paca Street. The 
schedule is so adjusted that the laboratory periods are placed with a view 
of obviating unnecessary movement on the part of the classes. The build- 
ing known as Gray Laboratory, at Greene and Lombard Streets, houses 
three departments. The Anatomical Laboratory is placed upon the top 
floor, where skylights and an auxiliary modern system of electric lighting 
give adequate illumination of the subjects. The Department of Pharma- 
cology occupies the second floor. There is a large room for the general 
student laboratory, which is thoroughly equipped with apparatus of recent 
acquisition, and in addition contains many instruments of unique and origi- 
nal design. With office and stockroom adjoining, this laboratory is com- 
plete for student experimentation. On the first floor of Gray Laboratory 
is the Department of Physiology. In addition to the large student labora- 
tory, which is constructed for groups of fifty-eight students, there are rooms 
for the departmental office, preparation of material, and storage of appa- 
ratus. An additional room is devoted exclusively to mammalian experi- 
ments. In this building there is maintained an animal room in which is kept 
an abundance of material for experimental purposes. The embalming 
and storage plant for the Department of Anatomy is in physical connection 
with the building and its special departments. The laboratories of physi- 
ology and pharmacology are completely equipped with apparatus lockers, 
so that, in accord with the best ideas of instruction, the students work in 
groups of two each, and each group has sufficient apparatus, so that the 
experimental work can be carried on without delay or recourse to a general 
stockroom. 

The laboratories of Pathology, Bacteriology, Biochemistry and Clinical 
Pathology are located in the Medical laboratory building on Greene Street 
north of Lombard. 



12 BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, U. OF MD. 

The Departments of Pathology, Bacteriology and Clinical Pathology 
use, conjointly, the large modernly equipped student laboratory on the 
second floor. The capacity is one hundred students. On the second floor 
also there are students' preparation rooms for the making and sterilization 
of media, cold storage and incubating rooms and research laboratories for 
the departments of Bacteriology and Clinical Pathology. 

On the main floor of this building are the offices, library, research and 
technical rooms of the Departments of Pathology and Bacteriology. The 
Department of Art also occupies quarters on this floor. The basement is 
given over to teaching museums, store rooms, students' locker room and 
lavatories. 

The Department of Biological Chemistry is housed on the top floor of 
this building. The space allotted to teaching includes a large student 
laboratory equipped with one hundred and thirty-two commodious locker 
units, supplied with gas, hot and cold water, vacuum and direct current 
service, a special apparatus room, a warm room, a colorimeter room, a 
balance room, a first-aid room and a stockroom. These rooms are appointed 
with modern laboratory furniture and apparatus, a constant temperature 
and ventilating system, and equipped and arranged for economic use of the 
students' time. 

Adjoining the students' space are private offices and laboratories of the 
staff, a departmental library, a shop and a preparation room. 

In the Main Building is the Museum of Anatomy, where are arranged 
for student reference, specimens which represent the careful selection of 
material over a period of many years. In the University Hospital is the 
Student Laboratory for the analytical studies by those students who are 
serving as clinical clerks on the wards. A similar laboratory is maintained 
in the building at the northwest corner of Saratoga and Calvert Streets, for 
the student work on the wards of the Mercy Hospital. 

At 32 and 34 South Paca Street are the Laboratories of Histology and 
Embryology. These laboratories accommodate one hundred and twenty- 
five students, or the full class, and are equipped with necessary lockers 
for microscopes and apparatus. The department housed in this building 
is provided with individual offices, preparation and stockrooms. 

CLINICAL FACILITIES 

UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL 

The University Hospital, which is the property of the University of Mary- 
land, is the oldest institution for the care of the sick in the State of Mary- 
land. It was opened in September, 1823, under the name of the Baltimore 
Infirmary, and at that time consisted of but four wards, one of which was 
reserved for eye patients. 



CLINICAL FACILITIES 13 

The present hospital has a capacity of two hundred and fifty beds, 
devoted to general medicine, surgery, obstetrics and the various medical 
and surgical specialties. It is equipped with a thoroughly modern X-ray 
department and clinical laboratory, and a post-mortem building which is 
constructed with special reference to the instruction of students in patho- 
logical anatomy. 

The hospital is situated opposite the medical school buildings, so that the 
students lose no time in passing from the lecture halls and laboratories to 
the clinical amphitheater, dispensary and wards. 

Owing to its situation, adjacent to the largest manufacturing district of 
the city and the shipping district, large numbers of accident patients are 
received. These, combined with a large number of sick seamen and with 
patients from our own city, furnish a large amount of clinical material. 
Accommodations for twenty-five obstetrical patients are provided in the 
hospital for the purpose of furnishing actual obstetrical experience to each 
member of the graduating class. 

Our new Hospital at the corner of Redwood and Greene Streets, con- 
tainining four hundred beds, will be ready for occupancy during the ses- 
sion 1934-1935. This will be a splendid increase in our clinical facilities. 

The present Hospital will be reconditioned for the use of our Outdoor 
Clinic. This will give us a much needed increase in space for this pur- 
pose and add to the usefulness and efficiency of this very valuable ad- 
junct to our hospital teaching. 

In connection with the University Hospital an outdoor obstetrical clinic 
is conducted, in which every patient is given careful prenatal supervision, 
is attended during labor by a senior student, supervised by a hospital physi- 
cian and assisted by a graduate nurse, and is visited during the puerperium 
by the attending student and graduate nurse. Careful prenatal, labor 
and puerperal records are kept, making this work of extreme value to the 
medical student, not only from the obstetrical standpoint, but also helping 
him to appreciate the value of social service and public health work. 

During the year ending December 31, 1933, 370 cases were delivered in 
the hospital and 1052 cases in the outdoor department. Students in the 
graduating class delivered or observed an average of fourteen cases, each 
student being required to deliver ten cases. 

The dispensaries associated with the University Hospital and the Mercy 
Hospital are organized upon a uniform plan in order that the teaching may 
be the same in each. Each dispensary has the following departments: 
Medicine, Surgery, Obstetrics, Pediatrics, Eye and Ear, Genito-Urinary, 
Gynecology, Gastro-Enterology, Neurology, Orthopaedics, Proctology, 
Dermatology, Throat and Nose, Tuberculosis and Psychiatry. 

All students in their junior year work in the departments of Medicine 
and Surgery each day in one of the dispensaries. 



14 



BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, U. OF MD. 



All students in their senior year work in the special departments one 
hour each day. 



HOSPITAL COUNCIL 

Raymond A. Pearson, M.S., D.Agr., LL.D., President. 

George M. Shriver, Esq., Chairman of the Board of Regents. 

J. M. H. Rowland, M.D., Dean of the School of Medicine. 

M. C. Pincoffs, B.S., M.D., Head of the Department of Medicine. 

A. M. Shipley, M.D., Sc.D., Head of the Department of Surgery. 

A. J. Lomas, M.D., CM., D.P.H., Superintendent of the Hospital. 

Miss Annie Crighton, R.N., Superintendent of Nurses. 

Mrs. John L. Whitehurst. 

W. B. Brooks, Esq. 

Miss Florence Sadtler, Representing Woman's Auxiliary Board. 



W. H. Toulson, M.D. 
C Reid Edwards, M.D. 

George Sargent, M.D. \ 
John Evans, M.D. / 



Representing Hospital Staff 



Representing Medical Alumni 



UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL STAFF 

A. J. Lomas, M.D., CM., D.P.H., Superintendent of the Hospital 

Physicians 

Maurice C Pincoffs, B.S., M.D. 

Harry M. Stein, M.D. G. Carroll Lockard, M.D. 



Walter A. Baetjer, M.D. 
C C. Habliston, M.D. 
L. A. M. Krause, M.D. 



Joseph E. Gichner, M.D. 

William H. Smith, M.D. 

William S. Love, Jr., M.D. 



Gastro-Enterolo gists 
Julius Friedenwald, A.M., M.D. Theodore H. Morrison, M.D. 

Neurologist 
Irving J. Spear, M.D. 

Psychiatrist 
R. M. Chapman, M.D. 



Clarence E. Macke, M.D. 



Hugh R. Spencer, M.D. 



Pediatricians 
C Lortng Joslin, M.D. 

Pathologists 



Albert Jaffe, M.D. 
S. Lloyd Johnson, M.D. 



UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL STAFF 15 

Surgeons 

Randolph Winslow, A.M., M.D., LL.D. Arthur M. Shipley, M.D., Sc.D. 

Nathan Winslow, M.D. Page Edmunds, M.D. 

Charles Reid Edwards, M.D. Frank S. Lynn, M.D. 

Laryngolo gists 
Edward A. Looper, M.D. Franklin B. Anderson, M.D. 

Proctologists 
G. Milton Linthicum, A.M., M.D. J. Dawson Reeder, M.D. 

Monte Edwards, M.D. 

Orthopaedic Surgeons 

Allen Fiske Voshell, A.B., M.D. Compton Riely, M.D. 

Moses Gellman, B.S., M.D. 

Genito-Urinary Surgeons 

W. H. Toulson, A.B., M.Sc, M.D. Lyle J. Millan, M.D. 

Roentgenologists 
Henry J. Walton, M.D. Eugene L. Flippin, M.D. 

Dermatologists 
Melvin S. Rosenthal, M.D. Harry M. Robinson, M.D. 

Bronchoscopist 

Edward A. Looper, M.D. 

A naesthetists 

S. Griffith Davis, M.D. George H. Yeager, B.S., M.D. 

E. Hollister Davis, A.B., M.D. Mary J. O'Brien, R.N. 

Obstetricians 

J. M. H. Rowland, M.D. L. H. Douglass, M.D. 

M. A. Novey, A.B., M.D. J. G. M. Reese, M.D. 

Isadore A. Siegel, A.B., M.D. E. P. H. Harrison, Jr., A.B., M.D. 

Ophthalmologists 
Clyde A. Clapp, M.D. William Tarun, M.D. 

Otologist 
J. W. Downey, Jr., M.D. 

Gynecologists 

W. S. Gardner, M.D. R. G. Willse, M.D. 

J. M. Hundley, Jr., M.D. Thos. K. Galvin, M.D. 

Leo Brady, M.D. 



16 



BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, U. OF MD. 



UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL RESIDENT AND INTERN STAFF 

1934-1935 

RESIDENT STAFF 

Harry Clay Hull, M.D., Resident in Surgery. 

George Stansbury Baker, A.B., A.M., M.D., Assistant Resident Surgeon. 

Samuel Eason Way, A.B., M.D., Assistant Resident Surgeon. 

Albert Earle Barnhardt, A.B., M.D., Assistant Resident Surgeon. 

Howard Stackhouse, Jr., M.D., Assistant Resident Surgeon. 

J.ames Irving Moore, A.B., M.D., Resident in Nose and Throat. 

Harry V. Langeluttig, A.B., M.D., Resident in Medicine. 

Lauriston L. Keown, A.B., M.D., Assistant Resident in Medicine. 

E. Bruce Brooke, M.D., Assistant Resident in Medicine. 

G. W. Brugler, M.D., Assistant Resident in Medicine. 

John E. Savage, B.S., M.D., Resident in Obstetrics. 

Newton Du Puy, M.D., Assistant Resident in Obstetrics. 

John C. Dumler, B.S., M.D., Resident in Gynecology. 



Thurston R. Adams, M.D. 
George E. Burgtorf, M.D 
D. D. Caples, M.D. 
Robert W. Farr, M.D. 
William L. Fearing, M.D. 
Herbert Goldstone, M.D. 



INTERN STAFF 

Charles L. Goodhand, M.D. 
W. L. Howard, M.D. 
Hugh McNally, M.D. 
Helen I. Maginnis, M.D. 
Edward Roberson, M.D. 
Andrew Taylor, M.D. 
W. H. Moursund, Jr., M.D. 
Douglass A. Browning, D.D.S., {Dental) 



UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL DISPENSARY STAFF 



M. A. Fine, M.D. 
J. G. Feman, M.D. 



Medicine 
L. A. M. Krause, M.D., Chief of Clinic 



W. H. Triplett, M.D. 
Joseph Lipsky, M.D. 



R. B. Mitchell, Jr., M.D. 
Diseases of the Stomach and Intestines 
Samuel Morrison, Chief of Clinic 
Joseph Sindler, M.D. 
Z. Morgan, M.D. 
C. Victor Richards, M.D. 
Ernest Levi, M.D. 
E. Contract, M.D. 

Albert J. Shochat 

Neurology 

Leon Freedom, M.D., Chief of Clinic 
H. S. Rubinstein, M.D., Chief of Clinic 



M. S. Koppelman, M.D. 

Z. Vance Hooper, M.D. 

Walter Kohn, M.D. 

Aaron C. Sollod, M.D. 

L. R. Schoolman, M.D. 



UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL DISPENSARY STAFF 17 

Mental Hygiene 

Ralph P. Truitt, M.D., Director 

H. W. Newell, M.D. Alice G. Rockwell, Ph.D. 

Diseases of the Lungs 

C. C. Habliston, M.D., Chief of Clinic 

Lawrence Serra, M.D. R. B. Mitchell, Jr., M.D. 

Diseases of Metabolism 

H. M. Stein, M.D., Chief of Clinic 

L. P. Gundry, M.D. 

Cardiovascular Diseases 

William S. Love, Jr., M.D., Chief of Clinic 

Frank J. Geraghty, M.D. H. C. Grant, M.D. 

Samuel J. Hankin, M.D. Carl P. Roetling, M.D. 

Allergy Clinic 
H. M. Bubert, M.D., Chief of Clinic 

Pediatrics 

C. Lorixg Joslin, M.D., Director 

John H. Traband, M.D., Chief of Clinic 

Clarence E. Macke, M.D., Chief of Clinic 

Albert Jaffe, M.D. A. H. Finkelstein, M.D. 

William J. Todd, M.D. M. Paul Byerly, M.D. 

F. Stratner Orem, M.D. Morris A. Fine, M.D. 

William G. Geyer, M.D. William G. Queen, M.D. 

R. M. Hening, M.D. Harry A. Rutledge, M.D. 

Marie Kovner, M.D. Samuel T. Helms, M.D. 

Clewell Howell, M.D. Israel P. Meranski, M.D. 

Samuel S. Glick, M.D. Walter A. Anderson, M.D. 

H. D. Franklin, M.D. 

Surgery 

Charles Reid Edwards, M.D., Chief of Clinic 

J. Willis Guyton, M.D. C. F. Karns, M.D. 

Thomas B. Aycock, M.D. A. C. Monninger, M.D. 

E. S. Johnson, M.D. W. W. Walker, M.D. 

W. R. Johnson, M.D. A. V. Buchness, M.D. 

J. Frank Hewitt, M.D. W. N. McFaul, Jr., M.D. 

Jas. C. Owings, M.D. Geo. H. Yeager, M.D. 

Luther, E. Little, M.D. C. W. Peake, M.D. 
Albert R. Wilkerson, M.D. 



18 BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, U. OF MD. 

Orthopaedic Surgery 

Allen Fiske Voshell, A.B., M.D., Chief of Clinic 

Moses Gellman, B.S., M.D. I. H. Maseritz, M.D. 

J. G. Benesunes, M.D. 

Genito-U rinary 

W. H. Toulson, M.D., Chief of Clinic 

Samuel T. Helms, M.D. Milton C. Lang, M.D. 

L. K. Fargo, M.D. Lyle J. Millan, M.D. 

Roentgenology 

Henry J. Walton, M.D., Chief of Clinic 
Eugene L. Flippin, M.D. 

Dermatology 

H. M. Robinson, M.D., Chief of Clinic 

M. H. Goodman, M.D. Francis Ellis, M.D. 

A. C. Monninger, M.D. 

Nose and Throat 

Franklin B. Anderson, M.D., Chief of Clinic 

Thomas R. O'Rourk, M.D. Birkhead McGowan, M.D. 

Joseph Nurkin, M.D. Benjamin S. Rich, M.D. 

Colon and Rectum 
Monte Edwards, M.D., Chief of Clinic 

Gynecology 

J. M. Hundley, Jr., M.D. James J. Marston, M.D. 

William J. Fulton, M.D. Leo Brady, M.D. 

John T. Hibbitts, M.D. Kenneth Boyd, M.D. 

Joseph V. Castagna, M.D. E. Eugene Covington, M.D. 

Thomas S. Boyer, M.D. 

Oral Surgery 

Brice M. Dorsey, D.D.S., Chief of Clinic 

Harold Goldstein, D.D.S. William E. Hahn, D.D.S. 

Samuel H. Bryant, D.D.S. 

Obstetrics 

L. H. Douglass, M.D., Chief of Clinic 

J. G. M. Reese, M.D. M. Alexander Novey, M.D. 

Maxwell Mazer, M.D. Isadore A. Siegel, A.B., M.D. 

Margaret B. Ballard, M.D. S. K. Wallace, M.D. 

E. P. H. Harrison, A.B., M.D. Kenneth B. Boyd, M.D. 

George L. Wissig, M.D. 



MERCY HOSPITAL 



19 



Ophthalmology 

Henry F. Graff, A.B., M.D., Chief of Clinic 

John G. Runkle, M.D. Frank A. Pacienza, M.D. 

Otology 
J. W. Downey, M.D., Chief of Clinic 

Social Service 
Miss Grace Pearson, Directress 

UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL DISPENSARY 

Report from October 1, 1932 to September 30, 1933 

Department New Cases Old Cases Total 

Pediatrics 3,190 20,159 23,349 

Dermatology 7,163 9,358 16,521 

Surgery 3,562 10,967 14,529 

Orthopedics 1,501 9,574 11,075 

Medicine 1,944 8,931 10,875 

Obstetrics 2,166 7,210 9,376' 

Gynecology 1,752 4,074 5,826 

Genito-Urinary 888 4,565 5,453 

Eye 1,606 3,065 4,671 

Nose and Throat 1,490 1,309 2,799 

Gastro-Intestinal 443 1 ,937 2,380 

Oncology 182 1,376 1,558 

Tuberculosis 452 1 ,071 1 ,523 

Neurology 412 957 1,369 

Cardiology 180 993 1,173 

Proctology 222 662 884 

Ear 362 404 766 

Cystoscopy 74 328 402 

Mental Hygiene 646 610 1,256 

Total 28,235 87,550 115,785 



MERCY HOSPITAL 

The Sisters of Mercy first assumed charge of the Hospital at the corner 
of Calvert and Saratoga Streets, then owned by the Washington University, 
in 1874. By the merger of 1878 the Hospital came under the control of 
the College of Physicians and Surgeons, but the Sisters continued their work 
of administering to the patients. 

In a very few years it became apparent that the City Hospital, as it was 
then called, was much too small to accommodate the rapidly growing de- 
mands upon it. However, it was not until 1888 that the Sisters of Mercy, 
with the assistance of the Faculty of the College of Physicians and Surgeons, 
were able to lay the cornerstone of the present Hospital. This building 
was completed and occupied late in 1889. Since then the growing demands 



20 



BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, U. OF MD. 



for more space have compelled the erection of additions, until now there are 
accommodations for 275 patients. 

In 1909 the name was changed from The Baltimore City Hospital to 
Mercy Hospital. 

The clinical material in the free wards is under the exclusive control of 
the Faculty of the University of Maryland School of Medicine and Col- 
lege of Physicians and Surgeons. 

The Hospital adjoins the College building, and all surgical patients 
from the public wards are operated upon in the College operating rooms. 
This union of the Hospital and College buildings greatly facilitates the 
clinical teaching. 

Mercy Hospital is the hospital of the United Railways and Electric Com- 
pany of Baltimore City, and receives patients from the Baltimore and Ohio 
Railroad Company and from the Pennsylvania Railroad Company and 
its branches. 



Mother M. Ricarda 
Sister M. Helen 
Sister M. Hildegarde 
Sister M. Vincent 
Sister M. Cornell a 



MERCY HOSPITAL STAFF 
BOARD OF GOVERNORS 

George M. Shriver, Esq., Chairman 

Dr. Alexius McGlannan 

Dr. Walter D. Wise 

Dr. Charles E. Brack 

Dr. Waitman F. Zinn 

Dr. Standish McCleary 



MERCY HOSPITAL STAFF 



SURGICAL DIVISION 



Alexius McGlannan, A.M., M.D., LL.D. 
W. D. Wise, M.D. 
C. F. Blake, M.D. 



Elliott Hutchins, A.M., M.D. 

A. M. Evans, M.D. 

F. L. Jennings, M.D. 



R. H. Locher, M.D. 

T. R. Chambers, A.M., M.D. 

D. J. Pessagno, M.D. 



Associate Surgeons 



J. J. Leyko, M.D. 



I. O. Ridgely, M.D. 

N. C. Marvel, M.D. 

H. F. Bongardt, M.D. 



Charles Maxson, M.D. 
H. B. McElwain, M.D. 
T. J. Touhey, M.D. 
Dwight Mohr, M.D. 



Assistant Surgeons 



I. R. Trimble, M.D. 



J. W. Nelson, M.D. 

John A. O'Connor, M.D. 

Simon Brager, M.D. 

Julius Goodman, M.D. 



MERCY HOSPITAL STAFF 



21 



H. K. Fleck, M.D. 



Frank D. Sanger, M.D. 
Waitman F. Zinn, M.D. 



F. A. Pacienza, M.D. 



Ophthalmologist and Otologist 
Harry Friedenwald, A.B., M.D. 

Associates 

J. W. Downey, M.D. 

Rhinologists and Laryngolo gists 

George W. Mitchell, M.D. 
Raymond McKenzie, M.D. 



Associates 

F. A. Kayser, M.D. 

Proctologist 
Charles F. Blake, M.D. 

Orthopaedic Surgeon 
Albertus Cotton, M.D. 

Associate 
H. L. Rogers, M.D. 

Urologist 
Alexander J. Gillis 



BlRCKHEAD MCGOWAN, M.D. 



Associate 
Kenneth D. Legge, M.D. 

Dentist 
J. D. Fusco, D.D.S. 

MEDICAL DIVISION 

Physicians 



Maurice C. Pincoffs, B.S., M.D. 
Standish McCleary, M.D. 



Cary B. Gamble, M.D. 
Harvey G. Beck, M.D. 



Hubert C. Knapp, M.D. 
C. C. W. Judd, M.D. 
H. R. Peters, M.D. 
Bartus T. Baggott, M.D. 



Associates 



George McLean, M.D. 
L. A. M. Krause, M.D. 

John E. Legge, M.D. 

J. S. Eastland. M.D. 



Wetherbee Fort, M.D. 



Assistant Physicians 

S. A. TUMMINELLO, M.D. 



J. M. Miller, M.D. 



22 



BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, U. OF MD. 



Gastro-Enterologist 
Julius Friedenwald, A.M., M.D. 



T. Frederick Leitz, M.D. 



Associates 



Theodore Morrison, M.D. 



Maurice Feldman, M.D. 



John Ruhrah, M.D. 



W. J. Schmitz, M.D. 



Charles E. Brack, M.D. 
A. Samuels, M.D. 
W. S. Gardner, M.D. 
G. A. Strauss, M.D. 



Assistants 

H. William Primakoff 
Pediatricians 

Associate Pediatrician 
F. B. Smith, M.D. 

Assistant Pediatricians 

Neurologist and Psychiatrist 
Andrew C. Gillis, M.D. 

Associate 

Milford Levy, M.D. 

Dermatologist 
Melvin Rosenthal, M.D. 

OBSTETRICAL DIVISION 



Frank K. Morris, M.D. 

GYNECOLOGICAL DIVISION 

Gynecologist 



Joseph Sindler, M.D. 



Edgar B. Friedenwald, M.D. 



G. B. Mansdorfer, M.D. 



William S. Gardner, M.D. 
George A. Strauss, M.D. 



T. K. Galvin, M.D. 

Associate 

J. J. Erwin, M.D. 

Assistants 



E. P. Smith, M.D. 

J. J. Erwin, M.D. 

T. K. Galvin, M.D. 

E. S. Edla vetch, M.D. 



Abram Samuels, M.D. 
E. P. Smith, M.D. 



E. S. Edlavitch, M.D. 



Frank K. Morris, M.D. 



MERCY HOSPITAL DISPENSARY STAFF 



23 



Standish McCleary, M.D. 



H. R. Peters, M.D. 



Sister Mary Kevin 



Albertus Cotton, M.D. 



PATHOLOGICAL DIVISION 

Clinical Pathologists 

H. T. COLLENBERG, M.D. 

Technicians 

X-RAY DEPARTMENT 

Radiographers 



Hugh R. Spencer, M.D. 



Emil G. Schmidt, Ph.D. 



Elizabeth Crook 



Harry L. Rogers, M.D. 



William Greenfeld, M.D. 

Technician 
Sister M. Antonia, R.N. 

MERCY HOSPITAL RESIDENT STAFF 

Raymond Helfrich, M.D., Resident Surgeon 
Daniel R. Robinson, M.D., Assistant Resident Surgeon 
Meyer H. Zuravin, M.D., Assistant Resident Surgeon 
Joseph A. Belz, M.D., Assistant Resident Surgeon 
Thomas Haigley, M.D., Assistant Resident Surgeon 
George H. Carr, Jr., M.D., Resident Physician 
Philip D. Flynn, M.D., Assistant Resident Surgeon 
Howard L. Zupnik, M.D., Resident Gynecologist 
Sol Smith, M.D., Resident Pathologist 



Interne Staff 1934-1935 



Ira E. Bayer, Jr., M.D. 
George S. Bayley, M.D. 
Edgar T. Campbell, M.D. 
Regis F. Downey, M.D. 



Joseph V. Jerardi, M.D. 

Alfred C. Moore, M.D. 

James G. Sasscer, M.D. 

Theodore A. Schwartz, M.D. 



Richard J. Sekerak, M.D. 



MERCY HOSPITAL DISPENSARY^ STAFF 

Surgery 
Supervisor Julius J. Leyko, M.D. 



D. H. Mohr, M.D. 
I. O. Ridgley, M.D. 
John O'Connor, M.D. 
H. F. Bongardt, M.D. 



Attending Surgeons 



I. R. Trimble, M.D. 



T. J. Touhey, M.D. 

J. W. Nelson, M.D. 

Simon Brager, M.D. 

Julius Goodman, M.D. 



24 BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, U. OF MD. 

Genito-U rinary Surgery 



A. J. Gillis, M.D. 
Albertus Cotton, M.D. 



Orthopaedic Surgery 



I. H. Maseritz, M.D. 



K. D. Legge, M.D. 



Harry L. Rogers, M.D. 



J. M. Miller 



Medicine 
Supervisor M. C. Pincoffs, B.S., M.D. 

Attending Physicians 

Henry Sheppard, M.D. \ nimS , , ~ 7 . . 
^ T ^ ^,^ ) Chiefs of Clinic 

Earl L. Chambers, M.D. J 

S. A. TUMMINELLO, M.D. 

Cardiovascular Diseases 
T. C. Wolff, M.D., Chief of Clinic 

Diseases of the Lungs 
S. Snyder, M.D., Chief of Clinic 

Diseases of Metabolism 
J. S. Eastland, M.D., Chief of Clinic 

Allergic Diseases 

H. M. Bubert, M.D., Chief of Clinic 
S. Snyder, M.D. 

Diseases of Stomach 
Supervisor, Julius Friedenwald, A.M., M.D. 

Attending Physicians 



S. Snyder, M.D. 



T. Frederick Leitz, M.D. 
M. Feldman, M.D. 



Theodore H. Morrison, M.D. 
Joseph Sindler, M.D. 



I. I. Levy, M.D. 

Esophagoscopist 
Waitman F. Zinn, M.D. 

Nervous Diseases 
Supervisor, A. C. Gillis, M.D. 

Attending Physicians 



Milford Levy, M.D. 



Miriam F. Dunn, M.D. 



Pediatrics 
Supervisor, Edgar B. Friedenwald, M.D. 



MERCY HOSPITAL DISPENSARY STAFF 



25 



Attending Physician, W. J. Schmitz, M.D. 
Gynecology 
Supervisors 



W. S. Gardner, M.D. 



George A. Strauss, M.D. 
J. J. Erwin, M.D. 



W. F. Zinn, M.D. 
Benjamin S. Rich, M.D. 



H. F. Fleck, M.D. 
J. I. Kemler, M.D. 



Melvin Rosenthal, M.D. 



Sister Mary Hildegard 



Attending Surgeons 

F. K. Morris, M.D. 

Diseases of Nose and Throat 

B. McGowan, M.D. 

Diseases of Eye and Ear 

Dermatology 
Social Service Department 



A. Samuels, M.D. 



E. Edlavitch, M.D. 
F. W. Gillis, M.D. 



R. F. McKenzie, M.D. 
Horace Strickland, M.D. 



M. Raskin, M.D. 
F. A. Pacienza, M.D. 



Llewellyn Lord, M.D. 



Katherine Craycroft 



MERCY HOSPITAL DISPENSARY 

(1933) 

Old 

Surgery 4,452 

Medicine 2,810 

Cardiac 277 

Diabetic 244 

Gynecology 879 

Eye and Ear 543 

Nose and Throat 799 

Neurology 765 

Pediatrics 297 

Gastro-Intestinal 271 

Dental 147 

Rectal 115 

Orthopedics 1 ,600 

Skin 681 

Genito-Urinary 2 ,283 

Total 16,163 6,996 



New 


Total 


1,559 


6,011 


1,475 


4,285 


77 


354 


19 


263 


447 


1,326 


329 


872 


749 


1,548 


132 


897 


292 


589 


123 


394 


283 


430 


86 


201 


535 


2,135 


399 


1,080 


491 


2,774 



23,159 



26 BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, U. OF MD. 

OTHER CLINICAL FACILITIES 

THE BALTIMORE CITY HOSPITALS 

The clinical advantages of the University have been largely increased 
by the liberal decision of the Board of Supervisors of City Charities to allow 
the immense material of these hospitals to be used for the purpose of medical 
education. There are daily visits and clinics in medicine and surgery by 
the Staff of the Hospitals. The autopsy material is unsurpassed in this 
country in amount, thoroughness of study, and the use made of it in medical 
teaching. 

The Baltimore City Hospitals consist of the following separate hospitals: 
The General Hospital, 400 beds. 
The Hospital for Chronic Cases, 300 beds. 
The Hospital for Tuberculosis, 172 beds. 
The Psychopathic Hospital, 325 beds. 
Infirmary (Home for Aged) 911 beds. 

STAFF OF BALTIMORE CITY HOSPITALS 
Parker J. McMillin, Superintendent 

VISITING STAFF 

Physician-in-Chief Thomas R. Boggs, S.B., M.D. 

Surgeon-in-Chief Arthur M. Shipley, ScD., M.D. 

Physician-in-Chief, Tuberculosis Hospital C. C. Habliston, M.D. 

Physician-in-Chief, Psychopathic Hospital Harry Goldsmith, M.D. 

Obstetrician-in-Chief Louis H. Douglass, M.D. 

Pediatrician-in-Chief Edwards A. Park, M.D. 

Visiting Pathologist S. S. Blackman, A.B., M.D. 

Resident Pathologist Ralph Stevenson, M.D. 

CONSULTING STAFF 

Gynecologists / R - G - Willse, M.D. 

\j. Mason Hundley, Jr., M.A., M.D. 

Urologist W. H. Toulson, A.B., M.D. 

Laryngologist Edward A. Looper, M.D. 

Pediatrician Lawson Wilkins, M.D. 

Neurological Surgeon Charles Bagley, M.D. 

Psychiatrist Esther L. Richards, M.D. 

{Allen Fiske Voshell, A.B., M.D. 
H. S. Wheeler, M.D. 
J. Alvin Jones, M.D. 

Proctologist Monte Edwards, M.D. 

Assisting Visiting Physician Charles R. Austrian, M.D. 

[Frank S. Lynn, M.D. 

Assisting Visiting Surgeons I C. A. Reifschneider, M.D. 

T. B. Aycock, M.D. 



JAMES LAWRENCE KERN AN HOSPITAL 27 

Assistant Neurologist O. R. Langworthy, M.D. 

Assistant Physician — Tuberculosis Henry C. Smith, M.D. 

Ophthalmologist Cecil Bagley, M.D. 

Dermatologist Isaac R. Pels, M.D. 

Roentgenologist John W. Pierson, M.D. 

THE JAMES LAWRENCE KERNAN HOSPITAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL OF 
MARYLAND FOR CRIPPLED CHILDREN 

This institution is situated on an estate of 75 acres at Hillsdale. The 
site is just within the northwestern city limits and of easy access from the 
city proper. 

The location is ideal for the treatment of children, in that it affords all 
the advantages of sunshine and country air. 

A complete hospital unit, new in every respect, offers all modern facili- 
ties for the care of any orthopaedic condition in children. 

The hospital is equipped with 82 beds — endowed, and city and state 
supported. 

The Children's Orthopaedic Dispensary at the University Hospital is 
maintained in closest affiliation and cares for the cases discharged from 
the Kernan Hospital. The physiotherapy department is very well equipped 
with modern apparatus and trained personnel. 

STAFF 

Surgeon-in-Chief and Medical Director Allen Fiske Voshell, A.B., M.D. 

Attending Orthopaedic Surgeon Albertus Cotton, A.M., M.D. 

Associate Orthopaedic Surgeons JMoses Gellman, B.S., M.D. 

\Harry L. Rogers, M.D. 

Resident Orthopaedic Surgeon E. M. Karp, B.S., M.D. 

Consulting Surgeons 1 1 M. T. Finney, A.B., M.D., D.S.M., F.R.C.S., (Eng.,Ire.)Hon. 
\Arthur M. Shipley, Sc.D., M.D. 

Consulting Plastic Surgeon John Staige Davis, B.Sc, M.D. 

Consulting Neurological Surgeon Charles Bagley, Jr., A.B., M.D. 

Considting Oculist Harry Friedenwald, M.D. 

Oculist F. A. Pacienza, M.D. 

Considting Aurist and Laryngologist Edward A. Looper, M.D. 

Aurist and Laryngologist F. B. Anderson, M.D. 

Consulting Dentist Harry B. McCarthy, D.D.S. 

Dentist M. E. Coberth, D.D.S. 

[Thomas B. Futcher, A.B., M.D. 
Considting Physicians JThomas R. Brown, A.B., M.D. 

(Lewellys F. Barker, A.B., M.D. 

Pediatrist Benjamin Tappan, A.B., M.D. 

Dermatologists ( Harry M. Robinson, M.D. 

\Leon Ginsberg, M.D. 

Consulting Pathologists J Sydney M. Cone, A.B., M.D. 

\Hugh R. Spencer, M.D. 
Consulting Neurologist Irving J. Spear, M.D. 



28 BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, U. OF MD. 

Neurologist R. V. Seliger, M.D. 

Anesthetists /j- A. Tompkins, M.D. 

\j. D. Holly, M.D. 

Roentgenologist Albertus Cotton, A.M., M.D. 

Superintendent Miss C. Gertrude Forrester, R.N. 

Dispensary and Social Service Nurse Miss Mabel S. Brown, R.N. 

Physiotherapist and X-Ray Technician Mrs. Georgiana Wisong 

Instructor in Grammar School Miss Laura Hampson 

st. Vincent's infant asylum 

The facilities of this institution, containing 150 infants and children, 
have been kindly extended to the University of Maryland by the Sisters 
of Charity. This large clinic enables this school to present to its students 
liberal opportunities for the study of diseases of infants and children. 

STAFF 

Obstetricians /Thos. K. Galvin, M.D. 

\ Frank K. Morris, M.D. 

W. C. Bacon, M.D. 
Pediatricians J C. L. Joslin, M.D. 

Clewell Howell, M.D. 

Chas. R. Goldsborough, M.D. 

Surgeon N. Winslow, M.D. 

Dermatologist J. A. Buchness, M.D. 

Oculist Clyde A. Clapp, M.D. 

Laryngologist Franklin B. Anderson, M.D. 

Orthopaedic Surgeon H. L. Wheeler, M.D. 

Physician C. P. Clautice, M.D. 

LIBRARIES 

The University Library, founded in 1813 by the purchase of the collec- 
tion of Dr. John Crawford, now contains 9,102 volumes, a file of 188 current 
medical journals, and several thousand pamphlets and reprints. It is well 
stocked with recent literature, including books and periodicals of general 
interest. The home of the library is Davidge Hall, a comfortable and com- 
modious building in close proximity to the classrooms and the laboratories 
of the Medical Department. The library is open daily during the year 
for use of members of the faculty, the students, and the profession generally. 

The Library of the Medical and Chirurgical Faculty of Maryland, 
containing 45,000 volumes, is open to the students of the school. The 
leading medical publications of the world are received by the library, and 
complete sets of many journals are available. Other libraries of Baltimore 
are the Peabody (250,000 volumes) and the Enoch Pratt Free Library 
(711,527 volumes). 

All these libraries are open to the students of the school without charge. 



ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 29 

ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 

The following curriculum is the result of a thorough revision of teaching 
in this school in order to meet modern requirements. The multiplication 
of specialties in medicine and surgery necessitates a very crowded course 
and the introduction of electives will very soon be depended on to solve 
some of the difficulties. 

The curriculum is organized under eleven departments. 

1. Anatomy (including Histology and Embryology). 

2. Physiology. 

3. Bacteriology and Immunology. 

4. Biological Chemistry. 

5. Pharmacology and Materia Medica. 

6. Pathology. 

7. Medicine (including Medical Specialties). 

8. Surgery (including Surgical Specialties). 

9. Obstetrics. 

10. Gynecology. 

11. Ophthalmology. 

The instruction is given in four years of graded work. 

Several courses of study extend through two years or more, but in no 
case are the students of different years thrown together in the same course 
of teaching. 

The first and second years are devoted largely to the study of the struc- 
tures and functions of the normal body. Laboratory work occupies most 
of the student's time during these two years. 

Some introductory instruction in Medicine and Surgery is given in the 
second year. The third and fourth years are almost entirely clinical. 

A special feature of instruction in the school is the attempt to bring to- 
gether teacher and student in close personal relationship. In many courses 
of instruction the classes are divided into small groups and a large number 
of instructors insures attention to the needs of each student. 

In most courses the final examination as the sole test of proficiency has 
disappeared and the student's final grade is determined largely by partial 
examinations, recitations and assigned work carried on throughout the 
course. 

DEPARTMENT OF ANATOMY, INCLUDING GROSS 
ANATOMY, HISTOLOGY AND EMBRYOLOGY 

—Carl L. Davis, M.D : Professor of Anatomy 

-Eduard Uhlenhuth, Ph.D Professor of Anatomy 

Thomas B. Aycock, S.B., M.D Assistant Professor of Anatomy 



30 BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, U. OF MD. 

"John F. Lutz, M.D Associate in Histology 

Monte Edwards, M.D Associate in Anatomy 

-Frank H. Figge, A.B., Ph.D Associate in Anatomy 

H. S. Rubinstein, B.S., M.D., Ph.D Associate in Neuro-Anatomy 

—Joseph Pokorny, M.D Instructor in Histology 

J. Hulla, M.D Instructor in Histology 

Frank K. Morris, A.B., M.D Instructor in Anatomy 

Martin J. Hanna, M.D Instructor in Histology 

Luther E. Little, M.D Assistant in Anatomy 

Gross Anatomy. First Year. Total number of hours 534. During 
the first semester, 5 lecture periods and 26 laboratory hours per week. 

The entire course centers around the dissection of the human body. 
Each student is given opportunity to dissect an entire half (left or right) 
of the body. The dissection is supplemented by lectures and informal 
discussions. 

Anatomy is taught as an independent science, emphasis being laid on the 
human species as contrasted with animal morphology. An attempt is 
made to familiarize the student with the elements of anthropometry, with 
systematic and regional anatomy, with the principles of topographical 
anatomy and with osteology. 

The actual dissection is preceded by a general examination of the body 
surface and superficial organs. Opportunity is provided for taking repre- 
sentative measurements of the head, face, trunk and limbs, and of acquiring 
a knowledge of the use of anthropometric instruments. Throughout the 
dissection the student is encouraged to take measurements and weights of 
all the major organs, including the brain and the endocrines, and to obtain 
a knowledge of the proportions of each organ to the body as a whole, as 
well as to the variability of these proportions. 

The dissection is undertaken in relation to topographical regions of the 
body, but systematic relations are continuously emphasized and, wherever 
possible, brought out by actual dissection. 

Osteology is taught in conjunction with the dissection of the muscles 
and the study of the functional mechanism of the skeleto-muscular appa- 
ratus. Each student is provided with a set of bones to aid him in his home- 
work. Fifty complete and perfect skeletons of the whole body and about 
as many of the limbs are available for reference and special advanced work. 

Second, Third and Fourth Years. Opportunity is provided for advanced 
special dissections and for research work in every branch of anatomy. 
Dr. Uhlenhuth. 

HISTOLOGY AND EMBRYOLOGY 

First Year. This course has three subdivisions: First, general histology; 
second, organology; and third, the central nervous system, the last being 



ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 31 

distinguished as neuroanatomy. The course in histology is divided equally 
between the study of the fundamental tissues and that of organs. Neuro- 
anatomy is taught during the first semester of the second year. Throughout 
the entire course the embryology of the part being studied precedes the 
study of the fully developed tissue. Thus embryology becomes a corre- 
lated part of the whole subject of microscopic anatomy and not an inde- 
pendent subject. 

A brief course in histological technic precedes the study of histological 
tissues, thus familiarizing the student with the principles involved in the 
preparation of material for microscopic study. For the remainder of the 
course, students are furnished slides of the required tissues, previously 
prepared in our own laboratory, thus insuring a uniform and satisfactory 
quality of material for study and permitting the time of the student to be 
expended in the study of material rather than in the technic of its 
preparation. 

Neuro-anatomy embraces a study of the fundamental structure of the 
central nervous system as applied to its function. An abundance of 
material permits of individual dissection of the human brain. A series 
of appropriately stained sections of the human brain stem is furnished each 
student for the microscopic study of the internal structure of the nervous 
system. Dr. Davis, Dr. Lutz, Dr. Rubinstein. 

Total assigned hours, Microscopic Anatomy, 192. 

For a description of the graduate courses offered by the members of the 
staff, consult the catalog of the Graduate School. 

DEPARTMENT OF PHYSIOLOGY 

Ferd A. Ries, M.D., Associate Professor of Physiology and Acting Head of the Department 

O. G. Harne, A.B Associate Professor of Physiology 

—Elizabeth E. Painter, A.B Instructor in Physiology 

Marius P. Johnson, A.B., M.D Instructor in Physiology 

First Year. Lectures and conferences are given on the physiology of 
blood, gastro-intestinal tract, including secretion and absorption, liver 
and pancreas, methods employed to determine metabolism and the endo- 
crine system. The laboratory work on these subjects is performed during 
the second year. 

Lectures and conferences 26 hours 

Second Year. Lectures, laboratory and conferences are given on the 
physiology of muscle-nerve, central nervous system and special senses, 
followed by work on respiration, circulation, metabolism and nutrition. 

Lectures and conferences 48 hours 

Laboratory 136 hours 

Total 184 hours 



32 BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, U. OF MD. 

For a description of the graduate courses offered by the members of the 
staff, consult the catalog of the Graduate School. 

DEPARTMENT OF BACTERIOLOGY AND IMMUNOLOGY 

Frank W. Hachtel, M.D Professor of Bacteriology 

J. A. F. Pfeiffer, M.D Instructor in Bacteriology 

Henry F. Buettner, M.D Instructor in Bacteriology 

H. Edmund Levin, M.D Assistant in Bacteriology 

' H. M. Bubert, M.D Assistant in Bacteriology 

Instruction in bacteriology is given in the laboratory to the students of 
of the second year during the first semester. This includes the various 
methods of preparation and sterilization of culture media, the study of 
pathogenic bacteria, and the bacteriological examination of water and 
milk. The bacteriological diagnosis of the communicable diseases is also 
included in this course. Animal inoculations are made in connection with 
the bacteria studied. The most important protozoa are also studied in 
the laboratory. The principles of general bacteriology are taught by quiz. 
conference and lecture. 

The principles of immunology are presented by means of quizzes, con- 
ferences and lectures to the second-year class throughout the second semes- 
ter, and practical experiments are carried out by the class in laboratorv 
sessions. 

Bacteriology Immunology 

Lectures and recitations 16 hours J 7 - , 

Laboratory 104 hours \ 

Total 120 hours 72 hours 

DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGICAL CHEMISTRY 

- H. Boyd Wylie, M.D Professor of Biological Chemistry 

•Emil G. Schmidt, Ph.D Assistant Professor of Biological Chemistry 

Frank N. Ogden, M.D Associate in Biological Chemistry 

Maurice J. Schmulovitz, A.B Weaver Fellow in Biological Chemistry 

This course is designed to present the fundamental concepts of biological 
chemistry. The phenomena of living matter, and its principal ingredients, 
secretions and excretions are discussed in lectures and conferences and 
examined experimentally. Training is afforded in routine biochemical 
methods of investigation. 

Lectures 66 hours 

Conferences 26 hours 

Laboratory 88 hours 

Total 180 hours 



ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 33 

For a description of the graduate courses offered by the members of 
the staff, consult the catalog of the Graduate School. 

DEPARTMENT OF PHARMACOLOGY 

"John C. Krantz, Jr., Ph.D Professor of Pharmacology 

•""Ruth Musser, B.A., M.S Instructor in Pharmacology 

"William Ellsworth Evans, M.S Instructor in Pharmacology 

"William Glenn Harne Demonstrator in Pharmacology 

C. Jelleff Carr, B.S.,M.S Isaac E. Emerson Fellow in Pharmacology 

This course is designed to include those phases of pharmacology necessary 
for an intelligent use of drugs in the treatment of disease. The didactic 
instruction includes materia medica, pharmacy, prescription-writing, toxi- 
cology, posology, pharmaco-dynamics, and experimental therapeutics. 
The laboratory exercises parallel the course of lectures. 

In addition, optional conference periods are available for students desiring 
further instruction or advice. 

Lectures 64 hours 

Laboratory 96 hours 

Total 160 hours 

Graduate Courses 

Students pursuing graduate instruction in the biological sciences may 
select graduate courses in pharmacology. The foregoing course in sys- 
tematic pharmacology designed for medical students is a prerequisite for 
these courses. 

A general description of the specific courses offered is set forth in the 
bulletin of the Graduate School. 

Opportunity will be provided for graduate students to engage in research 
in pharmacology and certain cognate sciences leading to graduate degrees. 

DEPARTMENT OF PATHOLOGY 

"Hugh R. Spencer, M.D Professor of Pathology 

Standish McCleary, M.D Professor of Pathology 

-Sydney M. Cone, A.B., M.D Associate Professor of Pathology 

-"Robert B. Wright, M.D Assistant Professor of Pathology 

-~C. Gardner Warner, M.D Assistant Professor of Pathology 

--Albert E. Goldstein, M.D Associate in Pathology 

""Walter C. Merkel, M.D Associate in Pathology 

-M. Alexander Novey, M.D Instructor in Pathology 

— \Vm. S. Love, Jr., M.D Instructor in Pathology 

—Leon Freedom, M.D Instructor in Pathology 

"~ M. Harold Goodman, M.D Instructor in Pathology 

— Benjamin Abeshouse, M.D Instructor in Pathology 

n^Ervin F. Lyon, M.D Instructor in Pathology 



34 BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, U. OF MD. 

W. R. Johnson, M.D Instructor in Pathology 

Frank J. Geraghty, M.D Instructor in Pathology 

James G. Arnold, A.B., M.D Assistant in Pathology 

- Conrad B. Acton, M.D Assistant in Pathology 

Robert W. Johnson, M.D Assistant in Pathology 

"Ralph Stevenson, M.D Assistant in Pathology 

Courses of instruction in pathology are given during the second and third 
years. These courses are based on previous study of normal structure and 
function and aim to outline the natural history of disease. Instruction is 
made as practical as possible so that the student may become familiar with 
the appearance of tissues in disease and may be able to correlate anatomical 
lesions with clinical symptoms and signs. 

1. General Pathology. {Second Year.) This course includes the 
study and demonstration of disturbances of the body fluids, disturbances 
of structure, nutrition and metabolism of cells, disturbances of fat, carbo- 
hydrate and protein metabolism, disturbances in pigment metabolism, 
inflammation and tumors. 

2. Applied Pathology. Including Gross Morbid Anatomy and 
Morbid Physiology. {Third Year.) In this course the special relation 
of lesions to clinical symptoms and signs is emphasized. 

In the laboratory the class is divided into groups for the study of classi- 
fied autopsy material. 

3. Autopsies. {Third Year.) Small groups of students attend autop- 
sies at the morgues of the University Hospital and Baltimore City Hospital. 
They are required to assist at autopsies and to prepare protocols. 

4. Clinical Pathological Conference. {Fourth Year.) In collabo- 
ration with the Department of Medicine. Material from autopsies is 
studied with reference to the correlation of the clinical aspects with the 
pathological findings. 

5. Advanced Work in Pathology. Properly qualified students will 
be permitted to carry out advanced or research work along the lines of 
experimental pathology. 

Summary 
Second Year 

Lectures 50 hours 

Laboratory 118 hours 

Total 168 hours 

Third Year 

Lectures 30 hours 

Laboratory 130 hours 

Total 160 hours 

Fourth year 

Clinical Pathological Conference 30 hours 



ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 



35 



DEPARTMENT OF MEDICINE 



Maurice C. Pincoffs, B.S., M.D Professor of Medicine 

Standish McCleary, M.D Professor of Clinical Medicine 

Jos. E. Gichner, M.D Professor of Clinical Medicine and Physical Therapeutics 

G. Carroll Lockard, M.D Professor of Clinical Medicine 

Harvey G. Beck, Sc.D., M.D Professor of Clinical Medicine 

Harry M. Stein, M.D Professor of Clinical Medicine 

Paul W. Clough, B.S., M.D Associate Professor of Medicine 

C. C. VV. Judd, A.B., M.D. Associate Professor of Medicine 

Sydney R. Miller, A.B., M.D Associate Professor of Medicine 

Walter A. Baetjer, A.B., M.D Associate Professor of Medicine 

William H. Smith, M.D Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine 

H. J. Maldeis, M.D Associate Professor of Medical Jurisprudence 

Charles C. Habliston, M.D Associate Professor of Medic: 

S. Lloyd Johnson, A.B., L.L.B., M.D Assistant Professor of Medic 

John G. Huck, M.D Assistant Professor of Medic 

George McLean, M.D Assistant Professor of Medic 

L. A. M. Krause, M.D Assistant Professor of Medic 

H. R. Peters, M.D Assistant Professor of Medic 

W. S. Love, Jr., A.B., M.D Assistant Professor of Medic 



H. M. Bubert, M.D Associate 

J. S. Eastland, M.D Associate 

Thomas C. Wolff, M.D Associate 

T. Nelson Carey, M.D Associate 

M. G. Gichner, M.D Instructor 

Wm. A. Strauss, M.D Instructor 

Henry Sheppard, M.D Instructor 

Wetherbee Fort, M.D Instructor 

Henry C. Smith, M.D Instructor 

Frank J. Geraghty, M.D Instructor 

L. P. Gundry, M.D Instructor 

Samuel T. Helms, M.D Instructor 

Bernard J. Cohen, M.D Instructor 

Earl L. Chambers, M.D Instructor 

Lawrence Serra, M.D Instructor 

Nathaniel Beck, M.D Assistant 

Carl Benson, M.D Assistant 

A. Scagnetti, M.D Assistant 

W. H. Triplett, M.D Assistant 

David Tenner, M.D Assistant 

M. Paul Byerly, M.D Assistant 

H. Edmund Levin, M.D Assistant 

J. Howard Burns, M.D Assistant 

J. G. Feman, M.D Assistant 

Morris Fine, M.D Assistant 

R. B. Mitchell, Jr., M.D Assistant 

George H. Carr. Jr., M.D Assistant 



n Medic 
n Medic 
n Medic 
n Medic 
n Medic 
n Medic 
n Medic 
n Medic 
n Medic 
n Medic 
n Medic 
n Medic 
n Medic 
n Medic 
n Medic 
n Medic 
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36 BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, U. OF MD. 

GENERAL OUTLINE 
Second Year 
Introduction to clinical medicine. 

(a) Introductory physical diagnosis. 

(1 hour a week, first semester: 2 hours a week, second semester.) 

(b) Medical climes. 

(1 hour a week, second semester.) 

Third Year 
I. The methods of examination (13 hours a week). 

(a) History taking. 

(b) Physical diagnosis. 

(c) Clinical pathology. 

These subjects are taught and practiced in the out-patient department and in the 
clinical laboratory. 
II. The principles of medicine (7 hours a week). 

(a) Lectures, clinics and demonstrations in general medicine, neurology, pediatrics 
and preventive medicine. 
III. The principles of therapeutics (1 hour a week). 

Lectures and demonstrations in general therapeutics, physical therapeutics and 
materia medica. 

Fourth Year 
The practice of medicine. 
I. Clinical clerkship on the medical wards. 
(26 hours a week for ten weeks.) 

(a) Responsibility, under supervision, for the history, physical examination, 

laboratory examinations and progress notes of assigned cases. 

(b) Ward classes in general medicine, the medical specialties, and therapeutics. 
II. Clinics in general medicine and the medical specialties. 

(6 hours a week.) 
III. Dispensary work in the medical specialties. 
IV. Clinical pathological conferences (1 hour a week). 

Medical Dispensary Work 

The medical dispensaries of both the Mercy and the University Hos- 
pitals are utilized for teaching in the third year. Each student spends 
two periods a week of two hours each in dispensary work. The work is 
done in groups of four to six students under an instructor. Systematic 
history-taking is especially stressed. Physical findings are demonstrated. 
The student becomes familiar with the commoner acute and chronic dis- 
ease processes. 

Physical Diagnosis 

Second Year. Didactic lectures and practical demonstrations in topo- 
graphical anatomy and normal physical signs. 

Third Year. The class is divided into small groups, and each section 



ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 37 

receives instruction for four hours a week for the entire session in the medical 
dispensaries of the hospitals. The large clinical material of the dispensaries 
and hospitals is utilized to give each student the opportunity to familiarize 
himself with the common types of bodily structure, with the normal varia- 
tions in physical signs and with the physical signs of the chief pulmonary, 
circulatory and abdominal diseases. 

A course of lectures (1 hour a week) on physical diagnosis supplements 
the practical work in this subject. 

Therapeutics 

Third Year. General therapeutics and materia medica are taken up and 
an effort is made to familiarize the student with the practical treatment of 
disease. The special therapy of the chief diseases is then reviewed. One 
hour a week. Dr. Lockard. 

Fourth Year. Special consideration is given to the practical application 
of therapeutic principles in bedside teaching and the chief therapeutic 
methods are demonstrated. 

Students attend therapeutic ward rounds once a week throughout their 
medical trimester. 

Tuberculosis 

During the third year in connection with the instruction in physical 
diagnosis a practical course is given weekly to sections of the class at the 
Municipal Tuberculosis Hospital. Stress is laid upon the recognition of 
the physical signs of the disease, as well as upon its symptomatology and 
gross pathology. 

Cardiology 

During the fourth year an elective course in cardiology is offered at the 
Mercy Hospital. The course occupies one and one-half hours weekly. 
Physical diagnosis, electrocardiography and the therapeutic management 
of cardiac cases are stressed. 

Syphilis 

Third Year. During the third year the subject of syphilis is dealt with 
in the lecture course. 

Fourth Year. An elective course in the therapeutic management of 
syphilis is offered in the dispensary. 

CLINICAL PATHOLOGY 

John G. Huck, M.D Assistant Professor of Medicine 

Head of Department of Clinical Pathology 
H. J. Maldeis, M.D Associate Professor of Medical Jurisprudence 



38 BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, U. OF MD. 

S. Lloyd Johnson, A.B., L.L.B., M.D Assistant Professor of Medicine 

Samuel T. Helms, M.D Instructor in Medicine 

E. M. Reese, M.S Assistant in Medicine 

During the third year the student is thoroughly drilled in the technic of 
the usual clinical laboratory work, so that he is able to perform all routine 
examinations which may be called for during his fourth year, in connection 
with the work in the wards and dispensary. 

The practical work is supplemented by a series of didactic lectures and 
demonstrations in which the entire teaching staff of the department takes 
an active part. The microscopical and chemical study of blood, exudates 
and transudates, gastric juice, spinal fluid, feces and urine are successively 
taken up, and special attention directed to the clinical significance of the 
findings. 

Clinical parasitology from the standpoint of the infecting agent and the 
carrier is given careful consideration. 

The entire course is thoroughly practical. Each student has his own 
microscope and is provided with blood counters and hemoglobinometer 
for his exclusive use, and every two students are equipped with a special 
laboratory outfit for all routine purposes. 

During the fourth year the student applies what he has learned during 
the preceding year in the laboratories of the various affiliated hospitals. 
He is also supplied with a laboratory outfit which is sufficiently complete 
to enable him to work independently of the general equipment. Special 
instructors are available during certain hours to give necessary assistance 
and advice. 

Lectures 32 hours 

Laboratory 96 hours 

Total 128 hours 

GASTRO-ENTEROLOGY 

Julius Friedenwald, A.M., M.D Professor of Gastro-Enterology 

T. Fred Leitz, M.D Clinical Professor of Gastro-Enterology 

Theodore H. Morrison, M.D Associate Professor of Gastro-Enterology 

Maurice Feldman, M.D Assistant Professor of Gastro-Enterology 

Zachariah Morgan, M.D Associate in Gastro-Enterology 

Joseph Sindler, M.D Associate in Gastro-Enterology 

Samuel Morrison, M.D Associate in Gastro-Enterology 

M. S. Koppelman, M.D Instructor in Gastro-Enterology 

Z. Vance Hooper, M.D Instructor in Gastro-Enterology 

C. Victor Richards, M.D Instructor in Gastro-Enterology 

H. William Primakoff, M.D Assistant in Gastro-Enterology 

Walter Kohn, M.D Assistant in Gastro-Enterology 

Aaron C. Sollod, M.D Assistant in Gastro-Enterology 

Eli Contract, M.D Assistant in Gastro-Enterology 



ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 39 

Third Year. A series of 14 lectures is given covering the diseases of the 
digestive tract. 

Fourth Year. Clinics and demonstrations to the class for one hour a week 
throughout the session. Dispensary instruction to small groups through- 
out the entire session. Practical instruction is given in the use of modern 
methods of study of the diseases of the gastro-intestinal tract. 

PSYCHIATRY 

R. M. Chapman, M.D Professor of Psychiatry 

Ralph P. Truitt, M.D Associate Professor of Psychiatry 

Harry Goldsmith, M.D Assistant Professor of Psychiatry 

Lawrence F. Woolley, M.D Assistant Professor of Psychiatry 

H. W. Newell, M.D Assistant Professor of Psychiatry 

Third Year. In the third year the student attends fifteen clinical lec- 
tures and five clinics which are designed to be introductory to the more 
intensive work in psychiatry in the fourth year. 

Four Year. The class is divided into sections for clinical conferences on 
selected groups of cases. Each student may work for a short period as 
assistant in the Mental Hygiene Clinic, and thus gain practical experience 
of the problems of history-taking, examination, and the care of psychiatric 
patients. 

PEDIATRICS 

Edgar B. Friedenwald, M.D Professor of Clinical Pediatrics 

C. Loring Joslin, M.D Professor of Clinical Pediatrics 

John H. Traband, M.D Assistant Professor of Pediatrics 

Clarence E. Macke, M.D Assistant Professor of Pediatrics 

Albert Jaffe, M.D Assistant Professor of Pediatrics 

William J. Todd, M.D Associate in Pediatrics 

William G. Geyer, M.D Associate in Pediatrics 

Clewell Howell, M.D Associate in Pediatrics 

Samuel S. Glick, M.D Associate in Pediatrics 

A. H. Finkelstein, M.D Associate in Pediatrics 

F. Stratner Orem, M.D Instructor in Pediatrics 

Frederick Smith, M.D Instructor in Pediatrics 

R. M. Hexing, M.D Instructor in Pediatrics 

Marie Kovner, M.D Instructor in Pediatrics 

Elizabeth Sherman, M.D Instructor in Pediatrics 

William G. Queen, M.D Instructor in Pediatrics 

M. Paul Byerly, M.D Instructor in Pediatrics 

W. J. Schmitz, M.D Assistant in Pediatrics 

Harry A. Rutledge, M.D .Assistant in Pediatrics 

S. Kendig Wallace, M.D Assistant in Pediatrics 

Morris Fine, M.D Assistant in Pediatrics 

Samuel T. Helms, M.D Assistant in Pediatrics 

G. Bowers Mansdorfer, M.D Assistant in Pediatrics 



40 BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, U. OF MB. 

Walter A. Anderson, M.D Assistant in Pediatrics 

Israel P. Meranski, M.D Assistant in Pediatrics 

H. D. Franklin, M.D Assistant in Pediatrics 

Third Year. Instruction during the third year consists of a weekly 
lecture. The more important diseases of infancy and childhood are re- 
viewed. The principles of infant feeding are presented in brief form. 

Fourth Year. Weekly clinical lectures are given at which patients are 
shown to demonstrate the chief features of the diseases discussed. The 
students attend a weekly ward round on the pediatric service throughout 
their medical trimester. A special course on physical diagnosis in children 
is given. Sections of the class work daily in the Babies' and Children's 
Clinic. 

NEUROLOGY 

Irving J. Spear, M.D Professor of Neurology 

Andrew C. Gillis, A.M., M.D., LL.D Professor of Neurology 

G. M. Settle, A.B., M.D., Associate Professor of Neurology and Clinical Medicine 

Milford Levy, M.D Assistant Professor of Neurology 

Leon Freedom, M.D Assistant Professor of Neurology 

H. S. Rubinstein, B.S., M.D., Ph.D Instructor in Neurology 

Ruth Foster, M.D Assistant in Neurology 

Third Year. Lectures and recitations one hour each week to the entire 
class. Instruction in clinical neurology two hours a week at the City Hos- 
pital to small groups. By means of didactic lectures and clinical con- 
ferences, there are considered the commoner types of diseases of the nervous 
system, the methods of neurological examination, and the relationship of 
signs and symptoms to pathological conditions. The material at the Uni- 
versity and Mercy Hospitals is available. 

Fourth Year. Clinical conference one hour each week to the entire class. 
This subject is taught at the University and Mercy Hospitals. All patients 
presented at these clinics are carefully examined; complete written records 
are made by the students who demonstrate the patients before the class. 
The patients are usually assigned one or two weeks before they are presented, 
and each student in the class must prepare one or more cases during the year. 

Ward Class Instruction. In small sections at the University and Mercy 
Hospitals. In these classes the students come in close personal contact 
with the patients in the wards under the supervision of the instructor. 

Dispensary Instruction. Small sections are instructed in the dispensaries 
of the University and Mercy Hospitals four afternoons each week. In 
this way students are brought into contact with nervous diseases in their 
early and late manifestations. 



ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 41 

HYGIENE AND PREVENTIVE MEDICINE 

Huntington Williams, M.D., Dr.P.H Professor of Hygiene and Public Health 

William H. F. Warthen, M.D Associate in Hygiene and Public Health 

Myron G. Tull, M.D Instructor in Hygiene and Public Health 

Third Year. Lecture or demonstration each Monday from September 
to May and each Thursday during January, February and March. The 
course deals with the fundamentals of public health including administra- 
tion, communicable disease and food control and environmental sanitation, 
including industrial hygiene; with major emphasis on the practice of pre- 
ventive medicine and the relation of prevention to diagnosis and treatment. 
Small groups visit Sydenham Hospital periodically and are given practical 
instruction in the diagnosis, treatment and prevention of the communica- 
ble diseases. 

Fourth Year. Demonstrations and discussion of public health work with 
emphasis on those phases which concern the practicing physician. 

MEDICAL JURISPRUDENCE 

H. J. Maldeis, M.D Associate Professor of Medical Jurisprudence 

Baltimore City Post Mortem Physician 

Third Year. One hour each week for six weeks. 

This course embraces a summary of the following : Proceedings in criminal 
and civil prosecution; medical evidence and testimony; identity and its 
general relations; sexual abnormalities; personal identity; impotence and 
sterility; rape; criminal abortions; signs of death; wounds in their medico- 
legal relations; death, natural and homicidal; malpractice, insanity; and 
medico-legal autopsies. 

DEPARTMENT OF SURGERY 

Arthur M. Shipley, Sc.D., M.D Professor of Surgery 

Alexius McGlannan, A.M., M.D., LL.D Professor of Surgery 

Nathan Winslow, A.M., M.D Professor of Clinical Surgery 

Page Edmunds, M.D Professor of Traumatic Surgery 

Walter D. Wise, M.D Professor of Clinical Surgery 

Frank S. Lynn, M.D Professor of Clinical Surgery 

Elliott H. Hutchins, A.M., M.D Professor of Clinical Surgery 

Charles Reid Edwards, M.D Professor of Clinical Surgery 

Charles Bagley, Jr., A.B., M.D Professor of Neurological Surgery 

F. L. Jennings, M.D Professor of Clinical Surgery 

Robert P. Bay, M.D Professor of Oral Surgery 

Thomas R. Chambers, A.M., M.D Associate Professor of Surgery 

R. W. Locher, M.D Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery 

A. M. Evans, M.D Associate Professor of Surgery 

Edward S. Johnson, M.D Associate Professor of Surgery 

D. J. Pessagno, M.D Associate Professor of Surgery 



42 BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, U. OF MD. 

Charles A. Reifschxeider, M.D Associate Professor of Surgery 

E. H. Hayward, M.D Associate in Surgery 

Cyrus F. Horixe, M.D Associate in Surgery 

I. 0. Ridgley, M.D Associate in Surgery 

H. F. Boxgardt, M.D Associate in Surgery 

Thomas B. Aycock, B.S., M.D Associate in Surgery 

Moxte Edwards, M.D Associate in Surgery 

Richard G. Coblextz, M.D Associate in Neurological Surgery 

N. Clyde Marvel, M.D Associate in Surgery 

W. R. Johxsox, M.D Instructor in Surgery 

E. M. Haxrahax, A.B., M.D Instructor in Surgery 

S. Demarco, M.D Instructor in Surgery 

Karl J. Steixmueller, A.B., M.D Instructor in Surgery 

W. W. Walker, M.D Instructor in Surgery 

J. J. Leyko, M.D Instructor in Surgery 

George H. Yeager, B.S., M.D Instructor in Surgery 

D wight Mohr, M.D Assistant in Surgery 

William R. Geraghty, B.S., M.D Assistant in Surgery 

H. B. McElwaix, M.D Assistant in Surgery 

J. G. Oxnen, M.D Assistant in Surgery 

A. V. Buchxess, M.D Assistant in Surgery 

T. J. Touhey, M.D Assistant in Surgery 

Clyde F. Karxs, M.D Assistant in Surgery 

Paul Schexker, M.D Assistant in Surgery 

Robert W. Johxsox, M.D Assistant in Surgery 

Fraxk K. Morris, A.B., M.D Assistant in Surgery 

J. Willis Guytox, M.D Assistant in Surgery 

Luther E. Little, M.D Assistant in Surgery 

Wm. N. McFaul, Jr., M.D Assistant in Surgery 

Samuel H. Culver, M.D Assistant in Surgery 

Simox H. Brager, M.D Assistant in Surgery 

C W. Peake, M.D Assistant in Surgery 

J. Fraxk Hewitt, M.D Assistant in Surgery 

James C. Owixgs, M.D Assistant in Surgery 

Albert R. Wilkersox, M.D Assistant in Surgery 

J. W. Nelsox, M.D Assistant in Surgery 

Julius Goodmax, M.D Assistant in Surgery 

I. H. Trimble, M.D Assistant in Surgery 

The teaching is done in the anatomical laboratory, the dispensaries, 
wards, clinical laboratories and operating rooms of the University and Mercy 
Hospitals, and in the wards and operating rooms of the Baltimore City 
Hospitals. 

Instruction is given by means of lectures, recitations, dispensary work, 
bedside instruction, ward classes, and clinics. The work begins in the sec- 
ond year, and continues throughout the third and fourth years. 



ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 43 

Second Year 

Topographic and Surgical Anatomy. The course is designed to bridge 
the gap between anatomy in the abstract, and clinical anatomy as applied 
to the study and practice of medicine and surgery. 

The teaching is done in the anatomical laboratory, and students are 
required to demonstrate all points, outlines, and regions on the cadaver. 
Underlying regions are dissected when necessary to bring out outlines and 
relations of structures. 

Didactic Lectures. Two hours a week for one semester, augmented 
by demonstrations with specimens, charts, and cross sections. Dr. Monte 
Edwards. 

Laboratory. Five hours a week for 16 weeks. Dr. Monte Edwards 
assisted by Drs. Morris and Little. 

Principles of Surgery. This course includes history-taking, records 
of physical examinations and of operations and progress notes; the 
preparation of surgical dressing, suture materials and solutions. It 
includes inflammation, infections, ulcers, gangrene, fistulae and sinuses, 
hemorrhage, shock and tumors. Lectures and conferences, two hours per 
week for one semester, to the entire class. Dr. C. R. Edwards. 

Third Year 

General and Regional Surgery. Principles of surgery and general 
surgery, three hours a week throughout the year to the entire class, lectures, 
recitations and clinics. Drs. Shipley and Wise. 

The class is divided into groups and receives instruction in history-taking, 
gross pathology, and surgical diagnosis — at the bedside and in the dead- 
house of the Baltimore City Hospitals. Drs. Shipley, Lynn, Reifschneider 
and Aycock. 

Operative Surgery. Instruction is given in operative surgery upon 
the cadaver and on dogs. The class is divided into sections, and each sec- 
tion is given practical and individual work under the supervision of the 
instructors. Dr. Lynn, assisted by Drs. Winslow, E. S. Johnson, Aycock, 
Demarco, Horine, Pessagno, Onnen, W. R. Johnson, Steinmueller, R. W. 
Johnson, McFaul, Culver and Brager. 

Fractures and Dislocations. This course consists of instruction in 
the various forms of fractures, dislocations and their treatment. There 
is a regular schedule of didactic lectures, which is supplemented by practical 
demonstrations in diagnosis and treatment. This practical work is given 
at the Mercy, University and Baltimore City Hospitals, Drs. Lynn and 
Jennings. 

Surgical Dispensary. Under supervision, the student takes the his- 



44 BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, U. OF MD. 

tory, makes the physical examinations, attempts the diagnosis, and, as far 
as possible, carries out the treatment of the ambulatory surgical patients 
in the University and in the Mercy Hospitals. Mercy Hospital — Drs. 
Dwight Mohr, Ridgely, Touhey, Bongardt and McElwain. University 
Hospital — Drs. Lynn, Winslow, Edwards and E. S. Johnson. 

Fourth Year 

Clinics. A weekly clinic is given at the Mercy and at the University 
Hospitals to one-half the class throughout the year. As far as possible 
this is a diagnostic clinic. Mercy Hospital — Dr. McGlannan. University 
Hospital — Dr. Shipley. 

Surgical Pathology. A weekly exercise of one hour at Mercy Hospital 
for one semester at which specimens from the operating room and museum 
are studied in the gross and microscopically in relation to the case history. 
Dr. McGlannan. 

Traumatic Surgery. Operative and post-operative treatment of acci- 
dent cases, with instructions as to the relationship between the state, the 
employee, the employer, and the physician's duty to each. One hour a 
week to sections of the class throughout the year. Dr. Edmunds. 

Clinical Clerkship. The personal study of assigned hospital patients, 
under supervision of the staffs of the University and Mercy Hospitals, 
history-taking, and physical examination of patients, laboratory examina- 
tions, attendance at operations and observation of post-operative treatment. 

Ward Classes. Ward class instruction in small groups will consist of 
ward rounds, surgical diagnosis, treatment and the after-care of operative 
cases. Mercy Hospital — Drs. McGlannan, Wise, Elliot Hutchins, Evans 
and Jennings. University Hospital — Drs. Shipley, Edmunds, Lynn 
and Edwards. 

ANAESTHESIA 

S. Griffith Davis, A.B., M.D Professor of Anaesthesia 

E. Hollister Davis, A.B., M.D Assistant in Anaesthesia 

Mary J. O'Brien, R.N Anaesthetist 

Third Year 

Lectures on the general physiology of anaesthesia, with consideration of 
special physiology of each anaesthetic agent. Methods of induction and 
administration of anaesthesia. Factors influencing the selection of the 
anaesthetic and types of anaesthetic agents. Preparation and care of the 
anaesthetized patient. 

The lectures are correlated with practical demonstrations during operative 
clinics at the City Hospitals. 



ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 45 

Fourth Year 

During operative clinics in both surgery and gynecology each student 
will be given practical instruction in the administration of anaesthetics and 
will be required to record such changes as take place in blood pressure, 
pulse and respiration. 

DERMATOLOGY 

Melvin S. Rosenthal, M.D Professor of Dermatology 

Harry M. Robinson, M.D Professor of Clinical Dermatology 

John R. Abercrombie, A.B., M.D Associate in Dermatology 

Francis Ellis, A.B., M.D Associate in Dermatology 

Arthur C. Monninger, M.D Instructor in Dermatology 

M. Harold Goodman, A.B., M.D Instructor in Dermatology 

Clinical conferences are held one hour each week with the entire class. 
This course consists of demonstrations of the common diseases of the skin 
in addition to a number of lectures on the general principles of dermatology. 
During the first semester this conference will be conducted by Dr. Rosen- 
thal. The second semester will be in charge of Dr. Robinson. 

Dispensary instruction in the diagnosis and treatment of skin diseases 
is given daily at the University Hospital by Drs. Robinson, Ellis, Goodman 
and Monninger. A similar course of instruction is given at the Mercy 
Hospital on Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays by Dr. Rosenthal. 
These courses are devised for the specific purpose of giving the student close 
and intimate contact with skin diseases. Students are assigned cases and 
under supervision are permitted to diagnose and administer accepted 
treatment. 



ORTHOPAEDIC SURGERY 

Allen Fiske Voshell, A.B., M.D Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery 

Albertus Cotton, A.M., M.D Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery 

Compton Riely, M.D Clinical Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery 

Moses Gellman, B.S., M.D Associate Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery 

Harry L. Rogers, M.D Associate Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery 

I. H. Maseritz M.D Assistant, in Orthopaedic Surgery 

J. G. Benesunes, M.D Assistant in Orthopaedic Surgery 

Egbert L. Mortimer, Jr., M.D Assistant in Orthopaedic Surgery 

In this course didactic, clinical, bedside and out-patient instruction is 
given. This instruction is provided in the University Hospital Amphi- 
theatre, Mercy Hospital and Dispensary, Kernan Hospital and Industrial 
School for Crippled Children at "Radnor Park" and in the Dispensary of 
the University Hospital. 

Lectures or clinics are held once a week at each of the hospitals named 
in town. In addition, a weekly bedside clinic is held for small sections of 



46 BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, U. OF MD. 

the class at "Radnor Park" and Mercy Hospital. Daily teaching in the 
Dispensary is stressed. 

The course covers instruction in the special methods of examination, 
pathology, diagnosis and treatment in this specialty. 

Brief outlines and demonstrations are also given of the apparatus em- 
ployed in Physiotherapy, Muscle Training and Corrective Gymnastics. 

ROENTGENOLOGY 

Henry J. Walton, M.D Professor of Roentgenology 

Albertus Cotton, A.M., M.D Professor of Roentgenology 

Eugene L. Flippin, M.D Associate in Roentgenology 

During the academic year small groups of the fourth year class are given 
weekly demonstrations in the diagnostic and therapeutic uses of the Roent- 
gen rays. An effort is made to familiarize the student with the appearance 
of normal Roentgenograms, after which instruction is given in the interpre- 
tation of the more common pathological lesions seen on the Roentgen films 
and fluoroscopic screen. The history, physics and practical application 
of the Roentgen rays are alluded to, but not stressed. Two conferences 
are held each week with the medical and pathological departments, which 
are also open to members of the fourth year class. 

DISEASES OF THE NOSE AND THROAT 

Edward A. Looper, M.D., D.Oph Professor of Diesases of the Nose and Throat 

Waitman F. Zinn, M.D Clinical Professor of Diseases of the Nose and Throat 

Franklin B. Anderson, M.D Associate in Diseases of the Nose and Throat 

R. F. McKenzie, M.D Associate in Diseases of the Nose and Throat 

Thomas O'Rourk, M.D Instructor in Diseases of the Nose and Throat 

Birckhead McGowan, M.D Assistant in Diseases of the Nose and Throat 

Third Year. Instruction to entire class is given in the common diseases 
of the nose and throat, attention being especially directed to infections ot 
the accessory sinuses, the importance of focal infections in the etiology of 
general diseases and modern methods of diagnosis. Lectures illustrated by 
lantern slides are given one hour weekly throughout the second semester 
by Dr. Looper. 

Fourth Year. Dispensary instruction one and one-half hours daily, to 
small sections at the University and the Mercy Hospitals. The student 
is given opportunity to study, diagnose and treat patients under super- 
vision. Ward classes and clinical demonstrations are given in periods of 
one and one-half hours weekly throughout the session in the University 
and the Mercy Hospitals. 

The Looper Clinic, recently established in the University Hospital for 
bronchoscopy and esophagoscopy, affords unusual opportunities for stu- 



ORGANIZATION OP THE CURRICULUM 47 

dents to study diseases of the larynx, bronchi and esophagus. The clinic 
is open to students daily from 2 to 4 P.M., under direction of Dr. Looper. 
The Mercy Hospital Clinic for bronchoscopy and esophagoscopy is under 
the direction of Dr. Zinn. In these two clinics the etiology, symptoma- 
tology, diagnosis and treatment of foreign bodies in the air and food pas- 
sages, as well as bronchoscopy, are taught to students, as an aid in the 
diagnosis and treatment of diseases of the lungs. 

GENITOURINARY SURGERY 

VV. H. Toulson, A.B., M.Sc, M.D Professor of Genito-Urinary Surgery 

A. J. Gillis, M.D Clinical Professor of Genito-Urinary Surgery 

Austin H. Wood, M.D Associate in Genito-Urinary Surgery 

L. J. Millan, M.D Associate in Genito-Urinary Surgery 

K. D. Legge, M.D Associate in Genito-Urinary Surgery 

L. K. Fargo, M.D Associate in Genito-Urinary Surgery 

Samuel T. Helms, M.D Instructor in Genito-Urinary Surgery 

John F. Hogan, M.D Instructor in Genito-Urinary Surgery 

Third Year. Eight hours to the entire class. This is a diadactic course 
in the principles of Genito-Urinary Surgery. Dr. Toulson. 

Fourth Year. The course includes urethroscopy, cystoscopy, ureter 
catheterization, renal function tests, urography, urine cultures, etc. The 
teaching consists of clinics in the amphitheater, ward rounds, and attendance 
by members of the senior class upon out-patients in the dispensary. The 
dispensary classes are carried on both at the Mercy and the University 
Hospital dispensaries. Every variety of venereal disease is here encoun- 
tered and this wealth of material is available for teaching purposes. 
In addition to this, a cystoscopic clinic is conducted in another part of the 
dispensary, where the students are given practical instruction in the modern 
diagnostic methods. 



"& J 



DISEASES OF THE RECTUM AND COLON 

G. Milton Linthicum, A.M., M.D Professor of Diseases of Rectum and Colon 

Charles F. Blake, A.M., M.D Professor of Diseases of Rectum and Colon 

J. Dawson Reeder, M.D Clinical Professor of Diseases of Rectum and Colon 

Monte Edwards, M.D Associate in Diseases of Rectum and Colon 

Third Year. Six hours to the entire class. This course is for instruction 
in the diseases of the colon, sigmoid flexure, rectum and anus, and will cover 
the essential features of the anatomy and physiology of the large intestine 
as well as the various diseases to which it is subject. Dr. Linthicum and 
Dr. Edwards. 

Fourth Year. Ward and dispensary instruction is given in the University 
and Mercy Hospitals, where different phases of the various diseases are 
taught by direct observation and examination. The use of the proctoscope 



48 BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, U. OF MD. 

and sigmoidoscope in the examination of the rectum and sigmoid is made 
familiar to each student. Mercy Hospital — Dr. Blake. University Hos- 
pital — Drs. Linthicum, Reeder and Monte Edwards. 

OTOLOGY 

J. W. Downey, M.D Professor of Otology 

Franklin B. Anderson, M.D Associate in Otology 

F. A. Holden, M.D Instructor in Otology 

Benjamin S. Rich, M.D Assistant in Otology 

Birckhead McGowan, M.D Assistant in Otology 

The course in otology is planned to give a practical knowledge of the 
anatomy and physiology of the ear, and its proximity and relationship to 
the brain and other vital structures. The inflammatory diseases, their 
etiology, diagnosis, treatment and complications are particularly stressed, 
with emphasis upon their relationship to the diseases of children, head- 
surgery and neurology. 

Third Year. The entire class is given instruction by means of talks, 
anatomical specimens and lantern slides. 

Fourth Year. Small sections of the class receive instruction and make 
personal examinations of patients under the direction of an instructor. 
The student is urged to make a routine examination of the ear in his ward 
work in general medicine and surgery. 

NEUROLOGICAL SURGERY 

Charles Bagley, Jr., A.B., M.D Professor of Neurological Surgery 

Richard G. Coblentz, M.D Associate in Neurological Surgery 

William R. Geraghty, B.S., M.D Instructor in Neurological Surgery 

James G. Arnold, Jr., A.B., M.D Hitchcock Fellow in Neurological Surgery 

Third Year. The course covers instruction in diagnosis and treatment 
of surgical conditions of the brain, spinal cord, and the peripheral nerves. 
Eight lectures are given to the entire class and conferences are held from 
time to time. Dr. Bagley. 

Fourth Year. Weekly ward rounds and conferences are given at the 
University Hospital. Drs. Bagley and Coblentz. 

ONCOLOGY 

J. Mason Hundley, Jr., M.A., M.D Associate in Gynecology 

Grant E. Ward, A.B., M.D Instructor in Surgery 

Every facility for the diagnosis and treatment of neoplastic diseases is 
available; this includes electro-surgery, radium therapy and deep X-ray- 
therapy. 

An out-patient clinic is held twice weekly which affords an opportunity 



ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 49 

for instruction to a limited number of students. The gynecological prob- 
lems are under the supervision of Dr. Hundley, and the general surgical 
conditions are under the direction of Dr. Ward. 

Instruction, other than dispensary teaching, is given to small groups of 
students, for one hour a week, in the history, physics and practical applica- 
tion of radium. Drs. Ward and Hundley. 

ORAL SURGERY 

Robert P. Bay, M.D Professor of Oral Surgery 

Horace M. Davis, D.D.S Professor of Exodontia 

Charles A. Reifschneider, M.D Associate Professor of Surgery and Oral Surgery 

Brice M. Dorsey, D.D.S Instructor in Exodontia 

This section in the Department of Surgery is established for the teaching 
of both medical and dental students. A new subdivision in the Dispensary 
has also been established, and beds will be provided in the University Hos- 
pital for the care of patients, who will be available for the teaching of stu- 
dents from both schools. 

Senior year: clinics weekly. 

Ward instruction and group teaching in dispensary. Instruction includes 
diagnosis and treatment of diseases of face, mouth and jaws. 

DEPARTMENT OF OBSTETRICS 

J. M. H. Rowland, M.D Professor of Obstetrics 

L. H. Douglass, M.D Professor of Clinical Obstetrics 

J. McFarland Bergland, M.D Associate Professor of Obstetrics 

Emil Novak, M.D Associate Professor of Obstetrics 

E. P. Smith, M.D Associate in Obstetrics 

J. G. M. Reese, M.D Associate in Obstetrics 

M. A. Novey, A.B., M.D Associate in Obstetrics 

Isadore A. Siegel, A.B., M.D Associate in Obstetrics 

E. P. H. Harrison, A.B., M.D Associate in Obstetrics 

Margaret B. Ballard, M.D Assistant in Obstetrics 

E. S. Edlavitch, M.D Assistant in Obstetrics 

Kenneth B. Boyd, M.D Assistant in Obstetrics 

George L. Wissig, M.D Assistant in Obstetrics 

Frank K. Morris, M.D Assistant in Obstetrics 

Dudley P. Bowe, M.D Assistant in Obstetrics 

Third Year. Three lectures and recitations each week by Drs. Bergland, 
Novak, Douglass and Rowland to entire class. 

Manikin Work. Drs. Smith and Edlavitch to sections of class at Mercy 
Hospital, and Drs. Douglass, Siegel, Harrison and Rowland at University 
Hospital. 

Fourth Year. Clinical Conference. One hour each week. Drs. Rowland 
and Douglass. 



50 BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, V. OF MD. 

Ward Classes. Six hours per week for five weeks to sections of class 
at University Hospital. Drs. Douglass, Reese and Novey. 

Each member of the Senior class is required to deliver ten women in 
their homes under supervision of the teaching and resident staff. 

DEPARTMENT OF GYNECOLOGY 

William S. Gardner, M.D Professor of Gynecology 

Abram S. Samuels, M.D Associate Professor of Gynecology 

George A. Strauss, Jr., M.D Associate in Gynecology 

R. G. Willse, M.D Associate in Gynecology 

Thomas K. Galvin, M.D Associate in Gynecology 

J. Mason Hundley. Jr., M.A., M.D Associate in Gynecology 

Leo Brady, M.D Associate in Gynecology 

E. S. Edlavitch, M.D Assistant in Gynecology 

Third Year. Diadactic Work. A course of thirty lectures and 
recitations. 

Fourth Year. Clinical Work. Six hours weekly for one trimester. 
In this course the student writes the clinical history of each patient in the 
ward and makes a general physical examination, including the blood and 
urine, before the patient is brought before the class. A pelvic examination 
is made by six students, and any operation required is then done before a 
section of the class small enough to see clearly what is being done and how 
it is done. On a subsequent day the whole group examines, microscopically, 
sections prepared from material removed from patients that have been 
before them. 

DEPARTMENT OF OPHTHALMOLOGY 

Clyde A. Clapp, M.D Professor of Ophthalmology 

M. Randolph Kahn, M.D Clinical Professor of Ophthalmology 

H. K. Fleck, M.D Associate Professor of Ophthalmology 

R. D. West, M.D Associate in Ophthalmology 

Henry F. Graff, A.B., M.D Associate in Ophthalmology 

Jonas Friedenwald, A.B., M.D Lecturer in Ophthalmic Pathology 

Joseph I. Kemler, M.D Associate in Ophthalmology 

F. A. Holden, M.D Instructor in Ophthalmology 

Frank A. Pacienza, M.D Instructor in Refraction 

John G. Runkle, M.D Assistant in Ophthalmology 

Thomas O'Rourk, M.D Assistant in Ophthalmology 

Third Year. Second semester. Dr. Kahn will give a course reviewing 
the anatomy and physiology of the eye and the methods used in making 
the various examinations. Errors of refraction and their effect upon the 
general system will be explained. Weekly section work, demonstrating 
the use of the ophthalmoscope, will be carried on during the entire session. 

Fourth Year. Clinics and demonstrations in diseases of the eye, weekly, 
for one year. Dr. Clapp. 



ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 51 

This course consists of lectures upon the diseases of the eye, with par- 
ticular reference to their diagnosis and relation to general medicine. Spe- 
cial lectures will be given upon vascular changes in the eye and upon the 
pathology of the eye. Some operations will be demonstrated by motion 
pictures. 

Weekly ward classes at the University, The Baltimore Eye, Ear and 
Throat and Mercy Hospitals during which the eye grounds in the various 
medical and surgical conditions are demonstrated. Drs. Fleck, West, 
Kemler and Graff. 

Also daily demonstrations in the taking of histories and the diagnosis 
and treatment of the various conditions as seen in the dispensary. 

Third Year — 

Lectures 20 hours 

Ophthalmoscopy 10 hours 

Total 30 hours 

Fourth Year — 

Lectures and demonstrations 26 hours 

Clinical work 20 hours 

Total 46 hours 

DEPARTMENT OF ART AS APPLIED TO MEDICINE 

Carl Dame Clarke Associate in Art as Applied to Medicine 

This department is maintained for the purpose of supplying pictoria 
and plastic illustrations for visual teaching in the classrooms of the Uni- 
versity and for publications in scientific periodicals. 

Special courses of instruction are given to qualified students. 

HISTORY OF MEDICINE 

John Rathbone Oliver, M.D., Ph.D. 

Professor of the History of Medicine 

In this Department a series of weekly lectures is given each year in March, 
April and May. The course is planned so that the entire field of medical 
history may be covered in four years. In this way any medical student 
who has attended the lectures during his four years course at the medical 
school has been given at least an outline of the history of his profession. 
During the past academic year the lectures have been devoted to the medi- 
cine of Greece and of the Roman Empire, beginning with the Pre-Hippo- 
cratic Period and ending with Galen. The lectures are illustrated with 
lantern slides and all the important books which bear on the subject of each 
lecture are brought into the lecture room and passed around among the 



52 BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, U. OF MD. 

students. This year we have been fortunate in having access to a series 
of very valuable slides illustrating the development of hospitals in con- 
nection with the Knights of St. John of Jerusalem, St. Vincent de Paul, 
and others. 

In the session of 1934-35, lectures will begin with the Medicine of the 
Middle Ages and will end with Harvey and the discovery of the circulation 
of the blood. The head of this department is always ready to welcome any 
student who is interested in medical history and will be glad to advise 
him as to his reading or to suggest subjects for special study. 



*FIRST SEMESTER, SEPTEMBER 24, 1934 TO JANUARY 26, 1935 



Hours 


Monday 


Tuesday 


Wednesday 


Thursday 


Friday 


Saturday 


9.00 


Sect. A. -A. II. 


A- A. II. 


A- A. II. 


A-A. II. 


A-A. //. 


A. II. 


10.00 


Sect. B.-Adm. 2 


B-Adm. 2 


B-2Q S. 
Greene 


B-Adm. 1 


B-Adm. 1 


A. II. 


10.00 














to 


Laboratory 


Laboratory 


Laboratory 


Laboratory 


Laboratory 


Laboratory 


12.00 














12.00 














to 


Lunch 


Lunch 


Lunch 


Lunch 


Lunch 




1.00 














1.00 


Sect. A.- A. II. 


A-A.H. 


A-A.H. 


A-A.H. 


A-C.H. 




to 














2.00 


Sect. B.-Adm. 1 


B-C. H. 


B-Adm. 1 


B-Adm. 1 


B-Adm. 2 




2.00 














to 


Laboratory 


Laboratory 


Laboratory 


Laboratory 


Laboratory 




5.00 















All 



scheduled classes are in Gross Anatomy. 

SECOND SEMESTER, JANUARY 29, TO MAY 25, 1935 



Hours 


Monday 


Tuesday 


Wednesday 


Thursday 


Friday 


Saturday 


9 00 

to 
10.00 




Biological 
Chemistry 

Laboratory 


Biological 
Chemistry 

Laboratory 


Biological 
Chemistry 

Laboratory 


Biological 
Chemistry 

Laboratory 




10.00 

to 
11.00 


Introductory 

Physiology 

,1. H. 




11.00 

to 
12.00 


Biological 

Chemistry 

C.H. 


Sect. A . 


Sect. B. 


Sect. A . 


Sect. B. 




12.00 

to 
12.50 


Lunch 


Lunch 


Lunch 


Lunch 


Lunch 




12 50 

to 

1 50 


Biological 

Chemistry 

Aim. I 


Biological 

Chemistry 

C. II. 


Biological 

Chemistry 

C.H. 


Biological 

Chemistry 

C.H. 


Biological 

Chemistry 

C. H 




2 00 

to 
3.00 


Histology 

and 

Embryology 

Laboratory 


Histology 

and 

Embryology 

Laboratory 


Introductory 

Physiology 

Adm. I 


Histology 

and 

Embryology 

Laboratory 


Histology 

and 
Embryology 

Laboratory 




3.00 

to 
5 00 







Locations of Lecture Halls and Laboratories: 
Adm. 1— First Floor, Administration Building, Lombard and Greene Streets. 
Adm. 2 — Second Floor, Administration Building, Lombard and Greene Streets. 
A. H. — Anatomical Hall — Upper Hall, N. E. Cor. Lombard and Greene Streets. 
C. H. — Chemical Hall, Lower Hall, N. E. Cor. Lombard and Greene Streets. 
Anatomy Laboratory — Third Floor, Gray Laboratory, Lombard and Greene Streets. 
Biological Chemistry Laboratory — Third Floor, 31 S. Greene Street. 
Histology and Embryology Laboratory — 32-34 S. Paca Street, Sixth Floor. 
Mid-Year Examinations — January 21-26, 1935 
Final Examinations — May 20-25, 1935 
(This schedule is subject to revision for 1934-1935) 

53 



54 



BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, U. OF MD. 



SECOND YEAR SCHEDULE 

FIRST SEMESTER, SEPTEMBER 24, 1934 TO JANUARY 26, 1935 



Hours 


Monday 


Tuesday 


Wednesday 


Thursday 


Friday 


Saturday 


9.00- 
10.00 


Pharmacology 
Adm. 1 


Pharmacology 
Adm. 1 


Medicine 
Adm. 1 


Laboratory 

*Physiology 
Sect. A 

Pharmacology 
Sect. B 


Laboratory 

*Physiology 
Sect. B 

Pharmacology 
Sect. A 




10.00- 
11.00 


Physiology 
Adm. 1 


Physiology 

Adm. 1 


Physiology 

Adm. 1 




1 1 . 00- 
12.00 


Pathology 
A. H. 


Pathology 
A.H. 


Bacteriology 
A.H. 




12.00- 
12.30 


Lunch 


Lunch 


Lunch 


Lunch 


Lunch 




12.30- 
1.30 


Bacteriology 
Laboratory 


Bacteriology 
Laboratory 


Bacteriology 
Laboratory 


Bacteriology 
Laboratory 






1.30- 
2.30 


Physiology 
Adm. 1 




2.30- 
3.00 








*Physiology 
Laboratory 

Sect. B 
(2.30-5.30) 


*Physiology 
Laboratory 

Sect. A 
(2.30-5 30) 




3.30- 
5.30 





Physiology Laboratory begins October 30, 1933. 



ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 



55 



SECOND SEMESTER, JANUARY 29 TO MAY 25, 1935 



Hours 


Monday 


Tuesday 


Wednesday 


Thursday 


Friday 


Saturday 


8.30- 
9 30 


Surgery 
Adm. 1 


Surgery 
Adm. 1 


Surgical 
Anatomy 
Adm. 1 


Laboratory 

Physiology 
Sect. A 

Pharmacology 
Sect. B 


Laboratory 

Physiology 
Sect. B 

Pharmacology 
Sect. A 


Pharmacology 
Adm. 1 


9.30- 
10.30 


Pharmacology 
Adm. 1 


**Physiology 
Adm. 1 


Surgical 

Anatomy 

Laboratory 


Physiology 
Adm. 1 


10.30- 
11.30 


Pathology 
A.H. 


Pathology 
A.H. 


Immunology 
C.E. 


11.30- 
12.00 


Lunch 


Lunch 


Lunch 


Lunch 


Lunch 


Physiology 

C.E. 

(11.30-12.30) 


12.00- 
2.00 


Pathology 
Laboratory 


Pathology 
Laboratory 


Pathology 
Laboratory 


Pathology 
Laboratory 


Pathology 
Laboratory 


Lunch 
(12.30-1.00) 


2.00- 
3.00 


Surgical 
Anatomy 

Adm. 1 


Immunology 
Laboratory 


Immunology 
Laboratory 






Medical 

Clinic 

Amp. 

(1 00-2.00) 


3.00- 
5.00 


Surgical 

Anatomy 

Laboratory 

(3.00-5.30) 


Physical 
Diagnosis 

Sect. A 
(3.00-5.30) 

Physiology 
Laboratory 

Sect. B 
(2.00-5.00) 


Physical 

Diagnosis 

Sect. B 

(3.00-5.30) 

Physiology 
Laboratory 

Sect. A 
(2.00-5.00) 





Physiology Course ends April 27, 1935. 

Locations of Lecture Halls and Laboratories: 
Adm. 1 — First Floor, Administration Building, Lombard and Greene Streets. 
A. H. — Anatomical Hall — Upper Hall, Lombard and Greene Streets. 
C. H. — Chemical Hall, Lower Hall, Lombard and Greene Streets. 
Amp. — Amphitheatre, University Hospital, Lombard and Greene Streets. 
Laboratories: 

Bacteriology — Second Floor, 31 S. Greene Street. 
Immunology — Second Floor, 31 S. Greene Street. 
Pathology — Second Floor, 31 S. Greene Street. 

Pharmacology — Second Floor, Gray Laboratory, Lombard and Greeue Streets. 
Physiology — First Floor, Gray Laboratory, Lombard and Greene Streets. 
Surgical Anatomy — Third Floor, Gray Laboratory, Lombard and Greene Streets. 
Mid-Year Examinations — January 21-26, 1935 
Final Examinations — May 20-25, 1935 
(This schedule is subject to revision for 1934-1935) 



THIRD YEAR SCHEDULE 

SEPTEMBER 24, 1934 TO MAY 25, 1935 



Hours 


Monday 


Tuesday 


Wednesday 


Thursday 


Friday 


Saturday 


8.30 

to 
9.30 


Therapeutics 


Pathology 


Medicine 


Medicine 


Pathology 


Medicine 


C.H. 


C.H. 


C. H. 


C.H. 


C.H. 


C.H. 


9.30 to 


Obstetrics 


Surgery 


Obstetrics 


Surgery 


Medicine 


Surgery 


10 30 


C.H. 


C.H. 


C.H. 


C.H. 


C.H. 


C.H. 




Physical 


Physical 


Physical 


Physical 


Physical 


Physical 




Diagnosis 


Diagnosis 


Diagnosis 


Diagnosis 


Diagnosis 


Diagnosis 


10.30 


Operative 


Operative 


Operative 


Operative 


Operative 


Operative 


to 


Surgery 


Surgery 


Surgery 


Surgery 


Surgery 


Surgery 


1 00 


Dispensary 


Dispensary 


Dispensary 


Dispensary 


Dispensary 


Dispensary 




Lunch and 


Lunch and 


Lunch and 


Lunch and 


Lunch and 


Lunch 




Transfer 


Transfer 


Transfer 


Transfer 


Transfer 






Fractures & 












1.00 
to 


Dislocations 
Amp. 


Medical 
Clinic 


Neurology 
P. & S. 34 


(12.45-1.45) 
Gynecology 


Obstetrics 
A.H. 


Transfer 


2.00 


**Nose-Throat 


Amp. 


29 S. Greene 






C.H. 


















(2.30-4.30) 


(2-3) 




(2-4) 


2.15 






Section A 


Clinical 




Section B 


to 






Clinical 


Pathology 




Clinical 


3.15 


Pathology 


Pathology- 


Medicine, 


29 S. Greene 




Medicine, 




Laboratory 


Laboratory 


Surgery, 






Surgery, 






3.15 






Gross 


(3-4) 


2.15 


Gross 


to 






Pathology. 


*Eye and Ear 


to 


Pathology. 


4 15 






at Baltimore 
City Hl vitals 


29 S. Greene 


5.15 
Clinical 


at Baltimore 
City Hospitals 








(2.15-4.15) 












Section B 


(4-5) 


Pathology 










Group Work 


Preventive 












Ophthalmos- 


Medicine, 


Laboratory 




4.15 


Preventive 


Pediatrics 


copy 


Legal 






to 


Medicine 


C.H. 


B. E. H. 


Medicine, 






5 15 


C. H. 






Mental 
















Practical 


Hygiene. 












Obstetrics 


29 S. Greene 












Univ. Hosp. 









From 10.30 A. M. to LOOP. M., the class is divided into two sections, one section reporting at Calvert and Saratoga 
Streets, the other at Lombard and Greene Streets. 

C. H. — Chemical Hall — N. E. Cor. Lombard and Greene Streets. 

A. H. — Anatomical Hall — N. E. Cor. Lombard and Greene Streets. 

Amp. — Amphitheatre — University Hospital, S. W. Cor. Lombard and Greene Streets. 
P. & S. — N. W. Cor. Calvert and Saratoga Streets. Rooms indicated on Second Floor. 

B. E. H— Baltimore Eye, Ear and Throat Hospital, 1214 Eutaw Place. 

At the beginning of the second semester Section "A" at Baltimore City Hospital on Saturdays, 2-4 P. M., and 
University Hospital on Wednesdays, 2.15-4.15 P. M.; Section '"B" at Baltimore City Hospital on Wednesdays. 230- 
4.30 P. M. 

Mid-Year Examinations — January 21-26, 1935 
Final Examinations — May 13-25, 1935. 

* Ear — First semester. 

* Eye — Second semester. 

** Nose-Throat — Second semester. 

(This schedule is subject to revision for 1934-1935) 
56 



SEPTEMBER 24, 1934 TO MAY 25, 1935 



Hours 


Monday 


Tuesday 


Wednesday 


Thursday 


Friday 


Saturday 




Ward Classes 


Ward Classes 


Ward Classes 


Ward Classes 


Ward Classes 


Ward Classes 


9.00 to 


Medicine 


Medicine 


Medicine 


Medicine 


Medicine 


Medicine 


11.00 


Surgery 


Surgery 


Surgery 


Surgery 


Surgery 


Surgery 




Obstetrics 


Gynecology 


Obstetrics 


Gynecology 


Obstetrics 


Gynecology 






Medical 












Orthopaedic 


Clinic 


Clinical 


Surgical 


Medical 


Pediatric 


11.00 


Surgery 


Univ. Sec. Amp. 


Pathological 


Clinic 


Clinic 


Clinic 


to 






Conference 








12.00 


Univ. Sec. Amp. 


Surgical 












P. & S. Sec. 51 


Pathology 


Univ. Sec. C. E. 


Univ. Sec. Amp. 


Univ. Sec. Amp. 


Univ. Sec. Amp. 






P. & S. Sec. 40 


P. & S. Sec. 34 


P. & S. Sec. 51 


P. & S. Sec. 34 


P. & S. Sec. 34 


12.00 


Dispensary 


Dispensary 


Dispensary 


Dispensary 


Dispensary 




to 


Lunch and 


and 


Lunch and 


and 


Lunch and 


Dispensary 


2.00 


Transfer 


Lunch 


Transfer 


Lunch 


Transfer 






Dermatology 




Eye and Ear 


Obstetrical 


Gastroenter- 




2.15 


Clinic 


Neurology 


Clinic 


Clinic 


ology Clinic 




to 




Clinic 










3.15 


(Full Class at 




(Full Class at 


(Full Class at 


(Full Class at 






Univ. Hosp.) 


Univ. Sec. Amp. 
P. & S. Sec. 34 


Univ. Hosp.) 


Univ. Hosp.) 


Univ. Hosp.) 






Amp. 




Amp.&C.H. 


Amp. 


Amp. 






P. & S. Sect. 


P. & S. Sect. 


P. & S. Sect. 


P. & S. Sect. 


P. & S. Sect. 






Ward Classes 


Ward Classes 


Ward Classes 


Ward Classes 


Ward Classes 




3.30 

to 
5.00 


Medicine 


Medicine 


Medicine 


Medicine 


Neurology 






Orthopedics 


Nose and 


Proctology 


Roentgen- 










Throat 




ology 






Eye and Ear 




Preventive 
Medicine 


Pediatrics 


Psychiatry 






Univ. Sect. 


Univ. Sect. 


Univ. Sect. 


Univ. Sect. 


Univ. Sect. 






Ward Classes 


Ward Classes 


Ward Classes 


Ward Classes 


Ward Classes 






Medicine 


Therapeutics 


Medicine 


Medicine 


Neurology 




3.30 














to 


Roentgen- 


Proctology 


Urology 


Nose and 


Psychiatry 




5.00 


ology 


Oncology 




Throat 


Orthopedic 






Neurological 


(3 30-4.30) 


Eye and Ear 


Phvsical 


Surgery 






Surgery 


(29 S. 
Greene St.) 




Therapeutics 


(Neman 
Hospital) 












*History of 






5-6 








Medicine 
C.H. 







* March, April and May, 5-6 p. m. 

The Senior Class is divided into two sections, which report, one at Lombard and Greene Streets, the other at Calvert 
and Saratoga Streets, for one semester each, then rotate. 

Each section of the class is divided into three groups — Medical, Surgical, and Special. These groups will rotate 
on the following dates: 

First Semester Second Semester 

1st period Sept. 24-Oct. 27 1st period Jan. 30-Mch. 2 

2nd period Oct. 29-Dec. 1 2nd period Mch. 4-Apr. 6 

3rd period Dec. 3-Jan. 19 3rd period Apr. 8-May 1 1 

C. H. — Chemical Hall — N. E. Cor. Lombard and Greene Streets. 
Amp. — Amphitheatre — University Hospital. 
P. & S., 34 — Second Floor, Calvert and Saratoga Streets. 
P. & S., 40, 51 — Fourth Floor, Calvert and Saratoga Streets. 
For sub-sections of P. & S. ward classes, 3.30 to 5.00 p. m., see supplementary schedule al Mercy Hospital. For sub- 
sections of U. H. ward classes, 3.30 to 5.00 p. m., see Medical School Bulletin Board. 
Mid-Year Examinations — January 21-26, 1935 

Final Examinations — May 13-25, 1935 
(This schedule is subject to revision for 1934-1935) 



St 



58 BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, U. OF MD. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR MATRICULATION 

Admission to the course in medicine is by a completed Medical Student 
Certificate issued by the Registrar of the University of Maryland. This 
certificate is obtained from the Registrar on the basis of satisfactory educa- 
tional credentials, and is essential for admission to any class. 

The minimum requirements for the issuance of the Medical Student 
Certificate are: 

(a) The completion of a standard four-year secondary school curriculum 
(it is advisable that a student take besides four years of English, courses in 
Latin; chemistry; physics; mathematics, including trigonometry; biology; 
and either French or German), or the equivalent in entrance examinations, 
and at least: 

(b) Two years or sixty semester hours of college credits (exclusive of 
military science and physical education), including chemistry, physics, 
biology, English, and a modern foreign language. (See details below.) 

Women are admitted to the School of Medicine of this University. 

DETAILS OF THE COLLEGE REQUIREMENT 

a. The preliminary college course shall extend through two college 
sessions of at least thirty-two weeks each, exclusive of holidays. 

b. In excellence of teaching and in content, the work of this preliminary 
college course shall be equal to the work done in the freshman and sophomore 
years in standard colleges and universities. 

c. This preliminary college course shall include courses in chemistry, 
physics, biology, English, and a modern foreign language, each course to 
embrace at least the credit shown in the schedule following: 

SCHEDULE OF SUBJECTS OF THE TWO-YEAR PREMEDICAL 
COLLEGE COURSE 

Sixty Semester Hours Required 
Required Courses: Semester Hours 

Chemistry (a) 12 

Physics (b) 8 

Biology (c) 8 

English Composition and Literature (d) 6 

Modern Foreign Language (e) 6 

Other Non-Science Subjects 6 

Courses Strongly Urged: 

Additional English 

Additional Foreign Language. 

Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy, Embryology, Histological Technique. 

Quantitative Analysis or other Advanced Chemistry. 



REQUIREMENTS FOR MATRICULATION 59 

Advanced Mathematics, including Algebra and Trigonometry. 
Psychology, Logic, Social Science, Economics, History, Political Science. 

A semester hour is the credit value of sixteen weeks' work consisting of one lecture or 
recitation period per week, each period to be not less than fifty minutes' duration net, at 
least two hours of laboratory work to be considered as the equivalent of one lecture or 
recitation period. 

(a) Chemistry. Twelve semester hours required of which at least 
eight semester hours must be in general inorganic chemistry, including four 
semester hours of laboratory work; and four semester hours in organic 
chemistry, including two semester hours of laboratory work. In the inter- 
pretation of this rule, work in qualitative analysis may be counted as gen- 
eral inorganic chemistry. 

(b) Physics. Eight semester hours required, of which at least two must 
be laboratory work. This course presupposes a knowledge of plane 
trigonometry. 

(c) Biology. Eight semester hours required, of which four must be 
laboratory work. This requirement may be satisfied by a course of eight 
semester hours in either general biology or zoology, or by courses of four 
semester hours each in zoology and botany, but not by botany alone. 

(d) English Composition and Literature. The usual introductory 
college course of six semester hours, or its equivalent, is required. 

(e) Foreign Language. Six semester hours minimum requirement. A 
A reading knowledge of a modern foreign language is very strongly urged. 
French and German have the closest bearing upon modern medical 
literature. 

COMBINED COURSE IN ARTS AND SCIENCES, AND 

MEDICINE 

A combined seven years' curriculum is offered leading to the degree 
of Bachelor of Science and Doctor of Medicine. The first three years are 
taken in residence in the College of Arts and Sciences at College Park, and 
the last four years in the School of Medicine in Baltimore. (See University 
catalogue for details of quantitative and qualitative premedical course 
requirements.) 

Upon the successful completion of the first year in the School of Medicine, 
and upon the recommendation of the Dean, the degree of Bachelor of Science 
may be conferred by the College of Arts and Sciences. 

Students are urged to consider carefully the advantages this combination 
course offers over the minimum requirements of two years. By com- 
pleting three years the training may be gradually broadened by a wider 
latitude in the election of courses in the arts subjects. 



60 BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, U. OF MD. 

POST-GRADUATE STUDENTS 

Graduates in medicine desiring to take the work of the senior year with- 
out being candidates for the degree, and, therefore, without examination, 
may receive a certificate of attendance on completing the full course 
satisfactorily. 

The requirements for graduates in medicine admitted to the fourth-year 
class as candidates for the degree of Doctor of Medicine are the same as 
those enforced against undergraduates admitted to advanced standing. 

RULES 

1 . All students are required to take the spring examinations unless excused 
by the Dean. No student will be permitted to advance from a lower to 
a higher class with conditions. 

2. Should a student be required to repeat any year in the course, he 
must pay regular fees. 

3. A student failing in final examinations for graduation at the end of the 
fourth year will be required to repeat the entire course of the fourth year 
and to take examination in such other branches as may be required should 
he again be permitted to enter the school as a candidate for graduation. 

4. The general fitness of a candidate for graduation as well as the results 
of his examination will be taken into consideration by the Faculty. 

5. All students entering the School of Medicine of the University of 
Maryland are required to provide themselves with microscopes of a satis- 
factory type. 

A standard microscope of either Bausch & Lomb, Leitz, Spencer, or 
Zeiss make, fitted with the following attachments, will fill the requirements: 

Triple nose piece: 10 x and 5 x Oculars 

Wide aperture stage: 16 mm. and 4 mm. Objectives 

Quick Screw condenser (Abbe): 1.9 mm. 125 N.A. Oil Immersion Lens 

All used microscopes are subject to inspection and approval before their 
use in the laboratory is permitted. The student is cautioned against the 
purchase of such an instrument before its official approval by the school. 

STUDENTS MUST BE PREPARED TO PURCHASE MICROSCOPES 
AT THE BEGINNING OF THE FIRST YEAR 

All the above rules, as well as the fees stated below, relate to the year 
ending June 1st, 1935 only. The right is reserved to make changes in the 
curriculum, the requirements for graduation, the fees and in any of the 
regulations whenever the Faculty deems it expedient. 



RESIDENCE STATUS OF STUDENTS 61 

FEES 

Matriculation fee (paid once) $10.00 

Tuition fee (each year) for residents of Maryland 375.00 

Tuition fee (each year) for non-residents 550.00 

Laboratory fee (each year) 25 .00 

Special and re-examination fee 5 .00 

Graduation fee 15 .00 

No fees are returnable. 

The above fees apply to all students who matriculate in the School of 
Medicine in any class for the session beginning September 24th, 1934. 

All students, after proper certification, are required to register at the 
Office of the Registrar. (See calendar in front part of this bulletin for 
dates for the payments of fees, and the note regarding late registration fee.) 

The matriculation fee is payable at the time the applicant is offered 
acceptance as a student. 

The laboratory fee and one-half of the tuition fee for the year shall be 
paid at the time of the first semester registration, and one-half of the tuition 
fee shall be paid at the second semester registration date. 

Failure to meet these conditions will automatically debar the student 
from attendance on classes and other privileges of the University. 

When offering checks in payment of tuition and other fees, students are 
requested to have them drawn in the exact amount or such fees. Personal 
checks whose face value is in excess of the fees due will be accepted for 
collection. 

DEFINITION OF RESIDENCE STATUS OF STUDENTS* 

Students who are minors are considered to be resident students if, at the 
time of their registration, their parents* have been residents of this State 
for at least one year. 

Adult students are considered to be resident students if, at the time of 
their registration, they have been residents oi this State for at least one 
year, provided such residence has not been acquired while attending any 
school or college in Maryland. 

The status of the residence of a student is determined at the time of his 
first registration in the University and may not thereafter be changed by 
him unless, in the case of a minor, his parents* move to and become legal 
residents of this State by maintaining such residence for at least one full 
calendar year. However, the right of the student (minor) to change from 
a non-resident to a resident status must be established by him prior to 
registration for a semester in any academic year. 

* The term "parents" includes persons who, by reason of death or other unusual circum- 
stances, have been legally constituted the guardians of or stand in loco parentis to such 
minor students. 



62 BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, U. OF MD. 

STATE MEDICAL STUDENT QUALIFYING CERTIFICATES 

Candidates for admission who live in or expect to practice medicine in 
Pennsylvania, New Jersey or New York, and who are accepted as students 
by the University of Maryland, must apply, immediately after having been 
accepted, to their respective state board of education for a medical student 
qualifying certificate (Pennsylvania and New Jersey) or an approval 
of application for a medical student qualifying certificate (New York). 

These certificates will be kept on file in the Office of the Registrar, Uni- 
versity of Maryland, during the period of attendance in the School of 
Medicine. 

MEDICAL CARE OF STUDENTS 

The Medical Council has made provision for the systematic care of stu- 
dents in the Medical School, according to the following plan: 

1. Preliminary Examination — All new students will be examined during 
the first week of the semester. Notice of the date, time, and place of the 
examination will be announced to the classes on the bulletin board. The 
passing of this physical examination is necessary before final acceptance 
of any student. 

2. Medical Attention — Students in need of medical attention will be seen 
by the School Physician, Dr. T. N. Carey, in his office at the Medical 
School, between 4 and 5 P.M., daily, except Saturday and Sunday. In 
cases of necessity, students will be seen at their homes. 

3. Hospitalization — If it becomes necessary for any student to enter the 
hospital during the school year, the Medical Council has arranged for the 
payment of part or all of his hospital expenses, depending on the length of 
his stay and special expenses incurred. This applies only to students 
admitted through the School Physician's Office. 

4. Prospective students are advised to have any known physical defects 
corrected before entering school in order to prevent loss of time which 
later correction might incur. As minor visual defects are frequently un- 
recognized until detected by an ophthalmologist, it is especially urged that 
all new students have their eyes examined and any error of refraction cor- 
rected before beginning the course. 

PRIZES AND SCHOLARSHIPS 

FACULTY PRIZE 

The Faculty each year awards a Gold Medal to the Graduate who during 
the four years of his course has shown the greatest proficiency in preparing 
for the practice of medicine. The five candidates standing next in order 
will be awarded Certificates of Honor. 



SCHOLARSHIPS 63 

DR. A. BRADLEY GAITHER MEMORIAL PRIZE 

A prize of $25.00 is given each year by Mrs. A. Bradley Gaither as a 
memorial to the late Dr. A. Bradley Gaither, to the student in the senior 
class doing the best work in Genito-Urinary Surgery. 

SCHOLARSHIPS* 

The Dr. Samuel Leon Frank Scholarship 

(Value $125.00) 

This scholarship was established by Mrs. Bertha Rayner Frank as a 
memorial to the late Dr. Samuel Leon Frank, an alumnus of this University. 

It is awarded by the Trustees of the Endowment Fund of the University 
each year upon nomination by the Medical Council "to a medical student 
of the University of Maryland, who in the judgment of said Council, is of 
good character and in need of pecuniary assistance to continue his medical 
course." 

This scholarship is awarded to a second, third or fourth year student 
who has successfully completed one year's work in this school. No student 
may hold such scholarship for more than two years. 

The Charles M. Hitchcock Scholarships 

(Value $125.00 each) 

Two scholarships were established from a bequest to the School of Medi- 
cine by the late Charles M. Hitchcock, M.D., an alumnus of the University. 

These scholarships are awarded annually by the Trustees of the Endow- 
ment Fund of the University, upon nomination by the Medical Council, 
to students who have meritoriously completed the work of at least the first 
year of the course in medicine, and who present to the Council satisfactory 
evidence of a good moral character and of inability to continue the course 
without pecuniary assistance. 

The Randolph Winslow Scholarship 

(Value $125.00) 

This scholarship was established by Prof. Randolph Winslow, M.D., 
LL.D. 

It is awarded annually by the Trustees of the Endowment Fund of the 
University, upon nomination by the Medical Council, to a "needy student 
of the Senior, Junior, or Sophomore Class of the Medical School." 

"He must have maintained an average grade of 85% in all his work up 
to the time of awarding the scholarship." 

*Note: Scholarships, unless specifically renewed on consideration of application, are 
for one year only. 



64 BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, U. OF MD. 

"He must be a person of good character and must satisfy the Medical 
Council that he is worthy of and in need of assistance." 

Dr. Leo Karlinsky Memorial Scholarship 

(Value $200.00) 

This scholarship was established by Mrs. Ray Mintz Karlinsky as a 
memorial to her husband, the late Dr. Leo Karlinsky, an alumnus of the 
University. 

It is awarded annually by the Trustees of the Endowment Fund of the 
University, upon the nomination of the Medical Council, to u a needy stu- 
dent of the Senior, Junior or Sophomore Class of the Medical School." 

He must have maintained in all his work up to the time of awarding the 
scholarship a satisfactory grade of scholarship. 

He must be a person of good character and must satisfy the Medical 
Council that he is worthy of and in need of assistance. 

The University Scholarships 

Two scholarships are awarded by the University: One to a student of 
the College of Arts and Sciences appointed by the President, to be held for 
only one year; the other, which entitles the holder to exemption from pay- 
ment of the tuition fee of the year, is awarded annually by the Medical 
Council to a student of the senior class who presents to the Medical Council 
satisfactory evidence that he is of good moral character and is worthy of 
and in need of assistance to complete the course. 

Frederica Gehrmann Scholarship 

(Not open to holders of Warfield and Cohen Scholarships) 

This scholarship was established by the bequest of the late Mrs. Frederica 
Gehrmann and entitles the holder to exemption from payment of tuition 
fees. The scholarship is awarded to a third-year student who at the end 
of the second year has passed the best practical examinations in Physiology, 
Pharmacology, Pathology, Bacteriology, Immunology, Serology, Surgical 
Anatomy and Neuro-Anatomy. 

The Clarence and Genevra Warfield Scholarships 

(Value $300.00 each) 

There are five scholarships established by the Regents from the income 
of the fund bequeathed by the will of Dr. Clarence Warfield. 

Terms and Conditions: These scholarships are available to students of 
any of the classes of the course in medicine. Preference is given to students 
from the counties of the State of Maryland which the Medical Council 



HOSPITAL APPOINTMENTS 65 

may from time to time determine to be most in need of medical practi- 
tioners. 

Any student receiving one of these scholarships must agree, after gradua- 
tion and a year's interneship, to undertake the practice of medicine, for a 
term of two years, in the county to which the student is accredited, or in a 
county selected by the Council. In the event that a student is not able 
to comply with the condition requiring him to practice in the county to 
which he is accredited by the Council, the money advanced by the Regents 
shall be refunded by the student. 

Israel and Cecilia E. Cohen Scholarship 

(Value $250.00) 

This scholarship was established by Miss Eleanor S. Cohen in memory 
of her parents, Israel and Cecelia E. Cohen. Terms and conditions: This 
scholarship will be available to students of any one of the classes of the 
course in Medicine; preference is given to students of the counties in the 
State of Maryland which the Medical Council may from time to time deter- 
mine to be most in need of medical practitioners. Any student receiving 
one of these scholarships must, after graduation and a year's interneship, 
agree to undertake the practice of medicine for a term of two years in the 
county to which the student is accredited, or in a county selected by the 
Council. In the event that a student is not able to comply with the con- 
dition requiring him to practice in the county to which he is accredited by 
the Council, the money advanced by the Regents shall be refunded. 

ANNUAL HOSPITAL APPOINTMENTS 

Each session the following annual appointments are made from among 
the graduates of the school: 

TO THE UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL 

Five Resident Surgeons Two Resident Obstetricians 

Four Resident Physicians Thirteen Junior Residents on a Rotating 

One Resident Gynecologist Service 

A number of students are appointed each year, at the close of the session , 
as Clinical Assistants in the University Hospital for the summer months . 

TO THE MERCY HOSPITAL 

Chief Resident Physician One Resident Gynecologist 

One Assistant Resident Physician One Resident Obstetrician 

Chief Resident Surgeon Eight Junior Residents on a Rotating 

Five Assistant Resident Surgeons Service 



66 BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, U. OF MD. 

NOTICE TO STUDENTS 

The personal expenses of the students are at least as low in Baltimore as 
in any large city in the United States. The following estimates of a stu- 
dent's personal expenses for the academic year of eight months have been 
prepared by students, and are based upon actual experience. In addition 
to these the student must bear in mind the expenditure for a microscope. 

Items Low Average Liberal 

Books $50 $75 $100 

College Incidentals 20 20 20 

Board, eight months 200 250 275 

Room rent 64 80 100 

Clothing and laundry 50 80 150 

All other expenses 25 50 75 

Total $409 $556 $720 

Students will save time and expense upon their arrival in the city by 
going directly to the School of Medicine on the University grounds, N. E. 
Corner Lombard and Greene Streets. Here may be found a list of com- 
fortable and convenient boarding houses suitable to their means and wishes. 
For further information, apply to 

J. M. H. Rowland, M.D., Dean, 

Lombard and Greene Streets. 

GRADUATES, UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND SCHOOL OF 

MEDICINE AND COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS AND 

SURGEONS, JUNE 2, 1934 

Abramovitz, Leonard Jerome, A.B. Farr, Robert Wilbur, B.S Maryland 

Maryland Fearing, William Lumsden. North Carolina 

Adams, Thurston Ray. . . . North Carolina Feldman, Leon Henry Maryland 

Austraw, Henry Harrison Maryland Finegold, Joseph, B.S Pennsylvania 

Bayer, Ira Eugene Maryland Gaskel, Jason Howard, A.B Maryland 

Bayley, George Schwing Pennsylvania Gelb, Jerome, B.S New Jersey 

Berenstein, Stanley Harry, B.S. .Maryland Gelman, Sidney. . . . . New Jersey 

Blum, Louis Vardee, A.B Delaware Goldman, Abram Maryland 

Brodey, David Franklin, A.B. . .New York Goldstone, Herbert Maryland 

Burgtorf, George Edward, B.S. .Maryland Goodhand, Charles Luther, A.B Maryland 

Campbell, Edgar Thrall, A.B . . .Maryland Goodman, Howard Maryland 

Caples, Delmas Maryland Gordon, Joseph Maryland 

Carliner, Paul Elliott Maryland Gutman, Isaac Maryland 

Coates, Stephen Paul, A.B New York Hanigsberg, Murray Joseph, B.S. 

Cohen, Lawrence Jack Maryland New York 

Cooper, Jules New Jersey Healy, Robert Fairbank, B.S.. . .Maryland 

Deitz, Joseph Robert, A.B. . . .New Jersey Hoffman, Edward Sayer, A.B.. .New York 

Diener, Samuel Maryland Horan, William Henry, A.B . .Pennsylvania 

Dorman, George Edward, B.S Howard, William Lawrence, B.S.. Maryland 

Pennsylvania Hummel, Leonard Malcolm Maryland 

Downey, Regis Fallon, B.S. .Pennsylvania Hurwitz, Abraham Maryland 

Dreher, Robert Hering, B.S.. Pennsylvania Insley, Philip Asbury, B.S Maryland 

Dunbar, John Charles Pennsylvania Janney, Nathan Bonney Maryland 

Echols, John Edward West Virginia Jerardi, Joseph Victor, B.S Maryland 



GRADUATES, 1934 



67 



Johnson, Thorwald California 

Kaf er, Oscar Adolph North Carolina 

Kallins, Edward Selig Maryland 

Katz, Simon, A.B New York 

Ketz, Wesley John Pennsylvania 

Knoll, William, B.S New York 

Lawler, Thomas Gorman, A.B . . California 

Leass, Reuben, B.S New York 

Leavitt, Abraham Charles, B.S. 

Massachusetts 

Levin, Manuel, A.B Maryland 

Levin, Milton Maryland 

Maginnis, Helen Irene, A.B Maryland 

Mains, Marshall Paul, A.B Wisconsin 

Marlett, Neumann Clyde, Mus.B. 

New Jersey 

McNally, Hugh Bernard Maryland 

Millett, Joseph Pennsylvania 

Mirow, Richard Raymond New York 

Moore, Alfred Charles, A.B Maryland 

Moulton, Olin Cates, A.B Maine 

Mund, Maxwell Herschel Maryland 

Needleman, Max, B.S New York 

O'Connor, Raymond Francis. Pennsylvania 
Orans, Alfred Abraham, A.B . . .New York 
Rabinowitz, Jacob Herbert, B.S 

New Jersey 

Ray, William Turner North Carolina 

Reardon, William Thomas, A. B.. Delaware 
Roberson, Edward Leon, B.S 

North Carolina 

Rosen, Morris, A.B Pennsylvania 

Rosenthal, Charles Morton, B.S 

New York 



Sacks, Milton Samuel Maryland 

Sasscer, James Ghiselin, B.S. . . .Maryland 
Satulsky, Emanuel Milton, B.S 

New Jersey 

Schwartz, Daniel James Maryland 

Schwartz, Theodore Allison Maryland 

Sedlacek, Joseph Arthur, B.S. . .Maryland 
Sekerak, Richard John Stephen 

Connecticut 
Siegel, Benjamin Israel, B.S. . . .Maryland 

Siegel, Milton, B.S New York 

Smith, William Benjamin Maryland 

Snyder, John Newcomer .... Pennsylvania 
Sollod, Bernard Walter, A.B. . . .Maryland 

Soltz, William Boyer, B.S New York 

Sproul, Dorothy Gertrude, B.S., M.S.S. 

Massachusetts 

Stein, Milton Robert Maryland 

Stephens, Wilson Paschall, B.S. . .Virginia 
Stutzman, Clyde Malverne, B.S. 

Pennsylvania 

Sugar, Samuel Jacob, B.S Maryland 

Sutton, Harold Lawrence, A.B. .New Jersey 
Taylor, Andrew Du Val . . . North Carolina 

Terman, Irving, A.B New York 

Timberlake, Landon, A.B Virginia 

Tuerk, Isadore, B.S Maryland 

Udkow, Samuel, B.S New York 

Wagner, Richard, A.B New Jersey 

Warshawsky, Harry, B.S New York 

Wilder, Earle Maurice Maryland 

W T olfe, William David, A.B Maryland 

Zurawski, Charles, Ph.B Rhode Island 



Honors 

University Prize Gold Medal Max Needleman 

Certificates of Honor 



Jacob Herbert Rabinowitz 
Paul Elliott Carliner 



Richard Raymond Mirow 
Milton Samuel Sacks 



Jules Cooper 



Prizes 

The Doctor A. Bradley Gaither Memorial Prize of $25.00 for the best work in genito- 
urinary surgery during the senior year Charles Zurawski 

INTERNESHIPS— CLASS 1933 

Aaron, Harold Henry Lebanon Hospital, Bronx, New York 

Baker, George Stansbury University Hospital, Baltimore, Md. 

Barnhardt, Albert Earl University Hospital, Baltimore, Md. 

Beanstock, Sam Cumberland Hospital, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Becker, Martin Beth Israel Hospital, Newark, N. J. 

Bellin, David Elias Cumberland Hospital, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Bernstein, Joseph Cecil 



68 BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, U. OF MD. 

Blitzman, Louis Gouverneur Hospital, New York, N. Y. 

Bowman, Harry Daniel University Hospital, Baltimore, Md. 

Cohen, Marvin Meyer Barnert Memorial Hospital, Paterson, N. J. 

Comegys, Richard Williamson West Baltimore General Hospital, Baltimore, Md. 

Diehl, Harold Clayton Mercy Hospital, Baltimore, Md. 

Di Stasio, Frank St. Raphael Hospital, New Haven, Conn. 

Drucker, Victor Sydenham Hospital, New York, N. Y. 

Emanuel, Meyer Mount Sinai Hospital, New York, N. Y. 

Espinosa, Manuel University Hospital, Baltimore, Md. 

Etkind, Meyer George 

Fineman, Jerome Mercy Hospital, Wilkes-Barre, Pa. 

Fox, Haskell Wright University Hospital, Baltimore, Md. 

Franklin, Frank Anthony Mountainside Hospital, Montclair, N. J. 

Garrison, Ralph Bernard Baltimore City Hospitals, Baltimore, Md. 

Goldman, Alexander Blodnick Trinity Hospital, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Goldman, Meyer Leo Gouverneur Hospital, New York, N. Y. 

Gorrell, James Stanley General Hospital of Fresno County, Fresno, Cal. 

Griggs, William Lemuel Baltimore City Hospitals, Baltimore, Md. 

Harris, Earle Harold Gouverneur Hospital, New York, N. Y. 

Hedgpeth, Louten Rhodes Baker Sanatorium, Lumberton, N. C. 

Hemminger, Earl Wentworth St. Margaret Memorial Hosp., Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Highstein, Gustav Sinai Hospital, Baltimore, Md. 

Himelfarb, Albert Joseph Sinai Hospital, Baltimore, Md. 

Hoover, William Alonzo Baltimore City Hospitals, Balto., Md. 

Hurwitz, George Hillel Jewish Hospital of St. Louis, St. Louis, Mo. 

Hyman, Joseph Jay United Israel Zion Hospital, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Hyman, Morris 

Kenler, Myron Lewis Wyckoff Heights Hosp., Ridgewood, L. I.; N. Y. 

Kent, Ann Patrick Metropolitan Hosp., Welfare Island, N. Y. 

Keown, Lauriston Livingston University Hospital, Baltimore, Md. 

Kimmel, Charles Beth Israel Hospital, Newark, N. J. 

Kochman, Leon Arthur Mercy Hospital, Baltimore, Md 

Konigsberg, Wilfred Kane Sinai Hospital, Baltimore, Md. 

Lentz, George Ellard York Hospital, York, Pa. 

Lifland, Bernard D Newark City Hospital, Newark, N. J. 

Lowman, Milton Edward South Baltimore General Hosp., Baltimore, Md. 

Malinoski, Wallace Henry South Baltimore General Hosp., Baltimore, Md. 

Matheke, George Adolph Newark City Hospital, Newark, N. J. 

Miller, Benjamin Baltimore City Hospitals, Baltimore, Md. 

Miller, Meyer George Coney Island Hospital, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Moore, James Irving University Hospital, Baltimore, Md. 

Novenstein, Sidney Lebanon Hospital, Bronx, N. Y. 

Osserman, Kermit Edward Bronx Hospital, New York, N. Y. 

Peer, George Foster Ohio Valley General Hosp., Wheeling, W. Va. 

Pico, Jose Teodoro University Hospital, Baltimore, Md. 

Racusin, Nathan Franklin Square Hospital, Baltimore, Md. 

Robinson, Daniel Robert Mercy Hospital, Baltimore, Md. 

Rosenberg, Arthur Israel Zion Hospital, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Rosenfeld, David Herman Grace Hospital, Richmond, Va. 

Rubin, Samuel S Franklin Square Hospital, Baltimore, Md. 



MATRICULATES 69 

Rutland, Hedley Ethelbert York Hospital, York, Pa. 

Sager, Harold Bayonne Hospital, Bayonne, N. J. 

Scarborough, Asa Mark Greenville City Hospital, Greenville, S. C. 

Schiff, Hyman 

Schiff, Joseph Wesson Memorial Hospital, Springfield, Mass. 

Schindler, Blane Markwood Philadelphia Jewish Hospital, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Schneiman, Maurice Harris Mercy Hospital, Baltimore, Md. 

Schochet, George West Baltimore General Hosp., Baltimore, Md. 

Schwartz, Alec Robert Sinai Hospital, Baltimore, Md. 

Schwartz, Paul M Wesson Memorial Hospital, Springfield, Mass. 

Sewell, Stephen Chestnut Hill Hospital, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Shea, Cornelius Joseph Bridgeport Hospital, Bridgeport, Conn. 

Shinn, George Clyde Baltimore City Hospitals, Baltimore, Md. 

Smith, Ashby Wade Jefferson Hospital, Roanoke, Va. 

Stackhouse, Howard Jr University Hospital, Baltimore, Md. 

Stern, Maurice Lee Lebanon Hospital, Bronx, N. Y. 

Taylor, Clifford Morrison University Hospital, Baltimore, Md. 

Thumin, Mark Chester Hospital, Chester, Pa. 

Turano, Leonard Francis Mary Immaculate Hospital, Jamaica, L. I., N. Y. 

Van Metre, John Lee University Hospital, Baltimore, Md. 

Way, Samuel Eason University Hospital, Baltimore, Md. 

Weisman, Samuel Sinai Hospital, Baltimore, Md. 

Wieciech, Michael Joseph South Baltimore General Hosp., Baltimore, Md. 

Wolbert, Frank Olaf Harrisburg Hospital, Harrisburg, Pa. 

Woodard, Barney Lelon City Memorial Hospital, Winston Salem, N. C. 

Woodford, Thomas L Ohio Valley General Hospital, Wheeling, W.Va. 

Zager, Saul Newark Beth Israel Hospital, Newark, N. J. 

MATRICULATES 

FOURTH YEAR CLASS, 1933-1934 

Abramovitz, Leonard Jerome, A.B. Dreher, Robert Hering, B.S.. Pennsylvania 

Maryland Dunbar, John Charles Pennsylvania 

Adams, Thurston Ray. . . .North Carolina Echols, John Edward West Virginia 

Austraw, Henry Harrison Maryland Farr, Robert Wilbur, B.S Maryland 

*Baldwin, Kenneth Malison. . . .Maryland Fearing, William Lumsden. North Carolina 

Bayer, Ira Eugene Maryland Feldman, Leon Henry Maryland 

Bayley, George Schwing Pennsylvania Finegold, Joseph, B.S Pennsylvania 

Berenstein, Stanley Harry, B.S.. Maryland Gaskel, Jason Howard, A.B Maryland 

Blum, Louis Vardee, A.B Delaware Gelb, Jerome, B.S New Jersey 

Brodey, David Franklin, A.B. . .New York Gelman, Sidney New Jersey 

Burgtorf, George Edward, B.S. .Maryland Goldman, Abram Maryland 

Campbell, Edgar Thrall, A.B . . . Maryland Goldstone, Herbert Maryland 

Caples, Delmas Maryland Goodhand, Charles Luther, A.B .Maryland 

Carliner, Paul Elliott Maryland Goodman, Howard Maryland 

Coates, Stephen Paul, A.B New York Gordon, Joseph Maryland 

Cohen, Lawrence Jack Maryland Gutman, Isaac Maryland 

Cooper, Jules New Jersey Hanigsberg, Murray Joseph, B.S. 

Deitz, Joseph Robert, A.B .... New Jersey New York 

Diener, Samuel Maryland Healy, Robert Fairbank, B.S.. . .Maryland 

Dorman, George Edward, B.S. Hoffman, Edward Sayer, A.B. . . New York 

Pennsylvania Horan, William Henry, A.B Pennsylvania 

Downey, Regis Fallon, B.S. .Pennsylvania Howard, William Lawrence, B.S. 

Maryland 

* Did not complete the year. Hummel, Leonard Malcolm Maryland 



70 



BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, U. OF MD. 



Hurwitz, Abraham Maryland 

Insley, Philip Asbury, B.S Maryland 

Janney, Nathan Bonne}'' Maryland 

Jerardi, Joseph Victor, B.S Maryland 

Johnson, Thorwald California 

Kaf er, Oscar Adolph North Carolina 

Kallins, Edward Selig Maryland 

Katz, Simon, A.B New York 

Ketz, Wesley John Pennsylvania 

Knoll, William, B.S New York 

Lawler, Thomas Gorman, A.B . . California 

Leass, Reuben, B.S New York 

Leavitt, Abraham Charles, B.S. 

Massachusetts 

Levin, Manuel, A.B Maryland 

Levin, Milton Maryland 

Maginnis, Helen Irene, A.B Maryland 

Mains, Marshall Paul, A.B Wisconsin 

Marlett, Neumann Clyde, Mus.B. 

New Jersey 

McNally, Hugh Bernard Maryland 

Millett, Joseph Pennsylvania 

Mirow, Richard Raymond New York 

Moore, Alfred Charles, A.B Maryland 

Moulton, Olin Cates, A.B Maine 

Mund, Maxwell Herschel Maryland 

Needleman, Max, B.S New York 

O'Connor, Raymond Francis. Pennsylvania 
Orans, Alfred Abraham, A.B.. . .New York 
Rabinowitz, Jacob Herbert, B.S. 

New Jersey 

Ray, William Turner North Carolina 

Reardon, William Thomas, A. B.. Delaware 
Roberson, Edward Leon, B.S. 

North Carolina 
Rosen, Morris, A.B Pennsylvania 



Rosenthal, Charles Morton, B.S. 

New York 

Rudo, Nathan Maryland 

Sacks, Milton Samuel Maryland 

Sasscer, James Ghiselin, B.S. . . .Maryland 
Satulsky, Emanuel Milton, B.S. 

New Jersey 

Schwartz, Daniel James Maryland 

Schwartz, Theodore Allison Maryland 

Sedlacek, Joseph Arthur, B.S. . .Maryland 
Sekerak, Richard John Stephen 

Connecticut 
Siegel, Benjamin Israel, B.S. . . .Maryland 

Siegel, Milton, B.S New York 

Smith, William Benjamin Maryland 

Snyder, John Newcomer .... Pennsylvania 
Sollod, Bernard Walter, A.B. . . .Maryland 

Soltz, William Boyer, B.S New York 

Sproul, Dorothy Gertrude, B.S., M.S.S. 

Massachusetts 

Stein, Milton Robert Maryland 

Stephens, Wilson Paschall, B.S. . .Virginia 
Stutzman, Clyde Malverne, B.S. 

Pennsylvania 

Sugar, Samuel Jacob, B.S Maryland 

Sutton, Harold Lawrence, A.B. .New Jersey 
Taylor, Andrew Du Val . . . North Carolina 

Terman, Irving, A.B New York 

Timberlake, Landon, A.B Virginia 

Tuerk, Isadore, B.S Maryland 

Udkow, Samuel, B.S New York 

Wagner, Richard, A.B New Jersey 

Warshawsky, Harry, B.S New York 

Wilder, Earl Maurice Maryland 

Wolfe, William David, A.B Maryland 

Zurawski, Charles, Ph.B Rhode Island 



THIRD YEAR CLASS, 1933-1934 



Adelman, Milton Harris, B.S. . .New York 
Albrittain, John Warren, B.S. . .Maryland 

Alessi, Edward James Maryland 

Alonso, Miguel, B.S Porto Rico 

Alpert, George, A.B Massachusetts 

Anderson, John Bascom, B.S. 

North Carolina 

Aungst, Melvin Rauch Pennsylvania 

Barnes, Henry Eugene, Jr., B.S. 

North Carolina 
Battaglia, Dominic Thomas, B.S. 

Maryland 
Bierer, Dan George, B.S. . . .Pennsylvania 
Bock, Charles Aloysius, B.S.. Pennsylvania 
Brouillet, George Hector, B.S. 

Massachusetts 
Bunn, James Pettigrew, Jr., B.S, 

North Carolina 

Cassidy, William Adrian, A.B Maine 

Cohen, Philip New Jersey 

Coplin, George Joseph, B.S New Jersey 

Cornbrooks, Ernest Ivon, Jr., A.B. 

New Jersey 
Cotter, Edward Francis Maryland 



Cutler, Frank Henry, A.B Utah 

Dickey, Francis George, A.B Maryland 

Diehl, Earl Henry Maryland 

Dodge, Douglas Rude Michigan 

Doerner, Alexander Andrew, A.B. 

New York 

Du Bois, Robert Lionel Connecticut 

Dunnigan, William Charles, A.B. 

Maryland 
Einhorn, Samuel Edward, B.S. .New Jersey 
Ewald, August Ludwig, B.S. . . .Maryland 

Fader, Ferdinand, A.B New Jersey 

Freeman, Irving, B.S Maryland 

Fruchtbaum, Robert Pearson, B.S. 

New Jersey 

Galitz, Philip Jacob, M.A New York 

Gerwig, Walter Henry, Jr. . .West Virginia 
Godbey, John Randolph .... West Virginia 
Grenzer, William Howard, A.B.. Maryland 

Gross, Joseph Bernard Maryland 

Hammill, Gerard Paul, B.S. .Pennsylvania 
Hamrick, John Carl, B.S. .North Carolina 
Harris, Aaron Maryland 



MATRICULATES 



71 



Hartman, Ira Frank, A.B., B.S. 

West Virginia 
Heghinian, Jeannette Rosaline E. 

Maryland 
Helfrich, William Goldsborough, B.S. 

Maryland 

Herald", James Kennedy Ohio 

Herrold, Lewis Charles, B.S.. Pennsylvania 

Hollander, Arthur, B.S New York 

Hugg, John Henry, B.S Pennsylvania 

Hunt, Josiah Arnold, B.S Maryland 

Jordan, William Pritchard, B.S. 

North Carolina 
Kaminsky, Aaron Louis, B.S. .New Jersey 

Kane, Harry Francis, A.B Maryland 

Keller, Michael Lawrence New Jersey 

Klein, Harold Henry Pennsylvania 

Klompus, Irving, A.B New Jersey 

Knowles, Frederick Edwin, Jr., B.S. 

New Jersey 

Laino, Frank Armento, B.S Maryland 

Lane, Edwin Charles, A.B New Jersey 

Layton, Caleb Rodney New York 

Lewis, Archie Clifton, B.S Maryland 

Lichtenberg, Walter, B.S., M.A. 

New York 

Lieb, Saul, A.B New Jersey 

Llewelyn, Louis Grandin, A.B.. .Maryland 
MacLaughlin, Donald Clay, A.B. 

Maryland 

Marek, Charles Bernard Maryland 

Mays, Howard Brooks Maryland 

McDonough, Oscar Tracy, Jr., A.B. 

Pennsylvania 

McGregor, Alpine Watson Utah 

McGregor, Lorenzo Watson Utah 

McHenry, DeArmond John, B.S. 

Pennsylvania 

Mech, Karl Frederick, B.S Maryland 

Mills, Lawrence Hoy, A.B., B.S. 

West Virginia 
Montgomery, Bruce Pennsylvania 



Noon, Milton A Maryland 

Pepe, Anthony James, B.S — Connecticut 

Raffel, William Maryland 

Reier, Charles Henry Maryland 

Roberts, David P Maryland 

Robinson, Harry Maximilian, Jr. 

Maryland 

Robinson, Milton Irving New York 

Rogers, Frank Tipton Tennessee 

Rosen, Israel, A.B Maryland 

Rosen, Sol Hyman New Jersey 

Rosenberg, Harold William, B.S. 

New York 

Russell, John Carroll Maryland 

Schlachman, Milton Maryland 

Schmitt, George Frederick, Jr. . .Maryland 

Schonfeld, Paul Maryland 

Shapiro, Joseph, A.B New York 

Shapiro, Sydney Harold New York 

Shaul, John Melvin, A.B New York 

Siscovick, Milton Maryland 

Skeen, Leo Brown North Carolina 

Spitznagle, Vernon Edward, B.S. 

Maryland 
Stein, Benjamin Maxwell, B.S. .New York 

Teitel, Louis, B.S New York 

Teitelbaum, Harry Allen, B.S.. .New York 

Tuby, Joseph, B.S New York 

Vieweg, George Louis, Jr West Virginia 

Vozel, Luther F Maryland 

Waghelstein, Julius Meyer Maryland 

Warren, John McCullen, A.B. . .Maryland 
Wheless, James Block, B.S. 

North Carolina 
Williams, Jesse Frank, B.S. .West Virginia 
Williamson, Charles Vernon .... Maryland 
Wilson, Norman James, B.S. . . Maryland 
Wode, Alvin Eugene William . . . Maryland 
Wood, Everet Hardenbergh, A.B. 

New Jersey 
Woodward, Lewis Klair, Jr., A.B. 

Maryland 



SECOND YEAR CLASS, 1933-1934 



Batalion, Abraham Louis Maryland 

Bernstein, Milton, A.B Maryland 

Bieren, Roland Essig Maryland 

Booth, Harold Thomas, A.B.. . .New York 

Bowie, Harry Clay Maryland 

Burka, Irving, B.S.. .District of Columbia 

Burns, Harold Hubert Pennsylvania 

Burton, Jerome Kermit Maryland 

Bush, Joseph Edgar, A.B Maryland 

Carlson, Carl Edwin Connecticut 

Cranage, Bidwell Chapman, A.B. 

Michigan 
Ctiboj, Vladimir Frantisek, A.B. 

New Jersey 

Czekaj, Leo Michael Maryland 

Davidson, Nachman, A.B Maryland 

Davis, George Howey, B.S Maryland 

Deehl, 'Seymour Ralph, B.S. . .New Jersey 



Deradorian, Neshon Edward, B.S. 

Connecticut 

Dittmar, Stuart Watt Pennsylvania 

Dixon, Darius McClelland, B.S.. Maryland 

Drozd, Joseph Maryland 

Feldman, Jerome Maryland 

Feldman, Philip Michael, B.S.. .New York 

Fichtner, Albon Russell Pennsylvania 

Fissel, John Edward Maryland 

Fox, Lester Mitchell Maryland 

Franklin, Philip Lair Maryland 

Frich, Michael Garland Pennsylvania 

Gillis, Marion Howard Maryland 

Gimbel Harry Solomon, A.B. . . .Maryland 

Glassner, Frank Maryland 

Gordner, Jesse Walter, Jr., B.S. 

Pennsylvania 
Greengold, David Bernard, A.B.Maryland 



72 



BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, U. OF MD. 



Gregory, Philip Orson Maine 

Greifinger, William, A.B New Jersey 

Grollman, Jaye Jacob Maryland 

Herman, Daniel Loeb, A.B Maryland 

Isaacs, Benjamin Herbert, A.B. .Maryland 

Jones, Ceirianog Henry Pennsylvania 

Jones, Emory Ellsworth, Jr.. West Virginia 
Kagen, Gordon Arthur, A. B.. Pennsylvania 
Karfgin, W'alter Esselman, B.S. . Maryland 

Karpel, Saul, B.S New York 

Katz, Joseph Maryland 

Kleiman, Norman, A.B Maryland 

Knobloch, Howard Thomas, B.S. 

Pennsylvania 

Kolodner, Louis Joseph Maryland 

Kroll, Louis Joseph, A.B Maryland 

Lipin, Raymond Joseph Maryland 

Lowman, Morris Robert Maryland 

Mansfield, William Kenneth . Pennsylvania 

Maser, Louis Robert Maryland 

McCauley, Arthur Franklin, B.S. 

Maryland 
McKnew, Hector Caldwell, Jr. . . Maryland 
McNinch, Eugene Robinson, B.S. 

Pennsylvania 
Moran, James Blessing, Ph.B. 

Rhode Island 

Moran, James Patrick, B.S New York 

Moses, Benjamin Bernard Maryland 

Myerovitz, Joseph Robert Maryland 

Myers, William, B.S Pennsylvania 

Nestor, Thomas Agnew, Ph.B. 

Rhode Island 
Nicholson, Morris John, B.S. . . .Maryland 
Nowak, Sigmund Roman, B.S.. .Maryland 
O'Brien, William Aloysius, Jr., A.B. 

New Jersey 
Parr, William Andrew Maryland 



Pembroke, Richard Heber, Jr., A.B. 

Maryland 
Pentecoste, Salvador Dante . . . New Jersey 
Reichel, Samuel Marvin, A.B. . .Maryland 
Reynolds, John Henry, Jr . . . Pennsylvania 

Rochlin, Narcisse Maryland 

Roseman, Ralph Bernard, A.B. 

Pennsylvania 

Rosenthal, Victor, B.S New York 

Schmieler, George Peter, B.S. 

Pennsylvania 

Selby, George Durward, A.B Maryland 

Shimanek, Lawrence Joseph .... Maryland 

Shub, Morris Maryland 

Soiomon, Cyril Maryland 

Sorin, Matthew New Jersey 

Spain, David Michael New York 

Squires, Millard Fillmore, Jr. . . .Maryland 

Stapen, Milton Honore, B.S New York 

Stecher, Joseph Louis Maryland 

Steinberg, Samuel Maryland 

Stern, Morris Harold, B.S New Jersey 

Sunday, Stuart Dos Passos, A.B. 

Maryland 

Terr, Isaac, B.S New York 

Thomas, Anthony Joseph, Ph.B. 

Massachusetts 
Tierney, Lawrence Matthew . . Connecticut 
Waller, William Kennedy, A.B . . Maryland 

Wehner, Daniel George Maryland 

Weinstein, Jack Joseph Maryland 

Wells, Gibson Jackson, A.B Maryland 

Wilfson, Daniel, Jr., A. B Maryland 

W T ilkinson, Arthur Gilbart, A.B. 

Connecticut 

Wolf, Nathan Maryland 

Yavelow, Charles Sidney, A.B. .New York 
Zimring, Joseph George, B.S. . .New York 



FIRST YEAR GLASS, 1933-1934 



Abbott, Thomas Gilbert Maryland 

Bank, R. Stanley Maryland 

Barnett, Ernest, B.S New York 

Bereston, Eugene Sydney, A.B. .Maryland 
Bowers, John Zimmerman, B.S.. Maryland 

Brill, Leonard Maryland 

Burtnick, Lester Leon Maryland 

*Butler, Charles Ayden. . . . North Carolina 

Casanova, Jose Ramon Porto Rico 

Christensen, Roland Arnold. . Pennsylvania 
Cocimano, Joseph Michael 

District of Columbia 

Cooney, Robert Francis Pennsylvania 

Coughlan, Stuart Gray Maryland 

Daily, Louis Eugene Maryland 

D'Alessio, Charles Magno, B.S. 

Connecticut 
D'Amico, Thomas Vincent, A.B. 

New Jersey 

Davidson, Eli, B.S New York 

Diggs, Everett Schnepfe Maryland 



Di Paula, Robert Salvatore, A.B. 

Maryland 
Eisner, William Monroe, B.S. . .New York 

Ellison, Emanuel Simon Maryland 

Ensor, Helen Robinson Maryland 

*Feldman Charles William Maryland 

Finn, John Hannon, A.B... .Massachusetts 
Fleming, Samuel Wallace. .North Carolina 

Frenkil, James Maryland 

Frohman, Isaac Maryland 

Gehlert, Sidney Richard, A.B. . .Maryland 

Gerber, Charles, B.S New Jersey 

Gibel, Harry New York 

Gillespie, John Lawrence, B.S. .New Jersey 
Gochenour, Howard Wellington 

West Virginia 

Goffin, Herbert New York 

Goldberg, Sigmund Maryland 

Goldsmith, Fred Emanuel Maryland 

Gordon, William Cecil, A.B . . . .New York 
Gore, Robert Joseph, A.B Maryland 



* Did not complete the year. 



MATRICULATES 



73 



Gottdiener, Elvin Edward Maryland 

Greenwald, Frank, A.B New York 

Gundry,. Alfred Thomas, Jr., A.B. 

Maryland 
Hahn, Charles Solomon, B.S. . .New York 
Hedrigk, Grover Cleveland, Jr. 

West Virginia 

Highstein, Benjamin Maryland 

Hochfeld, Leo, B.S New York 

Hodgson, Eugene Welch .... Pennsylvania 
Hoffman, Charles Wilbur, Jr. . . .Maryland 

Hornig, Frank August, Jr Maryland 

Humphries, William Coolidge, A.B. 

Maryland 
Insley, James Knox, Jr., A.B . . . Maryland 

Jackson, Samuel, B.S New York 

Jacobson, Isadore Alan, A.B. . . .Maryland 
Johnston, Clarence Frederick, Jr., A.B. 

Maryland 

Jones, James Porter West Virginia 

Kadan, James Earl, A.B Maryland 

Kaltreider, D. Frank Olewiler, Jr. 

Pennsylvania 

Kaplan, Isadore Maryland 

Kaplan, Jack Allen, B.S New York 

Kaplan, Nathan, A.B Maryland 

Katz, Albert Herbert, A.B Maryland 

Katz, Isadore, M.S New York 

Kemick, Irvin Bernard Maryland 

Klemkowski, Irvin Philip, A.B. .Maryland 
Kocher, Quintin Sherman, Jr. 

Pennsylvania 

Kolman, Lester Norman Maryland 

Krajcovic, Jesse John Maryland 

Kump, Albert Barker. New Jersey 

Kunkowski, Mitchell Frank, B.S. 

Maryland 

La Mar, David William Maryland 

Lenker, Luther Albert, B.S. .Pennsylvania 

Leone, Peter Ralph Pennsylvania 

Leskin, Louis Woton, B.S New York 

Levine, Leonard Warren Virginia 

Levinson, Leonard Jules, B.S. . .New York 

Linhardt, Elmer George Maryland 

Lisansky, Ephraim Theodore, A.B. 

Maryland 
Long, William Broughton, Jr . . . Maryland 
Lubinski, Chester James, A.B . . Maryland 
Mackowiak, Stephen Casimir. . .Maryland 

Manieri, Frank Vincent Maryland 

Marino, Irene Thelma New York 

Matheke, Otto George, Jr New Jersey 

Meyer, Milton Joseph New York 

Muller, Stephen Edwin Maryland 

Muse, Joseph Ennalls, B.S Maryland 

Myers, Lyndon Beaver Pennsylvania 

Myers, Philip, A.B Maryland 

Nataro, Maurice, B.S New Jersey 

Novey,. Samuel Maryland 



*Owens, Maurice E. Broadas, Jr. 

Maryland 
Owens, Richard Spurgeon, Jr., B.S. 

Virginia 

Pass, Isidore Earl Maryland 

Pavlatos, August Constantine, B.S, 

Maryland 

Perlman, Lawrence, B.S New York 

Piccolo, Pasquale Albert, B.S.Connecticut 
Pokrass, Frederick Phillip . . . Pennsylvania 

Resnick, Elton Maryland 

Revell, Samuel Thompson Redgrave, Jr., 

B.S Georgia 

Rigdon, Henry Lewis Maryland 

Robins, Isadore Morris, A.B.Pennsylvania 
Robinson, Martin Herman, A.B. 

Pennsylvania 

Rochkind, Reuben, A.B Maryland 

Roseman, Ephraim, A.B Maryland 

*Rotkovitz, William Maryland 

Rubin, Morris, A.B Connecticut 

Rudman, Gilbert Elmore, A.B. .Maryland 

Safran, Sidney Maryland 

Sakowski, John Paul New Jersey 

Sartorius, Norman Ellis, Jr., A.B. 

Maryland 
Scarborough, Clarence Parke, A.B. 

Pennsylvania 

Schmidt, Jacob Edward Maryland 

Seegar, John King Beck Emory, Jr., A.B. 

Maryland 

Seidel, Joshua, A.B Maryland 

Semoff, Milton C.F., B.S New York 

Shapiro, Abraham Maryland 

Shear, Meyer Robert Maryland 

♦Smith, John P., A.B . . Maryland 

Spielman, Morton Marvin, B.S.. Maryland 

Stapen, Mannie New York 

Statman, Bernhardt Joseph . . . New Jersey 

Steiner, Albert Maryland 

*Stewart, Roy Glen Maryland 

Sullivan, Thomas John, B.S. . .New Jersey 

Suwalsky, Sydney Connecticut 

Thompson, James Upshur, A.B. 

Maryland 

Trupp, Mason, B.S Maryland 

Weems, George Jones, A.B Maryland 

Weiss, Henry Wolf New York 

White, Samuel Cottrell Maryland 

Whitworth, Frank Dixon Maryland 

Wilkin, Mabel Giddings, M.A Texas 

Williams, Richard Jones, A.B. . .Maryland 
Williams, Robert Roderic, A.B..New York 

Wolff, Eldridge Henry Maryland 

Woodrow, Jack Henry, A.B .... New York 
Worthington, Richard Walker, Jr. 

Maryland 

Zacek, Frank Anthony Massachusetts 

Zeligman, Israel, A.B Maryland 

* Did not complete the year. 





865 


377 


377 




229 




331 




196 




117 


199 


199 


458 


458 


124 


124 


329 

1487 


329 
3397 




840 




201 


7487 


217 
4655 


7 _ 
1480 ' 


267 
4388 



74 BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, U. OF MD. 

SUMMARY OF STUDENT ENROLLMENT AS OF JUNE 1, 1934 

College Park Baltimore Totals 

Resident Collegiate Courses — Academic Year: 

College of Agriculture 172 

College of Arts and Sciences 865 

School of Dentistry 

College of Education 229 

College of Engineering 331 

Graduate School 196 

College of Home Economics 117 

School of Law 

School of Medicine 

School of Nursing 

School of Pharmacy 

Total 1910 

Summer School, 1933 840 

Extension Courses: 

Industrial Education (Collegiate Credit) 201 

Mining (Sub- Collegiate Credit) 217 

Grand Total 3168 

Less Duplications 220 

Net Total 2948 

Enrollment in Short Courses of from two to seven days; Rural Women, 414; Boys' and 
Girls' Club, 244; Volunteer Firemen, 77; Florists, 68; Nurserymen, 53; Garden School, 200; 
Practice School in the Summer Session, 38. 

ALUMNI ASSOCIATION SECTION 

OFFICERS 

President Dr. Alfred T. Gtjndry 

{Dr. Frederick E. Knowles 
Col. Roger Brooke 
Dr. Jesse R. Wanner 

Secretary Dr. Frank K. Morris 

Assistant Secretary Dr. T. Nelson Carey 

Treasurer Dr. D. J. Pessagno 

Dr. W. H. Toulson, Chairman 
Dr. Alfred T. Gundry 
Dr. T. B. Aycock 
Dr. Frank K. Morris 
Dr. D. J. Pessagno 
Dr. T. Nelson Carey 
Dr. Charles Bagley, Jr. 
Dr. Kenneth B. Boyd 
Dr. Arthur Hebb 

Hospital Council /Dr. John Evans 

Dr. George Sargent 



Board of Directors . 



Advisory Committee. 



Trustees Student's Rotating Fund < 



GENERAL SUMMARY 75 

Dr. Edgar Friedenwald, Chairman 
Dr. S. Demarco 
Dr. Frank Jennings 
Dr. F. S. Lynn 
T>r. A. F. Ries 

Library Committee Dr. Wm. S. Love, Jr. 

Dr. Wm. S. Love, Chairman 
Dr. Charles E. Brack 
Dr. Frank J. Kirby 
Dr. Robert L. Mitchell 
Dr. G. Milton Linthicum 

Editors (Dr. Emil Novak 

\Dr. Gardner Warner 

Alumni Council JDr. W. H. Triplett 

\Dr. Alfred T. Gundry 

The names listed above are officers for the term beginning July 1, 1934, and ending June 30, 1935. 

ENDOWMENT FUND 

The following constitute the Board of Trustees of this Fund: 

E. F. Kelly, Ph.G., Chairman Horace M. Davis, D.D.S. 

J. M. H. Rowland, M. D. Daniel Baker, Jr. 

Harry Adler, M.D. Stuart Janney 

Randolph Winslow, A.M., M.D., LL.D. Robertson Griswold 

Arthur M. Shipley, Sc.D., M.D. 

This Board is incorporated by act of the Legislature of the State, its 
legal title being "The Trustees of the Endowment Fund of the University 
of Maryland," and is independent and self -perpetuating. Its powers are 
limited to the expenditure of the interest derived from the various funds, which 
is applied as directed by donors for the benefit of the University. Con- 
tributions, donations and bequests are solicited from Alumni and friends. 
They may be made to the general or University Fund, to the Medical Fund 
or to any other department of the University. If intended for the School 
of Medicine, they may be given to the general medical fund or to some spe- 
cial object, as building, research, library, pathology, hospital, publication, 
laboratories, gymnasium, scholarship, medal, prize, etc., in which case the 
wishes of the donor will be strictly regarded. Attention is invited to the 
"Charles Frick Research Fund," already established in memory of that 
distinguished investigator. Checks should be made payable to Endow- 
ment Fund of the University of Maryland, J. M. H. Rowland, Treasurer, 
Lombard and Greene Streets, Baltimore, Md. 



76 BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, U. OF MD. 

FORMS OF DEVISE OR BEQUEST 

To School of Medicine 

I give, devise and bequeath to the Regents of the University of Maryland, a corporation 
incorporated under the laws of the State of Maryland, for the benefit of the Faculty of 

Physic 

(Here state amount or describe property) 

To Endowment Fund 

I give, devise and bequeath to the Trustees of the Endowment Fund of the University 
of Maryland, a corporation incorporated under the laws of the State of Maryland, for the 

benefit of the Faculty of Physic 

(Here state amount or describe property) 

THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 
SCHOOL OF NURSING 

FACULTY AND INSTRUCTORS 

Annie Crighton, R.N Superintendent of Nurses and Director of School of Nursing 

Vesta Swartz, R.N Assistant Superintendent of Nurses 

Lillie Hoke, R.N Instructor in Nursing 

Helen Wright, R.N Instructor of Nursing and Supervisor of Wards 

Elizabeth Aitkenhead, R.N. 

Instructor in Surgical Technique for Nurses and Supervisor of Operating Pavilion 

Miriam Connelly Instructor in Dietetics 

Edith Walton Instructor in Massage 

Bertha Hoffman, R.N Assistant Instructor in Nursing and Supervisor of Wards 

Marie Olga Cox, R.N Night Supervisor 

Eva Hollo way, R.N Supervisor — Dispensary 

Beatrice Krause, R.N Head Nurse — Obstetrical Ward 

Estella Baldwin, R.N Head Nurse — Children's Ward 

Grace Dick, R.N Head Nurse — Men's Medical Ward 

Naomi Allen, R.N Head Nurse — Men's Surgical Ward 

Elizabeth Cannon, R.N Head Nurse — Men's Surgical Ward 

Freda Fazenbaker, R.N Head Nurse — Women's Medical and Surgical Ward 

Lucy A. Brude, R.N Head Nurse — Private Hall 

Eva Laigneil, R.N Head Nurse — Private Hall 

Cora M. Wilson, R.N : .Head Nurse — Surgical Supply Room 

Tillie Mohan Supervisor — Nurse's Home 

Josephine Toms, R.N Assistant Head Nurse — Operating Room 

Rowena Roach, R.N Assistant Head Nurse — Operating Room 

Emma Winship, R.N Supervisor — Accident Department 

Catherine Rodenwald, R.N Outside Obstetrical Service — Prenatal 

Stella U. Ricketts, R. N Outside Obstetrical Service — Prenatal 

Louise Martin Outside Obstetrical Service — Delivery 

Harriet Schroeder, R.N Outside Obstetrical Service — Post-partum 

Evelyn Zapf, R.N Outside Obstetrical Service — Post-partum 

Margaret Currens, R.N Assistant Night Supervisor 



SCHOOL OF NURSING 77 

LECTURERS FROM THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 

C. L. Davis, M.D Anatomy 

Ferd. A. Ries, M.D Physiology 

F. W. Hachtel, M.D Bacteriology 

John C. Krantz, Jr., Ph.D Materia Medica 

Emil G. Schmidt, Ph.D. 



. . .Chemistry 
Ruth C. Vanden Bosche, B.S. 

H. C. Smith, M.D. ] 

C. C. Habliston, M.D. \ Medicine 

Myron Tull, M.D. J 

Cyrus Horine, M.D Surgery 

L. H. Douglass, M.D Obstetrics 

J. M. H. Hundley, Jr., M.D Gynecology 

Loring C. Joslin, M.D Pediatrics 

R. M. Chapman, M.D Psychiatry and Neurology 

Harry M. Robinson, M.D Skin and Venereal Diseases 

Clyde A. Clapp, M.D Otology and Ophthalmology 

E. A. Looper, M.D Laryngology and Rhinology 

Allen Fiske Voshell, M.D Orthopaedic Surgery 

Special Lecturers Social Service 

Harry B. McCarthy, D.D.S Dental 

STUDENT ENROLLMENT 

Seniors 24 

Intermediates 30 

Juniors and Preparatory 50 

Total 104 

GENERAL INFORMATION 

The University of Maryland School for Nurses was established in the 
year 1889. 

Since that time it has been an integral part of the University of Mary- 
land, coming under the same government. 

The school is non-sectarian, the only religious services being morning 
prayers. 

The University Hospital is a general hospital containing about 250 beds. 
It is equipped to give young women a thorough course of instruction and 
practice in all phases of nursing. 

Programs Offered: The program of study of the school is planned for 
two groups of students: (a) the three-year group and (b) the five-year group. 

Requirements for Admission: A candidate for admission to the School 
of Nursing must be a graduate of an accredited high school or other recog- 
nized preparatory school, and must present record showing that she has 
completed satisfactorily the required amount of preparatory study. Prefer- 



78 BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, U. OF MD. 

ence will be given to students who rank in the upper third of the graduating 
class in their preparatory schools. 

Candidates are required to present 15 units for entrance. Required 
(7), and Elective (8) units for entrance. 

Required: English (I, II, III, IV), 3 units; algebra to quadratics, 1 unit; 
plane geometry, 1 unit; history, 1 unit; science, 1 unit. Total, 7 units. 

Elective: Astronomy, biology, botany, chemistry, civics, drawing, eco- 
nomics, general science, geology, history, home economics, vocational 
subjects, languages, mathematics, physical geography, physics, zoology, or 
any other subject offered in a standard high school or preparatory school 
for which graduation credit is granted toward college or university entrance. 
Eight units must be submitted from this group, of which not more than 
four units may pertain to vocational subjects. 

In addition to the above requirements, students must meet certain other 
definite requirements in regard to health, age and personal fitness for 
nursing work. 

The preferable age for students registering for the three-year course is 
20 to 35 years, although students may be accepted at the age of 18. Women 
of superior education and culture are given preference, provided they meet 
the requirements in other particulars. If possible, a personal interview 
with the Director of the School should be arranged on Tuesday or Friday 
from 11:00 A.M. to 12:00 M. 

Blank certificates will be furnished upon application to the Director of 
the School of Nursing, University of Maryland Hospital, Baltimore, 
Maryland. 

Registration With Maryland State Board of Examiners of 
Nurses: By regulation of the Maryland State Board of Examiners of 
Nurses, all students entering schools of nursing in Maryland must, at the 
beginning of their course, register with the Board in order to be eligible 
for examination and license on completion of this course. Blanks necessary 
for this purpose will be sent with application forms. A fee of $2 is charged 
for registration. 

The fitness of the applicant for the work and the propriety of dismissing 
or retaining her at the end of her term of probation are left to the decision 
of the Director of the School. Misconduct, disobedience, insubordination, 
inefficiency, or neglect of duty are causes for dismissal at any time by the 
President of the University. 

The requirements for admission to the five-year program of the School 
of Nursing are the same as for other colleges. (Special catalog will be sent 
upon request.) The three-year program is designed to meet the require- 
ments for the diploma in Nursing and comprises the work of the first, second, 
and third hospital years. 



SCHOOL OF NURSING 79 

Admission to the School: Students for the spring term are admitted 
in February and those for the fall term in September or October, and the 
five-year course in September. 

Hours of Duty: During the preparatory period the students are 
engaged in class work for the first four months with no general duty in the 
hospital; for the remainder of this period they are sent to the wards on eight- 
hour duty. During the first, second, and third years the students are on 
eight-hour day duty and nine-hour night duty, with six hours on holidays 
and Sundays. The night-duty periods are approximately two months each, 
with one day at the termination of each term for rest and recreation. The 
period of night duty is approximately five to six months during the 
three years. 

The first four months of the preparatory period are devoted to theoretical 
instruction given entirely in the lecture and demonstration rooms of the 
training school, hospital, and medical school laboratories. The average 
number of hours per week in formal instruction, divided into lecture and 
laboratory periods, is 30 hours, and includes courses in Anatomy, Physiol- 
ogy, Cookery and Nutrition, Dosage and Solution, Hygiene, Bacteriology, 
Chemistry, Materia Medica, Practical Nursing, Bandaging, Ethics, and 
History of Nursing. During the last two months of the probation period 
the students are placed on duty in the hospital wards for instruction in bed- 
side nursing, and are expected to perform the duties assigned to them by the 
Director of the School. At the close of the first semester the students are 
required to pass satisfactorily both the written and practical tests. Failure 
to do so will be sufficient reason for terminating the course at this point. 

Sickness: A physician is in attendance each day, and when ill, all stu- 
dents are cared for gratuitously. The time lost through illness in excess 
of two weeks, during the three years, must be made up. Should the au- 
thorities of the school decide that through the time lost the theoretical 
work has not been sufficiently covered to permit the student to continue 
in that year, it will be necessary for her to continue her work with the 
next class. 

Vacations: Vacations are given between June and September. A 
period of three weeks is allowed the student at the completion of the first 
year, and four weeks at the completion of the second year. 

Expenses: A fee of $50.00, payable on entrance, is required from all 
students. This will not be returned. A student receives her board, lodg- 
ing, and a reasonable amount of laundry from the date of entrance. During 
her period of probation she provides her own uniforms, obtained through 
the hospital at a nominal cost. After being accepted as a student nurse 
she wears the uniform supplied by the hospital. The student is also pro- 
vided with text-books and shoes. Her personal expenses during the course 



80 BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, U. OF MD. 

of training and instruction will depend entirely upon her individual habits 
and tastes. 

FIVE-YEAR PROGRAM 

In addition to the regular three-year course of training, the University 
offers a combined Academic and Nursing program leading to the degree of 
Bachelor of Science and a Diploma in Nursing. 

The first two years of the course (or pre-hospital period), consisting of 
68 semester hours, are spent in the College of Arts and Sciences of the 
University, during which period the student has an introduction to the gen- 
eral cultural subjects which are considered fundamental in any college 
training. At least the latter of these two years must be spent in residence 
at College Park, in order that the student may have her share in the social 
and cultural activities of college life. The last three years are spent in 
the School of Nursing in Baltimore. 

Degree and Diploma 

The degree of Bachelor of Science and the Diploma in Nursing are 
awarded to students who complete successfully the prescribed combined 
academic and nursing program. 

MERCY HOSPITAL SCHOOL OF NURSING 

The Mercy Hospital School of Nursing was established in 1899 and incor- 
porated under the laws of the State of Maryland in 1901. It has developed 
the art of the profession according to the high standard requisite to qualify 
for Registered Nurse. 

Requirements for Admission. 

A candidate desiring to enter the School of Nursing should apply to the 
Superintendent of Nurses by letter or in person at least six weeks before 
the entrance date. If is preferred that she apply in person accompanied 
by her mother or guardian. If a personal interview is not possible, a written 
application may be submitted. 

Age. 

Candidates should be between the ages of eighteen and thirty-five years. 

Physique. 

Applicants should be of average height and good physique. Teeth 
and eyes should be attended to before entering the School, and tonsils 



SCHOOL OF NURSING 81 

removed if not in good condition. Every applicant is required to send in 
a certificate of health by her family physician. A physical examination is 
also made by the school physician during the preliminary period. 

Education. 

Applicants for admission should present at least high school certificate 
of graduation or its equivalent in educational values. The credits of pre- 
liminary education are fully accounted and the nurse who is the better 
qualified finds such a foundation more to her advantage as she progresses 
through the years of study. 

Calendar. 

Students are admitted September 1st and February 1st. 

Length of Course. 

The course of instruction covers three years. It is divided into a pre- 
liminary term of four months, a freshman term of eight months, a junior 
term of one year, and a senior term of one year. 

Conditions of Acceptance. 

The Superintendent of Nurses decides as to the fitness for the work and 
the propriety of retaining or dismissing a student at the end of the term of 
probation or during its course. She may also, with the approval of the 
faculty, terminate the connection of a student with the School in any justi- 
fiable instance. At the end of the preliminary period, if the student's health, 
general education, and natural aptitude prove satisfactory to the Director 
of the School and the Sister Superior, she shall be appointed for enrollment 
as a student nurse. 

Expenses. 

An admission fee of fifty dollars is required from all students. This 
covers the cost of uniforms and books required during the preliminary 
course. 

Should the student for any reason leave the school before completing 
the course, this fee will not be returned, nor may she take with her any 
part of the equipment. 

After four months' probation, candidates, if they possess the necessary 
qualifications, are admitted to the School of Nursing proper. They receive 
ten dollars per month to help defray incidental expenses. No other com- 



82 BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, U. OF MD. 

pensation is given, the education received being considered sufficient return 
for service rendered. Board, laundry, etc., are furnished by the institution. 
Four weeks before admission candidates should forward the fifty-dollar 
entrance fee, and measurements for uniforms and aprons, which will be in 
readiness upon their arrival. No orders will be considered until this fee 
is received. 

THE FIVE-YEAR COURSE 

Leading to B.S. Degree and Diploma of Graduate Nurse 

The University of Maryland, in affiliation with the Mercy Hospital 
School of Nursing, offers a combined Academic and Nursing program. 

The completion of this course entitles the student to the degree of Bache- 
lor of Science from the University of Maryland, and to the diploma of the 
Mercy Hospital School of Nursing. 

Graduate nurses who hold college degrees are greatly in demand, espe- 
cially for positions in administration and teaching. This program conse- 
quently offers a distinct advantage. 

Outline of Course. 

Two years of this course (pre-nursing or post-nursing period) consisting 
of 70 semester hours are spent in the College of Arts and Sciences of the 
University, with the usual College vacations. At least the latter of these 
two years must be spent in residence at College Park in order that the stu- 
dent may have her share in the social and cultural activities of college life. 

Requirements for Admission. 

Students electing such a course must, before entering the School of 
Nursing, satisfy the entrance requirements of the University of Maryland. 
Applicants must be personally adapted to professional nursing. 

Fees and Other Expenses. 

During the two years which the students spend at College Park they 
maintain themselves, and pay their own College fees. (See University of 
Maryland bulletin.) 

Throughout the Nursing School Course the hospital provides, without 
expense to the student, maintenance and care during temporary illness. 



INDEX 



PAGE 

Alumni Association 74 

Annual Hospital Appointments 65 

Board of Regents 3 

Calendar 2 

Combined Course in Arts and Medi- 
cine 59 

Consolidation of Schools 10 

Curriculum, Organization of 29 

Anatomy 29 

Histology 30 

Embryology 30 

Neuro Anatomy 31 

Physiology 31 

Bacteriology and Immunology 32 

Biological Chemistry 32 

Pharmacology and Materia Medica. . 33 

Pathology 33 

Medicine 35 

Clinical Pathology 37 

Gastro-Enterology 38 

Psychiatry 39 

Pediatrics 39 

Neurology 40 

Hygiene and Preventive Medicine. . 41 

Medical Jurisprudence 41 

Surgery 41 

Anaesthesia 44 

Dermatology 45 

Orthopaedic Surgery 45 

Roentgenology 46 

Diathermy and Radium Therapy . . 46 

Throat and Nose 46 

Bronchoscopy and Esophagoscopy . 46 

Genito-Urinary 47 

Colon and Rectum 47 

Otology 48 

Neurological Surgery 48 

Oncology 48 

Oral Surgery 49 

Obstetrics 49 

Gynecology 50 

Ophthalmology 50 



PAGE 

Art as Applied to Medicine 51 

History of Medicine 51 

Dispensary Reports: 

Mercy Hospital 25 

University Hospital 19 

Clinical Facilities: 

Mercy Hospital 19 

University Hospital 12 

Dispensary Staffs: 

Mercy Hospital 23 

University Hospital 16 

Endowment Fund 75 

Expenses, Students 66 

Faculty of Physic 4 

Fees 61 

General Summary of Students 74 

Hospitals: 

James Lawrence Kernan 27 

Mercy Hospital 19 

Baltimore City Hospitals 26 

University Hospital 12 

St. Vincent's Infant Asylum 28 

Internships 67 

Libraries 28 

Matriculates 69 

Medical Care of Students 62 

Medical Council 4 

Prizes 62 

Requirements for Matriculation 58 

Rules 60 

Schedule 53 

Scholarships 63 

Staffs: 

Baltimore City Hospitals 26 

James Lawrence Kernan Hospital. . 27 

Mercy Hospital 20 

University Hospital 14 

Training Schools for Nurses : 

Mercy Hospital 80 

University Hospital 76 

University Council 4 

University of Maryland, Organization 

of 11 



83 



VOLUME 19 NUMBER 5 



BULLETIN 



OF THE 



SCHOOL of MEDICINE 

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



MAY, 1935 




PUBLISHED FIVE TIMES A YEAR 
(JANUARY, APRIL, MAY, JULY AND OCTOBER) 



Lombard and Greene Streets 
Baltimore, Md. 



Entered as second-class matter June 16, 1916, at the Postomce at Baltimore, Maryland, 
under the Act of August 24, 1912. 



BULLETIN 



OF THE 



University of Maryland School of Medicine 
and College of Physicians and Surgeons 

Successor to The Hospital Bulletin of the University of Maryland, 

Baltimore Medical College News, and the Journal of the 

Alumni Association of the College of 

Physicians and Surgeons 




Annual Announcement 
Session 1935-36 



VOLUME 1 9, NO. 5 
MAY, I935 



CALENDAR FOR 1935-36 



1935 




September 24 


Tuesday 


September 25' 


Wednesday 


September 26 


Thursday 


November 27 


Wednesday 


December 2 


Monday 


December 21 


Saturday 


1936 




January 6 


Monday 


January 27 


Monday 


to 


to 


February 1, incl 


. Saturday 


February 1 


Saturday 


February 3 


Monday 


February 22 


Saturday 


April 8 


Wednesday 


April 15 


Wednesday 


June 6 


Saturday 



SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 

FIRST SEMESTER 

*Registration for first- and second-year students. 
*Registration for all other students. 

Instruction begins with the first scheduled period. 

Thanksgiving recess begins after the last scheduled period. 

Instruction resumed with the first scheduled period. 

Christmas recess begins after the last scheduled period. 

Instruction resumed with the first scheduled period. 
*Registration for the second semester. 



First semester ends after the last scheduled period. 

SECOND SEMESTER 

Instruction begins with the first scheduled period. 

Washington's Birthday. Holiday. 

Easter recess begins after the last scheduled period. 

Instruction resumed with the first scheduled period. 

Commencement. 

* A student who neglects or fails to register prior to or within the day or days specified 
for his or her school will be called upon to pay a fine of five dollars ($5.00). The last day 
of registration with fine added to regular fees is Saturday at noon of the week in which 
instruction begins following the specified registration period. (This rule may be waived 
only upon the written recommendation of the dean.) 

The offices of the registrar and comptroller are open daily, not including Saturday, 
from 9:00 a. m. to 5:00 p. m., and on Saturday from 9:00 a. m. to 12:30 p. m., with the 
following exceptions: Monday, September 16, 1935, until 8:00 p. m.; Saturday, Septem- 
ber 28, 1935, until 5:00 p. m.; and on Saturday, February 1, 1936, until 5:00 p. m. 

Advance registration is encouraged. 



ORGANIZATION 
THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Raymond A. Pearson, M.S., D.Agr., LL.D., President and 
Executive Officer 

BOARD OF REGENTS 

Term expires 

George M. Shriver, Chairman 1942 

Pikesville, Baltimore County 

John M. Dennis, Treasurer 1941 

Riderwood, Baltimore County 

W. W. Skinner, Secretary 1936 

Kensington, Montgomery County 

William P. Cole, Jr 1940 

Towson, Baltimore County 

Henry Holzapfel, Jr 1943 

Hagerstown, Washington County 

J. Milton Patterson 1944 

Cumberland, Allegany County 

John E. Raine 1939 

Towson, Baltimore County 

Clinton L. Riggs 1942 

Latrobe Apartments, Baltimore 

Mrs. John L. Whitehurst 1938 

3902 St. Paul Street, Baltimore 

Control of the University of Maryland is vested in a Board of nine 
Regents, appointed by the Governor and confirmed by the Senate for terms 
of nine years each. The general administration of the University is vested 
in the President. The University Council is an advisory body, composed 
of the President, the Vice-President, the Director of the Agricultural Experi- 
ment Station, the Director of the Extension Service, and the Deans. The 
University Council acts upon all matters having relation to the University 
as a whole or to cooperative work between the constituent groups. Each 
school has its own Faculty Council, composed of the Dean and members of 
its Faculty; each Faculty Council controls the internal affairs of the group 
it represents. 

The University has the following educational organization: 

The College of Agriculture, The College of Education, 

The College of Engineering, The College of Home Economics, 

The College of Arts and Sciences, The Graduate School, 

The School of Medicine, The Summer School, 

The School of Law, The Department of Physical Education 

The School of Dentistry, and Recreation. 

The School of Pharmacy, 

The Schools of Medicine, Law, Dentistry and Pharmacy are located in 
Baltimore; the others in College Park, Maryland. 

3 



4 BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, U. OF MD. 

THE UNIVERSITY COUNCIL 

Raymond A. Pearson, M.S., D.Agr., LL.D President 

H. C. Byrd, B.S Vice-President 

H. J. Patterson, D.Sc Dean of the College of Agriculture and 

Director of the Experiment Station 

A. N. Johnson, S.B., D.Eng Dean of the College of Engineering 

T. H. Taliaferro, C.E., Ph.D Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences 

Roger Howell, A.B., LL.D., Ph.D Dean of the School of Law 

J. M. H. Rowland, M.D., Sc.D., LL.D Dean of the School of Medicine 

A. G. Du Mez, Ph.D Dean of the School of Pharmacy 

T. O. Heatwole, M.D., D.D.S Secretary of the Baltimore Schools 

W. S. Small, Ph.D Dean of the College of Education 

M. Marie Mount, M.A Dean of the College of Home Economics 

C. O. Appleman, Ph.D Dean of the Graduate School 

Thomas B. Symons, M.S., D.Agr Director of Extension Service 

J. Ben Robinson, D.D.S., F.A.C.D Dean of the School of Dentistry 

MEDICAL COUNCIL 

Arthur M. Shipley, M.D., Sc.D. Carl L. Davis, M.D. 

Julius Friedenwald, A.M., M.D. Maurice C. Pincoffs, B.S., M.D. 

J. M. H. Rowland, M.D., Sc.D., LL.D. Frank W. Hachtel, M.D. 

Alexius McGlannan, A.M., M.D., LL.D. Eduard Uhlenhuth, Ph.D. 

Hugh R. Spencer, M.D. Clyde A. Clapp, M.D. 

H. Boyd Wylie, M.D. John C. Krantz, Jr., Ph.D. 
Walter D. Wise, M.D. 

FACULTY OF PHYSIC 

Randolph Winslow, A.M., M.D., LL.D Professor Emeritus of Surgery 

J. Frank Crouch, M.D Professor Emeritus of Clinical Ophthalmology and Otology 

John R. Winslow, A.B., M.D Professor Emeritus of Rhinology and Laryngology 

Harry Friedenwald, A. B., M.D Professor Emeritus of Ophthalmology 

William S. Gardner, M.D Professor Emeritus of Gynecology 



Arthur M. Shipley, M.D., Sc.D., Professor of Surgery. 

Julius Friedenwald, A.M., M.D., Professor of Gastroenterology. 

J. M. H. Rowland, M.D., Sc.D., LL.D. Professor of Obstetrics and Dean of the Faculty. 

Alexius McGlannan, A.M., M.D., LL.D., Professor of Surgery. 

Hugh R. Spencer, M.D., Professor of Pathology. 

H. Boyd Wylie, M.D., Professor of Biological Chemistry. 

Carl L. Davis, M.D., Professor of Anatomy. 

Maurice C. Pincoffs, B.S., M.D., Professor of Medicine. 

Frank W. Hachtel, M.D., Professor of Bacteriology. 

Clyde A. Clapp, M.D., Professor of Ophthalmology. 

John C. Krantz, Jr., Ph.D., Professor of Pharmacology. 

Eduard Uhlenhuth, Ph.D., Professor of Anatomy. 

William H. Schultz, Ph.B., Ph.D., Research Professor of Pharmacology. 

G. Milton Linthicum, A.M., M.D., Professor of Diseases of the Rectum and Colon. 

Joseph E. Gichner, M.D., Professor of Clinical Medicine and Physical Therapeutics. 



FACULTY OF PHYSIC 

Irving J. Spear, M.D., Professor of Neurology. 

Charles F. Blake, A.M., M.D., Professor of Diseases of the Rectum and Colon. 

S. Griffith Davis, M.S., M.D., Professor of Anaesthesia. 

G. Carroll Lockard, M.D., Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

Harvey G. Beck, M.D., Sc.D., Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

Albertus Cotton, A.M., M.D., Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery and Roentgenology. 

Andrew C. Gillis, A.M., M.D., LL.D., Professor of Neurology. 

Henry J. Walton, M.D., Professor of Roentgenology. 

Ross McC. Chapman, M.D., Professor of Psychiatry. 

John Rathbone Oliver, A.B., M.D., Ph.D., Professor of the History of Medicine. 

L. H. Douglass, M.D., Professor of Clinical Obstetrics. 

Edgar B. Friedenwald, M.D., Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. 

Edward A. Looper, M.D., D.Oph., Professor of Diseases of the Nose and Throat. 

J. W. Downey, M.D., Professor of Otology. 

Harry M. Stein, M.D., Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

W. H. Toulson, A.B., M.Sc, M.D., Professor of Genito-Urinary Surgery. 

Charles Bagley, A.B., M.D., Professor of Neurological Surgery. 

Allen Fiske Voshell, A.B., M.D., Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery. 

Nathan Winslow, A.M., M.D., Professor of Clinical Surgery. 

Page Edmunds, M.D., Professor of Traumatic Surgery. 

Walter D. Wise, M.D., Professor of Clinical Surgery. 

Frank S. Lynn, M.D., Professor of Clinical Surgery. 

Elliott H. Hutchins, A.M., M.D., Professor of Clinical Surgery. 

Charles Reid Edwards, M.D., Professor of Clinical Surgery. 

Harry M. Robinson, M.D., Professor of Clinical Dermatology. 

F. L. Jennings, M.D., Professor of Clinical Surgery. 

Huntington Williams, M.D., Dr.P.H., Professor of Hygiene and Public Health. 

Robert P. Bay, M.D., Professor of Oral Surgery. 

C. Loring Joslin, M.D., Professor of Pediatrics. 

Brice M. Dorsey, D.D.S., Professor of Exodontia. 

Compton Riely, M.D., Clinical Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery. 

W. S. Smith, M.D., Clinical Professor of Gynecology. 

T. Fred Leitz, M.D., Clinical Professor of Gastro-Enterology. 

M. Randolph Kahn, M.D., Clinical Professor of Ophthalmology. 

Waitman F. Zinn, M.D., Clinical Professor of Diseases of the Nose and Throat. 

J. Dawson Reeder, M.D., Clinical Professor of Diseases of the Colon and Rectum. 

A. J. Gillis, M.D., Clinical Professor of Genito-Urinary Surgery. 

R. W. Locher, M.D., Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery. 

Sydney M. Cone, A.B., M.D., Associate Professor of Pathology. 

Abram S. Samuels, M.D., Associate Professor of Gynecology. 

H. J. Maldeis, M.D., Associate Professor of Medical Jurisprudence. 

G. M. Settle, A.B., M.D., Associate Professor of Neurology and Clinical Medicine. 
C. C. W. Judd, A.B., M.D., Associate Professor of Medicine. 

Thomas R. Chambers, A.M., M.D., Associate Professor of Surgery. 
William H. Smith, M.D., Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine. 
Paul W. Clough, B.S., M.D., Associate Professor of Medicine. 
Sydney R. Miller, A.B., M.D., Associate Professor of Medicine. 
J. McFarland Bergland, M.D., Associate Professor of Obstetrics. 
Walter A. Baetjer, A.B., M.D., Associate Professor of Medicine. 
A. M. Evans, M.D., Associate Professor of Surgery. 
Theodore H. Morrison, M.D., Associate Professor of Gastro-Enterology. 



6 BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, U. OF MD. 

Edward S. Johnson, M.D., Associate Professor of Surgery. 
H. K. Fleck, M.D., Associate Professor of Ophthalmology. 
Emil Novak, M.D., Associate Professor of Obstetrics. 
Ralph P. Truitt, M.D., Associate Professor of Psychiatry. 

D. J. Pessagno, M.D., Associate Professor of Surgery. 

Moses Gellman, B.S., M.D., Associate Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery. 

Harry L. Rogers, M.D., Associate Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery. 

O. G. Harne, A.B., Associate Professor of Physiology. 

Charles A. Reifschneider, M.D. , Associate Professor of Surgery and Oral Surgery. 

Thomas R. Sprunt, M.D., Associate Professor of Medicine. 

Monte Edwards, M.D., Associate Professor of Surgery and Associate in Gross Anatomy 

and Diseases of the Rectum and Colon. 
S. Lloyd Johnson, A.B., LL.B., M.D., Assistant Professor of Medicine. 
John G. Huck, M.D., Assistant Professor of Medicine. 
George McLean, M.D., Assistant Professor of Medicine. 
Maurice Feldman, M.D., Assistant Professor of Gastro-Enterology. 
Robert B. Wright, B.S., M.D., Assistant Professor of Pathology. 
L. A. M. Krause, M.D., Assistant Professor of Medicine. 
H. R. Peters, M.D., Assistant Professor of Medicine. 
Milford Levy, M.D., Assistant Professor of Neurology. 
John H. Traband, M.D., Assistant Professor of Pediatrics. 
Albert Jaffe, M.D., Assistant Professor of Pediatrics. 
Thomas B. Aycock, B.S., M.D., Assistant Professor of Gross Anatomy and Associate in 

Surgery. 
Emil G. Schmidt, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Biological Chemistry. 
C. Gardner Warner, A.B., M.D., Assistant Professor of Pathology. 
W. S. Love, Jr., A.B., M.D., Assistant Professor of Medicine and Instructor in Pathology. 
Harry Goldsmith, M.D., Assistant Professor of Psychiatry. 
Lawrence F. Woolley, M.D., Assistant Professor of Psychiatry. 
H. W. Newell, M.D., Assistant Professor of Psychiatry. 

Leon Freedom, M.D., Assistant Professor of Neurology and Instructor in Pathology. 
Frank H. Figge, A.B., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Gross Anatomy. 
Zachariah Morgan, M.D., Assistant Professor of Gastro-Enterology. 
Samuel Morrison, M.D., Assistant Professor of Gastro-Enterology. 
Harry M. Murdock, M.D., Assistant Professor of Psychiatry. 
A. H. Flnkelstein, M.D., Assistant Professor of Pediatrics. 
Jonas Friedenwald, A.B., M.D., Lecturer in Ophthalmic Pathology. 
John R. Abercrombie, A.B., M.D., Associate in Dermatology. 
George A. Strauss, Jr., M.D., Associate in Gynecology. 
Joseph I. Kemler, M.D., Associate in Ophthalmology. 
R. G. Willse, M.D., Associate in Gynecology. 
Frank N. Ogden, M.D., Associate in Biological Chemistry. 

E. P. Smith, M.D., Associate in Obstetrics. 
Thomas K. Galvin, M.D., Associate in Gynecology. 

Franklin B. Anderson, M.D. , Associate in Diseases of the Nose and Throat and Otology. 

Austin H. Wood, M.D., Associate in Geni to-Urinary Surgery. 

Albert E. Goldstein, M.D., Associate in Pathology. 

H. M. Bubert, M.D., Associate in Medicine and Assistant in Bacteriology. 

J. Mason Hundley, Jr., M.A., M.D., Associate in Gynecology. 

Leo Brady, M.D., Associate in Gynecology. 

J. G. M. Reese, M.D., Associate in Obstetrics. 



FACULTY OF PHYSIC 7 

M. Alexander Novey, A.B., M.D., Associate in Obstetrics and Instructor in Pathology. 

Samuel S. Glick, M.D., Associate in Pediatrics. 

Cyrus F. Horine, M.D., Associate in Surgery. 

W. J. Todd, M.D., Associate in Pediatrics. 

William G. Geyer, M.D., Associate in Pediatrics. 

Clewell Howell, M.D., Associate in Pediatrics. 

Walter C. Merkel, A.B., M.D., Associate in Pathology. 

Joseph Sindler, M.D., Associate in Gastro-Enterology. 

John F. Lutz, M.D., Associate in Histology. 

Isadore A. Siegel, A.B., M.D., Associate in Obstetrics. 

H. F. Bongardt, M.D., Associate in Surgery. 

I. O. Ridgley, M.D., Associate in Surgery. 

R. D. West, M.D., Associate in Ophthalmology. 

Eugene L. Flippin, M.D., Associate in Roentgenology. 

Richard G. Coblentz, M.D., Associate in Neurological Surgery. 

J. S. Eastland, M.D., Associate in Medicine. 

Thomas C. Wolff, M.D., Associate in Medicine. 

N. Clyde Marvel, M.D., Associate in Surgery. 

L. J. Millan, M.D., Associate in Genito-Urinary Surgery. 

W. Raymond McKenzie, M.D., Associate in Diseases of the Nose and Throat. 

T. Nelson Carey, M.D., Associate in Medicine and Physician in Charge of Medical Care 

of Students. 
K. D. Legge, M.D., Associate in Genito-Urinary Surgery. 

E. P. H. Harrison, A.B., M.D., Associate in Obstetrics. 

William H. F. Warthen, M.D., Associate in Hygiene and Public Health. 

Francis Ellis, A.B., M.D., Associate in Dermatology. 

L. K. Fargo, M.D., Associate in Genito-Urinary Surgery. 

Henry F. Graff, A.B., M.D., Associate in Ophthalmology. 

Carl Dame Clarke, Associate in Art as Applied to Medicine. 

Grant E. Ward, A.B., M.D., Associate in Surgery. 

M. Harold Goodman, A.B., M.D., Associate in Dermatology. 

Wetherbee Fort, M.D., Associate in Medicine. 

John E. Legge, M.D., Associate in Medicine. 

F. Stratner Orem, M.D., Associate in Pediatrics. 
Frederick Smith, M.D., Associate in Pediatrics. 
Henry F. Buettner, M.D., Instructor in Bacteriology. 
J. A. F. Pfeiffer, M.D., Instructor in Bacteriology. 

M. S. Koppelman, M.D., Instructor in Gastro-Enterology. 

M. G. Gichner, M.D., Instructor in Medicine. 

M. G. Tull, M.D., Instructor in Hygiene and Public Health. 

W. R. Johnson, M.D., Instructor in Surgery and Pathology. 

E. M. Hanrahan, A.B., M.D., Instructor in Surgery. 

R. M. Hening, M.D., Instructor in Pediatrics. 

Marie Kovner, M.D., Instructor in Pediatrics. 

Henry Sheppard, M.D., Instructor in Medicine. 

Ruth Musser, A.B., M.S., Instructor in Pharmacology. 

Benjamin Abeshouse, Ph.B., M.D., Instructor in Pathology. 

Joseph Pokorney, M.D., Instructor in Histology 

Jaroslav Hulla, B.S., M.D., Instructor in Histology. 

A. C. Monninger, M.D., Instructor in Dermatology. 

S. Demarco, M.D., Instructor in Surgery. 



8 BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, U. OF MD. 

Karl J. Steinmueller, A.B., M.D., Instructor in Surgery. 

Frank J. Geraghty, M.D., Instructor in Medicine. 

William Ellsworth Evans, M.S., Instructor in Pharmacology. 

Frank A. Pacienza, M.D., Instructor in Refraction. 

L. P. Gundry, M.D., Instructor in Medicine. 

Samuel T. Helms, M.D., Instructor in Medicine and Genito-Urinary Surgery and 

Assistant in Pediatrics. 
W. W. Walker, M.D., Instructor in Surgery. 
J. J. Leyko, M.D., Instructor in Surgery. 
William R. Geraghty, B.S., M.D., Instructor in Neurological Surgery and Pathology 

and Assistant in Surgery. 
Thomas R. O'Rourk, M.D., Instructor in Diseases of the Nose and Throat and Assistant 

in Ophthalmology. 
George H. Yeager, B.S., M.D., Instructor in Surgery. 

F. A. Holden, M.D., Instructor in Ophthalmology and Otology. 

Frank K. Morris, A.B., M.D., Instructor in Gross Anatomy and Assistant in Surgery 

and Obstetrics. 
Martin J. Hanna, M.D., Instructor in Histology. 
Elizabeth E. Painter, A. B., Instructor in Physiology. 
Marius P. Johnson, A.B., M.D., Instructor in Physiology. 
Bernard J. Cohen, M.D., Instructor in Medicine. 
Earl L. Chambers, M.D., Instructor in Medicine. 
Z. Vance Hooper, M.D., Instructor in Gastro-Enterology. 
C. Victor Richards, M.D., Instructor in Gastro-Enterology. 
M. Paul Byerly, M.D., Instructor in Pediatrics and Assistant in Medicine. 
John F. Hogan, M.D., Instructor in Genito-Urinary Surgery. 
John C. Dunbar, M.D., Instructor in Pathology. 
E. H. Tonolla, M.D., Instructor in Medicine. 

G. Bowers Mansdorfer, M.D., Instructor in Pediatrics. 
J. Edmund Bradley, M.D., Instructor in Pediatrics. 

W. A. C. Councill, M.D., Instructor in Genito-Urinary Surgery, 

William E. Hahn, D.D.S., Instructor in Exodontia. 

Luther E. Little, M.D., Instructor in Surgery. 

J. Frank Hewitt, A.B., M.D., Instructor in Surgery. 

Dwight Mohr, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

J. G. Onnen, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

Howard B. McElwain, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

Robert W. Johnson, M.D., Assistant in Pathology and Surgery. 

A. V. Buchness, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

T. J. Touhey, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

Nathaniel Beck, M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 

Carl Benson, M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 

A. Scagnetti, M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 

W. J. Schmitz, M.D., Assistant in Pediatrics. 

H. Edmund Levin, M.D., Assistant in Bacteriology and Medicine. 

John G. Runkle, M.D., Assistant in Ophthalmology. 

Margaret B. Ballard, M.D., Assistant in Obstetrics. 

E. S. Edlavitch, M.D., Assistant in Gynecology and Obstetrics. 

Birckhead McGowan, M.D., Assistant in Diseases of the Nose and Throat and Otology. 

Clyde F. Karns, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

Paul Schenker, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 



FACULTY OP PHYSIC 

Harry A. Rutledge, M.D., Assistant in Pediatrics. 

Morris Fine, M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 

Samuel H. Culver, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

J. Willis Guyton, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

J. Howard Burns, M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 

Benjamin S. Rich, M.D., Assistant in Otology. 

W. H. Triplett, M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 

David Tenner, M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 

J. G. Feman, M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 

E. M. Reese, M.S., Assistant in Medicine. 

H. William Primakoff, M.D., Assistant in Gastro-Enterology. 

William N. McFaul, Jr., M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

Simon H. Brager, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

C. W. Peake, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

E. Hollister Davis, A.B., M.D., Assistant in Anaesthesia. 

James C. Owings, M.D., Assistant in Surgery and Diseases of the Rectum and Colon. 

James G. Arnold, Jr., A.B., M.D., Assistant in Pathology and Neurology. 

Kenneth B. Boyd, M.D., Assistant in Obstetrics. 

Ralph Stevenson, A.B., M.D., Assistant in Pathology. 

Conrad B. Acton, B.S., M.D., Assistant in Pathology. 

R. B. Mitchell, Jr., M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 

Aaron C. Sollod, M.D., Assistant in Gastro-Enterology. 

Eli Contract, M.D., Assistant in Gastro-Enterology. 

Walter A. Anderson, M.D., Assistant in Pediatrics. 

Israel P. Meranski, M.D., Assistant in Pediatrics. 

H. D. Franklin, M.D., Assistant in Pediatrics. 

Ruth Foster, M.D., Assistant in Neurology. 

Albert R. Wilkerson, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

J. W. Nelson, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. ^ 

Julius Goodman, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

I. Ridgeway Trimble, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

Dudley P. Bowe, M.D., Assistant in Obstetrics. 

Arthur G. Siwinski, A.B., M.D., Assistant in Gross Anatomy. 

Dorothy E. Schmalzer, B.S., Assistant in Biological Chemistry. 

John E. Savage, B.S., M.D., Assistant in Pathology and Obstetrics. 

Samuel Legum, A.B., M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 

Philip D. Flynn, M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 

Albert J. Shochat, M.D., Assistant in Gastro-Enterology. 

L. R. Schoolman, M.D., Assistant in Gastro-Enterology. 

Ernest Levi, M.D., Assistant in Gastro-Enterology. 

O. Walter Spurrier, M.D., Assistant in Pediatrics. 

Gustav Highstein, M.D., Assistant in Pediatrics. 

S. C. Feldman, M.D., Assistant in Pediatrics. 

Nelsa Lee Wade, M.D., Assistant in Pediatrics. 

Melvtn B. Davis, B.S., M.D., Assistant in Anaesthesia. 

Joseph C. Bernstein, M.D., Assistant in Dermatology. 

Edgar G. Smith, A.B., M.D., Assistant in Roentgenology. 



10 BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, U. OF MD. 

HISTORY OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 

The present School of Medicine, with the title of the University of Mary- 
land School of Medicine and College of Physicians and Surgeons, is the 
result of a consolidation and merger of the University of Maryland School 
of Medicine with the Baltimore Medical College (1913) and the College of 
Physicians and Surgeons (1915). 

The School of Medicine of the University of Maryland is one of the oldest 
foundations for medical education in America, ranking fifth in point of 
age among the medical colleges of the United States. It was organized in 
1807, and chartered in 1808, under the name of the College of Medicine 
of Maryland, and its first class was graduated in 1810. In 1812 the College 
was empowered by the Legislature to annex three other colleges or facul- 
ties: Divinity, Law, and Arts and Sciences; and the four colleges thus 
united were "constituted an University by the name and under the title of 
the University of Maryland." 

The beautiful college building at Lombard and Greene Streets, erected 
in 1812, is the oldest structure in America devoted to medical teaching. 
Here was founded one of the first medical libraries and the first medical 
college library in the United States. 

Here for the first time in America dissecting was made a compulsory 
part of the curriculum; here instruction in Dentistry was first given (1837) 
and here were first installed independent chairs for the teaching of Diseases 
of Women and Children (1867), and of Eye and Ear Diseases (1873). 

The School of Medicine was one of the first to provide for adequate 
clinical instruction by the erection in 1823 of its own hospital, and in this 
hospital intramural residency for the senior student was first established. 

In 1913, juncture was brought about with the Baltimore Medical College, 
an institution of thirty-two years' growth. By this association the facilities 
of the School of Medicine were enlarged in faculty, equipment and hospital 
connection. 

The College of Physicians and Surgeons was incorporated in 1872, and 
established on Hanover Street in a building afterward known as the Mater- 
nite, the first obstetrical hospital in Maryland. In 1878 union was effected 
with the Washington University School of Medicine, in existence since 
1827, and the college was removed to Calvert and Saratoga Streets. By the 
consolidation with the College of Physicians and Surgeons, medical control 
of the teaching beds in the City Hospital, now the Mercy Hospital, was 
obtained. 



LABORATORY FACILITIES 11 

ORGANIZATION OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 

LABORATORY FACILITIES 

The laboratories are located at two centers, the group of buildings at 
Greene and Lombard Streets, and at 32 and 34 South Paca Street. The 
schedule is so adjusted that the laboratory periods are placed with a view 
of obviating unnecessary movement on the part of the classes. The build- 
ing known as Gray Laboratory, at Greene and Lombard Streets, houses 
three departments. The Anatomical Laboratory is placed upon the top 
floor, where skylights and an auxiliary modern system of electric lighting 
give adequate illumination of the subjects. The Department of Pharma- 
cology occupies the second floor. There is a large room for the general 
student laboratory, which is thoroughly equipped with apparatus of recent 
acquisition, and in addition contains many instruments of unique and origi- 
nal design. With office and stockroom adjoining, this laboratory is com- 
plete for student experimentation. On the first floor of Gray Laboratory 
is the Department of Physiology. In addition to the large student labora- 
tory, which is constructed for groups of fifty-eight students, there are rooms 
for the departmental office, preparation of material, and storage of appa- 
ratus. An additional room is devoted exclusively to mammalian experi- 
ments. In this building there is maintained an animal room in which is kept 
an abundance of material for experimental purposes. The embalming 
and storage plant for the Department of Anatomy is in physical connection 
with the building and its special departments. The laboratories of physi- 
ology and pharmacology are completely equipped with apparatus and 
lockers in accord with the best ideas of instruction. The students work in 
groups of two each, and each group has sufficient apparatus, so that the 
experimental work can be carried on without delay or recourse to a general 
stockroom. 

The laboratories of Pathology, Bacteriology, Biochemistry and Clinical 
Pathology are located in the Medical laboratory building on Greene Street 
north of Lombard. 

The Departments of Pathology, Bacteriology and Clinical Pathology 
use, conjointly, the large modernly equipped student laboratory on the 
second floor. The capacity is one hundred students. On the second floor 
there are also students' preparation rooms for the making and sterilization 
of media, cold storage and incubating rooms and research laboratories for 
the Departments of Bacteriology and Clinical Pathology. 

On the main floor of this building are the offices, library, research and 
technical rooms of the Departments of Pathology and Bacteriology. The 
Department of Art also occupies quarters on this floor. The basement is 
given over to teaching museums, store rooms, students' locker room and 
lavatories. 



12 BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, U. OF MD. 

The Department of Biological Chemistry is housed on the top floor of 
this building. The space allotted to teaching includes a large student 
laboratory equipped with one hundred and thirty-two commodious locker 
units. It is supplied with gas, hot and cold water, vacuum and direct 
current service, a special apparatus room, a warm room, a colorimeter 
room, a balance room, a first-aid room and a stockroom. These rooms have 
modern laboratory furniture and apparatus, a constant temperature and 
ventilating system, and are equipped and arranged for economic use of the 
students' time. 

Adjoining the students' space are private offices and laboratories of the 
staff, a departmental library, a shop and a preparation room. 

In the Main Building is the Museum of Anatomy, where are arranged 
for student reference, specimens which represent the careful selection of 
material over a period of many years. In the University Hospital is the 
Student Laboratory for analytical studies by those students who are 
serving as clinical clerks on the wards. A similar laboratory is maintained 
in the building at the northwest corner of Saratoga and Calvert Streets, for 
the student work of the Mercy Hospital. 

At 32 and 34 South Paca Street are the Laboratories of Histology and 
Embryology. These laboratories accommodate the full class, and are 
equipped with necessary lockers for microscopes and apparatus. The 
department housed in this building is provided with individual offices, 
preparation and stockrooms. 

CLINICAL FACILITIES 

UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL 

The University Hospital, which is the property of the University of Mary- 
land, is the oldest institution for the care of the sick in the State of Mary- 
land. It was opened in September, 1823, under the name of the Baltimore 
Infirmary, and at that time consisted of but four wards, one of which was 
reserved for eye patients. 

In 1933-1934 the new University Hospital was erected, and patients were 
admitted to this building in November 1934. The new hospital is situated 
at the southwest corner of Redwood and Greene Streets, and is consequently 
opposite the Medical School buildings. The students, therefore, are in 
close proximity and little time is lost in passing from the lecture halls and 
laboratories to the clinical facilities of the new building. 

The new hospital has a capacity of practically four hundred beds devoted 
to general medicine, surgery, obstetrics, pediatrics, and the various medical 
and surgical specialties. On the second, seventh and eighth floors are 
centered practically all the clinical and laboratory teaching facilities of the 



CLINICAL FACILITIES 13 

institution. The north wing of the second floor is occupied by the entire 
Department of Roentgenology. The east wing with clinical pathology and 
special laboratories for clinical microscopy, bio-chemistry, bacteriology, 
and an especially well appointed laboratory for students' training. The 
south wing has its electro-cardiographic and basal metabolism departments, 
with new and very attractive air-conditioned or oxygen therapy cubicles. 
The west wing contains the Department of Rhinolaryngology and Broncos- 
copy, Industrial Surgery, Ophthalmology, and Male and Female Cystos- 
copy. 

The teaching zone extends from this floor to the eighth floor and comprises 
wards for surgery, medicine, obstetrics, pediatrics, and a large clinical lec- 
ture hall. 

On the seventh floor is the general operating suite, the delivery suite, 
and the central supply station. The eighth floor is practically a students' 
floor and affords a mezzanine over the operating and delivery suites, and a 
students' entrance to the clinical lecture hall. 

There are practically 270 beds available for teaching. In the basement 
there is a very well appointed Pathological Department with a large 
teaching autopsy room and its adjunct service of instruction of students 
in pathological anatomy. 

Owing to its situation, adjacent to the largest manufacturing district of 
the city and the shipping district, a large number of accident patients are 
received. 

The obstetrical service is particularly well arranged and provides accommo- 
dation for forty ward patients. This service, combined with an extensive 
home service, assures the student of abundant obstetrical training. 

During the year ending December 31, 1934, 432 cases were delivered in 
the hospital and 1182 cases in the outdoor department. Students in the 
graduating class delivered or observed an average of fourteen cases, each 
student being required to deliver ten cases in the Outdoor Department or 
in allied hospitals. 

The dispensaries associated with the University Hospital and the Mercy 
Hospital are organized upon a uniform plan in order that the teaching may 
be the same in each. Each dispensary has the following departments: 
Medicine, Surgery, Obstetrics, Pediatrics, Eye and Ear, Genito-Urinary, 
Gynecology, Gastro-Enterology, Neurology, Orthopaedics, Proctology, 
Dermatology, Throat and Nose, Tuberculosis and Psychiatry. 

All students in their junior year work each day in the Departments of 
Medicine and Surgery of the dispensaries. In their senior year, all stu- 
dents work one hour each day in the special departments. 

The new building, with its modern planning, makes a particularly attrac- 
tive teaching hospital and is a very valuable addition to the clinical facilities 
of the Medical School. 



14 BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, U. OF MD. 

The old hospital building is being remodeled and will be occupied by the 
Out-patient Department. Thus the students of the future will be pro- 
vided with a splendidly appointed group of clinics for their training in out- 
patient work. All departments of clinical training will be represented in 
this remodeled building and all changes have been predicated on the teach- 
ing function for which this department is intended. 

HOSPITAL COUNCIL 

Raymond A. Pearson, M.S., D.Agr., LL.D., President. 

George M. Shriver, Esq., Chairman of the Board of Regents. 

J. M. H. Rowland, M.D., Sc.D., LL.D., Dean of the School of Medicine and Head 

of Department of Obstetrics. 
M. C. Pincoffs, B.S., M.D., Head of the Department of Medicine. 
A. M. Shipley, M.D., Sc.D., Head of the Department of Surgery. 
A. J. Lomas, M.D., CM., D.P.H., Superintendent of the Hospital. 
Miss Annie Crighton, R.N., Superintendent of Nurses. 
Miss Florence Sadtler, Representing Woman's Auxiliary Board. 
Mrs. John L. Whitehurst. 
W. B. Brooks, Esq. 
John E. Raine, Esq. 



W. H. Toulson, M.D. 
Henry J. Walton, M.D. 

George Sargent, M.D. 
Kenneth Jones, M.D. 



Representing Hospital Staff 
Representing Medical Alumni 



UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL STAFF 

A. J. Lomas, M.D., CM., D.P.H., Superintendent of the Hospital 

Physicians 

Maurice C Pincoffs, B.S., M.D. 

Harry M. Stein, M.D. G. Carroll Lockard, M.D. 

Walter A. Baetjer, M.D. Joseph E. Gichner, M.D. 

Thomas R. Sprunt, M.D. William H. Smith, M.D. 

L. A. M. Krause, M.D. William S. Love, Jr., M.D. 

Gastro-Enterolo gists 
Julius Friedenwald, A.M., M.D. Theodore H. Morrison, M.D. 

Neurologists 

Irving J. Spear, M.D. 
George M. Settle, M.D. Leon Freedom, M.D. 

Psychiatrists 

Ross McC Chapman, M.D. 
Ralph P. Truitt, M.D. Harry M. Murdock, M.D. 



UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL STAFF 15 

Pediatricians 
C. Loring Joslin, M.D. Albert Jaffe, M.D. 

Pathologists 
Hugh R. Spencer, M.D. S. Lloyd Johnson, M.D. 

Surgeons 

Randolph Winslow, A.M., M.D., LL.D. Arthur M. Shipley, M.D., Sc.D. 

Nathan Winslow, M.D. Page Edmunds, M.D. 

Charles Reid Edwards, M.D. Frank S. Lynn, M.D. 

Laryngolo gists 
Edward A. Looper, M.D. Franklin B. Anderson, M.D. 

Proctologists 
G. Milton Linthicum, A.M., M.D. J. Dawson Reeder, M.D. 

Monte Edwards, M.D. 

Orthopaedic Surgeons 

Allen Fiske Voshell, A.B., M.D. Compton Riely, M.D. 

Moses Gellman, B.S., M.D. 

Genito-Urinary Surgeons 

W. H. Toulson, A.B., M.Sc, M.D. Lyle J. Millan, M.D- 

Roentgenologists 
Henry J. Walton, M.D. Eugene L. Flippin, M.D. 

Dermatologist 
Harry M. Robinson, M.D. 

Bronchoscopist 

Edward A. Looper, M.D., D.Oph. 

Anaesthetists 

S. Griffith Davis, M.S., M.D. Melvin B. Davis, B.S., M.D. 

E. Hollister Davis, A.B., M.D. Mary J. O'Brien, R.N. 

Obstetricians 

J. M. H. Rowland, M.D., Sc.D., LL.D. L. H. Douglass, M.D. 

M. A. Novey, A.B., M.D. J. G. M. Reese, M.D. 

Isadore A. Siegel, A.B., M.D. E. P. H. Harrison, Jr., A.B., M.D. 

Ophthalmologists 
Clyde A. Clapp, M.D. William Tarun, M.D. 

Otologist 
J. W. Downey, Jr., M.D. 



16 BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, U. OF MD. 

Gynecologists 
W. S. Gardner, M.D. R. G. Willse, M.D. 

J. M. Hundley, Jr., M.A., M.D. Thos. K. Galvin, M.D. 

Leo Brady, M.D. 

Oncologists 
J. M. Hundley, Jr., M.A., M.D. Grant E. Ward, A.B., M.D. 

UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL RESIDENT AND INTERNE STAFF 

1935-1936 

RESIDENT STAFF 

Harry Clay Hull, M.D., Resident in Surgery 

Coleman C. Johnston, M.D., Assistant Resident in Surgery 

G. W. Brugler, M.D., Resident in Medicine 

Joseph H. Holmes, M.D., Assistant Resident in Medicine 

Newton Du Puy, A.B., B.S., M.D., Resident in Obstetrics 

Hugh B. McNally, M.D., Assistant Resident in Obstetrics 

Merrell L. Stout, A.B., M.D., Assistant Resident in Obstetrics 

John C. Dumler, B.S., M.D., Resident in Gynecology 

Helen I. Maginnis, A.B., M.D., Assistant Resident in Gynecology 

Philtp M. Shipper, A.B., M.D., Resident in Pediatrics 

Olin Cates Moulton, A.B., M.D., Resident in Nose and Throat 

Edward W. Harrison, M.D., Resident in Roentgenology 

INTERNE STAFF 

Twenty-four months service 

John Warren Albrittain, B.S., M.D. John Randolph Godbey, M.D. 

James Pettigrew Bunn, Jr., B.S., M.D. John Carl Hamrick, B.S., M.D. 

Ernest Ivon Cornbrooks, Jr., A.B., M.D. Wm. Goldsborough Helfrich, B.S., M.D. 

Edward Francis Cotter, M.D. Howard Brooks Mays, M.D. 

Francis George Dickey, A.B., M.D. George Frederick Schmitt, Jr., M.D. 

Walter Henry Gerwig, Jr., M.D. Paul Schonfeld, M.D. 
Norman James Wilson, B.S., M.D. 

Twelve months service 

Thurston Ray Adams, M.D. William Lawrence Howard, B.S., M.D. 

George S. Bourne, M.D. Charles Henry Reier, M.D. 

Delmas Caples, M.D. Edward Leon Roberson, B.S., M.D. 

Robert Wilbur Farr, B.S., M.D. Harry M. Robinson, Jr., M.D. 

Irving Freeman, B.S., M.D. Andrew Du Val Taylor, M.D. 

Charles Luther Goodhand, A.B., M.D. John McCullen Warren, A.B., M.D. 

Lewis Klair Woodward, Jr., A.B., M.D. 
John J. Houlihan, D.D.S. (Dental) 



UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL DISPENSARY STAFF 17 

UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL DISPENSARY STAFF 

Medicine 

L. A. M. Krause, M.D., Chief of Clinic 

Consultant Physicians 

John E. Legge, M.D. Wetherbee Fort, M.D. 

J. Howard Burns, Assistant Chief of Clinic 
M. A. Fine, M.D. Carl Roetling, M.D. 

W. H. Triplett, M.D. Samuel Lilienfeld, M.D. 

Joseph Lipsky, M.D. George Silverstein, M.D. 

Louis Schoolman, M.D. Albert Glass, M.D. 

Diseases of the Stomach and Intestines 
Samuel Morrison, Chief of Clinic 
Joseph Sindler, M.D. M. S. Koppelman, M.D. 

Z. Morgan, M.D. Z. Vance Hooper, M.D. 

C. Victor Richards, M.D. Aaron C. Sollod, M.D. 

Ernest Levi, M.D. L. R. Schoolman, M.D. 

E. Contract, M.D. Albert J. Shochat, M.D. 

Neurology 
Leon Freedom, M.D., Chief of Clinic 

Psychiatry 

Ralph P. Truttt, M.D., Director 

H. W. Newell, M.D. Alice G. Rockwell, Ph.D. 

Harry M. Murdock, M.D. 

Diseases of the Lungs 

E. H. Tonolla, M.D., Chief of Clinic 
Albert Kermisch, M.D. Walter Niblett, M.D. 

Diseases of Metabolism 

H. M. Stein, M.D., Chief of Clinic 

L. P. Gundry, M.D. 

Cardiovascular Diseases 

William S. Love, Jr., M.D., Chief of Clinic 

Frank J. Geraghty, M.D. Carl P. Roetling, M.D. 

Samuel J. Hankin, M.D. Richard France, M.D. 

H. C. Grant, M.D. Conrad Acton, M.D. 

Allergy Clinic 

H. M. Bubert, M.D., Chief of Clinic 

Samuel Snyder, M.D. L. R. Schoolman, M.D. 



18 



BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, U. OF MD. 



Pediatrics 

C. Loring Joslln, M.D., Director 

John H. Traband, M.D., Chief of Clinic 

Clewell Howell, M.D., Chief of Clinic 
Albert Jaffe, M.D. Samuel T. Helms, M.D. 

William J. Todd, M.D. Israel P. Meranski, M.D. 

F. Stratner Orem, M.D. Walter A. Anderson, M.D. 

William G. Geyer, M.D. H. D. Franklin, M.D. 

R. M. Hening, M.D. Nelsa Lee Wade, M.D. 

Marie Kovner, M.D. Samuel Lilienfeld, M.D. 

Samuel S. Glick, M.D. H. W. Schiff, M.D. 

A. H. FlNKELSTEIN, M.D. O. WALTER SPURRIER, M.D. 

M. Paul Byerly, M.D. J. Edmund Bradley, M.D. 

Harry A. Rutledge, M.D. Gustav Highstein, M.D. 

S. C. Feldman, M.D. 

Surgery 
Charles Reld Edwards, M.D., Chief of Clinic 



Thomas B. Aycock, M.D. 
E. S. Johnson, M.D. 
W. R. Johnson, M.D. 
J. Frank Hewitt, M.D. 
Jas. C. Owings, M.D. 



Luther E. Little, M.D. 

C. F. Karns, M.D. 

A. V. Buchness, M.D. 

W. N. McFaul, Jr., M.D. 

Geo. H. Yeager, M.D. 



Albert R. Wilkerson, M.D. 

Orthopaedic Surgery 

Allen Fiske Voshell, A.B., M.D., Chief of Clinic 

Moses Gellman, B.S., M.D. 
I. H. Maseritz, M.D. 



J. G. Benesunes, M.D. 
Egbert L. Mortimer, M.D. 



John B. Hopkins, M.D. 

Genito-U rinary 

W. H. Toulson, M.D., Chief of Clinic 



Samuel T. Helms, M.D. 
Lyle J. Millan, M.D. 



John F. Hogan, M.D. 
W. A. C. Councill, M.D. 



Roentgenology 



M. H. Goodman, M.D. 



Henry J. Walton, M.D., Chief of Clinic 
Eugene L. Flippin, M.D. 

Dermatology 
H. M. Robinson, M.D., Chief of Clinic 

A. C. Monninger, M.D. 



Francis Ellis, M.D. 



Nose and Throat 

Franklin B. Anderson, M.D., Chief of Clinic 

Thomas R. O'Rourk, M.D. Birkhead McGowan, M.D. 

Joseph Nurkin, M.D. Benjamin S. Rich, M.D. 



UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL DISPENSARY 



19 



James J. Marston, M.D. 

Leo Brady, M.D. 

Kenneth Boyd, M.D. 

E. Eugene Covington, M.D. 



Colon and Rectum 

Monte Edwards, M.D., Chief of Clinic 

Gynecology 

J. M. Hundley, Jr., M.A., M.D. 
William J. Fulton, M.D. 
John T. Hibbitts, M.D. 
Joseph V. Castagna, M.D. 

Thomas S. Bowyer, M.D. 

Oral Surgery 

Brice M. Dorsey, D.D.S., Chief of Clinic 

Harold Goldstein, D.D.S. William E. Hahn, D.D.S. 

Samuel H. Bryant, D.D.S. 

Obstetrics 
L. H. Douglass, M.D., Chief of Clinic 

M. Alexander Novey, A.B., M.D. 



J. G. M. Reese, M.D. 
Maxwell Mazer, M.D. 
Margaret B. Ballard, M.D. 
E. P. H. Harrison, A.B., M.D. 



J. M. Hundley, Jr., M.A., M.D. 
Grant E. Ward, A. B., M.D. 
Thomas S. Bowyer, M.D. 



Oncology 



ISADORE A. SlEGEL, A.B., M.D. 

S. K. Wallace, M.D. 
Kenneth B. Boyd, M.D. 



J. W. Nelson, M.D. 

E. Eugene Covington, M.D. 

Eldred Roberts, M.D. 



Ophthalmology 
Henry F. Graff, A.B., M.D., Chief of Clinic 



Frank A. Holden, M.D. 
John G. Runkle, M.D. 



Thomas O'Rourk, M.D. 
Frank A. Pacienza, M.D. 



Otology 
J. W. Downey, M.D., Chief of Clinic 

Social Service 
Miss Grace Pearson, Directress 



UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL DISPENSARY 

Report from October 1, 1933 to September 30, 1934 

Departments New Cases Old Casts Total 

Pediatrics 2,904 17, 194 20,098 

Dermatology 8,209 9,176 17,385 

Surgery 2,665 9,911 12,576 

Orthopedics 1,488 9,160 10,648 

Obstetrics " 2,291 8,075 10,366 

Medicine 1,595 4,700 6,295 



Old Cases 


Total 


3,744 


5,183 


3,539 


5,050 


4,871 


4,973 


3,247 


3,738 


1,437 


2,456 


1,144 


2,244 


2,021 


2,441 


1,851 


2,071 


1,383 


1,700 


1,099 


1,424 


1,011 


1,235 


584 


747 


404 


628 


340 


431 



20 BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, U. OF MD. 

Departments New Cases 

Eye 1,439 

Gynecology 1,511 

Allergy 102 

Genito-Urinary 491 

Nose and Throat 1,019 

Dental 1 , 100 

Gastro-Intestinal 420 

Oncology 220 

Cardiology 317 

Tuberculosis 325 

Neurology 224 

Proctology 163 

Ear 224 

Cystoscopy 91 

Total 26,798 



MERCY HOSPITAL 

The Sisters of Mercy first assumed charge of the Hospital at the corner 
of Calvert and Saratoga Streets, then owned by the Washington University, 
in 1874. By the merger of 1878 the Hospital came under the control of 
the College of Physicians and Surgeons, but the Sisters continued their work 
of administering to the patients. 

In a very few years it became apparent that the City Hospital, as it was 
then called, was much too small to accommodate the rapidly growing de- 
mands upon it. However, it was not until 1888 that the Sisters of Mercy, 
with the assistance of the Faculty of the College of Physicians and Surgeons, 
were able to lay the cornerstone of the present Hospital. This building 
was completed and occupied late in 1889. Since then the growing demands 
for more space have compelled the erection of additions, until now there are 
accommodations for 275 patients. 

In 1909 the name was changed from The Baltimore City Hospital to 
Mercy Hospital. 

The clinical material in the free wards is under the exclusive control of 
the Faculty of the University of Maryland School of Medicine and Col- 
lege of Physicians and Surgeons. 

The Hospital adjoins the College building, and all surgical patients 
from the public wards are operated upon in the College operating rooms. 
This union of the Hospital and College buildings greatly facilitates the 
clinical teaching. 

Mercy Hospital is the hospital of the United Railways and Electric Com- 
pany of Baltimore City, and receives patients from the Baltimore and Ohio 
Railroad Company and from the Pennsylvania Railroad Company and 
its branches. 



MERCY HOSPITAL STAFF 



21 



MERCY HOSPITAL STAFF 

BOARD OF GOVERNORS 

Alexius McGlannan, A.M., M.D., LL.D., Chairman 



Sister M. Ricarda 
Sister M. Helen 
Sister M. Hildegarde 
Sister M. Vincent 



Walter D. Wise, M.D. 

Waitman F. Zinn, M.D. 

Thomas K. Calvin, M.D. 

Maurice C. Pincoffs, M.D. 



Sister M. Cornelia 

HOSPITAL STAFF 

SURGICAL DIVISION 

Consulting Surgeon 
Alexius McGlannan, A.M., M.D., LL.D. 

Surgeons 
Walter D. Wise, M.D. 



Charles F. Blake, M.D. 
F. L. Jennings, M.D. 
R. W. Locher, M.D. 
Thomas R. Chambers, M.D. 



I. O. Ridgely, M.D. 
J. W. Nelson, M.D. 
H. B. McElwain, M.D. 



N. Clyde Marvel, M.D. 



Associate Surgeons 



Julius Leyko, M.D. 



Elliott H. Hutchins, M.D. 

D. J. Pessagno, M.D. 

A. M. Evans, M.D. 

William F. Rienhoff, M.D. 



H. F. Bongardt, M.D. 

Thomas B. Aycock, M.D. 

Charles W. Maxson, M.D. 



John A. O'Connor, M.D. 
Julius Goodman, M.D. 
E. E. Covington, M.D. 
S. Demarco, Jr., M.D. 



Assistant Surgeons 



Simon Brager, M.D. 

T. J. Touhey, M.D 

I. R. Trimble, M.D. 

R. T. Shackelford, M.D. 



H. K. Fleck, M.D. 



J. I. Kemler, M.D. 



Ophthalmologists and Otologists 
Harry Friedenwald, A.B., M.D. 

Associates 



J. W. Downey, M.D 



F. A. Pacienza, M.D. 



Consulting Rhinologists and Laryngolo gists 
Raymond McKenzee, M.D. George W. Mitchell, M.D. 



22 



BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, U. OF MD. 



Rhinologists and Laryngologists 
Waitman F. Zinn, M.D. 



Associates 



F. A. Pacienza, M.D. 
F. A. Kayser, M.D. 



Kenneth D. Legge, M.D. 



Birckhead McGowan, M.D. 
Benjamin S. Rich, M.D. 



Bronchoscopist 
Waitman F. Zinn, M.D. 

Associate 
F. A. Kayser, M.D. 

Proctologist 
Charles F. Blake, M.D. 

Assistant 
E. E. Covington, M.D. 

Orthopaedic Surgeon 
Albertus Cotton, M.D. 

Associate 
H. L. Rogers, M.D. 

Urologist 
Alexander J. Gillis, M D 

Associates 



C. B. Gamble, M.D. 
C. C. W. Judd, M.D. 



Dentist 
N. D. Fusco, D.D.S. 

Assistant 
J. J. Foley, D.D.S. 

MEDICAL DIVISION 

Physicians 
Maurice C. Pincoffs, B.S., M.D. 

George McLean, M.D. 



Leon K. Fargo, M.D. 



Harvey G. Beck, M.D. 
H. K. Peters, M.D. 



Hubert C. Knapp, M.D. 
Bartus T. Baggott, M.D. 
J. S. Eastland, M.D. 



S. A. TUMMINELLO, M.D. 

Howard Burns, M.D. 



MERCY HOSPITAL STAFF 
Associates 

Nelson P. Carey, M.D. 

Assistants 

J. M. Miller, M.D. 

Gastro-Enterologist 
Julius Friedenwald, A.M., M.D. 



23 



Wetherbee Fort, M.D. 

L. A. M. Krause, M.D. 

John E. Legge, M.D. 



Earl Chambers, M.D. 
K. W. Golley, M.D. 



T. Frederick Leitz, M.D. 



Maurice Feldman, M.D. 



Associates 



Assistants 



Theodore Morrison, M.D. 



Joseph Sindler, M.D. 



F. B. Smith M.D. 



W. J. Schmitz, M.D. 



Pediatricians 
Edgar B. Friedenwald, M.D. 

Associates 



Assistants 

Neurologist and Psychiatrist 
Andrew C. Gillis, M.D. 

Associate 
Milford Levy, M.D. 



Thomas J. Coonan, M.D. 
G. B. Mansdorfer, M.D. 



OBSTETRICAL DIVISION 
E. P. Smith, M.D. 



Abram S. Samuels, M.D. 
George A. Strauss, M.D. 
Ernest Edlavitch, M.D. 



Frank K. Morris, M.D. 



Associate Obstetricians 



William S. Gardner, M.D. 

Thomas K. Galvin, M.D. 

John J. Erwin, M.D. 



Francis W. Gillis, M.D. 



24 



BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, U. OF MD. 



Thomas J. Galvin, M.D. 
George A. Strauss, M.D. 



E. S. Edlavitch, M.D. 



Walter C. Merkel, M.D. 



H. R. Peters, M.D. 



Sister Mary Joan 
Sister Mary Claude 



GYNECOLOGICAL DIVISION 

Gynecologists 
William S. Gardner, M.D. 

Associate 
J. J. Erwln, M.D. 

Assistants 
PATHOLOGICAL DIVISION 

Clinical Pathologists 

H. T. COLLENBERG, M.D. 



Abram Samuels, M.D. 
E. P. Smith, M.D. 



Frank K. Morris, M.D. 



Hugh R. Spencer, M.D. 



Technicians 

Eleanor Behr 

X-RAY DEPARTMENT 

Radiographer 

Albertus Cotton, M.D. 

Associate 

Harry L. Rogers, M.D. 

Assistant 

William Greenfeld, M.D. 

Technicians 



Charles E. Bramble, Ph.D. 



Sister Mary Celeste 
Frances Donovan 



Sister M. Kevin 



Elizabeth Crook 



MERCY HOSPITAL RESIDENT STAFF 

Chief Resident 
Meyer H. Zuravin, M.D. 



Resident Surgeons 



Daniel R. Robinson, M.D. 
Joseph V. Jerardi, M.D. 



C. F. Davis, M.D. 
Jason Gaskel, M.D. 



Resident Physician 

Philip D. Flynn, M.D. 

Assistant 

Grafton Hersperger, M.D. 



MERCY HOSPITAL DISPENSARY STAFF 



25 



Resident Gynecologist 
Brlen Haigley, M.D. 

Resident Rhinologist and Laryngologist 
Theodore A. Schwartz, M.D. 

Resident Pathologist 
Rotating Internes 



Frank H. Cutler, Jr., M.D. 
William C. Dunnigan, M.D. 
William Howard Grenzer, M.D. 
Harry Francis Kane, M.D. 



Frederick E. Knowles, Jr., M.D. 

Caleb R. Layton, M.D. 

Lawrence H. Mills, M.D. 

William J. Tobin, M.D. 



Julius M. Waghelstein, M.D. 



DISPENSARY STAFF 

Surgeons 
Supervisor, Julius J. Leyko, M.D. 



I. O. RlDGELY, M.D. 

John O'Connor, M.D. 
H. F. Bongardt, M.D. 
I. R. Trimble, M.D. 
S. Demarco, M.D. 



A. J. Gillis, M.D. 



Albertus Cotton, M.D. 



Richard T. Shackelford, M.D. 
Genito-Urinary 

Orthopaedists 
I. H. Maseritz, M.D. 



T. J. Touhey, M.D. 

J. W. Nelson, M.D. 

Simon Brager, M.D. 

Julius Goodman, M.D. 

E. E. Covington, M.D. 



K. D. Legge, M.D. 



Harry L. Rogers, M.D. 



Physicians 

Supervisor, Maurice C. Pincoffs, B.S., M.D. 
Henry Sheppard, M.D. 
Earl L. Chambers, M.D 



Chiefs of Clinic 



J. M. Miller, M.D. 



S. A. TUMM1NELLO, M.D. 

Cardiovascular Diseases 
T. C. Wolfe, M.D., Chief of Clinic 

Diseases of the Lung 
S. Snyder, M.D., Chief of Clinic 



S. Snyder, M.D. 



26 



BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, U. OF MD. 



Diseases of Metabolism 
J. S. Eastland, M.D., Chief of Clinic 

Allergic Diseases 

H. M. Bubert, M.D., Chief of Clinic 
S. Snyder, M.D. 

Diseases of the Stomach 
Supervisor, Julius Frledenwald, M.D. 



T. Frederick Leitz, M.D. 
M. Feldman, M.D. 



Theodore H. Morrison, M.D. 
Joseph Sindler, M.D. 



H. William Prlmakoff, M.D. 

Esophagoscopist 
Waitman F. Zlnn, M.D. 



Milford Levy, M.D. 



Nervous Diseases 
Supervisor, A. C. Glllis, M.D. 



Miriam F. Dunn, M.D. 



Pediatricians 

Supervisor, Edgar B. Friedenwald, M.D. 
W. J. Schmitz, M.D. 

Gynecologists 

W. S. Gardner, M.D. 
A. Samuels, M.D. 



George A. Strauss, M.D. 
J. J. Erwin, M.D. 



F. K. Morris, M.D. 



E. Edlavitch, M.D. 
F. W. Gillis, M.D. 



Benjamin S. Rich, M.D. 
B. McGowan, M.D. 



Diseases of Nose and Throat 
Waitman F. Zinn, M.D. 



R. F. McKenzie, M.D. 
Horace Strickland, M.D. 



H. F. Eleck, M.D. 
J. I. Kemler, MD. 



Diseases of Eye and Ear 



M. Raskin, M.D. 
F. A. Pacienza, M.D. 



Sister Mary Beatrice 



Dermatologist 
Llewellyn Lord, M.D. 

Social Service Department 



Katherlne Craycroft 



THE BALTIMORE CITY HOSPITALS 27 

MERCY HOSPITAL DISPENSARY REPORT 

(Year 1934) 

Department Old New Total 

Surgery 5,041 1,368 6,409 

Medicine 2,991 1,064 4,055 

Cardiac 279 49 328 

Diabetic 313 7 320 

Gynecology 992 405 1,397 

Eye and Ear 459 280 739 

Nose and Throat 464 551 1,015 

Neurology 919 141 1,060 

Pediatrics 362 253 615 

Gastro-Intestinal 403 81 484 

Dental 212 246 458 

Rectal 202 67 269 

Orthopedics 1,278 368 1,646 

Skin 680 363 1,043 

Genito-Urinary 2,975 424 3,399 

Total 17,570 5,667 23,237 

OTHER CLINICAL FACILITIES 

THE BALTIMORE CITY HOSPITALS 

The clinical advantages of the University have been largely increased 
by the liberal decision of the Department of Public Welfare to allow 
the immense material of these hospitals to be used for the purpose of medical 
education. There are daily visits and clinics in medicine and surgery by 
the Staff of the Hospitals. The autopsy material is unsurpassed in this 
country in amount, thoroughness of study, and the use made of it in medical 
teaching. 

The Baltimore City Hospital consists of the following separate divisions: 
The General Hospital, 400 beds. 
The Hospital for Chronic Cases, 508 beds. 
The Hospital for Tuberculosis, 172 beds. 
The Psychopathic Hospital, 320 beds. 
Infirmary (Home for Aged) 1053 beds. 

STAFF OF BALTIMORE CITY HOSPITALS 
Parker J. McMillin, Superintendent 

VISITING STAFF 

Physician-in-Chief Thomas R. Boggs, S.B., M.D. 

Surgeon-in-Chief Arthur M. Shipley, Sc.D., M.D. 

Physician-in-Chief, Tuberculosis Hospital Harry M. Stein, M.D. 



28 



BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, U. OF MD. 



Physician-in-Chief, Psychopathic Hospital Harry Goldsmith, M.D. 

Obstetrician-in-Chief. Louis H. Douglass, M.D. 

Pediatrician-in-Chief T. Campbell Goodwin, M.D. 

Visiting Pathologist S. S. Blackman, A.B., M.D. 

Resident Pathologist Ralph Stevenson, M.D. 



Assistant Visiting Surgeons. 



Assistant Visiting Obstetricians . 



ASSISTANT VISITING STAFF 

T. Bayron Aycock, M.D. 
Frank S. Lynn, M.D. 
C. A. Reifschnelder, M.D. 
Grant Ward, M.D. 
^Luther E. Little, M.D. 

E. M. Hanrahan, M.D. 
George G. Finney, M.D. 
I. Ridge way Trimble, M.D. 
James C. Owlngs, M.D. 
J. G. M. Reese, M.D. 
I. A. Slegel, M.D. 
Margaret Ballard, M.D. 
Kenneth B. Boyd, M.D. 
John M. Haws, M.D. 
Alan F. Guttmacher, M.D. 
Watson W. Gray, M.D. 
Bessie Moses, M.D. 
Earle P. Clemson, M.D. 

CONSULTING STAFF 

{Raymond G. Willse, M.D. 
J. Mason Hundley, Jr., M.D. 
John T. Hibbitts, M.D. 

Orthopedics (Allen F. Voshell, M.D. 

\H. Alvan Jones, M.D. 

Roentgenology John W. Pierson, M.D. 

Psychiatry Esther L. Richards, M.D. 

Pediatrics Lawson Wilkins, M.D. 

Ophthalmology Cecil Bagley, M.D. 

Otology Leroy M. Polvogt, M.D. 

Charles Bagley, M.D. 

Richard G. Coblentz, M.D. 

F. S. Wolfe, M.D. 
O. R. Langworthy, M.D. 

Edward A. Looper, M.D. 

Frank B. Anderson, M.D. 

Harry R. Slack, M.D. 

Waitman F. Zinn, M.D. 

Urology W. Houston Toulson, M.D. 

f Monte Edwards, M.D. 

sy | Lewis Rosenthal, M.D. 

Dental Irvin Goldboro, D.D.S. 

Dermatology Isaac R. Pels, M.D. 

Tuberculosis Lawrence M. Serra, M.D 



Neurology. 



Laryngology . 



JAMES LAWRENCE KERNAN HOSPITAL 29 

THE JAMES LAWRENCE KERNAN HOSPITAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL OF 
MARYLAND FOR CRIPPLED CHILDREN 

This institution is situated on an estate of 75 acres at Hillsdale. The 
site is just within the northwestern city limits and of easy access from the 
city proper. 

The location is ideal for the treatment of children, in that it affords all 
the advantages of sunshine and country air. 

A complete hospital unit, new in every respect, offers all modern facili- 
ties for the care of any orthopaedic condition in children. 

The hospital is equipped with 82 beds — endowed, and city and state 
supported. 

The Children's Orthopaedic Dispensary at the University Hospital is 
maintained in closest affiliation and cares for the cases discharged from 
the Kernan Hospital. The physiotherapy department is very well equipped 
with modern apparatus and trained personnel. 



STAFF 

Surgeon-in-Chief and Medical Director Allen Fiske Voshell, A.B., M.D. 

Attending Orthopaedic Surgeon Albertus Cotton, A.M., M.D. 

Associate Orthopaedic Surgeons f Moses Gellman, B.S., M.D. 

\Harry L. Rogers, M.D. 

Resident Orthopaedic Surgeon E. M. Karp, B.S., M.D. 

Consulting Surgeons (J- M - T. Finney, A.B., M.D., D.S.M, F.R.C.S., (Eng,Ire.)Hon. 
[Arthur M. Shipley, Sc.D., M.D. 

Consulting Plastic Surgeon John Staige Davis, B.Sc, M.D. 

Consulting Neurological Surgeon Charles Bagley, Jr., A.B., M.D. 

Consulting Oculist Harry Friedenwald, M.D. 

Oculist F. A. Pacienza, M.D. 

Consulting Aurist and Laryngologist Edward A. Looper, M.D. 

Aurist and Laryngologist F. B. Anderson, M.D. 

Consulting Dentist Harry B. McCarthy, D.D.S. 

Dentist M. E. Coberth, D.D.S. 

[Thomas B. Futcher, A.B., M.D. 
Consulting Physicians JThomas R. Brown, A.B., M.D. 

(Lewellys F. Barker, A.B., M.D. 

Pediatrist Benjamin Tappan, A.B., M.D. 

Dermatologists (Harry M. Robinson, M.D. 

\Leon Ginsberg, M.D. 

Considting Pathologists /Sydney M. Cone, A.B., M.D. 

\Hugh R. Spencer, M.D. 

Consulting Neurologist Irving J. Spear, M.D. 

Neurologist R. V. Seliger, M.D. 

Anesthetists /j A. Tompkins, M.D. 

\J. D. Holly, M.D. 
Roentgenologist Albertus Cotton, A.M., M.D. 



30 BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, U. OF MD. 

Superintendent Miss C. Gertrude Forrester, R.N. 

Dispensary and Social Service Nurse Miss Mabel S. Brown, R.N. 

Physiotherapist and X-Ray Technician Mrs. Georgiana Wisong 

Instructor in Grammar School Miss Laura Hampson 



LIBRARIES 

The University Library, founded in 1813 by the purchase of the collec- 
tion of Dr. John Crawford, now contains 15,443 volumes, a file of 188 current 
medical journals, and several thousand pamphlets and reprints. It is well 
stocked with recent literature, including books and periodicals of general 
interest. The home of the library is Davidge Hall, a comfortable and com- 
modious building in close proximity to the classrooms and the laboratories 
of the Medical Department. The library is open daily during the year 
for use of members of the faculty, the students, and the profession generally. 

The Library of the Medical and Chirurgical Faculty of Maryland, 
containing 50,000 volumes, is open to the students of the school. The 
leading medical publications of the world are received by the library, and 
complete sets of many journals are available. Other libraries of Baltimore 
are the Peabody (250,000 volumes) and the Enoch Pratt Free Library 
(709,129 volumes). 

All these libraries are open to the students of the school without charge. 

ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 

The following curriculum is the result of a thorough revision of teaching 
in this school in order to meet modern requirements. The multiplication 
of specialties in medicine and surgery necessitates a very crowded course 
and the introduction of electives will very soon be depended on to solve 
some of the difficulties. 

The curriculum is organized under eleven departments. 

1. Anatomy (including Histology and Embryology). 

2. Physiology. 

3. Bacteriology and Immunology. 

4. Biological Chemistry. 

5. Pharmacology and Materia Medica. 

6. Pathology. 

7. Medicine (including Medical Specialties). 

8. Surgery (including Surgical Specialties). 

9. Obstetrics. 

10. Gynecology. 

11. Ophthalmology. 



ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 31 

The instruction is given in four years of graded work. 

Several courses of study extend through two years or more, but in no 
case are the students of different years thrown together in the same course 
of teaching. 

The first and second years are devoted largely to the study of the struc- 
tures and functions of the normal body. Laboratory work occupies most 
of the student's time during these two years. 

Some introductory instruction in Medicine and Surgery is given in the 
second year. The third and fourth years are almost entirely clinical. 

A special feature of instruction in the school is the attempt to bring to- 
gether teacher and student in close personal relationship. In many courses 
of instruction the classes are divided into small groups and a large number 
of instructors insures attention to the needs of each student. 

In most courses the final examination as the sole test of proficiency has 
disappeared and the student's final grade is determined largely by partial 
examinations, recitations and assigned work carried on throughout the 
course. 

DEPARTMENT OF ANATOMY, INCLUDING GROSS 
ANATOMY, HISTOLOGY AND EMBRYOLOGY 

Carl L. Davis, M.D Professor of Anatomy 

Eduard Uhlenhuth, Ph.D Professor of Anatomy 

Frank H. Figge, A.B., Ph.D Assistant Professor of Gross Anatomy 

Thomas B. Aycock, B.S., M.D Assistant Professor of Gross Anatomy 

John F. Lutz, M.D Associate in Histology 

Monte Edwards, M.D Associate in Gross Anatomy 

Joseph Pokorny, M.D Instructor in Histology 

Jaeoslav Hulla, B.S., M.D Instructor in Histology 

Frank K. Morris, A.B., M.D Instructor in Gross Anatomy 

Martin J. Hanna, M.D Instructor in Histology 

Arthur G. Siwinski, A.B., M.D Assistant in Gross Anatomy 

Harry A. Teitelbaum, B.S., M.D Weaver Fellow in Gross Anatomy 

James U. Thompson, A.B Weaver Fellow in Gross Anatomy 

Gross Anatomy. First Year. Total number of hours 534. During 
the first semester, 5 lecture periods and 26 laboratory hours per week. 

The entire course centers around the dissection of the human body. 
Each student is given opportunity to dissect an entire half (left or right) 
of the body. The dissection is supplemented by lectures and informal 
discussions. 

Anatomy is taught as an independent science, emphasis being laid on the 
human species as contrasted with animal morphology. An attempt is 



32 BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, U. OF MD. 

made to familiarize the student with the elements of anthropometry, with 
systematic and regional anatomy, with the principles of topographical 
anatomy and with osteology. 

The actual dissection is preceded by a general examination of the body 
surface and superficial organs. Opportunity is provided for taking repre- 
sentative measurements of the head, face, trunk and limbs, and of acquiring 
a knowledge of the use of anthropometric instruments. Throughout the 
dissection the student is encouraged to take measurements and weights of 
all the major organs, including the brain and the endocrines, and to obtain 
a knowledge of the proportions of each organ to the body as a whole, as 
well as to the variability of these proportions. 

The dissection is undertaken in relation to topographical regions of the 
body, but systematic relations are continuously emphasized and, wherever 
possible, brought out by actual dissection. 

Osteology is taught in conjunction with the dissection of the muscles 
and the study of the functional mechanism of the skeleto-muscular appa- 
ratus. The students are provided with skeletal bones, as far as our fa- 
cilities permit. 

Second, Third and Fourth Years. Opportunity is provided for advanced 
special dissections and for research work in every branch of anatomy. 
Dr. Uhlenhuth. 

HISTOLOGY AND EMBRYOLOGY 

First Year. This course has three subdivisions: First, general histology; 
second, organology; and third, the central nervous system, the last being 
distinguished as neuro-anatomy. The course in histology is divided equally 
between the study of the fundamental tissues and that of organs. Neuro- 
anatomy is taught during the first semester of the second year. Throughout 
the entire course the embryology of the part being studied precedes the 
study of the fully developed tissue. Thus embryology becomes a corre- 
lated part of the whole subject of microscopic anatomy and not an inde- 
pendent subject. 

A brief course in histological technic precedes the study of histological 
tissues, thus familiarizing the student with the principles involved in the 
preparation of material for microscopic study. For the remainder of the 
course, students are furnished slides of the required tissues, previously 
prepared in our own laboratory, thus insuring a uniform and satisfactory 
quality of material for study and permitting the time of the student to be 
expended in the study of material rather than in the technic of its 
preparation. 

Neuro-anatomy embraces a study of the fundamental structure of the 
central nervous system as applied to its function. An abundance of 



ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 33 

material permits of individual dissection of the human brain. A series 
of appropriately stained sections of the human brain stem is furnished each 
student for the microscopic study of the internal structure of the nervous 
system. Dr. Davis, Dr. Lutz. 

Total assigned hours, Microscopic Anatomy, 192. 

For a description of the graduate courses offered by the members of the 
staff, consult the catalog of the Graduate School. 

DEPARTMENT OF PHYSIOLOGY 

Professor of Physiology 

O. G. Harne, A.B. 

Associate Professor of Physiology, and Acting Head of the Department 

Elizabeth Painter, A.B Instructor in Physiology 

Marius P. Johnson, A.B., M.D Instructor in Physiology 

First Year. Lectures and conferences are given on the physiology of 
blood, gastro-intestinal tract, including secretion and absorption, liver 
and pancreas, methods employed to determine metabolism and the endo- 
crine system. The laboratory work on these subjects is performed during 
the second year. 

Lectures and conferences 26 hours 

Second Year. The course in physiology is designed to acquaint the 
student first with the fundamental principles of systemic and organic 
function. From this point the physiology of the organ or system is studied 
per se, and in relation to other organs and the body as a whole. 

This is accomplished by first lecturing, then performing laboratory 
experiments or demonstrations dealing with the phenomenon, and lastly 
conferences and summaries. 

Lectures 32 hours 

Conferences 32 hours 

Laboratory 120 hours 

Total 184 hours 

For a description of the graduate courses offered by the members of the 
staff, consult the catalog of the Graduate School. 

DEPARTMENT OF BACTERIOLOGY AND IMMUNOLOGY 

Frank W. Hachtel, M.D Professor of Bacteriology 

J. A. F. Pfeiffer, M.D Instructor in Bacteriology 

Henry F. Buettner, M.D Instructor in Bacteriology 

H. Edmund Levin, M.D Assistant in Bacteriology 

H. M, Bubert, M.D Assistant in Bacteriology 



34 BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, U. OF MD. 

Instruction in bacteriology is given in the laboratory to the students of 
of the second year during the first semester. This includes the 
methods of preparation and sterilization of culture media, the study of 
pathogenic bacteria, and the bacteriological examination of water and 
milk. The bacteriological diagnosis of the communicable diseases is also 
included in this course. Animal inoculations are made in connection with 
the bacteria studied. The most important protozoa are also studied in 
the laboratory. The principles of general bacteriology are taught by quiz, 
conference and lecture. 

The principles of immunology are presented by means of quizzes, con- 
ferences and lectures to the second-year class throughout the second semes- 
ter, and practical experiments are carried out by the class in laboratory 
sessions. 

Bacteriology Immunology 

Lectures and recitations 16 hours L. , 

Laboratory 104 hours \ 

Total 120 hours 72 hours 

DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGICAL CHEMISTRY 

H. Boyd Wylie, M.D Professor of Biological Chemistry 

Emil G. Schmidt, Ph.D Assistant Professor of Biological Chemistry 

Frank N. Ogden, M.D Associate in Biological Chemistry 

Dorothy E. Schmalzer, B.S Assistant in Biological Chemistry 

Maurice J. Schmulovitz, A.B Weaver Fellow in Biological Chemistry 

This course is designed to present the fundamental concepts of biological 
chemistry. The phenomena of living matter, and its principal ingredients, 
secretions and excretions are discussed in lectures and conferences and 
examined experimentally. Training is afforded in routine biochemical 
methods of investigation. 

Lectures 66 hours 

Conferences 26 hours 

Laboratory 88 hours 

Total 180 hours 

For a description of the graduate courses offered by the members of 
the staff, consult the catalog of the Graduate School. 

DEPARTMENT OF PHARMACOLOGY 

John C. Krantz, Jr., Ph.D Professor of Pharmacology 

Ruth Musser, A.B., M.S Instructor in Pharmacology 

William Ellsworth Evans, M.S Instructor in Pharmacology 

William Glenn Harne Demonstrator in Pharmacology 

C. Jelleff Carr, B.S.,M.S Isaac E. Emerson Fellow in Pharmacology 



ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 35 

This course is designed to include those phases of pharmacology necessary 
for an intelligent use of drugs in the treatment of disease. The didactic 
instruction includes materia medica, pharmacy, prescription-writing, toxi- 
cology, posology, pharmaco-dynamics, and experimental therapeutics. 
The laboratory exercises parallel the course of lectures. 

In addition, optional conference periods and lectures are available for 
students desiring further instruction or advice. 

Lectures 64 hours 

Laboratory 96 hours 

Total 160 hours 

For a description of the graduate courses offered by the members of 
the staff, consult the catalog of the Graduate School. 

DEPARTMENT OF PATHOLOGY 

Hugh R. Spencer, M.D Professor of Pathology 

Sydney M. Cone, A.B., M.D Associate Professor of Pathology ^ 

Robert B. Wright, B.S., M.D Assistant Professor of Pathology 

C. Gardner Warner, A.B., M.D Assistant Professor of Pathology 

Albert E. Goldstein, M.D .Associate in Pathology 

Walter C. Merkel, A.B., M.D Associate in Pathology 

M. Alexander Novey, A.B., M.D Instructor in Pathology 

Wm. S. Love, Jr., A.B., M.D Instructor in Pathology 

Leon Freedom, M.D Instructor in Pathology 

William R. Geraghty, B.S., M.D Instructor in Pathology 

Benjamin Abeshouse, Ph.B., M.D Instructor in Pathology 

John C. Dunbar, M.D Instructor in Pathology 

W. R. Johnson, M.D Instructor in Pathology 

James G. Arnold, A.B., M.D Assistant in Pathology 

Conrad B. Acton, B.S., M.D Assistant in Pathology 

John E. Savage, B.S., M.D Assistant in Pathology 

Robert W. Johnson, M.D Assistant in Pathology 

Ralph Stevenson, A.B., M.D Assistant in Pathology 

Courses of instruction in pathology are given during the second and third 
years. These courses are based on previous study of normal structure and 
function and aim to outline the natural history of disease. Instruction is 
made as practical as possible so that the student may become familiar with 
the appearance of tissues in disease and may be able to correlate anatomical 
lesions with clinical symptoms and signs. 

1. General Pathology. {Second Year.) This course includes the 
study and demonstration of disturbances of the body fluids, disturbances 
of structure, nutrition and metabolism of cells, disturbances of fat, carbo- 
hydrate and protein metabolism, disturbances in pigment metabolism, 
inflammation and tumors. 



36 BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, U. OF MD. 

2. Applied Pathology. Including Gross Morbid Anatomy and 
Morbid Physiology. (Third Year.) In this course the special relation 
of lesions to clinical symptoms and signs is emphasized. 

In the laboratory the class is divided into groups for the study of classi- 
fied autopsy material. 

3. Autopsies. (Third Year.) Small groups of students attend autop- 
sies at the morgues of the University Hospital and Baltimore City Hospitals. 
They are required to assist at autopsies and to prepare protocols. 

4. Clinical Pathological Conference. (Fourth Year.) In collabo- 
ration with the Department of Medicine, material from autopsies is 
studied with reference to the correlation of the clinical aspects with the 
pathological findings. 

5. Advanced Work in Pathology. Properly qualified students will 
be permitted to carry out advanced or research work along the lines of 
experimental pathology. 

Summary 
Second Year 

Lectures 50 hours 

Laboratory 118 hours 

Total 168 hours 

Third Year 

Lectures 30 hours 

Laboratory 130 hours 

Total 160 hours 

Fourth year 
Clinical Pathological Conference 30 hours 

DEPARTMENT OF MEDICINE 

Maurice C. Pincoffs, B.S., M.D Professor of Medicine 

Jos. E. Gichner, M.D Professor of Clinical Medicine and Physical Therapeutics 

G. Carroll Lockard, M.D Professor of Clinical Medicine 

Harvey G. Beck, Sc.D., M.D Professor of Clinical Medicine 

Harry M. Stein, M.D Professor of Clinical Medicine 

Paul W. Clough, B.S., M.D Associate Professor of Medicine 

C. C. W. Judd, A.B., M.D Associate Professor of Medicine 

Sydney R. Miller, A.B., M.D Associate Professor of Medicine 

Walter A. Baetjer, A.B., M.D Associate Professor of Medicine 

Thomas R. Sprunt, M.D Associate Professor of Medicine 

William H. Smith, M.D Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine 

H. J. Maldeis, M.D Associate Professor of Medical Jurisprudence 

S. Lloyd Johnson, A.B., L.L.B., M.D Assistant Professor of Medicine 

John G. Huck, M.D Assistant Professor of Medicine 

George McLean, M.D Assistant Professor of Medicine 



ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 



37 



L. A. M. Krause, M.D Assistant Professor 

H. R. Peters, M.D Assistant Professor 

W. S. Love, Jr., A.B., M.D Assistant Professor 

H. M. Bubert, M.D Associate 

J. S. Eastland, M.D Associate 

Thomas C. Wolff, M.D Associate 

T. Nelson Carey, M.D Associate 

Wetherbee Fort, M.D Associate 

John E. Legge, M.D Associate 

M. G. Gichner, M.D Instructor 

Henry Sheppard, M.D Instructor 

Frank J. Geraghty, M.D Instructor 

L. P. Gundry, M.D Instructor 

Samuel T. Helms, M.D Instructor 

Bernard J. Cohen, M.D Instructor 

Earl L. Chambers, M.D Instructor 

E. H. Tonolla, M.D Instructor 

Nathaniel Beck, M.D Assistant 

Carl Benson, M.D Assistant 

A. Scagnetti, M.D Assistant 

W. H. Triplett, M.D Assistant 

David Tenner, M.D Assistant 

M. Paul B yerly, M.D Assistant 

H. Edmund Levin, M.D Assistant 

J. Howard Burns, M.D Assistant 

J. G. Feman, M.D Assistant 

Morris Fine, M.D Assistant 

R. B. Mitchell, Jr., M.D Assistant 

Samuel Legum, A.B., M.D Assistant 

Philip D. Flynn, M.D Assistant 

Harry V. Langeluttig, A.B., M.D Hitchcock Fellow 



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GENERAL OUTLINE 
Second Year 

Introduction to clinical medicine. 

(a) Introductory physical diagnosis. 

(1 hour a week, first semester; 2 hours a week, second semester.) 

(b) Medical clinics. 

(1 hour a week, second semester.) 

Third Year 



The methods of examination (13 hours a week). 

(a) History taking. 

(b) Physical diagnosis. 

(c) Clinical pathology. 

These subjects are taught and practiced in the hospital out-patient department 
and in the clinical laboratory. 



38 BULLETIN OF TEE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, U. OF MD. 

II. The principles of medicine (5 hours a week). 

(a) Lectures, clinics and demonstrations in general medicine, neurology, pediatrics, 
psychiatry and preventive medicine. 
III. The principles of therapeutics (10 hours a week). 
Lectures and demonstrations. 

Fourth Year 
The practice of medicine. 
I. Clinical clerkship on the medical wards. 
(26 hours a week for ten weeks.) 

(a) Responsibility, under supervision, for the history, physical examination, 

laboratory examinations and progress notes of assigned cases. 

(b) Ward classes in general medicine, the medical specialties, and therapeutics. 
II. Clinics in general medicine and the medical specialties. 

(6 hours a week.) 

III. Dispensary work in the medical specialties. 

IV. Clinical pathological conferences (1 hour a week). 

Medical Dispensary Work 

The medical dispensaries of both the Mercy and the University Hos- 
pitals are utilized for teaching in the third year. Each student spends 
two hours daily for ten weeks in dispensary work. The work is done in 
groups of four to six students under an instructor. Systematic history- 
taking is especially stressed. Physical findings are demonstrated. The 
student becomes familiar with the commoner acute and chronic disease 
processes. 

Physical Diagnosis 

Second Year. Didactic lectures and practical demonstrations in topo- 
graphical anatomy and normal physical signs. 

Third Year. The class is divided into small groups, and each section 
receives instruction for two hours daily for ten weeks. This course is given 
at the City Hospitals. The large clinical material there is utilized to give 
each student the opportunity to familiarize himself with the common types 
of bodily structure, with the normal variations in physical signs and with 
the physical signs of the chief pulmonary, circulatory and abdominal 
diseases. 

A course of lectures (1 hour a week) on physical diagnosis supplements 
the practical work in this subject. 

Therapeutics 

Third Year. General therapeutics and materia medica are taken up and 
an effort is made to familiarize the student with the practical treatment of 
disease. The special therapy of the chief diseases is then reviewed. One 
hour a week. Dr. Lockard. 



ORGANIZATION OF TEE CURRICULUM 39 

Fourth Year. Special consideration is given to the practical application 
of therapeutic principles in bedside teaching and the chief therapeutic 
methods are demonstrated. 

Students attend therapeutic ward rounds once a week throughout their 
medical trimester. 

Tuberculosis 

During the third year in connection with the instruction in physical 
diagnosis a practical course is given at the Municipal Tuberculosis Hos- 
pital. Stress is laid upon the recognition of the physical signs of the 
disease, as well as upon its symptomatology and gross pathology. 

Cardiology 

During the fourth year an elective course in cardiology is offered at the 
Mercy Hospital. The course occupies one and one-half hours weekly. 
Physical diagnosis, electrocardiography and the therapeutic management 
of cardiac cases are stressed. 

Syphilis 

Third Year. During the third year the subject of syphilis is dealt with 
in the lecture course. 

Fourth Year. An elective course in the therapeutic management of 
syphilis is offered in the dispensary. 

CLINICAL PATHOLOGY 

John G. Huck, M.D Assistant Professor of Medicine 

Head of Department of Clinical Pathology 

H. J. Maldeis, M.D Associate Professor of Medical Jurisprudence 

S. Lloyd Johnson, A.B., LL.B., M.D Assistant Professor of Medicine 

Samuel T. Helms, M.D Instructor in Medicine 

E. M. Reese, M.S Assistant in Medicine 

During the third year the student is thoroughly drilled in the technic of 
the usual clinical laboratory work, so that he is able to perform all routine 
examinations which may be called for during his fourth year, in connection 
with the work in the wards and dispensary. 

The practical work is supplemented by a series of didactic lectures and 
demonstrations in which the entire teaching staff of the department takes 
an active part. The microscopical and chemical study of blood, exudates 
and transudates, gastric juice, spinal fluid, feces and urine are successively 
taken up, and special attention directed to the clinical significance of the 
findings. 

Clinical parasitology from the standpoint of the infecting agent and the 
carrier is given careful consideration. 



40 BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, U. OF MD. 

The entire course is thoroughly practical. Each student has his own 
microscope and is provided with blood counters and hemoglobinometer 
for his exclusive use, and every two students are equipped with a special 
laboratory outfit for all routine purposes. 

During the fourth year the student applies what he has learned during 
the preceding year in the laboratories of the various affiliated hospitals. 
He is also supplied with a laboratory outfit which is sufficiently complete 
to enable him to work independently of the general equipment. Special 
instructors are available during certain hours to give necessary assistance 
and advice. 

Lectures 32 hours 

Laboratory 96 hours 

Total 128 hours 

GASTRO-ENTEROLOGY 

Julius Friedenwald, A.M., M.D Professor of Gastro-Enterology 

T. Fred Leitz, M.D Clinical Professor of Gastro-Enterology 

Theodore H. Morrison, M.D Associate Professor of Gastro-Enterology 

Maurice Feldman, M.D Assistant Professor of Gastro-Enterology 

Zachariah Morgan, M.D Assistant Professor of Gastro-Enterology 

Samuel Morrison, M.D Assistant Professor of Gastro-Enterology 

Joseph Sindler, M.D Associate in Gastro-Enterology 

M. S. Koppelman, M.D Instructor in Gastro-Enterology 

Z. Vance Hooper, M.D Instructor in Gastro-Enterology 

C. Victor Richards, M.D Instructor in Gastro-Enterology 

H. William Primakoff, M.D Assistant in Gastro-Enterology 

Aaron C. Sollod, M.D Assistant in Gastro-Enterology 

Eli Contract, M.D Assistant in Gastro-Enterology 

Albert J. Shochat, M.D Assistant in Gastro-Enterology 

Ernest Levi, M.D Assistant in Gastro-Enterology 

L. R. Schoolman, M.D Assistant in Gastro-Enterology 

Third Year. A series of 4 lectures is given on ths disease of the diges- 
tive tract. 

Fourth Year. Clinics and demonstrations to the class for one hour a week. 
Dispensary instruction to small groups throughout the entire session. 
Practical instruction is given in the use of modern methods of study of 
the diseases of the gastro-intestinal tract. 

PSYCHIATRY 

Ross McC. Chapman, M.D Professor of Psychiatry 

Ralph P. Truitt, M.D Associate Professor of Psychiatry 

Harry Goldsmith, M.D Assistant Professor of Psychiatry 

Lawrence F. Woolley, M.D Assistant Professor of Psychiatry 

H. W. Newell, M.D Assistant Professor of Psychiatry 

Harry M. Murdock, M.D Assistant Professor of Psychiatry 



ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 41 

First Year. The student attends six lectures dealing with the develop- 
ment and function of the normal personality. 

Second Year. The student attends fourteen lectures dealing with 
psychopathology. 

Third Year. Psychopathology continued, six lectures; reaction types, 
twelve hours, lectures and demonstrations; the psychoses, six hours, lec- 
tures and demonstrations; history-taking and actual study of cases, out- 
patient clinic, thirty hours. 

Fourth Year. The neuroses, psychoneuroses, psychoses, lectures and 
demonstrations, ten hours. In this year the class is divided into sections 
for clinical conferences on selected cases. 

PEDIATRICS 

C. Loring Joslin, M.D Professor of Pediatrics 

Edgar B. Friedenwald, M.D Professor of Clinical Pediatrics 

John H. Traband, M.D Assistant Professor of Pediatrics 

Albert Jaffe, M.D Assistant Professor of Pediatrics 

A. H. Finkelstein, M.D Assistant Professor of Pediatrics 

William J. Todd, M.D Associate in Pediatrics 

William G. Geyer, M.D Associate in Pediatrics 

Clewell Howell, M.D Associate in Pediatrics 

Samuel S. Glick, M.D Associate in Pediatrics 

F. Stratner Orem, M.D Associate in Pediatrics 

Frederick Smith, M.D Associate in Pediatrics 

R. M. Hening, M.D Instructor in Pediatrics 

Marie Kovner, M.D Instructor in Pediatrics 

M. Paul Byerly, M.D Instructor in Pediatrics 

G. Bowers Mansdorfer, M.D Instructor in Pediatrics 

J. Edmund Bradley, M.D Instructor in Pediatrics 

W. J. Schmitz, M.D Assistant in Pediatrics 

Harry A. Rutledge, M.D Assistant in Pediatrics 

Samuel T. Helms, M.D Assistant in Pediatrics 

Walter A. Anderson, M.D Assistant in Pediatrics 

Israel P. Meranski, M.D Assistant in Pediatrics 

H. D . Franklin, M.D Assistant in Pediatrics 

O. Walter Spurrier, M.D Assistant in Pediatrics 

Gustav Highstein, M.D Assistant in Pediatrics 

S. C. Feldman, M.D Assistant in Pediatrics 

Nelsa Lee Wade, M.D Assistant in Pediatrics 

Third Year. Instruction during the third year consists of a short lecture 
course. The more important diseases of infancy and childhood are re- 
viewed. The principles of infant feeding are presented in brief form. 

Fourth Year. Weekly clinical lectures are given at which patients are 
shown to demonstrate the chief features of the diseases discussed. The 
students attend a weekly ward round on the pediatric service throughout 
their medical trimester. A special course on physical diagnosis in children 



42 BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, U. OF MD. 

is given. Sections of the class work daily in the Babies' and Children's 
Clinic. 

NEUROLOGY 

Irving J. Spear, M.D Professor of Neurology 

Andrew C. Gillis, A.M., M.D., LL.D Professor of Neurology 

G. M. Settle, A.B., M.D., Associate Professor of Neurology and Clinical Medicine 

Milford Levy, M.D Assistant Professor of Neurology 

Leon Freedom, M.D Assistant Professor of Neurology 

Ruth Foster, M.D Assistant in Neurology 

James G. Arnold, Jr., M.D Assistant in Neurology 

Third Year. Ten lecture-demonstrations are given in which the major 
types of diseases of the nervous system are presented. A short course is 
also given at the Baltimore City Hospitals, consisting of six periods of two 
hours each, in which the students in small groups carry out complete neuro- 
logic examinations of selected cases which illustrate the chief neurologic 
syndromes. 

Fourth Year. Clinical conference one hour each week to the entire class. 
This subject is taught at the University and Mercy Hospitals. All patients 
presented at these clinics are carefully examined; complete written records 
are made by the students who demonstrate the patients before the class. 
The patients are usually assigned one or two weeks before they are pre- 
sented, and each student in the class must prepare one or more cases during 
the year. 

Ward Class Instruction. In small sections at the University and Mercy 
Hospitals. In these classes the students come in close personal contact 
with the patients in the wards under the supervision of the instructor. 

Dispensary Instruction. Small sections are instructed in the dispensaries 
of the University and Mercy Hospitals four afternoons each week. In this 
way students are brought into contact with nervous diseases in their early 
and late manifestations. 

HYGIENE AND PREVENTIVE MEDICINE 

Huntington Williams, M.D., Dr. P.H Professor of Hygiene and Public Health 

William H. F. Warthen, M.D Associate in Hygiene and Public Health 

Myron G. Tull, M.D Instructor in Hygiene and Public Health 

Third Year. One-hour lecture to the whole class each Monday from 
September to May and two-hour instruction periods for groups of ten to 
fifteen students on six Wednesday afternoons. In addition there are four 
Wednesday afternoon field inspection trips for each third of the class. 
These trips, under guidance of full time public health workers, include 
visits to (1) city water filtration plant, (2) rural dairy farm, (3) milk pas- 



ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 43 

teurization plant, ice cream plant and bakery, and (4) industrial plant which 
has an active program of hygiene. 

The course deals with the fundamentals of public health including admin- 
istration, communicable disease and food control and environmental sani- 
tation, including industrial hygiene; with major emphasis on the practice 
of preventive medicine and the relation of prevention to diagnosis and 
treatment. Small groups visit Sydenham Hospital periodically and are 
given practical instruction in the diagnosis, treatment and prevention of the 
communicable diseases. 

Fourth Year. Demonstrations and discussion of public health work with 
emphasis on those phases which concern the practising physician. (Course 
under reorganization.) 

MEDICAL JURISPRUDENCE 

H. J. Maldeis, M.D Associate Professor of Medical Jurisprudence 

Baltimore City Post Mortem Physician 

Third Year. One hour each week for six weeks. 

This course embraces a summary of the following : Proceedings in criminal 
and civil prosecution, medical evidence and testimony, identity and its 
general relations, sexual abnormalities, personal identity, impotence and 
sterility, rape, criminal abortions, signs of death, wounds in their medico- 
legal relations, death — natural and homicidal, malpractice, insanity, and 
medico-legal autopsies. 

DEPARTMENT OF SURGERY 

Arthur M. Shipley, Sc.D., M.D Professor of Surgery 

Alexius McGlannan, A.M., M.D., LL.D Professor of Surgery 

Nathan Winslow, A.M., M.D Professor of Clinical Surgery 

Page Edmunds, M.D Professor of Traumatic Surgery 

Walter D. Wise, M.D Professor of Clinical Surgery 

Frank S. Lynn, M.D Professor of Clinical Surgery 

Elliott H. Hutchins, A.M., M.D Professor of Clinical Surgery 

Charles Reid Edwards, M.D Professor of Clinical Surgery 

Charles Bagley, Jr., A.B., M.D Professor of Neurological Surgery 

F. L. Jennings, M.D Professor of Clinical Surgery 

Robert P. Bay, M.D Professor of Oral Surgery 

Thomas R. Chambers, A.M., M.D Associate Professor of Surgery 

R. W. Locher, M.D Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery 

A. M. Evans, M.D Associate Professor of Surgery 

Edward S. Johnson, M.D Associate Professor of Surgery 

D. J. Pessagno, M.D Associate Professor of Surgery 

Charles A. Reifschneider, M.D Associate Professor of Surgery 

Monte Edwards, M.D Associate Professor of Surgery 

Cyrus F. Horine, M.D Associate in Surgery 

I. O. Ridgley, M.D Associate in Surgery 



44 BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, U. OF MD. 

H. F. Bongardt, M.D Associate in Surgery 

Thomas B. Aycock, B.S., M.D Associate in Surgery 

Richard G. Coblentz, M.D Associate in Neurological Surgery 

N. Clyde Marvel, M.D Associate in Surgery 

Grant E. Ward, A.B., M.D Associate in Surgery 

W. R. Johnson, M.D Instructor in Surgery 

E. M. Hanrahan, A.B., M.D Instructor in Surgery 

S. Demarco, M.D Instructor in Surgery 

Karl J. Steinmueller, A.B., M.D Instructor in Surgery 

W. W. Walker, M.D Instructor in Surgery 

J. J. Leyko, M.D Instructor in Surgery 

George H. Yeager, B.S., M.D Instructor in Surgery 

Luther E. Little, M.D Instructor in Surgery 

J. Frank Hewitt, A.B., M.D Instructor in Surgery 

Dwight Mohr, M.D Assistant in Surgery 

William R. Geraghty, B.S., M.D Assistant in Surgery 

H. B. McElwatn, M.D Assistant in Surgery 

J. G. Onnen, M.D Assistant in Surgery 

A. V. Buchness, M.D Assistant in Surgery 

T. J. Touhey, M.D Assistant in Surgery 

Clyde F. Karns, M.D Assistant in Surgery 

Paul Schenker, M.D Assistant in Surgery 

Robert W. Johnson, M.D Assistant in Surgery 

Frank K. Morris, A.B., M.D Assistant in Surgery 

J. Willis Guyton, M.D Assistant in Surgery 

Wm. N. McFaul, Jr., M.D Assistant in Surgery 

Samuel H. Culver, M.D Assistant in Surgery 

Simon H. Brager, M.D Assistant in Surgery 

C W. Peake, M.D Assistant in Surgery 

James C. Owings, M.D Assistant in Surgery 

Albert R. Wilkerson, M.D Assistant in Surgery 

J. W. Nelson, M.D Assistant in Surgery 

Julius Goodman, M.D Assistant in Surgery 

I. Ridgeway Trimble, M.D Assistant in Surgery 

The teaching is done in the anatomical laboratory, the dispensaries, 
wards, clinical laboratories and operating rooms of the University and Mercy 
Hospitals, and in the wards and operating rooms of the Baltimore City 
Hospitals. 

Instruction is given by means of lectures, recitations, dispensary work, 
bedside instruction, ward classes, and clinics. The work begins in the sec- 
ond year, and continues throughout the third and fourth years. 

Second Year 

Topographic and Surgical Anatomy. The course is designed to bridge 
the gap between anatomy in the abstract and clinical anatomy as applied 
to the study and practice of medicine and surgery. 

The teaching is done in the anatomical laboratory, and students are 



ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 



45 



required to demonstrate all points, outlines, and regions on the cadaver. 
Underlying regions are dissected to bring out outlines and relations of 
structures. 

Didactic Lectures. Two hours a week for one semester, augmented 
by demonstrations with specimens, charts, and cross sections. Dr. Monte 
Edwards. 

Laboratory. Five hours a week for 16 weeks. Dr. Monte Edwards 
assisted by Drs. Morris, Little and Yeager. 

Principles of Surgery. This course includes history-taking, records 
of physical examinations and of operations and progress notes; the 
preparation of surgical dressing, suture materials and solutions. It 
includes inflammation, infections, ulcers, gangrene, fistulae and sinuses, 
hemorrhage, shock and tumors. Lectures and conferences, two hours per 
week for one semester, to the entire class. Dr. C. R. Edwards. 



Third Year 

General and Regional Surgery. Lectures, recitations and clinics 
on the principles of surgery and general surgery are given three hours 
a week to the entire class. Drs. Lynn and Wise. 

The class is divided into groups and receives instruction in history- taking, 
^ross pathology, and surgical diagnosis — at the bedside and in the dead- 




46 BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, U. OF MB. 

Fourth Year 

Clinics. A weekly clinic is given at the Mercy and at the University 
Hospitals to one-half the class throughout the year. As far as possible 
this is a diagnostic clinic. Mercy Hospital — Dr. Wise. University Hos- 
pital — Dr. Shipley. , 

Surgical Pathology. A weekly exercise of one hour at Mercy Hospital 
for one semester at which specimens from the operating room and museum 
are studied in the gross and microscopically in relation to the case history. 
Dr. McGlannan. 

Traumatic Surgery. Operative and post-operative treatment of acci- 
dent cases, with instructions as to the relationship between the state, the 
employee, the employer, and the physician's duty to each. One hour a 
week to sections of the class throughout the year. Dr. Edmunds. 

Clinical Clerkship. The personal study of assigned hospital patients, 
under supervision of the staffs of the University and Mercy Hospitals, 
history-taking, and physical examination of patients, laboratory examina- 
tions, attendance at operations and observation of post-operative treatment. 

Ward Classes. Ward class instruction in small groups will consist of 
ward rounds, surgical diagnosis, treatment and the after-care of operative 
cases. Mercy Hospital — Drs. Wise, Elliot Hutchins, Evans and Jennings. 
University Hospital — Drs. Shipley, Edmunds, Lynn and Edwards. 




ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 47 

DERMATOLOGY 

Harry M. "Robinson, M.D Professor of Clinical Dermatology 

John R. Abercrombie, A.B., M.D Associate in Dermatology 

Francis Ellis, A.B., M.D Associate in Dermatology 

M. Harold Goodman, A.B., M.D Associate in Dermatology 

Arthur C. Monninger, M.D Instructor in Dermatology 

Joseph C. Bernstein, M.D Assistant in Dermatology 

Clinical conferences are held one hour each week with the entire class. 
This course consists of demonstrations of the common diseases of the skin 
in addition to a number of lectures on the general principles of dermatology. 
Dr. Robinson. 

Dispensary instruction in the diagnosis and treatment of skin diseases 
is given daily at the University Hospital by Drs. Robinson, Ellis, Goodman 
and Monninger. A similar course of instruction is given at the Mercy 
Hospital on Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays. These courses are de- 
vised for the specific purpose of giving the student close and intimate con- 
tact with skin diseases. Students are assigned cases and under supervision 
are permitted to diagnose and administer accepted treatment. 



ORTHOPAEDIC SURGERY 

Allen Fiske Voshell, A.B., M.D Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery 

Albertus Cotton, A.M., M.D Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery 

Compton Riely, M.D Clinical Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery 

Moses Gellman, B.S., M.D Associate Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery 

Harry L. Rogers, M.D Associate Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery 

In this course didactic, clinical, bedside and out-patient instruction is 
given. This instruction is provided in the University Hospital Amphi- 
theatre, Mercy Hospital and Dispensary, Kernan Hospital and Industrial 
School for Crippled Children at "Radnor Park" and in the Dispensary of 
the University Hospital. 

Lectures or clinics are held once a week at each of the hospitals named 
in town. In addition, a weekly bedside clinic is held for small sections of 
the class at "Radnor Park" and Mercy Hospital. Daily teaching in the 
Dispensary is stressed. 

The course covers instruction in the special methods of examination, 
pathology, diagnosis and treatment in this specialty. 

Brief outlines and demonstrations are also given of the apparatus em- 
ployed in physiotherapy, muscle training and corrective gymnastics. 

ROENTGENOLOGY 

Henry J. Walton, M.D Professor of Roentgenology 

Albertus Cotton, A.M., M.D Professor of Roentgenology 

Eugene L. Flippin, M.D Associate in Roentgenology 

Edgar G. Smith, A.B., M.D Assistant in Roentgenology 



48 BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, U. OF MD. 

During the academic year small groups of the fourth year class are given 
weekly demonstrations in the diagnostic and therapeutic uses of the Roent- 
gen rays. An effort is made to familiarize the student with the appearance 
of normal Roentgenograms, after which instruction is given in the interpre- 
tation of the more common pathological lesions seen on the Roentgen films 
and fluoroscopic screen. The history, physics and practical application 
of the Roentgen rays are alluded to, but not stressed. Weekly conferences 
are held with the medical and pathological departments, which are also 
open to members of the fourth year class. 

DISEASES OF THE NOSE AND THROAT 

Edward A. Looper, M.D., D.Oph Professor of Diseases of the Nose and Throat 

Waitman F. Zinn, M.D Clinical Professor of Diseases of the Nose and Throat 

Franklin B. Anderson, M.D Associate in Diseases of the Nose and Throat 

W. Raymond McKenzie, M.D Associate in Diseases of the Nose and Throat 

Thomas O'Rourk, M.D Instructor in Diseases of the Nose and Throat 

Birckhead McGowan, M.D Assistant in Diseases of the Nose and Throat 

Third Year. Instruction to entire class is given in the common diseases 
of the nose and throat, attention being especially directed to infections of 
the accessory sinuses, the importance of focal infections in the etiology of 
general diseases and modern methods of diagnosis. Lectures illustrated by 
lantern slides are given one hour weekly throughout the second semester 
by Dr. Looper. 

Fourth Year. Dispensary instruction one and one-half hours daily, to 
small sections at the University and the Mercy Hospitals. The student 
is given opportunity to study, diagnose and treat patients under super- 
vision. Ward classes and clinical demonstrations are given in periods of 
one and one-half hours weekly throughout the session in the Universitv 
and the Mercy Hospitals. 

The Looper Clinic, recently established in the University Hospital for 
bronchoscopy and esophagoscopy, affords unusual opportunities for stu- 
dents to study diseases of the larynx, bronchi and esophagus. The clinic 
is open to students daily from 2 to 4 P.M., under direction of Dr. Looper. 

The Mercy Hospital Clinic for bronchoscopy and esophagoscopy is under 
the direction of Dr. Zinn. In these two clinics the etiology, symptoma- 
tology, diagnosis and treatment of foreign bodies in the air and food pas- 
sages, as well as bronchoscopy, are taught to students, as an aid in the 
diagnosis and treatment of diseases of the lungs. 

GENITO-URINARY SURGERY 

W. H. Toulson, A.B., M.Sc, M.D Professor of Genito-Urinary Surgery 

A. J. Gillis, M.D Clinical Professor of Genito-Urinary Surgery 

Austin H. Wood, M.D Associate in Genito-Urinary Surgery 



ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 49 

L. J. Millan, M.D Associate in Genito-Urinary Surgery 

K. D. Legge, M.D Associate in Genito-Urinary Surgery 

L. K. Fargo, M.D Associate in Genito-Urinary Surgery 

Samuel T. Helms, M.D Instructor in Genito-Urinary Surgery 

John F. Hogan, M.D Instructor in Genito-Urinary Surgery 

W. A. C. Councill, M.D Instructor in Genito-Urinary Surgery 

Third Year. This course is given from eight to ten hours to the entire 
class. It consists of lectures and demonstrations including the use of lan- 
tern slides and motion pictures. Dr. Toulson. 

Fourth Year. The course in this year includes explanations and dem- 
onstrations of. urethroscopy, cystoscopy, ureteral catheterization, renal 
function tests, urography, urine cultures and the various laboratory pro- 
cedures. The teaching consists of clinics and ward rounds to small groups, 
and attendance by members of the senior class upon the out-patients in 
the dispensary. The student here is placed much on his own responsibility 
in arriving at a diagnosis. Members of the Staff are in constant attendance 
for consultations. These dispensary classes are conducted at both the 
Mercy and University Hospitals where practically every variety of venereal 
disease is here encountered and used for teaching purposes. 

DISEASES OF THE RECTUM AND COLON 

G. Milton Linthicum, A.M., M.D Professor of Diseases of Rectum and Colon 

Charles F. Blake, A.M., M.D Professor of Diseases of Rectum and Colon 

J. Dawson Reeder, M.D Clinical Professor of Diseases of Rectum and Colon 

Monte Edwards, M.D Associate in Diseases of Rectum and Colon 

James C. Owings, M.D Assistant in Diseases of the Rectum and Colon 

Third Year. Six hours to the entire class. This course is for instruction 
in the diseases of the colon, sigmoid flexure, rectum and anus, and will cover 
the essential features of the anatomy and physiology of the large intestine 
as well as the various diseases to which it is subject. Dr. Linthicum and 
Dr. Edwards. 

Fourth Year. Ward and dispensary instruction is given in the University 
and Mercy Hospitals, where different phases of the various diseases are 
taught by direct observation and examination. The use of the proctoscope 
and sigmoidoscope in the examination of the rectum and sigmoid is made 
familiar to each student. Mercy Hospital — Dr. Blake. University Hos- 
pital — Drs. Linthicum, Reeder and Monte Edwards. 

OTOLOGY 

J. W. Downey, M.D Professor of Otology 

Franklin B. Anderson, M.D Associate in Otology 

F. A. Holden, M.D Instructor in Otology 

Benjamin S. Rich, M.D Assistant in Otology 

Birckhead McGowan, M.D Assistant in Otology 



50 BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, U. OF MD, 

The course in otology is planned to give a practical knowledge of the 
anatomy and physiology of the ear, and its proximity and relationship to 
the brain and other vital structures. The inflammatory diseases, their 
etiology, diagnosis, treatment and complications are particularly stressed, 
with emphasis upon their relationship to the diseases of children, head- 
surgery and neurology. 

Third Year. The entire class is given instruction by means of talks, 
anatomical specimens and lantern slides. 

Fourth Year. Small sections of the class receive instruction and make 
personal examinations of patients under the direction of an instructor. 
The student is urged to make a routine examination of the ear in his ward 
work in general medicine and surgery. 

NEUROLOGICAL SURGERY 

Charles Bagley, Jr., A.B., M.D Professor of Neurological Surgery 

Richard G. Coblentz, M.D Associate in Neurological Surgery 

William R. Geraghty, B.S., M.D Instructor in Neurological Surgery 

James G. Arnold, Jr., A.B., M.D Hitchcock Fellow in Neurological Surgery 

Third Year. The course covers instruction in diagnosis and treatment 
of surgical conditions of the brain, spinal cord, and the peripheral nerves. 
Eight lectures are given to the entire class and conferences are held from 
time to time. Dr. Bagley. 

Fourth Year. Weekly ward rounds and conferences are given at the 
University Hospital. Drs. Bagley and Coblentz. 

ONCOLOGY 

J. Mason Hundley, Jr., M.A., M.D Associate in Gynecology 

Grant E. Ward, A.B., M.D .Associate in Surgery 

Every facility for the diagnosis and treatment of neoplastic diseases is 
available; this includes electro-surgery, radium therapy and deep X-ray 
therapy. 

An out-patient clinic is held twice weekly which affords an opportunity 
for instruction to a limited number of students. The gynecological prob- 
lems are under the supervision of Dr. Hundley, and the general surgical 
conditions are under the direction of Dr. Ward. 

Instruction, other than dispensary teaching, is given to small groups of 
students, for one hour a week, in the history, physics and practical applica- 
tion of radium. Drs. Ward and Hundley. 

ORAL SURGERY 

Robert P. Bay, M.D Professor of Oral Surgery 

Brice M. Dorsey, D.D.S Professor of Exodontia 

Charles A. Reifschneider, M.D Associate Professor of Surgery and Oral Surgery 

William E. Hahn, D.D.S Instructor in Exodontia 



ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 51 

This section in the Department of Surgery is established for the teaching 
of both medical and dental students. A new subdivision in the Dispensary 
has also been established, and beds will be provided in the University Hos- 
pital for the care of patients, who will be available for the teaching of stu- 
dents from both schools. 

Senior year: clinics weekly. 

Ward instruction and group teaching in dispensary. Instruction includes 
diagnosis and treatment of diseases of the face, mouth and jaws. 

DEPARTMENT OF OBSTETRICS 

J. M. H. Rowland, M.D., Sc.D., LL.D Professor of Obstetrics 

L. H. Douglass, M.D Professor of Clinical Obstetrics 

J. McFarland Bergland, M.D Associate Professor of Obstetrics 

Emil Novak, M.D Associate Professor of Obstetrics 

E. P. Smith, M.D Associate in Obstetrics 

J. G. M. Reese, M.D Associate in Obstetrics 

M. Alexander Novey, A.B., M.D Associate in Obstetrics- 

Isadore A. Siegel, A.B., M.D Associate in Obstetrics 

E. P. H. Harrison, A.B., M.D Associate in Obstetrics 

Margaret B. Ballard, M.D Assistant in Obstetrics 

E. S. Edlavvtch, M.D Assistant in Obstetrics 

Kenneth B. Boyd, M.D Assistant in Obstetrics 

Frank K. Morris, A.B., M.D Assistant in Obstetrics 

Dudley P. Bowe, M.D Assistant in Obstetrics 

John E. Savage, B.S., M.D Assistant in Obstetrics 

Third Year. Two lectures and recitations are given each week to the 
entire class. Drs. Bergland, Novak, Douglass and Rowland. 

Manikin work is given to sections of the class. Mercy Hospital, Drs. 
Smith and Edlavitch — University Hospital, Drs. Douglass, Siegel and 
Harrison. 

Demonstrations in the University Hospital Dispensary are given to sec- 
tions of the class. Drs. Siegel and Harrison. 

Fourth Year. A clinical conference is given each week. Drs. Rowland 
and Douglass. 

Ward classes are given six hours per week, for five weeks, to sections 
of the class at the University Hospital. Drs. Douglass, Reese and Novey. 

Each member of the senior class is required to conduct the delivery 
of ten women. This work is performed in their homes under the super- 
vision of the teaching and resident staff. 

DEPARTMENT OF GYNECOLOGY 

Professor of Gynecology 

Abram S. Samuels, M.D Associate Professor of Gynecology 

George A. Strauss, Jr., M.D Associate in Gynecology 

R. G. Willse, M.D Associate in Gynecology 



52 BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, U. OF MB. 

Thomas K. Galvin, M.D Associate in Gynecology 

J. Mason Hundley. Jr., M.A., M.D Associate in Gynecology 

Leo Brady, M.D Associate in Gynecology 

E. S. Edlavitch, M.D Assistant in Gynecology 

Third Year. Diadactic Work. A course of fifteen lectures and 
recitations. 

Fourth Year. Clinical Work. Six hours weekly for one trimester. 
In this course the student writes the clinical history of each patient in the 
ward and makes a general physical examination, including the blood and 
urine, before the patient is brought before the class. A pelvic examination 
is made by six students, and any operation required is then done before a 
section of the class small enough to see clearly what is being done and how 
it is done. On a subsequent day the whole group examines, microscopically, 
sections prepared from material removed from patients that have been 
before them. 

DEPARTMENT OF OPHTHALMOLOGY 

Clyde A. Clapp, M.D Professor of Ophthalmology 

M. Randolph Kahn, M.D Clinical Professor of Ophthalmology 

H. K. Fleck, M.D Associate Professor of Ophthalmology 

R. D. West, M.D Associate in Ophthalmology 

Henry F. Graff, A.B., M.D Associate in Ophthalmology 

Jonas Friedenwald, A.B., M.D Lecturer in Ophthalmic Pathology 

Joseph I. Kemler, M.D Associate in Ophthalmology 

F. A. Holden, M.D Instructor in Ophthalmology 

Frank A. Pacienza, M.D Instructor in Refraction 

John G. Runkle, M.D Assistant in Ophthalmology 

Thomas O'Rourk, M.D Assistant in Ophthalmology 

Third Year. Second semester. Dr. Kahn will give a course reviewing 
the anatomy and physiology of the eye and the methods used in making 
the various examinations. Errors of refraction and their effect upon the 
general system will be explained. Weekly section work, demonstrating 
the use of the ophthalmoscope, will be carried on during the entire session. 

Fourth Year. Clinics and demonstrations in diseases of the eye, weekly, 
for one year. Dr. Clapp. 

This course consists of lectures upon the diseases of the eye, with par- 
ticular reference to their diagnosis and relation to general medicine. Spe- 
cial lectures will be given upon vascular changes in the eye and upon the 
pathology of the eye. Some operations will be demonstrated by motion 
pictures. 

Weekly ward classes at the University, The Baltimore Eye, Ear and 
Throat and Mercy Hospitals during which the eye grounds in the various 
medical and surgical conditions are demonstrated. Drs. Fleck, West, 
Kemler and Graff. 



ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 53 

Also daily demonstrations are given in the taking of histories and the 
diagnosis and treatment of the various conditions as seen in the dispensary. 

Third Year- 
Lectures 20 hours 

Ophthalmoscopy 10 hours 

Total 30 hours 

Fourth Year — 

Lectures and demonstrations 26 hours 

Clinical work 20 hours 

Total 46 hours 

DEPARTMENT OF ART AS APPLIED TO MEDICINE 

Carl Dame Clarke Associate in Art as Applied to Medicine 

This department is maintained for the purpose of supplying pictorial 
and plastic illustrations for visual teaching in the classrooms of the Uni- 
versity and for publication in scientific periodicals. 

Special courses of instruction are given to qualified students. 

HISTORY OF MEDICINE 

John Rathbone Oliver, M.D., Ph.D Professor of the History of Medicine 

In this department, a series of lectures is given each year in March, 
April and May. The course is planned so that the entire field of Medical 
History may be covered in four years. Any medical student attending 
these lectures during his four years' course will be given, at least, an out- 
fine of the history of his profession. 

During the past academic year, the lectures have been devoted to the 
Medicine of the Middle Ages, the birth of modern Anatomy during the 
Renaissance and the foundations of Physiology, in connection with the 
discoveries of Harvey. The lectures are illustrated with lantern slides; 
also important books, which bear on the subject of each lecture, are 
brought into the lecture room and passed around among the students. 
In this way, each student will be able to say, for instance, that he has held 
in his own hands a copy of the De Fabrica of Vesalius and a copy of Harvey's 
De Motu Cordis. 

The department was fortunate in having been able to hear one visiting 
lecturer, Dr. Owsei Temkin of the Institute of the History of Medicine 
at the Johns Hopkins University, who is a distinguished authority on 
Arabic Medicine and who gave one lecture on that subject. 



54 BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, U. OF MD. 

In the coming year 1935-36, the lectures will deal with the medicine 
of the 18th Century and the beginnings of modern medicine and hygiene 
in the 19th Century. 

The Head of the Department is always glad to welcome any student who 
is interested in Medical History and will be glad to advise him as to his 
reading or to suggest subjects for special study. 



FIRST YEAR SCHEDULE 

FIRST SEMESTER, SEPTEMBER 26, 1935 TO FEBRUARY 1, 1936 





Monday 


Tuesday 


Wednesday 


Thursday 




Friday 


Saturday 


9.00 

to 
12.00 


tGross Anatomy — Lectures and Laboratories 


12.00 

to 

1.00 


Lunch 




1.00 

to 

5.00 




Gross Anatomy— Lectures and Laboratories 







tNo classes on Wednesdays from 9-12 after November 13, 1935 





SECOND SEMESTER, FEBRUARY 3 TO MAY 30, 1936 






Monday 


Tuesday 


Wednesday 


Thursday 


Friday 


Saturday 


9.00 

to 
10.00 




Sect. A 


Biological Chemistry Laboratory 

Sect. B Sect. A Sect. B 




10.00 

to 
11.00 


Introductory 
Physiology 
29 S. Greene 




11.00 

to 
12.00 


Biological 

Chemistry 

C.H. 




12.00 

to 
12.50 


Lunch 


Lunch 


Lunch 


Lunch 


Lunch 




12.50 

to 

1.50 


Biological 

Chemistry 

Adm. 1 


Biological 

Chemistry 

C.H. 


Biological 

Chemistry 

C.H. 


Biological 

Chemistry 

C.H. 


Biological 

Chemistry 

C.H. 




2.00 

to 
3.00 


Histology and Embryology 


'Psychiatry 

Introductory 
Physiology 

Adm. 1 


Histology and Embryology 




3.00 

to 
5.00 


32-34 S. 


Paca St. 




32-34 S. P 


ica St. 





* Psychiatry — February 5-March 11, 1936. During this time Introductory Physiology will be given from 3 to 4 p.m., 
lso in Adm. 1. 

Locations of Lecture Halls and Laboratories: 
Adm. 1 — First Floor, Administration Building, Lombard and Greene Streets. 
A. H. — Anatomical Hall — Upper Hall, N. E. Cor. Lombard and Greene Streets. 
C. H. — Chemical Hall, Lower Hall, N. E. Cor. Lombard and Greene Streets. 
Anatomy Laboratory — Third Floor, Gray Laboratory, Lombard and Greene Streets. 
Biological Chemistry Laboratory — Third Floor, 31 S. Greene Street. 
Histology and Embryology Laboratory — 32-34 S. Paca Street, Sixth Floor. 
Mid-Year Examinations — January 27-February 1, 1936 
Final Examinations — May 25-30, 1936 
(This schedule is subject to revision for 1935-1936) 

55 



56 



BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, V. OF MD. 



SECOND YEAR SCHEDULE 

FIRST SEMESTER, SEPTEMBER 26, 1935 TO FEBRUARY 1, 



1936 





Monday 


Tuesday 


Wednesday 


Thursday 


Friday 


Saturday 


9.00 

to 
10.00 


Pharmacology 
Aim. 1 


Pharmacology 
Aim 1 


Medicine 
Aim. 1 


Laboratory 

♦Physiology 
Sect. A 

Pharmacology 
Sect. B 


Laboratory 

♦Physiology 
Sect. B 

Pharmacology 
Sect. A 




10.00 

to 
11.00 


Physiology 
Aim. 1 


Physiology 
Aim. 1 


Bacteriology 
A.H. 




11.00 

to 
12.00 


Pathology 
A.H. 


Pathology 
A.H. 






12.00 

to 
12.30 


Lunch 


Lunch 


Lunch 


Lunch 


Lunch 




12.30 

to 
1.30 


t Bacteriology 
Laboratory 


Bacteriology 
Laboratory 


Bacteriology 
Laboratory 


Bacteriology 
Laboratory 






1.30 

to 

2.30 


Psychiatry 
Aim. 1 




2.30 

to 
5.30 


JNeuro- 
Anatomy 


Neuro- 
Anatomy 


Neuro- 
Anatomy 


Laboratory 

Physiology 

Sect. B 


Laboratory 

Physiology 

Sect. A 





* Physiology Laboratory begins October 31, 1935. 

t Bacteriology Laboratory — section work during the last month. 

t Neuro-anatomy — September 26 to November 27, 1935. 



ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 



57 



SECOND SEMESTER, FEBRUARY 3 TO MAY 30, 1936 





Monday 


Tuesday 


Wednesday 


Thursday 


Friday 


Saturday 


5.30 
to 
>.30 


Surgery 
Adm. J 


Surgery 

Adm. 1 


Surgical 
Anatomy 
Adm. 1 


Laboratory 

Physiology 
Sect. A 

Pharmacology 
Sect. B 


Laboratory 

Physiology 
Sect. B 

Pharmacology 
Sect. A 




>.30 
to 
0.30 


Pharmacology 
Adm. 1 


§ Physiology 
Adm. 1 


Surgical 

Anatomy 

Laboratory 


Pharmacology 
Adm. 1 


0.30 
to 
1.30 


' Pathology 
A.E. 


Pathology 
A.E. 


Physiology 
Adm. 1 


1.30 
to 
2.00 


Lunch 


Lunch 


Lunch 


Lunch 


Lunch 


Lunch 


2.00 
to 
!.00 


Pathology 
Laboratory 


Pathology 
Laboratory 


Pathology 
Laboratory 


Pathology 
Laboratory 


Pathology 
Laboratory 


(12-1) 

Medical Clinic 

Amp. 


!00 
to 
5.00 


Surgical 
Anatomy 
Adm. 1 


Immunology 
|| Laboratory 


Immunology 
Laboratory 


Physiology 

Laboratory 

Sect. B 

Physical 

Diagnosis 

Sect. A 

(3.00-5.30) 


Physiology 

Laboratory 

Sect. A 

Physical 
Diagnosis 

Sect. B 
3.00-5.30 




.00 

to 

.00 


Surgical 

Anatomy 

Laboratory 





§ Physiology Course ends May 2, 1936. 

|| Immunology Laboratory — section work during last two months. 

Locations of Lecture Halls and Laboratories: 
Adm. 1 — First Floor, Administration Building, Lombard and Greene Streets. 
A. H. — Anatomical Hall — Upper Hall, Lombard and Greene Streets. 
C. H. — Chemical Hall, Lower Hall, Lombard and Greene Streets. 
Amp. — Amphitheatre, University Hospital, Lombard and Greene Streets. 
Laboratories: 

Bacteriology — Second Floor, 31 S. Greene Street. 
Immunology — Second Floor, 31 S. Greene Street. 
Neuro-Anatomy — 32-34 S. Paca Street. 
Pathology — Second Floor, 31 S. Greene Street. 

Pharmacology — Second Floor, Gray Laboratory, Lombard and Greene Streets. 

Physiology — First Floor, Gray Laboratory, Lombard and Greene Streets. 

Surgical Anatomy — Third Floor, Gray Laboratory, Lombard and Greene Streets. 

Mid-Year Examinations — January 27 -February 1, 1936 

Final Examinations — May 25-30, 1936 

(This schedule is subject to revision for 1935-36) 



58 



BULLETIN OF TEE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, U. OF MD. 



SCHEDULE 



THIRD YEAR SCHEDULE 

SEPTEMBER 26, 1935 TO MAY 30, 1936 





Monday 


Tuesday 


Wednesday 


Thursday 


Friday 


Saturday 


8.30 

to 
9.30 


(Whole Class) 

Obstetrics 

C.H. 


(Whole Class) 

Surgery 

C.H. 


(Whole Class) 

Obstetrics 

C.H. 


(Whole Class) 

Surgery 

C.H. 


(Whole Class) 

Pathology 

C.H. 


(Whole Class) 

Medicine 

C.H. 


9.30 

to 
10.00 


Transfer to Baltimore City Hospitals 


10 00 

to 
12.00 


Physical Diagnosis at B. C. H. 


12.00 

to 
1.00 


Transfer 

and 

Lunch 


Transfer 

and 

Lunch 


Lunch 


Transfer 

and 

Lunch 


Lunch 




1.00 

to 
2.00 


(Whole Class) 

'Fractures and 

Dislocations 

tSurgical 

Specialties 

C.H. 


(Whole Class) 
•Gynecology 

C.H. 

fEye— 10 wks. 

Ear — 5 wks. 

Adm. 1 


Medical 

Clinic 
B. C. H. 


(Whole Class) 

Clinical 
Pathology 

Adm. 1 


Obstetrical 

Clinic 

B. C. H. 




2.00 

to 
4.00 


(Whole Class) 
Pathology 
Laboratory 


Surgery, 

Pathology and 

Neurology 

B. C. H. 


(Whole Class) 
Laboratory 

Clinical 
Pathology 


Surgery, 

Pathology and 

Neurology 

B. C. H. 




4.00 

to 
5.00 


(Whole Class) 

Preventive 

Medicine 

C.H. 


(Whole Class) 
Preventive and 
Legal Medicine 
Mental Hygiene 
C.H. 









* First semester, 
t Second semester. 

SCHEDULE 2 





Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday 


8.30 

to 
9.30 


Same as Schedule 1 


9.30 

to 
10.30 


Pediatrics 
C.H. 


Medicine 
C.H. 


Surgery 
C.H. 


Therapeutics 
C.H. 


Surgery 
C.H. 


Neurology 
C.H. 


10.30 

to 
12.30 


Operative Surgery 


12.30 

to 

1.00 


Lunch 


Lunch 


Lunch 


Lunch 


Lunch 




1.00 

to 
2.00 


Same as 
Schedule 1 


Medical 
Clinic 
Amp. 


Same as 
Schedule 1 


Psychiatry 
U. H. Disp. 




2.00 

to 
4.00 


{2.00-4.30) 
Public 
Health 




4.00 

to 
5.00 













ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 



59 



SCHEDULE 3 





Monday- 


Tuesday 


Wednesday 


Thursday 


Friday 


Saturday 


8.30 

to 
9.30 


Same as Schedule 1 


9.30 

to 
12.30 


Medical and Surgical Dispensary 
( University and Mercy Sections) 


12.30 

to 
1.00 


Lunch 


Lunch 


Lunch 


Lunch 


Lunch 




1.00 

to 
2.00 


Same as 
Schedule 1 


Medical 
Clinic 
Amp. 


Same as 
Schedule 1 


Dermatology 
Obstetrics 
U. H. Disp. 




2.00 

to 
4.00 


Ophthalmoscopy 
(5 weeks) 
B. E. H. 

Practical 

Obstetrics 

(5 weeks) 

Univ. Hosp. 




4.00 

to 
5.00 









The Junior Class will be divided into three sections — A, B and C. All sections report to classes in keeping with the 
following schedule assignment, in which the letters represent the class sections and the numerals indicate the schedules 
to be followed for the 10-week periods shown. 

Schedule Assignment 
Periods Sections and Schedules 

September 26 to November 27 A-l, B-2, C-3 

December 2 to February 29 C-l, A-2, B-3 

March 2 to May 16 B-l, C-2, A-3 

Locations of Lecture Halls, etc. 
Adm. 1 — First Floor, Administration Building, Lombard and Greene Streets. 
C. H. — Chemical Hall — Lower hall, N. E. corner Lombard and Greene Streets. 
B. C. H.— Baltimore City Hospitals, 4940 Eastern Avenue. 
B. E. H— Baltimore Eye, Ear and Throat Hospital, 1214 Eutaw Place. 
Mid-Year Examinations — January 27 -February 1, 1936 
Final Examinations — May 18-30, 1936 
(This schedule is subject to revision for 1935-1936 



FOURTH YEAR SCHEDULE 

SEPTEMBER 26, 1935 TO MAY 30, 1936 



Hours 


Monday 


Tuesday 


Wednesday 


Thursday 


Friday 


Saturday 




Ward Classes 


Ward Classes 


Ward Classes 


Ward Classes 


Ward Classes 


Ward Classes 


9 . 00 to 


Medicine 


Medicine 


Medicine 


Medicine 


Medicine 


Medicine 


11.00 


Surgery 


Surgery 


Surgery 


Surgery 


Surgery 


Surgery 




Obstetrics 


Gynecology 


Obstetrics 


Gynecology 


Obstetrics 


Gynecology 






Medical 












Orthopaedic 


Clinic 


Clinical 


Surgical 


Medical 


Pediatric 


11.00 


Surgery 


Univ. Sec. Amp. 


Pathological 


Clinic 


Clinic 


Clinic 


to 






Conference 








12.00 


Univ. Sec. Amp. 


Surgical 












P. &S. Sec. 51 


Pathology 


Univ. Sec. C. H. 


Univ. Sec. Amp. 


Univ. Sec. Amp. 


Univ. Sec. Amp. 






P. & S. Sec. 40 


P. & S. Sec. 34 


P. & S. Sec. 51 


P. & S. Sec. 34 


P. & S. Sec. 34 


12.00 


Dispensary 


Dispensary 


Dispensary 


Dispensary 


Dispensary 




to 


Lunch and 


and 


Lunch and 


and 


Lunch and 


Dispensary 


2 00 


Transfer 


Lunch 


Transfer 


Lunch 


Transfer 






Dermatology 




Eye and Ear 


Obstetrical 


Gastroenter- 




2. IS 


Clinic 


Neurology 


Clinic 


Clinic 


ology Clinic 




to 




Clinic 










3.15 


(Full Class at 




(Full Class at 


(Full Class at 


(Full Class at 






Univ. Hosp.) 


Univ. Sec. Amp. 
P. & S. Sec. 34 


Univ. Hosp.) 


Univ. Hosp.) 


Univ. Hosp.) 






Amp. 




Amp. & C. H. 


Amp. 


Amp. 






P. & S. Sect. 


P. & S. Sect. 


P. & S. Sect. 


P. & S. Sect. 


P. & S. Sect. 






Ward Classes 


Ward Classes 


Ward Classes 


Ward Classes 


Ward Classes 




3.30 


Medicine 


Medicine 


Medicine 


Medicine 


Neurology 




5.00 




Orthopedics 


Nose and 
Throat 


Proctology 


Roentgen- 
ology 






Eye and Ear 




Preventive 
Medicine 


Pediatrics 


Psychiatry 






Univ. Sect. 


Univ. Sect. 


Univ. Sect. 


Univ. Sect. 


Univ. Sect. 






Ward Classes 


Ward Classes 


W T ard Classes 


Ward Classes 


Ward Classes 






Medicine 


Therapeutics 


Medicine 


Medicine 


Neurology 




3.30 














to 


Roentgen- 


Proctology 


Urology 


Nose and 


Psychiatry 




5.00 


ology 


Oncology 




Throat 


Orthopedic 






Neurological 


(3.30-4.30) 


Eye and Ear 


Physical 


Surgery 






Surgery 


Adm. 1 




Therapeutics 


(Kernan 
Hospital) 




5.00 








'History of 






to 








Medicine 






6.00 








C.H. 







* March, April and May, 5-6 p. m. 

The Senior Class is divided into two sections, which report, one at Lombard and Greene Streets, the other at Calvert 
and Saratoga Streets, for one semester each, then rotate. 

Each section of the class is divided into three groups— Medical, Surgical, and Special. These groups will rotate 
on the following dates: 

First Semester Second Semester 

1st period Sept. 26-Nov. 2 1st period Feb. 3-Mar. 7 

2nd period Nov. 4-Dec. 7 2nd period Mar. 9-Apr. 8 

3rd period Dec. 9-Jan. 25 3rd period Apr. 15-May 16 

C. H.— Chemical Hall— N. E. Cor. Lombard and Greene Streets. 
Amp.— Amphitheatre — University Hospital. 
P. & S., 34— Second Floor, Calvert and Saratoga Streets. 
P. & S., 40, 51— Fourth Floor, Calvert and Saratoga Streets. 
For sub-sections of P. & S. ward classes, 3.30 to 5.00 p. m., see supplementary schedule at Mercy Hospital. For sub- 
sections of U. E. ward classes, 3.30 to 5.00 p. m., see Medical School Bulletin Board. 

Mid-Year Examinations— January 27- February 1, 1936 

Final Examinations— M ay 18-23, 1936 

(This schedule is subject to revision for 1935-1936) 

60 



REQUIREMENTS FOR MATRICULATION 61 

REQUIREMENTS FOR MATRICULATION 

Admission to the course in medicine is by a completed Medical Student 
Certificate issued by the Registrar of the University of Maryland. This 
certificate is obtained from the Registrar on the basis of satisfactory edu- 
cational credentials, and is essential for admission to any class. 

The minimum requirements for the issuance of the Medical Student 
Certificate are: 

(a) The completion of a four-year curriculum in an approved secondary 
school, or the equivalent in entrance examinations; and 

(b) Credit for not less than two full academic years with a normal 
schedule of classes in an accredited college or university. The curriculum 
should include biology (1), general inorganic chemistry (2), organic chemis- 
try, physics, English, and a modern foreign language (3). Every course 
should have full premedical and baccalaureate degree credit. 

(1) The primary year-course in biology may be composed entirely of 
zoology. If botany is a part of the year-course, then not more than 
one semester should be devoted to plant biology. 

It is desirable that comparative vertebrate anatomy, embryology, 
and histological technique be made a part of the preprofessional 
course of study. 

(2) Qualitative analysis may be included in the year-course in general 
inorganic chemistry. 

It is advantageous, also, to complete courses in quantitative analysis 
and introductory physical chemistry. 

(3) To make a balanced curriculum selections should be made, too, 
from the additional elective courses that are listed below: 

Advanced English and modern foreign language 

Mathematics 

Economics, history, political science, sociology, psychology, etc. 
While the School of Medicine announces a minimum requirement for 
entrance of two years of premedical training, the Faculty Council recom- 
mends strongly that not less than three years of preprofessional training be 
taken and that all students who find it possible to do so should earn a 
baccalaureate degree. 

Each prospective candidate for admission to the study of medicine should 
take the Medical Aptitude Test given each fall by the Association of 
American Medical Colleges in the institutions that are preparing students 
for medicine. 



62 BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, U. OF MD. 

COMBINED COURSE IN ARTS AND SCIENCES, 
AND MEDICINE 

A combined seven years' curriculum leading to the degrees of Bachelor 
of Science and Doctor of Medicine is offered by the University of Maryland. 
The first three years are taken in residence in the College of Arts and 
Sciences at College Park, and the last four years in the School of Medicine 
in Baltimore. (See University catalogue for details of quantitative and 
qualitative premedical course requirements.) 

Upon the successful completion of the first year in the School of Medicine, 
and upon the recommendation of the Dean, the degree of Bachelor of 
Science may be conferred by the College of Arts and Sciences. 

Students are urged to consider carefully the advantages this combination 
course offers over the minimum requirements of two years. By completing 
three years the training may be gradually broadened by a wider latitude in 
the election of courses in the arts subjects. 

POST-GRADUATE STUDENTS 

Graduates in medicine desiring to take the work of the senior year with- 
out being candidates for the degree, and, therefore, without examination, 
may receive a certificate of attendance on completing the full course 
satisfactorily. 

RULES 

1. All students are required to take the spring examinations unless excused 
by the Dean. No student will be permitted to advance from a lower to 
a higher class with conditions. 

2. Should a student be required to repeat any year in the course, he 
must pay regular fees. 

3. A student failing in final examinations for graduation at the end of the 
fourth year will be required to repeat the entire course of the fourth year 
and to take examinations in such other branches as may be required, should 
he again be permitted to enter the school as a candidate for graduation. 

4. The general fitness of a candidate for graduation, as well as the results 
of his examinations, will be taken into consideration by the Faculty. 

5. All students are required to provide themselves with microscopes of a 
satisfactory type. 

A standard microscope of either Bausch & Lomb, Leitz, Spencer, or 
Zeiss make, fitted with the following attachments, will fill the requirements: 

Triple nose piece: 10 x and 5 x Oculars 

Wide aperture stage: 16 mm. and 4 mm. Objectives 

Quick Screw condenser (Abbe): 1.9 mm. 125 N.A. Oil Immersion Lens 






FEES 63 

All used microscopes are subject to inspection and approval before their 
use in the laboratory is permitted. The student is cautioned against the 
purchase of such an instrument before its official approval by the school. 

STUDENTS MUST BE PREPARED TO PURCHASE MICROSCOPES 
AT THE BEGINNING OF THE FIRST YEAR 

All the above rules, as well as the fees stated below, relate to the year 
ending June 6th, 1936 only. The right is reserved to make changes in the 
curriculum, the requirements for graduation, the fees and in any of the 
regulations whenever the Faculty deems it expedient. 

FEES 

Matriculation fee (paid once) $10 . 00 

Tuition fee (each year) for residents of Maryland 375 .00 

Tuition fee (each year) for non-residents 550.00 

Laboratory fee (each year) 25 .00 

Special and re-examination fee 5 . 00 

Graduation fee 15 . 00 

No fees are returnable. 

The above fees apply to all students who matriculate in the School of 
Medicine in any class for the session beginning September 26, 1935. 

All students, after proper certification, are required to register at the 
Office of the Registrar. (See calendar in front part of this bulletin for 
dates for the payments of fees, and the note regarding late registration 
fee.) 

The matriculation fee is payable at the time the applicant is offered 
acceptance as a student. 

The laboratory fee and one-half of the tuition fee for the year shall be 
paid at the time of the first semester registration, and the remainder of the 
tuition fee shall be paid at the second semester registration date. 

Failure to meet these conditions will debar automatically the student 
from attendance on classes and other privileges of the University. 

When offering checks in payment of tuition and other fees, students are 
requested to have them drawn in the exact amount of such fees. Personal 
checks whose face value is in excess of the fees due will be accepted only for 
collection. 



64 BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, U. OF MD. 

DEFINITION OF RESIDENCE STATUS OF STUDENTS* 

Students who are minors are considered to be resident students if, at the 
time of their registration, the parents* have been residents of this State 
for at least one year. 

Adult students are considered to be resident students if, at the time of 
their registration, they have been residents of this State for at least one 
year, provided such residence has not been acquired while attending any 
school or college in Maryland. 

The status of the residence of a student is determined at the time of his 
first registration in the University and may not thereafter be changed by 
him unless, in the case of a minor, his parents* move to and become legal 
residents of this State by maintaining such residence for at least one full 
calendar year. However, the right of the student (minor) to change from 
a non-resident to a resident status must be established by him prior to 
registration for a semester in any academic year. 

STATE MEDICAL STUDENT QUALIFYING 
CERTIFICATES 

Candidates for admission who live in or expect to practice medicine in 
Pennsylvania, New Jersey or New York, should apply to their respective 
state boards of education for medical student qualifying certificates (Penn- 
sylvania and New Jersey) or approval of applications for medical student 
qualifying certificates (New York). 

Those students who are accepted here must file their state certificates 
in the Office of the Registrar, University of Maryland, during the period 
of attendance in the School of Medicine. 

MEDICAL CARE OF STUDENTS 

The Medical Council has made provision for the systematic care of stu- 
dents in the Medical School, according to the following plan: 

1. Preliminary Examination — All new students will be examined during 
the first week of the semester. Notice of the date, time, and place of the 
examination will be announced to the classes and on the bulletin board. 
The passing of this physical examination is necessary before final accep- 
tance of any student. 

2. Medical Attention — Students in need of medical attention will be seen 
by the School Physician, Dr. T. N. Carey, in his ofiice at the Medical 

The term "parents" includes persons who, by reason of death or other unusual 
circumstances, have been legally constituted the guardians of or stand in loco parentis 
to such minor students. 



SCHOLARSHIPS 65 

School, between 4 and 5 P.M., daily, except Saturday and Sunday. In 
cases of necessity, students will be seen at their homes. 

3. Hospitalization — If it becomes necessary for any student to enter the 
hospital during the school year, the Medical Council has arranged for the 
payment of part or all of his hospital expenses, depending on the length of 
his stay and special expenses incurred. This applies only to students 
admitted through the School Physician's Office. 

4. Prospective students are advised to have any known physical defects 
corrected before entering school in order to prevent loss of time which 
later correction might incur. As minor visual defects are frequently un- 
recognized until detected by an ophthalmologist, it is especially urged that 
all new students have their eyes examined and any error of refraction cor- 
rected before beginning the course. 

PRIZES AND SCHOLARSHIPS 

FACULTY PRIZE 

The Faculty each year awards a Gold Medal to the Graduate who during 
the four years of his course has shown the greatest proficiency in preparing 
for the practice of medicine. The five candidates standing next in order 
will be awarded Certificates of Honor. 

DR. A. BRADLEY GAITHER MEMORIAL PRIZE 

A prize of $25.00 is given each year by Mrs. A. Bradley Gaither as a 
memorial to the late Dr. A. Bradley Gaither, to the student in the senior 
class doing the best work in Genito-Urinary Surgery. 

SCHOLARSHIPS* 

The Dr. Samuel Leon Frank Scholarship 
(Value $125.00) 

This scholarship was established by Mrs. Bertha Rayner Frank as a 
memorial to the late Dr. Samuel Leon Frank, an alumnus of this University. 

It is awarded by the Trustees of the Endowment Fund of the University 
each year upon nomination by the Medical Council "to a medical student 
of the University of Maryland, who in the judgment of said Council, is of 
good character and in need of pecuniary assistance to continue his medical 
course." 

This scholarship is awarded to a second, third or fourth year student 

*Note: Scholarships, unless specifically renewed on consideration of application, are 
for one year only. 



66 BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, V. OF MD. 

who has successfully completed one year's work in this school. No student 
may hold such scholarship for more than two years. 

The Charles M. Hitchcock Scholarships 
(Value $125.00 each) 

Two scholarships were established from a bequest to the School of Medi- 
cine by the late Charles M. Hitchcock, M.D., an alumnus of the University. 

These scholarships are awarded annually by the Trustees of the Endow- 
ment Fund of the University, upon nomination by the Medical Council, 
to students who have meritoriously completed the work of at least the first 
year of the course in medicine, and who present to the Council satisfactory 
evidence of a good moral character and of inability to continue the course 
without pecuniary assistance. 

The Randolph Winslow Scholarship 
(Value $125.00) 

This scholarship was established by Prof. Randolph Winslow, M.D., 
LL.D. 

It is awarded annually by the Trustees of the Endowment Fund of the 
University, upon nomination by the Medical Council, to a "needy student 
of the Senior, Junior, or Sophomore Class of the Medical School." 

"He must have maintained an average grade of 85% in all his work up 
to the time of awarding the scholarship." 

"He must be a person of good character and must satisfy the Medical 
Council that he is worthy of and in need of assistance." 

Dr. Leo Karlinsky Memorial Scholarship 
(Value $200.00) 

This scholarship was established by Mrs. Ray Mintz Karlinsky as a 
memorial to her husband, the late Dr. Leo Karlinsky, an alumnus of the 
University. 

It is awarded annually by the Trustees of the Endowment Fund of the 
University, upon the nomination of the Medical Council, to "a needy stu- 
dent of the Senior, Junior or Sophomore Class of the Medical School." 

He must have maintained in all his work up to the time of awarding the 
scholarship a satisfactory grade of scholarship. 

He must be a person of good character and must satisfy the Medical 
Council that he is worthy of and in need of assistance. 

The University Scholarships 

Two scholarships are awarded by the University: One to a student of 
the College of Arts and Sciences appointed by the President, to be held for 



SCHOLARSHIPS 67 

only one year; the other, which entitles the holder to exemption from pay- 
ment of the tuition fee of the year, is awarded annually by the Medical 
Council to a student of the senior class who presents to the Medical Council 
satisfactory evidence that he is of good moral character and is worthy of 
and in need of assistance to complete the course. 

Frederica Gehrmann Scholarship 

(Not open to holders of Warfield and Cohen Scholarships) 

This scholarship was established by the bequest of the late Mrs. Frederica 
Gehrmann and entitles the holder to exemption from payment of tuition 
fees. The scholarship is awarded to a third-year student who at the end 
of the second year has passed the best practical examinations in Physiology, 
Pharmacology, Pathology, Bacteriology, Immunology, Serology, Surgical 
Anatomy and Neuro-Anatomy. 

The Clarence and Genevra Warfield Scholarships 
(Value $300.00 each) 

There are five scholarships established by the Regents from the income 
of the fund bequeathed by the will of Dr. Clarence Warfield. 

Terms and Conditions: These scholarships are available to students of 
any of the classes of the course in medicine. Preference is given to students 
from the counties of the State of Maryland which the Medical Council 
may from time to time determine to be most in need of medical practi- 
tioners. 

Any student receiving one of these scholarships must agree, after gradua- 
tion and a year's interneship, to undertake the practice of medicine, for a 
term of two years, in the county to which the student is accredited, or in a 
county selected by the Council. In the event that a student is not able 
to comply with the condition requiring him to practice in the county to 
which he is accredited by the Council, the money advanced by the Regents 
shall be refunded by the student. 

Israel and Cecilia E. Cohen Scholarship 

(Value $250.00) 

This scholarship was established by Miss Eleanor S. Cohen in memory 
of her parents, Israel and Cecelia E. Cohen. Terms and conditions: This 
scholarship will be available to students of any one of the classes of the 
course in Medicine; preference is given to students of the counties in the 
State of Maryland which the Medical Council may from time to time deter- 
mine to be most in need of medical practitioners. Any student receiving 
one of these scholarships must, after graduation and a year's interneship, 



68 BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, U. OF MB. 

agree to undertake the practice of medicine for a term of two years in the 
county to which the student is accredited, or in a county selected by the 
Council. In the event that a student is not able to comply with the con- 
dition requiring him to practice in the county to which he is accredited by 
the Council, the money advanced by the Regents shall be refunded. 

ANNUAL HOSPITAL APPOINTMENTS 

Each session the following annual appointments are made from among 
the graduates of the school: 

TO THE UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL 

Two Residents in Surgery Resident in Nose and Throat 

Two Residents in Medicine Resident in Roentgenology 

Three Residents in Obstetrics Thirteen Senior Internes rotating in 

Two Residents in Gynecology Medicine and Surgery 

Resident in Pediatrics Twelve Junior Internes rotating in the 

Specialties 

TO THE MERCY HOSPITAL 

Chief Resident Physician Resident in Nose and Throat 

Two Residents in Medicine Resident in Pathology 

Four Residents in Surgery Nine Internes on a Rotating Service 
Resident in Gynecology 



NOTICE TO STUDENTS 

The personal expenses of the students are at least as low in Baltimore as 
in any large city in the United States. The following estimates of a stu- 
dent's personal expenses for the academic year of eight months have been 
prepared by students, and are based upon actual experience. In addition 
to these the student must bear in mind the expenditure for a microscope. 

Items Low Average Liberal 

Books $50 $75 $100 

College Incidentals 20 20 20 

Board, eight months 200 250 275 

Room rent 64 80 100 

Clothing and laundry 50 80 150 

All other expenses 25 50 75 

Total $409 $556 $720 

Students will save time and expense upon their arrival in the city by 
going directly to the School of Medicine on the University grounds, N. E. 
Corner Lombard and Greene Streets. Here may be found a list of com- 



GRADUATES, 1935 



69 



fortable and convenient boarding houses suitable to their means and wishes. 
For further information, apply to 

J. M. H. Rowland, Dean, 

Lombard and Greene Streets. 



GRADUATES, UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND SCHOOL OF 
MEDICINE AND COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS AND 
SURGEONS, JUNE 1, 1935 



Adelman, Milton Harris, B.S... .New York 
Albrittain, John Warren, B.S — Maryland 

Alessi, Edward James Maryland 

Alonso, Miguel, B.S Puerto Rico 

Alpert, George, A.B Massachusetts 

Anderson, John Bascom, A.B. 

North Carolina 

Aungst, Melvin Rauch Pennsylvania 

Barnes, Henry Eugene, Jr., B.S. 

North Carolina 
Battaglia, Dominic Thomas, B.S. 

Maryland 

Bierer, Dan George, B.S Pennsylvania 

Bock, Charles Aloysius, B.S. ..Pennsylvania 
Brouillet, George Hector, B.S. 

Massachusetts 
Bunn, James Pettigrew, Jr., B.S. 

North Carolina 

Cassidy, William Adrian, A.B Maine 

Cornbrooks, Ernest Ivon, Jr., A.B. 

New Jersey 

Cotter, Edward Francis Maryland 

Cutler, Frank Henry, A.B Utah 

Dickey, Francis George, A.B.. . .Maryland 

Diehl, Earl Henry Maryland 

Dodge, Douglas Rude Michigan 

Doerner, Alexander Andrew, A.B. 

New York 

Du Bois, Robert Lionel Connecticut 

Dunnigan, William Charles, A.B. 

Maryland 
Einhorn, Samuel Edward, B.S. .New Jersey 
Ewald, August Ludwig, Jr., B.S. 

Maryland 

Fader, Ferdinand, A.B New Jersey 

Freeman, Irving, B.S Maryland 

Fruchtbaum, Robert Pearson, B.S. 

New Jersey 

Galitz, Philip Jacob, M.A New York 

Gerwig, Walter Henry, Jr. . . West Virginia 
Godbey, John Randolph .... West Virginia 
Grenzer, William Howard, A.B... Mary land 

Gross, Joseph Bernard Maryland 

Hammill, Gerard Paul, B.S. . . Pennsylvania 
Hamrick, John Carl, B.S.. .North Carolina 

Harris, Aaron Maryland 

Hartman, Ira Frank, A.B., B.S. 

West Virginia 
Heghinian, Jeannette Rosaline E. 

Maryland 



Helfrich, William Goldsborough, B.S. 

Maryland 

Herald, James Kennedy Ohio 

Herrold, Lewis Charles, B.S... Pennsylvania 

Hollander, Arthur, B.S New York 

Hugg, John Henry, B.S Pennsylvania 

Hunt, Josiah Arnold, B.S Maryland 

Jordan, William Pritchard, B.S. 

North Carolina 
Kaminsky, Aaron Louis, B.S. ..New Jersey 

Kane, Harry Francis, A.B Maryland 

Keller, Michael Lawrence New Jersey 

Klein, Harold Henry Pennsylvania 

Klompus, Irving, A.B New Jersey 

Knowles, Frederick Edwin, Jr., B.S. 

New Jersey 

Laino, Frank Armento, B.S Maryland 

Lane, Edwin Charles, A.B New Jersey 

Layton, Caleb Rodney New York 

Lewis, Archie Clifton, B. S Maryland 

Lichtenberg, Walter, B.S., M.A. .New York 

Lieb, Saul, A.B New Jersey 

Llewelyn, Louis Grandin, A.B.. .Maryland 
MacLaughlin, Donald Clay, A.B. 

Maryland 

Marek, Charles Bernard Maryland 

Mays, Howard Brooks Maryland 

McDonough, Oscar Tracy, Jr., A.B. 

Pennsylvania 

McGregor, Alpine Watson Utah 

McGregor, Lorenzo Watson Utah 

McHenry, DeArmond John, B.S. 

Pennsylvania 

Mech, Karl Frederick, B.S Maryland 

Mills, Lawrence Hoy, A.B., B.S. 

West Virginia 

Montgomery, Bruce Pennsylvania 

Noon, Milton Alexander Maryland 

Owen, Philip New Jersey 

Pepe, Anthony James, B.S.. . .Connecticut 

Raffel, William Maryland 

Reier, Charles Henry Maryland 

Roberts, David P Maryland 

Robinson, Harry Maximilian, Jr.. Maryland 

Robinson, Milton Irving New York 

Rogers, Frank Tipton Tennessee 

Rosen, Israel, A.B Maryland 

Rosen, Sol Hyman New Jersey 

Rosenberg, Harold William, B.S. 

New York 



70 BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE; U. OF MD. 

Russell, John Carroll Maryland Vozel, Luther F Maryland 

Schlachman, Milton Maryland Waghelstein, Julius Meyer, B.S... Mary land 

Schmitt, George Fredrick, Jr. . . .Maryland Warren, John McCullen, A.B. 

Schonfeld, Paul Maryland North Carolina 

Shapiro, Joseph, A.B New York Wheless, James Block, B.S. .North Carolina 

Shapiro, Sydney Harold, B.S... .New York Williams, Jesse Frank, Jr., B.S. 

Shaul, John Melvin, A.B New York West Virginia 

Siscovick, Milton Maryland Williamson, Charles Vernon Maryland 

Skeen, Leo Brown North Carolina Wilson, Norman James, B.S Maryland 

Spitznagle, Vernon Edward, B.S. .Maryland Wode, Alvin Eugene William . . .Maryland 

Stein, Benjamin Maxwell, B.S. ...New York Wood, Everet Hardenbergh, A.B. 

Teitel, Louis, B.S New York New Jersey 

Teitelbaum, Harry Allen, B.S.. .New York Woodward, Lewis Klair, Jr., A.B. 

Tuby, Joseph, B.S New York Maryland 

Honors 

University Prize Gold Medal George Fredrick Schmitt, Jr. 

Certificates of Honor 

Walter Lichtenberg Norman James Wilson 

Edward Francis Cotter John Warren Albrittatn 

Douglas Rude Dodge 

Prize 

The Doctor A Bradley Gaither Memorial Prize of $25.00 for the best work in genito- 
urinary surgery during the senior year Edward Francis Cotter 

Degree Conferred September 15, 1934 

Nathan Rudo Maryland 

INTERNESHIPS— CLASS OF 1934 

Abramovitz, Leonard Jerome Sinai Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland 

Adams, Thurston Ray University Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland 

Austraw, Henry Harrison St. Joseph's Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland 

Bayer, Ira Eugene Mercy Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland 

Bayley, George Schwing Mercy Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland 

Berenstein, Stanley Harry 

Emergency Hospital and Central Dispensary, Washington, D. C. 

Blum, Louis Vardee St. Francis Hospital, Wilmington, Delaware 

Brodey, David Franklin Elizabeth General Hospital, Elizabeth, New Jersey 

Burgtorf, George Edward University Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland 

Campbell, Edgar Thrall Mercy Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland 

Caples, Delmas University Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland 

Carliner, Paul Elliott Sinai Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland 

Coates, Stephen Paul Baltimore City Hospitals, Baltimore, Maryland— 6 months 

Hartford Hospital, Hartford, Connecticut— 18 months 

Cohen, Lawrence Jack Sinai Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland 

Cooper, Jules Beth-El General Hospital, Colorado Springs, Colorado 



INTERNESHIPS, 1934 71 

Deitz, Joseph Robert St. Francis Hospital, Trenton, New Jersey 

Diener, Samuel Baltimore City Hospitals, Baltimore, Maryland 

Dorman, George Edward Mercy Hospital, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

Downey, Regis Fallon Mercy Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland 

Dreher, Robert Hering Sacred Heart Hospital, Allentown, Pennsylvania 

Dunbar, John Charles St. John's General Hospital, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

Echols, John Edward Baltimore City Hospitals, Baltimore, Maryland 

Farr, Robert Wilbur University Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland 

Fearing, William Lumsden University Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland 

Feldman, Leon Henry Baltimore City Hospitals, Baltimore, Maryland 

Finegold, Joseph Montefiore Hospital, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Gaskel, Jason Howard South Baltimore General Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland 

Gelb, Jerome Beth Israel Hospital, Newark, New Jersey 

Gelman, Sidney Barnert Memorial Hospital, Paterson, New Jersey 

Goldman, Abram Dr. E. C. Hazard Hospital, Long Branch, New Jersey 

Goldstone, Herbert University Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland 

Goodhand, Charles Luther University Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland 

Goodman, Howard Passavant Hospital, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

Gordon, Joseph Manhattan General Hospital, New York City 

Gutman, Isaac Michael Reese Hospital, Chicago, Illinois 

Hanigsberg, Murray Joseph Harlem Hospital, New York City 

Healy, Robert Fairbank St. Agnes Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland 

Hoffman, Edward Sayer Highland Hospital of Rochester, Rochester, New York 

Horan, William Henry St. Vincent's Hospital, New York City 

Howard, William Lawrence University Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland 

Hummel, Leonard Malcolm W'est Baltimore General Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland 

Hurwitz, Abraham Sinai Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland 

Insley, Philip Asbury Maryland General Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland 

Janney, Nathan Bonney Sinai Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland 

Jerardi, Joseph Victor Mercy Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland 

Johnson, Thorwald Alameda County Hospital, Oakland, California 

Kafer, Oscar Adolph City Memorial Hospital, Winston-Salem, North Carolina 

Kallins, Edward Selig Sinai Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland 

Katz, Simon Beth-El Hospital, Brooklyn, New York 

Ketz, Wesley John Church Home and Infirmary, Baltimore, Maryland 

Knoll, William Misericordia Hospital, New York City 

Lawler, Thomas Gorman San Francisco Hospital, San Francisco, California 

Leass, Reuben Trinity Hospital, Brooklyn, New York 

Leavitt, Abraham Charles Boston City Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 

Levin, Manuel Mt. Pleasant Sanatorium, Reisterstown, Maryland 

Levin, Milton West Baltimore General Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland 

Maginnis, Helen Irene University Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland 

Mains, Marshall Paul Illinois Masonic Hospital, Chicago, Illinois 

Marlett, Neumann Clyde Mountainside Hospital, Montclair, New Jersey 

McNally, Hugh Bernard University Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland 

Millett, Joseph Maryland Tuberculosis Sanatorium — to Dec. 15th, 1934 

Gouveneur Hospital, New York City — Jan. 1, 1935 

Mirow, Richard Raymond Hospital for Joint Diseases, New York City 

Moore, Alfred Charles Mercy Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland 

Moulton, Olin Cates Bon Secours Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland 



72 BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, U. OF MD. 

Mund, Maxwell Herschel Irvington General Hospital, Irvington, New Jersey 

Needleman, Max Beth Israel Hospital, New York City 

O'Connor, Raymond Francis Mercy Hospital, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

Orans, Alfred Abraham Coney Island Hospital, Brooklyn, New York 

Rabinowitz, Jacob Herbert Jewish Hospital, St. Louis, Missouri 

Ray, William Turner Franklin Square Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland 

Reardon, William Thomas Delaware Hospital, Wilmington, Delaware 

Roberson, Edward Leon University Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland 

Rosen, Morris Northern Liberties Hospital, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 

Rosenthal, Charles Morton Metropolitan Hospital, Welfare Island, New York City 

Rudo, Nathan Virginia Baptist Hospital, Lynchburg, Virginia 

Sacks, Milton Samuel Northern Liberties Hospital, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 

Sasscer, James Ghiselin Mercy Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland 

Satulsky, Emanuel Milton Elizabeth General Hospital, Elizabeth, New Jersey 

Schwartz, Daniel James Sinai Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland 

Schwartz, Theodore Allison Mercy Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland 

Sedlacek, Joseph Arthur Church Home and Infirmary, Baltimore, Maryland 

Sekerak, Richard John Stephen Mercy Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland 

Siegel, Benjamin Israel Post Hospital, Fort Moultrie, South Carolina 

Siegel, Milton Bronx Hospital, Bronx, New York 

Smith, William Benjamin Maryland General Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland 

Snyder, John Newcomer Uniontown Hospital, Uniontown, Pennsylvania 

Sollod, Bernard Walter , Sinai Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland 

Soltz, William Boyer Bronx Hospital, New York City 

Sproul, Dorothy Gertrude 

University of California Medical School and Hospital, San Francisco, 

California 

Stein, Milton Robert South Baltimore General Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland 

Stephens, Wilson Paschall Maryland General Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland 

Stutzman, Clyde Malverne W 7 illiamsport Hospital, Williamsport, Pennsylvania 

Sugar, Samuel Jacob Swedish Hospital, Brooklyn, New York 

Sutton, Harold Lawrence Lenox Hill Hospital, New York City 

Taylor, Andrew Du Val University Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland 

Terman, Irving Sydenham Hospital, New York, New York 

Timberlake, Landon Union Memorial Hospital, Baltimore, Md. 

Tuerk, Isadore Baltimore City Hospitals, Baltimore, Maryland 

Udkow, Samuel Gouverneur Hospital, New York, New York 

Wagner, Richard St. Elizabeth Hospital, Elizabeth, New Jersey 

W 7 arshawsky, Harry Trinity Hospital, Brooklyn, New York 

Wilder, Earle Maurice W T est Baltimore General Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland 

Wolfe, William David South Baltimore General Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland 

Zurawski, Charles St. Mary of Nazareth Hospital, Chicago, Illinois 

MATRICULATES 
FOURTH YEAR CLASS 1934-35 

Adelman, Milton Harris, B.S. . . .New York Anderson, John Bascom, A.B. 

Albnttain, John Warren, B.S. . . . Maryland North Carolina 

Alessi, Edward James Maryland Aungst, Melvin Rauch Pennsylvania 

Alonso, Miguel, B.S Puerto Rico Barnes, Henry Eugene, Jr., B.S. 

Alpert, George, A.B Massachusetts North Carolina 



. 



MATRICULATES 



73 



Battaglia, Dominic Thomas, B.S. 

Maryland 

Bierer, Dan George, B.S Pennsylvania 

Bock, Charles Aloysius, B.S... Pennsylvania 
Brouillet, George Hector, B.S. 

Massachusetts 
Bunn, James Pettigrew, Jr., B.S. 

North Carolina 

Cassidy, William Adrian, A.B Maine 

*Coplin, George Joseph, B.S.. . .New Jersey 
Cornbrooks, Ernest Ivon, Jr., A.B. 

New Jersey 

Cotter, Edward Francis Maryland 

Cutler, Frank Henry, A.B Utah 

Dickey, Francis George, A.B.. . .Maryland 

Diehl, Earl Henry Maryland 

Dodge, Douglas Rude Michigan 

Doerner, Alexander Andrew, A.B. 

New York 

Du Bois, Robert Lionel Connecticut 

Dunnigan, William Charles, A.B. 

Maryland 
Einhorn, Samuel Edward, B.S. .New Jersey 
Ewald, August Ludwig, Jr., B.S. ..Maryland 

Fader, Ferdinand, A.B New Jersey 

Freeman, Irving, B.S Maryland 

Fruchtbaum, Robert Pearson, B.S. 

New Jersey 

Galitz, Philip Jacob, M.A New York 

Gerwig, Walter Henry, Jr. . . . West Virginia 
Godbey, John Randolph .... West Virginia 
Grenzer, William Howard, A.B.. Maryland 

Gross, Joseph Bernard Maryland 

Hammill, Gerard Paul, B.S. . . Pennsylvania 
Hamrick, John Carl, B.S.. .North Carolina 

Harris, Aaron Maryland 

Hartman, Ira Frank, A.B., B.S. 

West Virginia 
Heghinian, Jeannette Rosaline E. 

Maryland 
Helfrich, William Goldsborough, B.S. 

Maryland 

Herald, James Kennedy Ohio 

Herrold, Lewis Charles, B.S... Pennsylvania 

Hollander, Arthur, B.S New York 

Hugg, John Henry, B.S Pennsylvania 

Hunt, Josiah Arnold, B.S Maryland 

Jordan, William Pritchard, B.S. 

North Carolina 
Kaminsky, Aaron Louis, B.S. ..New Jersey 

Kane, Harry Francis, A.B Maryland 

Keller, Michael Lawrence New Jersey 

Klein, Harold Henry Pennsylvania 

Klompus, Irving, A.B New Jersey 

Knowles, Frederick Edwin, Jr., B.S. 

New Jersey 

Laino, Frank Armento, B.S Maryland 

Lane, Edwin Charles, A.B New Jersey 

Layton, Caleb Rodney New York 

* Did not complete the year. 



Lewis, Archie Clifton, B.S Maryland 

Lichtenberg, Walter, B.S., M.A . .New York 

Lieb, Saul, A.B New Jersey 

Llewelyn, Louis Grandin, A.B.. ..Maryland 
MacLaughlin, Donald Clay, A.B. 

Maryland 

Marek, Charles Bernard Maryland 

Mays, Howard Brooks Maryland 

McDonough, Oscar Tracy, Jr., A.B. 

Pennsylvania 

McGregor, Alpine Watson Utah 

McGregor, Lorenzo Watson Utah 

McHenry, DeArmond John, B.S. 

Pennsylvania 

Mech, Karl Frederick, B.S Maryland 

Mills, Lawrence Hoy, A.B., B.S. 

West Virginia 

Montgomery, Bruce Pennsylvania 

Noon, Milton Alexander Maryland 

Owen, Philip New Jersey 

Pepe, Anthony James, B.S.. . .Connecticut 

Raffel, William Maryland 

Reier, Charles Henry Maryland 

Roberts, David P Maryland 

Robinson, Harry Maximilian, Jr.. Maryland 

Robinson, Milton Irving New York 

Rogers, Frank Tipton Tennessee 

Rosen, Israel, A.B Maryland 

Rosen, Sol Hyman New Jersey 

Rosenberg, Harold William, B.S. 

New York 

Russell, John Carroll Maryland 

Schlachman, Milton Maryland 

Schmitt, George Fredrick, Jr. . . . Maryland 

Schonfeld, Paul Maryland 

Shapiro, Joseph, A.B New York 

Shapiro, Sydney Harold, B.S. . .New York 

Shaul, John Melvin, A.B New York 

Siscovick, Milton Maryland 

Skeen, Leo Brown North Carolina 

Spitznagle, Vernon Edward, B.S.. Maryland 
Stein, Benjamin Maxwell, B.S. . .New York 

Teitel, Louis, B.S New York. 

Teitelbaum, Harry Allen, B.S.. .New York 

Tuby, Joseph, B.S New York 

Vozel, Luther F Maryland 

Waghelstein, Julius Meyer, B.S. ..Maryland 
Warren, John McCullen, A.B. 

North Carolina 
Wheless, James Block, B.S. 

North Carolina 
Williams, Jesse Frank, Jr., B.S. 

West Virginia 

Williamson, Charles Vernon Maryland 

Wilson, Norman James, B.S Maryland 

Wode, Alvin Eugene William . . . Maryland 
Wood, Everet Hardenbergh, A.B. 

New Jersey 
Woodward, Lewis Klair, Jr., A.B. 

Maryland 



74 



BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, U. OF MD. 



THIRD YEAR CLASS 1934-35 



Batalion, Abraham Louis Maryland 

Beers, Reid Lafeal, A.B Utah 

Bernstein, Milton, A.B Maryland 

Bieren, Roland Essig Maryland 

Booth, Harold Thomas, A.B — New York 

Bowie, Harry Clay, B.S Maryland 

Bunn, James Harry, Jr., B.S. 

North Carolina 
Burka, Irving, B.S.. .District of Columbia 

Burns, Harold Hubert Pennsylvania 

Burton, Jerome Kermit Maryland 

Bush, Joseph Edgar, A.B Maryland 

Chesson, Andrew Long. . . .North Carolina 
Ctibor, Vladimir Frantisek, A.B. 

New Jersey 

Czekaj, Leo Michael Maryland 

Davidson, Nachman, A.B Maryland 

Davis, George Howey, B.S Maryland 

Deehl, Seymour Ralph, B.S... .New Jersey 
Deradorian, Neshon Edward, B.S. 

Connecticut 

Dittmar, Stuart Watt Pennsylvania 

Dixon, Darius McClelland, B.S... Maryland 

Drozd, Joseph Maryland 

Feldman, Jerome Maryland 

Fissel, John Edward, Jr., B.S Maryland 

Fox, Lester Mitchell Maryland 

Franklin, Philip Lair Maryland 

Frich, Michael Garland Pennsylvania 

Gillis, Marion Howard Maryland 

Gimbel, Harry Solomon, A.B.. . .Maryland 

Glassner, Frank Maryland 

Gordner, Jesse Walter, Jr., B.S. 

Pennsylvania 
Greengold, David Bernard, A.B. .Maryland 

Gregory, Philip Orson Maine 

Greifinger, William, A.B New Jersey 

Grollman, Jaye Jacob Maryland 

Herman, Daniel Loeb, A.B Maryland 

Isaacs, Benjamin Herbert, A.B. ..Maryland 

Jones, Ceirianog Henry Pennsylvania 

Jones, Emory Ellsworth, Jr. .West Virginia 
Karfgin, Walter Esselman, B.S. ..Maryland 

Karpel, Saul, B.S New York 

Katz, Joseph Maryland 

Kleiman, Norman, A.B Maryland 

Knobloch, Howard Thomas, B.S. 

Pennsylvania 

Kolodner, Louis Joseph Maryland 

Kroll, Louis Joseph, A.B Maryland 

Lipin, Raymond Joseph Maryland 

Lowman, Robert Morris Maryland 

Lund, Grant Utah 

Mansfield, William Kenneth.. Pennsylvania 

Maser, Louis Robert Maryland 

McCauley, Arthur Franklin, B.S. 

Maryland 
McKnew, Hector Caldwell, Jr.. .Maryland 
McXinch, Eugene Robinson, B.S. 

Pennsylvania 



Moran, James Blessing, Ph.B. 

Rhode Island 

Moran, James Patrick, B.S New York 

Moses, Benjamin Bernard Maryland 

Myerovitz, Joseph Robert Maryland 

Myers, William, B.S Pennsylvania 

Nester, Hansford Dorsey, A.B., B.S. 

West Virginia 
Nestor, Thomas Agnew, Ph.B. 

Rhode Island 
Nicholson, Morris John, B.S. . . .Maryland 
Nowak, Sigmund Roman, B.S. . .Maryland 
O'Brien, William Aloysius, Jr., A.B. 

New Jersey 

O'Nolan, Martin James, B.S Ireland 

Parr, William Andrew Maryland 

Pembroke, Richard Heber, Jr., A.B. 

Maryland 
Pentecoste, Salvador Dante, B.S. 

New Jersey 

Pigman, Carl, B.S Kentucky 

Reichel, Samuel Marvin, A.B.. ..Maryland 
Reynolds, John Henry, Jr. . . . Pennsylvania 

Rochlin, Narcisse Maryland 

Roseman, Ralph Bernard, A.B. 

Pennsylvania 

Rosenthal, Victor, B.S New York 

Royster, James Dan, B.S. . .North Carolina 
Schmieler, George Peter, B.S. 

Pennsylvania 
Selby, George Durward, A.B.. . .Maryland 

Shimanek, Lawrence Joseph Maryland 

Smith, William Carey North Carolina 

Solomon, Cyril Maryland 

Sorin, Matthew New Jersey 

Spain, David Michael New York 

Squires, Millard Fillmore, Jr. . . .Maryland 
Stapen, Milton Honore, B.S. . . .New York 

Stecher, Joseph Louis Maryland 

Steinberg, Samuel Maryland 

Stern, Morris Harold, B.S New Jersey 

Sunday, Stuart Dos Passos, A.B. .Maryland 

Terr, Isaac, B.S New York 

Thomas, Anthony Joseph, Ph.B. 

Massachusetts 
Tierney, Lawrence Matthew . . Connecticut 
Troutman, Baxter Suttles, B.S. 

North Carolina 
Vieweg, George Louis, Jr.. . .West Virginia 
Waller, William Kennedy, A.B... Maryland 

Wehner, Daniel George Maryland 

Weinstein, Jack Joseph Maryland 

Wells, Gibson Jackson, A.B Maryland 

Wilfson, Daniel, Jr., A.B Maryland 

Wilkinson, Arthur Gilbart, A.B. 

Connecticut 

Wolf, Nathan Maryland 

Yavelow, Charles Sidney, A.B. . .New York 
Zimring, Joseph George, B.S.. . .New York 



MATRICULATES 



75 



SECOND YEAR CLASS 1934-35 



Abbott, Thomas Gilbert Maryland 

Bank, R. Stanley, A.B Maryland 

Barnett, Ernest, B.S New York 

Bereston, Eugene Sydney, A. B.. .Maryland 
*Bowers, John Zimmerman, B.S.. Maryland 

Brill, Leonard Maryland 

Burtnick, Lester Leon Maryland 

Carlson, Carl Edwin Connecticut 

Casanova, Jose Ramon Puerto Rico 

Christensen, Roland Arnold.. Pennsylvania 
Cocimano, Joseph Michael 

District of Columbia 

Cooney, Robert Francis Pennsylvania 

Coughlan, Stuart Gray, B.S Maryland 

Daily, Louis Eugene Maryland 

D'Alessio, Charles Magno, B.S. 

Connecticut 
D'Amico, Thomas Vincent, A.B. 

New Jersey 

Davidson, Eli, B.S New York 

Diggs, Everett Schnepfe Maryland 

Eisner, William Monroe, B.S... .New York 
Ellison, Emanuel Simon, B.S.. . .Maryland 

Ensor, Helen Robinson Maryland 

Finn, John Hannon, A.B.. .Massachusetts 

Frenkil, James Maryland 

Frohman, Isaac Maryland 

Gehlert, Sidney Richard, A.B.. .Maryland 
Gillespie, John Lawrence, B.S. .New Jersey 

Goffin, Herbert, B.S New York 

Goldberg, Sigmund Maryland 

Gordon, William Cecil, A.B New York 

Gore, Robert Joseph, A.B Maryland 

Gottdiener, Elvin Edward Maryland 

Greenwald, Frank, A.B New York 

Hahn, Charles Solomon, B.S. . . .New York 
Hedrick, Grover Cleveland, Jr. 

West Virginia 

Highstein, Benjamin Maryland 

Hochfeld, Leo, B.S New York 

Hodgson, Eugene Welch Pennsylvania 

Hoffman, Charles Wilbur, Jr. . . . Maryland 
Humphries, William Coolidge, A.B. 

Maryland 
Insley, James Knox, Jr., A.B. . . .Maryland 

Jackson, Samuel, B.S New York 

Jacobson, Isadore Alan, A.B.. . .Maryland 
Johnston, Clarence Frederick, Jr., A.B. 

Maryland 

Jones, James Porter West Virginia 

Kadan, James Earl, A.B Maryland 

Kagen, Gordon Arthur, A.B. . Pennsylvania 
Kaltreider, D. Frank Olewiler, Jr., A.B. ^ 
Pennsylvania 

Kaplan, Isadore Maryland 

Kaplan, Jack Allen, B.S New York 

Kaplan, Nathan, A.B Maryland 

Katz, Albert Herbert, A.B Maryland 

Katz, Isadore, M.S New York 

* Did not complete the year. 



Kemick, Irvin Bernard Maryland 

Klemkowski, Irvin Philip, A.B. . .Maryland 

Kolman, Lester Norman Maryland 

Kunkowski, Mitchell Frank, B.S.Maryland 

La Mar, David William Maryland 

Leskin, Louis Woron, B.S New York 

Levine, Leonard Warren, B.S. . Connecticut 
Levinson, Leonard Jules, B.S. . . . New York 

Linhardt, Elmer George Maryland 

Lisansky, Ephraim Theodore, A.B. 

Maryland 
Long, William Broughton, Jr., B.S. 

Maryland 
Lubinski, Chester James, A.B.. .Maryland 
Mackowiak, Stephen Casimir . . . Maryland 
Manieri, Frank Vincent, B.S.. . .Maryland 

Marino, Irene Thelma New York 

Matheke, Otto George, Jr., B.S. 

New Jersey 

Meyer, Milton Joseph, B.S New York 

Muller, Stephen Edwin Maryland 

Muse, Joseph Ennalls, B.S Maryland 

Myers, Philip, A.B Maryland 

Nataro, Maurice, B.S New Jersey 

Novey, Samuel Maryland 

Owens, Richard Spurgeon, Jr., B.S. 

Virginia 

Pass, Isidore Earl Maryland 

Pavlatos, August Constantine, B.S. 

Pennsylvania 

Perlman, Lawrence, B.S New York 

Piccolo, Pasquale Albert, B.S. . Connecticut 
Pokrass, Frederick Phillip, A.B. 

Pennsylvania 

Resnick, Elton Maryland 

Revell, Samuel Thompson Redgrave, 

Jr., B.S Georgia 

Rigdon, Henry Lewis Maryland 

Robins, Isadore Morris, A.B. . Pennsylvania 
Robinson, Martin Herman, A.B. 

Pennsylvania 

Rochkind, Reuben, A.B Maryland 

Roseman, Ephraim, A.B Maryland 

Rubin, Morris, A.B Connecticut 

Rudman, Gilbert Elmore, A.B.. .Maryland 

Safran, Sidney Maryland 

Sakowski, John Paul New Jersey 

Sartorius, Norman Ellis, Jr., A.B. 

Maryland 
Scarborough, Clarence Parke, A.B. 

Pennsylvania 

Schmidt, Jacob Edward Maryland 

Seegar, John King Beck Emory, Jr., A.B. 

Maryland 

Seidel, Joshua, A.B Maryland 

Semoff, Milton C. F., B.S New York 

Shapiro, Abraham, B.S Maryland 

Shear, Meyer Robert Maryland 

Spielman, Morton Marvin, B.S. .Maryland 
Stapen, Mannie, B.S New York 



76 



BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, V. OF MD. 



Statman, Bernhardt Joseph, B.S. 

New Jersey 

Steiner, Albert Maryland 

Sullivan, Thomas John, B.S. . .New Jersey 

Suwalsky, Sydney, B.S Connecticut 

Thompson, James Upshur, A. B.. Maryland 

Trupp, Mason, B.S Maryland 

Weems, George Jones, A.B Maryland 

Weiss, Henry Wolf, B.S New York 



Whitworth, Frank Dixon Maryland 

Wilkin, Mabel Giddings, M.A Texas 

Williams, Richard Jones, A.B. . . . Maryland 
Williams, Robert Roderic, A.B . .New York 

Wolff, Eldridge Henry Maryland 

Woodrow, Jack Henry, A.B New York 

Zacek, Frank Anthony Massachusetts 

Zeligman, Israel, A.B Maryland 



FIRST YEAR CLASS 1934-35 



Abarbanel, Milton G., B.S.. . .New Jersey 

♦Abrahams, John James, Jr Maryland 

Abramson, Daniel Jerome Maryland 

Applefeld, Willard Maryland 

Asimakes, Charles Peter, B.S Maryland 

Barenburg, Clara, B.S Maryland 

Baum, Max, A.B Maryland 

Blandford, Alma, B.S Maryland 

Bonner, Robert Alexander, Jr.. Connecticut 
Borden, Melvin Nachlas, A.B.. .Maryland 
Bradley, Stanley Edward, A.B. . . Maryland 
Brooks, Wilbur Starr, A.B.. . .Connecticut 

Brown, Manuel Maryland 

Bunting, John James New Jersey 

Callahan, Timothy Andrew, Jr.. .Maryland 

Chance, Burton, Jr Pennsylvania 

Cohen, Hilliard Maryland 

Colleran, Harold Leo, B.S. . .Pennsylvania 
Coolahan, John Francis, B.S. . . .Maryland 
Cooper, Donald Dwight, A.B... .Maryland 

Costas, Jaime Luis Puerto Rico 

Cowherd, William Jerome Maryland 

Crawford, Robert Clifford, A.B.. Maryland 

Dausch, Michael Joseph Maryland 

Dodd, William Anthony Maryland 

Dolfman, Victor, A.B., M.S.. . Pennsylvania 

Eichert, Arnold Herman Maryland 

Feder, Aaron New York 

Fox, Lester Irving, A.B Massachusetts 

Fox, Samuel Louis Maryland 

Gareis, Louis Calvin Maryland 

George, Joseph Mathias, Jr., A.B. 

Maryland 

Gertman, Samuel, A.B Maryland 

Ginsberg, Milton, A.B Maryland 

Glassman, Edward Lewin Maryland 

Goodman, Louis E., Jr., A.B.. . .Maryland 
Goodman, Sylvan Chauncey. . . . Maryland 

Gottdiener, Florence Hazel Maryland 

Govons, Sidney Robert Maryland 

Graff, Frederick Lewis, A. B.. West Virginia 

Guyton, William Lehman Maryland 

Haase, John Henry Maryland 

Harris, Sidney, A.B New Jersey 

Hayleck, Mary Lodema, A.B.. . . Maryland 

Horky, John Ralph Maryland 

*Jannarone, Lewis Henry New Jersey 

Januszeski, Francis Joseph Maryland 

Katz, Gabriel Elliott Maryland 

* Did not complete the year. 



Katz, Milton Aaron, A.B Maryland 

Kelmenson, Harry Maryland 

Knox, John Joseph, B.S Pennsylvania 

Kotleroff, Jerome, B.S New York 

Kump, Albert Barker New Jersey 

Kurtz, Gerald Independence, A.B. 

New Jersey 

Kyle, Henry Hall Maryland 

Ladensky, Milton, A.B Maryland 

Lauve, Celeste Constance Maryland 

Lenker, Luther Albert, B.S. . Pennsylvania 

Lipsitz, Morton Hirsch, B.S Maryland 

Lopez, Hilton Luis Puerto Rico 

Lumpkin, W 7 illiam Randolph Maryland 

Magness, Stephen Lee, A.B Maryland 

*Meyer, Charles Nathaniel, A.B. .Maryland 

Michaelson, Ernest Maryland 

Milholland, Arthur Vincent, A.B.Maryland 

Miller, Clarence Lee Missouri 

Miller, Royston Maryland 

Miniszek, James Haight Maryland 

Molofsky, Leonard Carl Maryland 

Palmer, David Waugh West Virginia 

Post, Laurence Caldwell, B.S. 

West Virginia 
Powell, Geraldine Kennedy, A.B.Maryland 

Rizzolo, John New Jersey 

Roman, Paul, A.B Maryland 

Rossello, Juan A Puerto Rico 

Rothkopf , Henry New York 

Sabatino, Bernard Joseph, A.B. Maryland 
Sarajian, Aram Martyr, A.B.. .New Jersey 

Schaefer, John Ferdinand Maryland 

Schammel, Adam John Maryland 

Schenthal, Joseph Edwin, A.B. . .Maryland 

Scherlis, Sidney, A.B Maryland 

Schlesinger, Robert Abraham. . .New York 

Scott, John Matthai Maryland 

Sevcik, Charles Vincent Maryland 

*Seymour, William Abercrombie, B.S. 

Maryland 

Sharp, Martin Burke, B.S Maryland 

Sheppard, Robert Clay Maryland 

Siegel, Edward, M.A New York 

Silberman, Donald Jared, A.B.. .Alabama 

Smith, John P., A.B Maryland 

Sprei, Emanuel, M.S New York 

Stein, Aaron, A.B Maryland 

Steinberg, Morris William Maryland 

* Did not complete the year. 



ALUMNI ASSOCIATION SECTION 



77 



Swiss, Adam George Maryland 

Taliaferro, William Booth Virginia 

Thomas, Bernard Oscar Maryland 

Thompson, Winfield Lynn Maryland 

Twardowicz, Albin Harry, B.S. . .Maryland 

♦Ullman, Alfred Jr., A.B Maryland 

Urlock, John Peter, Jr Maryland 

Vollmer, Frederick Joseph, B.S.. Maryland 

Wagner, John Alfred, B.S Maryland 

Wanner, Jesse Rosenberger, Jr. . . Maryland 
Warner, Margaret Elizabeth, A.B. 

Maryland 
* Did not complete the year. 



Warres, Herbert Leonard, B.S. . .New York 

Weisberg, Millard Maryland 

Welfeld, Alvan Abram, A.B Maryland 

White, Harry Fletcher, Jr Maryland 

White, Samuel Cottrell Maryland 

Winer, Albert Sidney, A.B Maryland 

Woodward, Theodore Englar, B.S. 

Maryland 
Worthington, Richard Walker, Jr. 

Maryland 

Wulwick, Michael, B.S New York 

Yaffe, Kennard Levinson Maryland 



OFFICERS OF THE MEDICAL ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 
For the Year 1935-36 



President Dr. Frank J. Kirby 

{Dr. Frank H. Cutler 
Dr. Wm. N. Palmer 
Dr. Geo. O. Sharrett 

Secretary Dr. Frank K. Morris 

Assistant Secretary Dr. T. Nelson Carey 



Treasurer Dr. D. J. 

Dr. Alfred T. Gundry, 



Board of Directors. 



Pessagno 
Chairman 



Dr. T. B. Aycock 
Dr. Kenneth B. Boyd 
Dr. Arthur Hebb 
Dr. W. H. Toulson 
Dr. Robert P. Bay 
Dr. Frank K. Morris 
Dr. T. Nelson Carey 
Dr. D. J. Pessagno 

Dr. George F. Sargent 
Dr. Kenneth Jones 
Dr. S. Demarco, Chairman 
Dr. Frank Jennings 
Dr. Frank S. Lynn 
Dr. Morley Hoag 
Dr. Paul Byerly 

Library Committee Dr. W. S. Love, Jr. 

Dr. W. S. Love, Chairman 



Hospital Council 



Advisory Committee. 



Student Rotating Fund. 



De. R. L. Mitchell 
Dr. G. M. Linthicum 
Dr. Eugene Hayward 



Editors. 



Dr. 
Dr. 



Alumni Council. 



Emil Novak 

C Gardner Warner 
Dr. W. H. Triplett 
Dr. Frank J. Kirby 



78 BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, U. OF MD. 

ENDOWMENT FUND 

The following constitute the Board of Trustees of this Fund: 

E. F. Kelly, Ph.G., Chairman Daniel Baker, Jr. 

J. M. H. Rowland, M.D., Sc.D., LL.D. Stuart Janney 

Harry Adler, M.D. Robertson Griswold 

Randolph Winslow, A.M., M.D., LL.D. Arthur M. Shipley, Sc.D., M.D. 

Henry Holzapfel, Jr. 

This Board is incorporated by act of the Legislature of the State, its 
Jegal title being "The Trustees of the Endowment Fund of the University 
of Maryland," and is independent and self-perpetuating. Its powers are 
limited to the expenditure of the interest derived from the various funds, which 
is applied as directed by donors for the benefit of the University. Con- 
tributions, donations and bequests are solicited from Alumni and friends. 
They may be made to the general or University Fund, to the Medical Fund 
or to any other department of the University. If intended for the School 
of Medicine, they may be given to the general medical fund or to some spe- 
cial object, as building, research, library, pathology, hospital, publication, 
laboratories, gymnasium, scholarship, medal, prize, etc., in which case the 
wishes of the donor will be strictly regarded. Attention is invited to the 
"Charles Frick Research Fund," already established in memory of that 
distinguished investigator. Checks should be made payable to Endow- 
ment Fund of the University of Maryland, J. M. H. Rowland, Treasurer, 
Lombard and Greene Streets, Baltimore, Md. 

FORMS OF DEVISE OR BEQUEST 
To School of Medicine 

I give, devise and bequeath to the Regents of the University of Maryland, a corporation 
incorporated under the laws of the State of Maryland, for the benefit of the Faculty of 
Physic 

(Here state amount or describe property) 
To Endowment Fund 
I give, devise and bequeath to the Trustees of the Endowment Fund of the University 
of Maryland, a corporation incorporated under the laws of the State of Maryland, for the 

benefit of the Faculty of Physic 

(Here state amount or describe property) 

THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND SCHOOL OF NURSING 

The University of Maryland School for Nurses was established in the 
year 1889. Since that time it has been an integral part of the University 
of Maryland, coming under the same government. It is a non-sectarian 
school, the only religious services being morning prayers. 



SCHOOL OF NURSING 79 

The University Hospital is a general hospital containing about 400 beds. 
It is equipped to give young women a thorough course of instruction and 
practice in all phases of nursing. 

Programs Offered: The programs of study of the school are planned for 
two groups of students: (a) the five-year group, (b) the three-year group. 

The requirements for admission to the five-year program of the School 
of Nursing are the same as for other colleges of the University. The com- 
pletion of this course entitles the student to the degree of Bachelor of 
Science from the University of Maryland and to the diploma of the Uni- 
versity Hospital School of Nursing. 

The requirements for admission to the three year program are the satis- 
factory completion of an academic course in an approved high school. 
The completion of this course entitles the student to the diploma of the 
University of Maryland School of Nursing. Blank certificates will be 
furnished upon application to the Director of the School of Nursing. 

MERCY HOSPITAL SCHOOL OF NURSING 

The Mercy Hospital School of Nursing was established in 1899 and 
incorporated on December 23, 1901. It has developed the art of the pro- 
fession according to the high standard necessary to qualify as a Registered 
Nurse. 

The rapid growth of the institution, attested by the increasing number 
of its graduates, is evidence of the active part it takes in the health of the 
community. Through its connection with the Mercy Hospital its oppor- 
tunities are unlimited. By its affiliation with the University of Maryland 
it has the advantage of the best professors for the instruction of the nurses. 

The University of Maryland, in affiliation with the Mercy Hospital 
School of Nursing, offers a five year combined Academic and Nursing 
prog am. The completion of this course entitles the student to the degree 
of Bachelor of Science from the University of Maryland, and to the diploma 
of the Mercy Hospital School of Nursing. Graduate nurses who hold col- 
lege degrees are greatly in demand, especially for positions in administration 
and teaching institutions. This program consequently offers a distinct 
advantage. 



INDEX 



PAGE 

Alumni Association 77 

Annual Hospital Appointments 68 

Board of Regents 3 

Calendar 2 

Combined Course in Arts and Medi- 
cine 62 

Consolidation of Schools 10 

Curriculum, Organization of 30 

Anatomy 31 

Histology 32 

Embryology 32 

Neuro Anatomy 32 

Physiology 33 

Bacteriology and Immunology 33 

Biological Chemistry 34 

Pharmacology and Materia Medica 34 

Pathology 35 

Medicine 36 

Clinical Pathology 39 

Gastro-Enterology 40 

Psychiatry 40 

Pediatrics 41 

Neurology 42 

Hygiene and Preventive Medicine . . 42 

Medical Jurisprudence 43 

Surgery 43 

Anaesthesia 46 

Dermatology 47 

Orthopaedic Surgery 47 

Roentgenology 47 

Diathermy and Radium Therapy. . 47 

Throat and Nose 48 

Bronchoscopy and Esophagoscopy. . 48 

Genito-Urinary 48 

Rectum and Colon 49 

Otology 49 

Neurological Surgery 50 

Oncology 50 

Oral Surgery 50 

Obstetrics 51 

Gynecology 51 

Ophthalmology 52 



PAGE 

Art as Applied to Medicine 53 

History of Medicine 53 

Dispensary Reports: 

Mercy Hospital 27 

University Hospital 19 

Clinical Facilities: 

Mercy Hospital 20 

University Hospital 12 

Dispensary Staffs: 

Mercy Hospital 25 

University Hospital 17 

Endowmen t Fund 78 

Expenses, Students 68 

Faculty of Physic 4 

Fees 63 

Hospitals : 

James Lawrence Kernan 29 

Mercy Hospital 20 

Baltimore City Hospitals 27 

University Hospital 12 

Internships 70 

Libraries 30 

Matriculates 72 

Medical Care of Students 64 

Medical Council 4 

Prizes 65 

Requirements for Matriculation 61 

Rules 62 

Schedule 55 

Scholarships 65 

Staffs: 

Baltimore City Hospitals 27 

James Lawrence Kernan Hospital. . 29 

Mercy Hospital 21 

University Hospital 14 

Training Schools for Nurses: 

Mercy Hospital 79 

University Hospital 78 

University Council 4 

University of Maryland, Organization 

of 11 



80 



VOLUME 2.0 NUMBER 5 



BULLETIN 



OF THE 



SCHOOL of MEDICINE 

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



MAY, 1936 




PUBLISHED FIVE TIMES A YEAR 
(JANUARY, APRIL, MAY, JULY AND OCTOBER) 



Lombard and Greene Streets 
Baltimore, Md. 



Entered as second-class matter June 16, 1916, at the Postoffice at Baltimore, Maryland, 
under the Act of August 24, 1912. 



Made in United States of America 



BULLETIN 



OF THE 



University of Maryland School of Medicine 
and College of Physicians and Surgeons 



Successor to The Hospital Bulletin of the University of Maryland, 

Baltimore Medical College News, and the Journal of the 

Alumni Association of the College of 

Physicians and Surgeons 




Annual Announcement 
Session 1936-37 



VOLUME lO, NO. 5 
MAY, IQ36 



CALENDAR FOR 1936-37 
SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 



1936 




September 22 


Tuesday 


September 23 


Wednesday 


September 24 


Thursday 


November 25 


Wednesday 


November 30 


Monday 


December 19 


Saturday 


1937 




January 4 


Monday 


January 25 


Monday 


to 


to 


January 30, incl. Saturday 


January 30 


Saturday 


February 1 


Monday 


February 22 


Monday 


March 24 


Wednesday 


March 3 1 


Wednesday 


June 5 


Saturday 



FIRST SEMESTER 

*Registration for first- and second-year students. 
*Registration for all other students. 

Instruction begins with the first scheduled period. 

Thanksgiving recess begins after the last scheduled period. 

Instruction resumed with the first scheduled period. 

Christmas recess begins after the last scheduled period. 

Instruction resumed with the first scheduled period. 
*Registration for the second semester. 



First semester ends after the last scheduled period. 

SECOND SEMESTER 

Instruction begins with the first scheduled period. 

Washington's Birthday. Holiday. 

Easter recess begins after the last scheduled period. 

Instruction resumed with the first scheduled period. 

Commencement. 



* A student who neglects or fails to register prior to or within the day or days specified 
for his or her school will be called upon to pay a fine of five dollars ($5.00). The last 
day of registration with fine added to regular fees is Saturday at noon of the week in 
which instruction begins following the specified registration period. (This rule may be 
waived only upon the written recommendation of the dean.) 

The offices of the registrar and comptroller are open daily, not including Saturday, 
from 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., and on Saturday from 9:00 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., with the 
following exceptions: Monday, September 14, 1936, until 8:00 p.m.: Saturday, Septem- 
ber 26, 1936, until 5:00 p.m.; and on Saturday, January 30, 1937, until 5:00 p.m. 

Advance registration is encouraged. 



ORGANIZATION 
THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Harry Clifton Byrd, B.S., LL.D., President and Executive Officer 
BOARD OF REGENTS 

Term expires 

Dr. W. W. Skinner, Chairman 1936 

Kensington, Montgomery County 

Mrs. John L. Whitehurst, Secretary 1938 

3902 St. Paul Street, Baltimore 

Hon. W. Calvin Chesnut 1942 

United States Postoffice Building, Baltimore 

Hon. William P. Cole, Jr 1940 

Towson, Baltimore County 

Henry Holzapfel, Jr., Esq 1943 

Hagerstown, Washington County 

Harry H. Nuttle, Esq 1941 

Denton, Caroline County 

J. Milton Patterson, Esq 1944 

Cumberland, Alleghany County 

John E. Raine, Esq 1939 

Towson, Baltimore County 

Clinton L. Riggs, Esq 1942 

903 N. Charles Street, Baltimore 

Control of the University of Maryland is vested in a Board of nine 
Regents, appointed by the Governor and confirmed by the Senate for terms 
of nine years each. The general administration of the University is vested 
in the President. The University Council is an advisory body, composed 
of the President, the Vice-President, the Director of the Agricultural Experi- 
ment Station, the Director of the Extension Service, and the Deans. The 
University Council acts upon all matters having relation to the University 
as a whole or to cooperative work between the constituent groups. Each 
school has its own Faculty Council, composed of the Dean and members of 
its Faculty; each Faculty Council controls the internal affairs of the group 
it represents. 

The University has the following educational organization: 

The College of Agriculture, The College of Education, 

The College of Engineering, The College of Home Economics, 

The College of Arts and Sciences, The Graduate School, 

The School of Medicine, The Summer School, 

The School of Law, The Department of Physical Education 

The School of Dentistry, and Recreation. 

The School of Pharmacy, 

The Schools of Medicine, Law, Dentistry and Pharmacy are located in 
Baltimore; the others in College Park, Maryland. 

3 



4 BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, U. OF MD. 

THE UNIVERSITY SENATE 

(Baltimore Schools) 

H. C. Byrd, B.S., LL.D President of the University 

J. M. H. Rowland, M.D., Sc.D., LL.D Dean of the School of Medicine 

Roger Howell, Ph.D., LL.B Dean of the School of Law 

Andrew G. DuMez, M.S., Ph.D Dean of the School of Pharmacy 

J. Ben Robinson, D.D.S., F.A.C.D Dean of the School of Dentistry 

T. H. Taliaferro, C.E., Ph.D Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences 

Arthur J. Lomas, M.D., CM., D.P.H Superintendent of the Hospital 

T. 0. Heatwole, M.D., D.D.S., D.Sc Secretary of the Baltimore Schools 

W. M. Hillegeist Director of Admissions 



MEDICAL COUNCIL 

Arthur M. Shipley, M.D., Sc.D. Frank W. Hachtel, M.D. 

J. M. H. Rowland, M.D., Sc.D., LL.D. Eduard Uhlenhuth, Ph.D. 

Alexius McGlannan, A.M., M.D., LL.D. Clyde A. Clapp, M.D. 

Hugh R. Spencer, M.D. John C. Krantz, Jr., Ph.D. 

H. Boyd Wylie, M.D. Walter D. Wise, M.D. 

Carl L. Davis, M.D. Magnus I. Gregersen, M.A., Ph.D. 

Maurice C. Pincoffs, B.S., M.D. J. Mason Hundley, Jr., M.A., M.D. 



FACULTY OF PHYSIC 

Randolph Winslow, A.M., M.D., LL.D Professor Emeritus of Surgery 

J. Frank Crouch, M.D Professor Emeritus of Clinical Ophthalmology and Otology 

John R. Winslow, A.B., M.D Professor Emeritus of Rhinology and Laryngology 

Harry Friedenwald, A.B., M.D Professor Emeritus of Ophthalmology 

William S. Gardner, M.D Professor Emeritus of Gynecology 

Julius Friedenwald, A.M., M.D Professor Emeritus of Gastro-Enterology 



Arthur M. Shipley, M.D., Sc.D., Professor of Surgery. 

J. M. H. Rowland, M.D., Sc.D., LL.D. Professor of Obstetrics and Dean of the Faculty. 

Alexius McGlannan, A.M., M.D., LL.D., Professor of Surgery. 

Hugh R. Spencer, M.D., Professor of Pathology. 

H. Boyd Wylie, M.D., Professor of Biological Chemistry. 

Carl L. Davis, M.D., Professor of Anatomy. 

Maurice C. Pincoffs, B.S., M.D., Professor of Medicine. 

Frank W. Hachtel, M.D., Professor of Bacteriology. 

Clyde A. Clapp, M.D., Professor of Ophthalmology. 

John C. Krantz, Jr., Ph.D., Professor of Pharmacology. 

Eduard Uhlenhuth, Ph.D., Professor of Anatomy. 

Magnus I. Gregersen, M.A., Ph.D., Professor of Physiology. 

J. Mason Hundley, Jr., M.A., M.D., Professor of Gynecology. 

William H. Schultz, Ph.B., Ph.D., Research Professor of Pharmacology. 

Joseph E. Gichner, M.D., Professor of Clinical Medicine and Physical Therapeutics. 



FACULTY OF PHYSIC 

Irving J. Spear, M.D., Professor of Neurology. 

Charles F. Blake, A.M., M.D., Professor of Diseases of the Rectum and Colon. 

S. Griffith Davis, M.S., M.D., Professor of Anaesthesia. 

G. Carroll Lockard, M.D., Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

Harvey G. Beck, M.D., Sc.D., Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

Albertus Cotton, A.M., M.D., Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery and Roentgenology. 

Andrew C. Gillis, A.M., M.D., LL.D., Professor of Neurology. 

Henry J. Walton, M.D., Professor of Roentgenology. 

Ross McC. Chapman, M.D., Professor of Psychiatry. 

John Rathbone Oliver, A.B., M.D., Ph.D., Professor of the History of Medicine. 

L. H. Douglass, M.D., Professor of Clinical Obstetrics. 

Edgar B. Friedenwald, M.D., Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. 

Edward A. Looper, M.D., D.Oph., Professor of Diseases of the Nose and Throat. 

J. W. Downey, M.D., Professor of Otology. 

Harry M. Stein, M.D., Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

W. H. Toulson, A.B., M.Sc, M.D., Professor of Genito-Urinary Surgery. 

Charles Bagley, Jr., A.B., M.D., Professor of Neurological Surgery. 

Allen Fiske Voshell, A.B., M.D., Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery. 

Nathan Winslow, A.M., M.D., Professor of Clinical Surgery. 

Page Edmunds, M.D., Professor of Traumatic Surgery. 

Walter D. Wise, M.D., Professor of Clinical Surgery. 

Frank S. Lynn, M.D., Professor of Clinical Surgery. 

Elliott H. Hutchins, A.M., M.D., Professor of Clinical Surgery. 

Charles Reid Edwards, M.D., Professor of Clinical Surgery. 

Harry M. Robinson, M.D., Professor of Clinical Dermatology. 

F. L. Jennings, M.D., Professor of Clinical Surgery. 

Huntington Williams, M.D., Dr.P.H., Professor of Hygiene and Public Health. 

Robert P. Bay, M.D., Professor of Oral Surgery. 

C. Loping Joslin, M.D., Professor of Pediatrics. 

Brice M. Dorsey, D.D.S., Professor of Exodontia. 

J. Dawson Reeder, M.D., Professor of Diseases of the Rectum and Colon. 

Compton Rtely, M.D., Clinical Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery. 

W. S. Smith, M.D., Clinical Professor of Gynecology. 

T. Fred Leitz, M.D., Clinical Professor of Gastro-Enterology. 

M. Randolph Kahn, M.D., Clinical Professor of Ophthalmology. 

Waitman F. Zinn, M.D., Clinical Professor of Diseases of the Nose and Throat. 

A. J. Gillis, M.D., Clinical Professor of Genito-Urinary Surgery. 

Theodore H. Morrison, M.D., Clinical Professor of Gastro-Enterology. 

Abram S. Samuels, M.D., Clinical Professor of Gynecology. 

R. W. Locher, M.D., Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery. 

Sydney M. Cone, A.B., M.D., Associate Professor of Pathology. 

H. J. Maldeis, M.D., Associate Professor of Medical Jurisprudence. 

G. M. Settle, A.B., M.D., Associate Professor of Neurology and Clinical Medicine. 
C. C. W. Judd, A.B., M.D., Associate Professor of Medicine. 

Thomas R. Chambers, A.M., M.D., Associate Professor of Surgery. 
William H. Smith, M.D., Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine. 
Paul W. Clough, B.S., M.D., Associate Professor of Medicine. 
Sydney R. Miller, A.B., M.D., Associate Professor of Medicine. 
J. McFarland Bergland, M.D., Associate Professor of Obstetrics. 
Walter A. Baetjer, A.B., M.D., Associate Professor of Medicine. 
A. M. Evans, M.D., Associate Professor of Surgery. 



6 BULLETIN OF TEE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, U. OF MD. 

Edward S. Johnson, M.D., Associate Professor of Surgery. 
H. K. Fleck, M.D., Associate Professor of Ophthalmology. 
Emil Novak, M.D., Associate Professor of Obstetrics. 
Ralph P. Truitt, M.D., Associate Professor of Psychiatry. 

D. J. Pessagno, M.D., Associate Professor of Surgery. 

Moses Gellman, B.S., M.D., Associate Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery. 

Harry L. Rogers, M.D., Associate Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery. 

O. G. Haene, Associate Professor of Histology. 

Charles A. Reifschneider, M.D. , Associate Professor of Surgery and Oral Surgery. 

Thomas R. Sprunt, M.D., Associate Professor of Medicine. 

Monte Edwards, M.D., Associate Professor of Surgery and Associate in Gross Anatomy 

and Diseases of the Rectum and Colon. 
Frank H. Figge, A.B., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Gross Anatomy. 
W. S. Love, Jr., A.B., M.D., Associate Professor of Medicine and Instructor in Pathology. 
Cyrus F. Horine, M.D., Associate Professor of Surgery. 
Clyde N. Marvel, M.D., Associate Professor of Surgery. 
Walter S. Root, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Physiology. 
T. Campbell Goodwin, M.D., Associate Professor of Pediatrics. 
Carl Dame Clarke, Associate Professor of Art as Applied to Medicine. 
S.Xloyd Johnson, A.B., LL.B., M.D., Assistant Professor of Medicine. 
John G. Huck, M.D., Assistant Professor of Medicine. 
George McLean, M.D., Assistant Professor of Medicine. 
Maurice Feldman, M.D., Assistant Professor of Gastro-Enterology. 
Robert B. Wright, B.S., M.D., Assistant Professor of Pathology. 
L. A. M. Krause, M.D., Assistant Professor of Medicine. 
H. R. Peters, M.D., Assistant Professor of Medicine. 
Milford Levy, M.D., Assistant Professor of Neurology. 
John H. Traband, M.D., Assistant Professor of Pediatrics. 
Albert Jaffe, M.D., Assistant Professor of Pediatrics. 
Emil G. Schmidt, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Biological Chemistry. 
C. Gardner Warner, A.B., M.D., Assistant Professor of Pathology. 
Harry Goldsmith, M.D., Assistant Professor of Psychiatry. 
Lawrence F. Woolley, M.D., Assistant Professor of Psychiatry. 
H. W. Newell, M.D., Assistant Professor of Psychiatry. 

Leon Freedom, M.D., Assistant Professor of Neurology and Instructor in Pathology. 
Zachariah Morgan, M.D., Assistant Professor of Gastro-Enterology. 
Samuel Morrison, M.D., Assistant Professor of Gastro-Enterology. 
Harry M. Murdock, M.D., Assistant Professor of Psychiatry. 
A. H. Finkelstein, M.D., Assistant Professor of Pediatrics. 
John E. Legge, M.D., Assistant Professor of Medicine. 
Thomas C. Wolff, M.D., Assistant Professor of Medicine. 
Frederick Smith, M.D., Assistant Professor of Pediatrics. 
J. G. M. Reese, M.D., Assistant Professor of Obstetrics. 
M. Alexander Novey, A.B., M.D., Assistant Professor of Obstetrics and Instructor in 

Pathology. 
George A. Strauss, Jr., M.D., Assistant Professor of Gynecology. 
R. G. Willse, M.D., Assistant Professor of Gynecology. 
Thomas K. Galvin, M.D., Assistant Professor of Gynecology. 
Leo Brady, A.B., M.D., Assistant Professor of Gynecology. 
Jonas Friedenwald, A.B., M.D., Lecturer in Ophthalmic Pathology. 

E. B. Freeman, M.D., Lecturer in Medicine. 
Charles R. Goldsborough, M.D., Lecturer in Medicine. 



FACULTY OF PHYSIC 7 

Thomas B. Aycock, B.S., M.D., Associate in Surgery. 

John R. Abercrombie, A.B., M.D., Associate in Dermatology. 

Joseph I. Kemler, M.D., Associate in Ophthalmology. 

Frank N. Ogden, M.D., Associate in Biological Chemistry. 

E. P. Smith, M.D., Associate in Gynecology. 

Franklin B. Anderson, M.D., Associate in Diseases of the Nose and Throat and Otology. 

Austin H. Wood, M.D., Associate in Genito-Urinary Surgery. 

Albert E. Goldstein, M.D., Associate in Pathology. 

H. M. Bubert, M.D., Associate in Medicine and Assistant in Bacteriology. 

Samuel S. Glick, M.D., Associate in Pediatrics. 

W. J. Todd, M.D., Associate in Pediatrics. 

William G. Geyer, M.D., Associate in Pediatrics. 

Clewell Howell, M.D., Associate in Pediatrics. 

Walter C. Merkel, A.B., M.D., Associate in Pathology. 

Joseph Sindler, M.D., Associate in Gastro-Enterology. 

John F. Lutz, A.B., M.D., Associate in Histology. 

Isadore A. Siegel, A.B., M.D., Associate in Obstetrics. 

H. F. Bongardt, M.D., Associate in Surgery. 

I. O. Rtdgley, M.D., Associate in Surgery. 

R. D. West, M.D., Associate in Ophthalmology. 

Eugene L. Flippin, M.D., Associate in Roentgenology. 

Richard G. Coblentz, A.B., M.D., Associate in Neurological Surgery. 

J. S. Eastland, M.D., Associate in Medicine. 

L. J. Millan, M.D., Associate in Genito-Urinary Surgery. 

W. Raymond McKenzie, M.D., Associate in Diseases of the Nose and Throat. 

T. Nelson Carey, M.D., Associate in Medicine and Physician in Charge of Medical Care 

of Students. 
K. D. Legge, M.D., Associate in Genito-Urinary Surgery. 

E. P. H. Harrison, A.B., M.D., Associate in Obstetrics. 

William H. F. Warthen, M.D., Associate in Hygiene and Public Health. 

Francis Ellis, A.B., M.D., Associate in Dermatology. 

L. K. Fargo, M.D., Associate in Genito-Urinary Surgery. 

Henry F. Graff, A.B., M.D., Associate in Ophthalmology. 

Grant E. Ward, A.B., M.D., Associate in Surgery. 

Harold M. Goodman, A.B., M.D., Associate in Dermatology. 

Wetherbee Fort, M.D., Associate in Medicine. 

F. Stratner Orem. M.D., Associate in Pediatrics. 
Frank J. Geraghty, M.D., Associate in Medicine. 
L. P. Gundry, M.D., Associate in Medicine. 

John F. Hogan, M.D., Associate in Genito-Urinary Surgery. 

Thomas R. O'Rourk, M.D., Associate in Diseases of the Nose and Throat and Assis- 
tant in Ophthalmology and Otology. 
Kenneth B. Boyd, M.D., Associate in Gynecology and Assistant in Obstetrics. 
Chester L. Reynolds, M.D., Associate in Psychiatry. 
Benjamin Pushkin, M.D., Associate in Neurology. 
John T. Hibbitts, M.D., Associate in Gynecology. 
Henry F. Buettner, M.D., Instructor in Bacteriology. 
J. A. F. Pfelffer, M.D., Instructor in Bacteriology. 
M. S. Koppelman, M.D., Instructor in Gastro-Enterology. 
M. G. Gichner, M.D., Instructor in Medicine. 
M. G. Tull, M.D., Instructor in Hygiene and Public Health. 
W. R. Johnson, M.D., Instructor in Surgery and Pathology. 



8 BULLETIN OF TEE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, U. OF MD. 

E. M. Hanrahan, A.B., M.D., Instructor in Surgery. 
R. M. Hening, M.D., Instructor in Pediatrics. 

Ruth Musser, A.B., M.S., Instructor in Pharmacology. 

Benjamin Abeshouse, Ph.B., M.D., Instructor in Pathology. 

Joseph Pokorney, M.D., Instructor in Histology. 

Jaroslav Hulla, B.S., M.D., Instructor in Histology and Assistant in Obstetrics. 

A. C. Monninger, M.D., Instructor in Dermatology. 

S. Demarco, M.D., Instructor in Surgery. 

Karl J. Steinmueller, A.B., M.D., Instructor in Surgery. 

William Ellsworth Evans, M.S., Ph.D., Instructor in Pharmacology. 

Frank A. Pacienza, M.D., Instructor in Refraction. 

Samuel T. Helms, M.D., Instructor in Medicine and Genito-Urinary Surgery 

W. W. Walker, M.D., Instructor in Surgery. 

J. J. Leyko, M.D., Instructor in Surgery. 

William R. Geraghty, B.S., M.D., Instructor in Neurological Surgery and Pathology 

and Assistant in Surgery. 
George H. Yeager, B.S., M.D., Instructor in Surgery. 

F. A. Holden, M.D., Instructor in Ophthalmology and Otology. 
Martin J. Hanna, M.D., Instructor in Histology. 
Elizabeth E. Painter, A. B., Instructor in Physiology. 

Earl L. Chambers, M.D., Instructor in Medicine. 

Z. Vance Hooper, M.D., Instructor in Gastro-Enterology. 

C. Victor Richards, M.D., Instructor in Gastro-Enterology. 

M. Paul Byerly, M.D., Instructor in Pediatrics and Assistant in Medicine. 

E. H. Tonolla, M.D., Instructor in Medicine. 

G. Bowers Mansdorfer, M.D., Instructor in Pediatrics. 
J. Edmund Bradley, M.D., Instructor in Pediatrics. 

W. A. H. Councill, M.D., Instructor in Genito-Urinary Surgery. 

William E. Hahn, D.D.S., Instructor in Exodontia. 

Luther E. Little, M.D., Instructor in Surgery. 

J. Frank Hewitt, A.B., M.D., Instructor in Surgery. 

Arthur G. Siwinski, A.B., M.D., Instructor in Gross Anatomy and Assistant in Surgery. 

David Tenner, M.D., Instructor in Medicine. 

J. Howard Burns, M.D., Instructor in Medicine. 

R. B. Mitchell, Jr., M.D., Instructor in Medicine. 

Samuel Legum, A.B., M.D., Instructor in Medicine. 

Ernest Levi, M.D., Instructor in Gastro-Enterology. 

James G. Arnold, Jr., A.B., M.D., Instructor in Neurology and Assistant in Pathology. 

J. G. Onnen, M.D., Instructor in Surgery. 

E. S. Edlavitch, M.D., Instructor in Gynecology and Assistant in Obstetrics. 

William M. Seabold, A.B., M.D., Instructor in Neural Anatomy and Pediatrics and 

Assistant in Pathology. 
William L. Fearing, M.D., Instructor in Histology. 
C. Jelleff Carr, M.S., Instructor in Pharmacology. 
Milton S. Sacks, B.S., M.D., Instructor in Pathology. 
John A. Askin, M.D., Instructor in Pediatrics. 
Thomas J. Coonan, M.D., Instructor in Pediatrics. 
Thomas S. Bowyer, M.D., Instructor in Gynecology. 
Joseph V. Castagna, M.D., Instructor in Gynecology. 

Frank K. Morris, A.B., M.D., Assistant in Surgery, Obstetrics and Gynecology. 
Marius P. Johnson, A.B., M.D., Assistant in Pharmacology and Obstetrics. 



FACULTY OF PHYSIC 9 

Dwight Mohr, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

Howard B. McElwain, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

Robert W. Johnson, M.D., Assistant in Pathology and Surgery. 

A. V. Buchness, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

T. J. Touhey, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

Nathaniel Beck, M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 

Carl Benson, M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 

A. Scagnetti, M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 

W. J. Schmitz, M.D., Assistant in Pediatrics. 

H. Edmund Levin, M.D., Assistant in Bacteriology and Medicine. 

John G. Runkle, M.D., Assistant in Ophthalmology. 

Margaret B. Ballard, M.D., Assistant in Obstetrics. 

Birkhead Macgowan, M.D., Assistant in Diseases of the Nose and Throat and Otology. 

Clyde F. Karns, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

Paul Schenker, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

Morris Fine, M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 

Samuel H. Culver, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

J. Willis Guyton, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

Benjamin S. Rich, M.D., Assistant in Otology. 

W. H. Trtplett, M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 

J. G. Feman, M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 

E. M. Reese, M.S., Assistant in Medicine. 

H. William Primakoff, M.D., Assistant in Gastro-Enterology. 

William N. McFaul, Jr., M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

Simon H. Brager, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

C W. Peake, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

E. Hollister Davis, A.B., M.D., Assistant in Anaesthesia. 

James C. Owings, M.D., Assistant in Surgery and Diseases of the Rectum and Colon. 

Conrad B. Acton, B.S., M.D., Assistant in Pathology and Medicine. 

Israel P. Meranski, M.D., Assistant in Pediatrics. 

H. D. Franklin, M.D., Assistant in Pediatrics. 

Albert R. Wilkerson, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

J. W. Nelson, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

Julius Goodman, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

I. Ridgeway Trimble, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

Dudley P. Bowe, A.B., M.D., Assistant in Obstetrics. 

Dorothy E. Schmalzer, B.S., Assistant in Biological Chemistry. 

John E. Savage, B.S., M.D., Assistant in Pathology and Obstetrics. 

Phild? D. Flynn, M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 

Albert J. Shochat, M.D., Assistant in Gastro-Enterology. 

O. Walter Spurrier, M.D., Assistant in Pediatrics. 

Gustav Highstein, M.D., Assistant in Pediatrics. 

S. C. Feldman, M.D., Assistant in Pediatrics. 

Nelsa Lee Wade, M.D., Assistant in Pediatrics. 

Joseph C. Bernstein, M.D., Assistant in Dermatology. 

H. Whitney Wheaton, M.D., Assistant in Pediatrics. 

Eugene Covington, M.D., Assistant in Gross Anatomy. 

Harry C. Hull, M.D., Assistant in Pathology and Surgery. 

Harry V. Langeluttig, A.B., M.D., Assistant in Pathology and Medicine. 

J. E. Wilson, Jr., A.B., M.D., Assistant in Pathology. 

Richard France, M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 



10 BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, U. OF MD. 

M. S. Shilixg, M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 

Robert W. Garis, M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 

Sol Smith, M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 

W. Grafton Hersperger, M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 

Beatrice Bamberger, M.D., Assistant in Gastro-Enterology. 

Lauriston L. Keown, M.D., Assistant in Pediatrics. 

Philip F. Lerner, A.B., M.D., Assistant in Neurology. 

J. H. Wilkerson, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

L. T. Chance, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

Samuel McLanahan, Jr., M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

W. Allen Deckert, M.D., Assistant in Surgery, Obstetrics and Gynecology. 

Raymond F. Helfrich, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

Samuel E. Proctor, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

George Govatos, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

Francis W. Gillis, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

R. Walter Graham, Jr., M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

H. Alvan Jones, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

Richard T. Shackelford, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

Robert B. Taylor, M.D., Assistant in Dermatology. 

Henry F. Ullrich, M.D., Assistant in Orthopaedic Surgery. 

Walter L. Kilby, M.D., Assistant in Roentgenology. 

Harry S. Shelley, B.S., M.D., Assistant in Genito -Urinary Surgery. 

Beverley C. Compton, A.B., M.D., Assistant in Gynecology. 

John C. Dumler, B.S., M.D., Assistant in Gynecology and Oncology. 

Jerome Snyder, M.D., Assistant in Ophthalmology. 

I. H. Maseritz, M.D., Assistant in Orthopaedic Surgery. 

John V. Hopklns, M.D., Assistant in Orthopaedic Surgery. 

J. G. Benesuns, M.D., Assistant in Orthopaedic Surgery. 

E. L. Mortimer, Jr., Assistant in Orthopaedic Surgery. 

James R. Gibbons, M.D., Assistant in Diseases of the Nose and Throat. 

Joseph Nurkdn, M.D., Assistant in Diseases of the Nose and Throat. 

Samuel H. Bryant, D.D.S., Assistant in Exodontia. 

Harold Goldstein, D.D.S., Assistant in Exodontia. 

Eldred Roberts, M.D., Assistant in Oncology. 



HISTORY OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 11 

HISTORY OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 

The present School of Medicine, with the title of the University of Mary- 
land School of Medicine and College of Physicians and Surgeons, is the 
result of a consolidation and merger of the University of Maryland School 
of Medicine with the Baltimore Medical College (1913) and the College of 
Physicians and Surgeons (1915). 

The School of Medicine of the University of Maryland is one of the oldest 
foundations for medical education in America, ranking fifth in point of 
age among the medical colleges of the United States. It was organized in 
1807, and chartered in 1808, under the name of the College of Medicine 
of Maryland, and its first class was graduated in 1810. In 1812 the College 
was empowered by the Legislature to annex three other colleges or facul- 
ties: Divinity, Law, and Arts and Sciences; and the four colleges thus 
united were "constituted an University by the name and under the title of 
the University of Maryland." 

The beautiful college building at Lombard and Greene Streets, erected 
in 1812, is the oldest structure in America devoted to medical teaching. 
Here was founded one of the first medical libraries and the first medical 
college library in the United States. 

Here for the first time in America dissecting was made a compulsory 
part of the curriculum; here instruction in Dentistry was first given (1837) 
and here were first installed independent chairs for the teaching of Diseases 
of Women and Children (1867), and of Eye and Ear Diseases (1873). 

The School of Medicine was one of the first to provide for adequate 
clinical instruction by the erection in 1823 of its own hospital, and in this 
hospital intramural residency for the senior student was first established. 

In 1913, juncture was brought about with the Baltimore Medical College, 
an institution of thirty-two years' growth. By this association the facilities 
of the School of Medicine were enlarged in faculty, equipment and hospital 
connection. 

The College of Physicians and Surgeons was incorporated in 1872, and 
established on Hanover Street in a building afterward known as the Mater- 
nite, the first obstetrical hospital in Maryland. In 1878 union was effected 
with the Washington University School of Medicine, in existence since 
1827, and the college was removed to Calvert and Saratoga Streets. By the 
consolidation with the College of Physicians and Surgeons, medical control 
of the teaching beds in the City Hospital, now the Mercy Hospital, was 
obtained. 



12 BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, U. OF MD. 

ORGANIZATION OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 

LABORATORY FACILITIES 

The laboratories are located at two centers, the group of buildings at 
Greene and Lombard Streets, and at 32 and 34 South Paca Street. The 
schedule is so adjusted that the laboratory periods are placed with a view 
of obviating unnecessary movement on the part of the classes. The build- 
ing known as Gray Laboratory, at Greene and Lombard Streets, houses 
three departments. The Anatomical Laboratory is placed upon the top 
floor, where skylights and an auxiliary modern system of electric lighting 
give adequate illumination of the subjects. The Department of Pharma- 
cology occupies the second floor. There is a large room for the general 
student laboratory, which is thoroughly equipped with apparatus of recent 
acquisition, and in addition contains many instruments of unique and origi- 
nal design. With office and stockroom adjoining, this laboratory is com- 
plete for student experimentation. On the first floor of Gray Laboratory 
is the Department of Physiology. In addition to the large student labora- 
tory, which is constructed for groups of fifty-eight students, there are rooms 
for the departmental office, preparation of material, and storage of appa- 
ratus. An additional room is devoted exclusively to mammalian experi- 
ments. In this building there is maintained an animal room in which is kept 
an abundance of material for experimental purposes. The embalming 
and storage plant for the Department of Anatomy is in physical connection 
with the building and its special departments. The laboratories of physi- 
ology and pharmacology are completely equipped with apparatus and 
lockers in accord with the best ideas of instruction. The students work in 
groups of two each, and each group has sufficient apparatus, so that the 
experimental work can be carried on without delay or recourse to a general 
stockroom. 

The laboratories of Pathology, Bacteriology, Biochemistry and Clinical 
Pathology are located in the Medical laboratory building on Greene Street 
north of Lombard. 

The Departments of Pathology, Bacteriology and Clinical Pathology 
use, conjointly, the large modernly equipped student laboratory on the 
second floor. The capacity is one hundred students. On the second floor 
there are also students' preparation rooms for the making and sterilization 
of media, cold storage and incubating rooms and research laboratories for 
the Departments of Bacteriology and Clinical Pathology. 

On the main floor of this building are the offices, library, research and 
technical rooms of the Departments of Pathology and Bacteriology. The 
Department of Art also occupies quarters on this floor. The basement is 
given over to teaching museums, store rooms, students' locker room and 
lavatories. 



CLINICAL FACILITIES 13 

The Department of Biological Chemistry is housed on the top floor of 
this building. The space allotted to teaching includes a large student 
laboratory equipped with one hundred and thirty-two commodious locker 
units. It is supplied with gas, hot and cold water, vacuum and direct 
current service, a special apparatus room, a warm room, a colorimeter 
room, a balance room, a first-aid room and a stockroom. These rooms have 
modern laboratory furniture and apparatus, a constant temperature and 
ventilating system, and are equipped and arranged for economic use of the 
students' time. 

Adjoining the students' space are private offices and laboratories of the 
staff, a departmental library, a shop and a preparation room. 

In the Main Building is the Museum of Anatomy, where are arranged 
for student reference, specimens which represent the careful selection of 
material over a period of many years. In the University Hospital is the 
Student Laboratory for analytical studies by those students who are 
serving as clinical clerks on the wards. A similar laboratory is maintained 
in the building at the northwest corner of Saratoga and Calvert Streets, for 
the student work of the Mercy Hospital. 

At 32 and 34 South Paca Street are the Laboratories of Histology and 
Embryology. These laboratories accommodate the full class, and are 
equipped with necessary lockers for microscopes and apparatus. The 
department housed in this building is provided with individual offices, 
preparation and stockrooms. 

CLINICAL FACILITIES 

UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL 

The University Hospital, which is the property of the University of Mary- 
land, is the oldest institution for the care of the sick in the State of Mary- 
land. It was opened in September, 1823, under the name of the Baltimore 
Infirmary, and at that time consisted of but four wards, one of which was 
reserved for eye patients. 

In 1933-1934 the new University Hospital was erected, and patients were 
admitted to this building in November 1934. The new hospital is situated 
at the southwest corner of Redwood and Greene Streets, and is consequently 
opposite the Medical School buildings. The students, therefore, are in 
close proximity and little time is lost in passing from the lecture halls and 
laboratories to the clinical facilities of the new building. 

The new hospital has a capacity of practically four hundred beds devoted 
to general medicine, surgery, obstetrics, pediatrics, and the various medical 
and surgical specialties. On the second, seventh and eighth floors are 
centered practically all the clinical and laboratory teaching facilities of the 



14 BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, U. OF MD. 

institution. The north wing of the second floor is occupied by the entire 
Department of Roentgenology. The east wing houses clinical pathology and 
special laboratories for clinical microscopy, bio-chemistry, bacteriology, 
and an especially well appointed laboratory for students' training. The 
south wing has its electro-cardiographic and basal metabolism departments, 
with new and very attractive air-conditioned or oxygen therapy cubicles. 
The west wing contains the Department of Rhinolaryngology and Bronchos- 
copy, Industrial Surgery, Ophthalmology, and Male and Female Cystos- 
copy. 

The teaching zone extends from this floor to the eighth floor and comprises 
wards for surgery, medicine, obstetrics, pediatrics, and a large clinical lec- 
ture hall. 

On the seventh floor is the general operating suite, the delivery suite, 
and the central supply station. The eighth floor is practically a students' 
floor and affords a mezzanine over the operating and delivery suites, and a 
students' entrance to the clinical lecture hall. 

There are practically 270 beds available for teaching. In the basement 
there is a very well appointed Pathological Department with a large 
teaching autopsy room and its adjunct service of instruction of students 
in pathological anatomy. 

Owing to its situation, adjacent to the largest manufacturing district of 
the city and the shipping district, a large number of accident patients are 
received. 

The obstetrical service is particularly well arranged and provides accommo- 
dation for forty ward patients. This service, combined with an extensive 
home service, assures the student of abundant obstetrical training. 

During the year ending December 31, 1935, 859 cases were delivered in 
the hospital and 749 cases in the outdoor department. Students in the 
graduating class delivered or observed an average of fourteen cases, each 
student being required to deliver ten cases in the Outdoor Department or 
in allied hospitals. 

The dispensaries associated with the University Hospital and the Mercy 
Hospital are organized upon a uniform plan in order that the teaching may 
be the same in each. Each dispensary has the following departments: 
Medicine, Surgery, Obstetrics, Pediatrics, Eye and Ear, Genito-Urinary, 
Gynecology, Gastro-Enterology, Neurology, Orthopaedics, Proctology, 
Dermatology, Throat and Nose, Tuberculosis and Psychiatry. 

All students in their junior year work each day in the Departments of 
Medicine and Surgery of the dispensaries. In their senior year, all stu- 
dents work one hour each day in the special departments. 

The new building, with its modern planning, makes a particularly attrac- 
tive teaching hospital and is a very valuable addition to the clinical facilities 
of the Medical School. 



UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL STAFF 15 

The old hospital building has been remodeled and is occupied by the 
Out-patient Department. Thus the students of the future have been pro- 
vided with a splendidly appointed group of clinics for their training in out- 
patient work. All departments of clinical training are represented in 
this remodeled building and all changes have been predicated on the teach- 
ing function for which this department is intended. 

HOSPITAL COUNCIL 

Harry Clifton Byrd, B.S., LL.D., President. 

W. W. Skinner, Esq., Chairman of the Board of Regents. 

J. M. H. Rowland, M.D., Sc.D., LL.D., Dean of the School of Medicine and Head 

of Department of Obstetrics. 
M. C. Pincoffs, B.S., M.D., Head of the Department of Medicine. 
A. M. Shipley, M.D., Sc.D., Head of the Department of Surgery. 
A. J. Lomas, M.D., CM., D.P.H., Superintendent of the Hospital. 
Miss Annie Crighton, R.N., Superintendent of Nurses. 
Miss Florence Sadtler, Representing Woman's Auxiliary Board. 
Mrs. John L. Whitehurst. 
John E. Raine, Esq. 

Ralph P. Truitt, M.D. 
Henry J. Walton, M.D. 

George F. Sargent, M.D. 
Kenneth Jones, M.D. 



Representing Hospital Staff 
Representing Medical Alumni 



UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL STAFF 

A. J. Lomas, M.D., CM., D.P.H., Superintendent of the Hospital 

Physicians 

Maurice C Pincoffs, B.S., M.D. 

Harry M. Stein, M.D. G. Carroll Lockard, M.D. 

Walter A. Baetjer, M.D. Joseph E. Gichner, M.D. 

Thomas R. Sprunt, M.D. William H. Smith, M.D. 

L. A. M. Krause, M.D. William S. Love, Jr., M.D. 

Gastro-Enterologist 
Theodore H. Morrison, M.D. 

Neurologists 

Irving J. Spear, M.D. 
George M. Settle, M.D. Leon Freedom, M.D. 

Psychiatrists 

Ross McC. Chapman, M.D. 
Ralph P. Truitt, M.D. Harry M. Murdock, M.D. 



16 BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, U. OF MD. 

Pediatricians 
C. Loring Joslin, M.D. Albert Jaffe, M.D. 

Pathologists 
Hugh R. Spencer, M.D. S. Lloyd Johnson, M.D. 

Surgeons 

Randolph Winslow, A.M., M.D., LL.D. Arthur M. Shipley, M.D., Sc.D. 

Nathan Winslow, M.D. Page Edmunds, M.D. 

Charles Reid Edwards, M.D. Frank S. Lynn, M.D. 

Laryngolo gists 
Edward A. Looper, M.D. Franklin B. Anderson, M.D. 

Proctologists 
J. Dawson Reeder, M.D. Monte Edwards, M.D. 

Orthopaedic Surgeons 

Allen Fiske Voshell, A.B., M.D. Compton Riely, M.D. 

Moses Gellman, B.S., M.D. 

Genito-Urinary Surgeons 
W. H. Toulson, A.B., M.Sc, M.D. Lyle J. Millan, M.D. 

Roentgenologists 
Henry J. Walton, M.D. Eugene L. Flippin, M.D. 

Dermatologist 
Harry M. Robinson, M.D. 

Bronchoscopist 

Edward A. Looper, M.D., D.Oph. 

Anaesthetists 

S. Griffith Davis, M.S., M.D. Melvtn B. Davis, B.S., M.D. 

E. Hollister Davis, A.B., M.D. Mary J. O'Brien, R.N. 

Obstetricians 

J. M. H. Rowland, M.D., Sc.D., LL.D. L. H. Douglass, M.D. 

M. A. Novey, A.B., M.D. J. G. M. Reese, M.D. 

Isadore A. Slegel, A.B., M.D. E. P. H. Harrison, Jr., A.B., M.D. 

Ophthalmologists 
Clyde A. Clapp, M.D. William Tarun, M.D. 

Otologist 
J. W. Downey, Jr., M.D. 



UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL STAFF 



17 



W. S. Gardner, M.D. 

J. M. Hundley, Jr., M.A., M.D. 

J. M. Hundley, Jr., M.A., M.D. 



Gynecologists 



Oncologists 



R. G. Willse, M.D. 
Leo Brady, M.D. 

Grant E. Ward, A.B., M.D. 



UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL RESIDENT AND INTERNE STAFF 

1936-1937 

RESIDENT STAFF 

Coleman Carnegie Johnston, M.D., Resident in Surgery. 

Thurston Ray Adams, M.D., Assistant Resident in Surgery. 

John McCullen Warren, A.B., M.D., Assistant Resident in Surgery. 

Joseph H. Holmes, A.B., M.D., Resident in Medicine. 

Harry M. Robinson, Jr., M.D. , Assistant Resident in Medicine. 

Hugh Bernard McNally, M.D., Resident in Obstetrics. 

Charles Luther Goodhand, A.B., M.D., Assistant Resident in Obstetrics. 

Charles K. Fetterhoff, M.D., Assistant Resident in Obstetrics. 

Lewis B. Whiting, M.D., Assistant Resident in Gynecology. 

Clarence Conway Briscoe, M.D., Assistant Resident in Gynecology. 

William Lawrence Howard, B.S., M.D., Resident in Nose and Throat. 

Emanuel de Lalla, M.D., Resident in Roentgenology. 

Thomas A. Christensen, M.D., Resident in Pediatrics. 

Israel Rosen, M.D., Assistant Resident in Pediatrics. 

SENIOR INTERNS 



John Warren Albrittain, B.S., M.D. 
James Pettigrew Bunn, Jr., B.S., M.D. 
Ernest Ivon Cornbrooks, Jr., A.B., M.D. 
Edward Francis Cotter, M.D 
Francis George Dickey, A.B., M.D. 
Walter Henry Gerwig, Jr., M.D. 



John Randolph Godbey, M.D. 

John Carl Hamrick, B.S., M.D. 

Wm. Goldsborough Helfrich, B.S., M.D. 

Howard Brooks Mays, M.D. 

George Frederick Schmitt, Jr., M.D. 

Paul Schonfeld, M.D. 



Joseph E. Bush, A.B., M.D. 
Roland E. Bieren, M.D. 
Harry Clay Bowie, B.S., M.D. 
Nachman Davidson, A.B., M.D. 
George Howey Davis, B.S., M.D. 
Walter Esselman Karfgin, B.S., M.D 



JUNIOR INTERNS 

Charles H. Doeller, Jr., A.B., M.D. 

Thomas Agnew Nestor, Ph.B., M.D. 

Morris John Nicholson, B.S., M.D. 

William Kennedy Waller, A.B., M.D. 

Gibson Jackson Wells, A.B., M.D. 

Norman James Wilson, B.S., M.D. 



Vernon D. Kaufman, D.D.S. (Dental) 



18 BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, U. OF MD. 

UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL DISPENSARY STAFF 

Merrell L. Stout, A.B., M.D. 

Assistant Superintendent 

Dispensary Director 

DISPENSARY COMMITTEE 

C. R. Edwards, M.D., Chairman 

Merrell L. Stout, M.D., Secretary 

L. H. Douglass, M.D. John E. Legge, M.D. 

J. Mason Hundley, Jr., M.D. A. J. Lomas, M.D. 

C. Loring Joslin, M.D. Ralph P. Truitt, M.D. 

MEDICINE 

John E. Legge, M.D., Chief of Clinic 

Consultant Physicians 

Wetherbee Fort, M.D. Paul W. Clough, M.D. 

L. A. M. Krause, M.D. 
Lewis P. Gundry, M.D., Assistant Chief of Clinic 
M. S. Shiling, M.D., Assistant Chief of Clinic 
Harry G. Jones, M.D. George Silverstein, M.D. 

Robert W. Garis, M.D. Harry A. Rutledge, M.D. 

Grace G. Jones, M.D. S. Lilienfeld, M.D. 

William H. Triplett, M.D. Carl P. Roetling, M.D. 

M. A. Fine, M.D. 

GASTROENTEROLOGY 

Samuel Morrison, M.D., Chief of Clinic 

Beatrice Bamberger, M.D. Z. Morgan, M.D. 

Z. V. Hooper, M.D. C Victor Richards, M.D. 

M. S. Koppelman, M.D. Albert J. Shochat, M.D. 

Ernest Levi, M.D. Joseph Sindler, M.D. 

NEUROLOGY 

Leon Freedom, M.D., Chief of Clinic 
Benjamin Pushkin, M.D. 

PSYCHIATRY 

Ralph P. Truitt, M.D., Chief of Clinic 
H. W. Newell, M.D. Harry Murdock, M.D. 

DISEASES OF THE LUNGS 

E. H. Tonolla, M.D., Chief of Clinic 
H. V. Langeluttig, M.D. 



UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL DISPENSARY STAFF 



19 



DISEASES OF METABOLISM 

Lewis P. Gundry, M.D., Chief of Clinic 

CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASES 

William S. Love, Jr., M.D., Chief of Clinic 



H. C. Grant, M.D. 
Richard France, M.D. 



Paul Carliner, M.D. 



Samuel J. Hankin, M.D. 
Conrad Acton, M.D. 



ALLERGY CLINIC 
H. M. Bubert, M.D., Chief of Clinic 



Herbert Goldstone, M.D. 



Samuel Snyder, M.D. 

PEDIATRICS 

C. Loring Joslin, M.D., Director 

John H. Traband, M.D., Chief of Clinic 

Clewell Howell, M.D., Chief of Clinic 
John A. Askin, M.D. William M. Seabold, M.D. 

M. Paul Byerly, M.D. Nelsa Wade, M.D. 

A. H. Finkelstein, M.D. W. H. Wheaton, M.D. 

William G. Geyer, M.D. S. C. Feldman, M.D. 

Samuel S. Glick, M.D. H. D. Franklin, M.D. 

R. M. Hening, M.D. Albert Jaffe, M.D. 

F. Strattner Orem, M.D. S. Lilienfeld, M.D. 

Gustav HlGHSTEIN, M.D. H. W. Schiff, M.D. 

Israel P. Meranski, M.D. T. W. Keown, M.D. 

Robert B. Taylor, M.D. William J. Todd, M.D. 

J. Edmund Bradley, M.D. 



SURGERY 
M.D. 



Charles Reid Edwards 
J. Frank Hewitt, M.D. 
Luther E. Little, M.D. 
R. Walter Graham, Jr., M.D. 
James C. Owings, M.D. 
Samuel E. Proctor, M.D. 
William N. McFaul, Jr., M.D. 



Chief of Clinic 

W. R. Johnson, M.D. 

J. H. Wilkerson, M.D. 

A. R. Wilkerson, M.D. 

A. G. Siwinski, M.D. 

L. T. Chance, M.D. 

Samuel McLanahan, Jr., M.D. 



ORTHOPAEDIC SURGERY 

Allen Fiske Voshell, M.D., Chief of Clinic 
Moses Gellman, M.D. E. L. Mortimer, Jr., M.D. 

I. H. Maseritz, M.D. J. G. Benesuns, M.D. 

John V. Hopkins, M.D. Henry F. Ullrich, M.D. 



W. 
W. A. H. Councill, M.D. 
L. J. Millan, M.D. 



GENITO-URINARY 

H. Toulson, M.D., Chief of Clinic 

Harry S. Shelley, M.D. 
John F. Hogan, M.D. 



20 BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, U. OF MD. 

ROENTGENOLOGY 

Henry J. Walton, M.D., Chief of Clinic 
Eugene L. Flippin, M.D. 

DERMATOLOGY 

Harry M. Robinson, M.D., Chief of Clinic 
Francis A. Ellis, M.D. A. C. Monninger, M.D. 

H. M. Goodman, M.D. Robert B. Taylor, M.D. 

NOSE AND THROAT 

Franklin B. Anderson, M.D., Chief of Clinic 
James R. Gibbons, M.D. Thomas R. O'Rourk, M.D. 

BlRKHEAD MACGOWAN, M.D. BENJAMIN S. RlCH, M.D. 

Joseph Nurkin, M.D. 

COLON AND RECTUM 

Monte Edwards, M.D., Chief of Clinic 
James C. Owings, M.D. 

GYNECOLOGY 

J. Mason Hundley, Jr., M.A., M.D., Chief of Clinic 
John T. Hibbitts, M.D. W. Allen Deckert, M.D. 

Kenneth B. Boyd, M.D. Marius P. Johnson, M.D. 

Thomas S. Bowyer, M.D. Joseph V. Castagna, M.D. 

Beverley C. Compton, M.D. John C. Dumler, M.D. 

FEMALE CYSTOSCOPY 

J. Mason Hundley, Jr., M.D. W. Allen Deckert, M.D. 

John T. Hibbitts, M.D. Beverley C. Compton, M.D. 

John C. Dumler, M.D. 

ORAL SURGERY 

Brice M. Dorsey, D.D.S., Chief of Clinic 
Harold Goldstein, D.D.S. Samuel H. Bryant, D.D.S. 

William E. Hahn, D.D.S. 

OBSTETRICS 

Louis H. Douglass, M.D., Chief of Clinic 

J. M. Reese, M.D., Assistant Chief of Clinic 

M. A. Novey, M.D., Assistant Chief of Clinic 

I. A. Siegel, M.D., Assistant Chief of Clinic 

M. B. Ballard, M.D. D. P. Bowe, A.B., M.D. 

M. L. Mazer, M.D. S. K. Wallace, M.D. 

J. Hulla, M.D. W. Allen Deckert, M.D. 

M. P. Johnson, M.D. Kenneth B. Boyd, M.D. 

John E. Savage, B.S., M.D. 






UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL DISPENSARY 



21 



ONCOLOGY 



Gynecological Division 
J. Mason Hundley, Jr., M.D. 
Thomas S. Bowyer, M.D. 
Beverley C. Compton, M.D. 
John C. Dumler, B.S., M.D. 



Surgical Division 

Grant E. Ward, M.D. 

Eldred Roberts, M.D. 

E. E. Covington, M.D. 

J. W. Nelson, M.D. 

H. A. Miller, M.D. 

H. H. Ashbury, M.D. 



OPHTHALMOLOGY 
H. F. Graff, M.D., Chief of Clinic 



Thomas R. O'Rourk, M.D. 
M. C. Lang, M.D. 
J. G. Runkle, M.D. 



Frank A. Holden, M.D. 

Jerome Snyder, M.D. 

Frank A. Pacienza, M.D 



J. W. Downey, M.D 
Franklin B. Anderson, M.D. 
Thomas R. O'Rourk, M.D. 

BlRKHEAD MACGOWAN, M.D. 



OTOLOGY 

Chief of Clinic 



Frank A. Holden, M.D. 

Benjamin S. Rich, M.D. 

Joseph Nurkin, M.D. 



OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY 

Miss Sue P. Hurt, Directress 

SOCIAL SERVICE 
Miss Grace Pearson, Directress 

UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL DISPENSARY 

Report from October 1, 1934 to September 30, 1935 

Departments New Cases Old Cases Total 

Dermatology 7,114 13,652 20,766 

Surgery 2,435 9,548 11,983 

Pediatrics 2,873 17,381 20,254 

Orthopaedics 1,428 9,526 10,954 

Obstetrics 1,502 7,074 8,576 

Medicine 1,721 5,375 7,096 

Eye 1,467 4,538 6,005 

Gynecology 1,557 3,712 5,269 

Protein 118 4,897 5,015 

Genito-Urinary 417 2,812 3,229 

Oral Surgery 1,293 1,921 3,214 

Nose and Throat 1,172 1,686 2,858 

Oncology 256 2,280 2,536 

Gastro-Intestinal 390 2,043 2 ,433 

Cardiology 403 1,937 2,340 

Tuberculosis 312 1,396 1,708 

Neurology 264 1 , 192 1 ,456 

Ear 251 436 687 

Proctology 184 442 626 

Cystoscopy 92 393 485 

Total 25,249 92,241 117,490 



22 BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, U. OF MB. 

MERCY HOSPITAL 

The Sisters of Mercy first assumed charge of the Hospital at the corner 
of Calvert and Saratoga Streets, then owned by the Washington University, 
in 1874. By the merger of 1878 the Hospital came under the control of 
the College of Physicians and Surgeons, but the Sisters continued their work 
of ministering to the patients. 

In a very few years it became apparent that the City Hospital, as it was 
then called, was much too small to accommodate the rapidly growing de- 
mands upon it. However, it was not until 1888 that the Sisters of Mercy, 
with the assistance of the Faculty of the College of Physicians and Surgeons, 
were able to lay the cornerstone of the present Hospital. This building 
was completed and occupied late in 1889. Since then the growing demands 
for more space have compelled the erection of additions, until now there are 
accommodations for 275 patients. 

In 1909 the name was changed from The Baltimore City Hospital to 
Mercy Hospital. 

The clinical material in the free wards is under the exclusive control of 
the Faculty of the University of Maryland School of Medicine and Col- 
lege of Physicians and Surgeons. 

The Hospital adjoins the College building, and all surgical patients 
from the public wards are operated upon in the College operating rooms. 
This union of the Hospital and College buildings greatly facilitates the 
clinical teaching. 

Mercy Hospital is the hospital of the United Railways and Electric Com- 
pany of Baltimore City, and receives patients from the Baltimore and Ohio 
Railroad Company and from the Pennsylvania Railroad Company and 
its branches. 

MERCY HOSPITAL STAFF 

BOARD OF GOVERNORS 

Alexius McGlannan, A.M., M.D., LL.D., Chairman 

Sister M. Placide Walter D. Wise, M.D. 

Sister M. Helen Waitman F. Zinn, M.D. 

Sister M. Hildegarde Thomas K. Galvin, M.D. 

Sister M. Vincent Maurice C. Pincoffs, M.D. 

Sister M. Cornelia 

HOSPITAL STAFF 

SURGICAL DIVISION 

Consulting Surgeon 
Alexius McGlannan, A.M., M.D., LL.D. 



MERCY HOSPITAL STAFF 



23 



Charles F. Blake, M.D. 
F. L. Jennings, M.D. 
R. W. Locher, M.D. 
Thomas R. Chambers, M.D. 



I. O. Ridgely, M.D. 
J. W. Nelson, M.D. 
H. B. McElwain, M.D. 



John A. O'Connor, M.D. 
Julius Goodman, M.D. 
E. E. Covington, M.D. 
S. Demarco, Jr., M.D. 
Simon Brager, M.D. 



Surgeons 
Walter D. Wise, M.D. 



N. Clyde Marvel, M.D. 
Associate Surgeons 

Julius Leyko, M.D. 
Assistant Surgeons 



Elliott H. Hutchins, M.D. 

D. J. Pessagno, M.D. 

A. M. Evans, M.D. 

William F. Rienhoff, M.D. 



H. F. Bongardt, M.D. 

Thomas B. Aycock, M.D. 

Charles W. Maxson, M.D. 



T. J. Touhey, M.D. 

I. R. Trimble, M.D. 

R. T. Shackelford, M.D. 

William N. McFaul, M.D. 

Raymond F. Helfrich, M.D. 



H. K. Fleck, M.D. 



J. I. Kemler, M.D. 



Ophthalmologists and Otologists 
Harry Friedenwald, A.B., M.D. 

Associates 



J. W. Downey, M.D. 



F. A. Pacienza, M.D. 



Consulting Rhinologists and Laryngolo gists 
Raymond McKenzie, M.D. George W. Mitchell, 

Rhinologists and Laryngolo gists 
Waitman F. Zinn, M.D. 



M.D. 



F. A. Pacienza, M.D. 
F. A. Kayser, M.D. 



Associates 



Bronchoscopist 
Waitman F. Zinn, M.D. 

Associate 
F. A. Kayser, M.D. 

Proctologist 
Charles F. Blake, M.D. 



BlRKHEAD MACGOWAN, M.D. 

Benjamin S. Rich, M.D. 



24 



BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, U. OF MD. 

Assistant 
E. E. Covington, M.D. 

Orthopaedic Surgeon 
Albertus Cotton, M.D. 

Associate 
H. L. Rogers, M.D. 

Urologist 
Alexander J. Gillis, M D. 

Associates 



Kenneth D. Legge, M.D. 



Leon K. Fargo, M.D. 



C. B. Gamble, M.D. 
C. C. W. Judd, M.D. 



Dentist 
N. D. Fusco, D.D.S. 

Assistant 
J. J. Foley, D.D.S. 

MEDICAL DIVISION 

Physicians 
Maurice C. Plncoffs, B.S., M.D. 

George McLean, M.D. 
Associates 



Hubert C. Knapp, M.D. 
Bartus T. Baggott, M.D. 
J. S. Eastland, M.D. 



Harvey G. Beck, M.D. 
H. K. Peters, M.D. 



Wetherbee Fort, M.D. 

L. A. M. Krause, M.D. 

John E. Legge, M.D. 



S. A. TUMMLNELLO, M.D. 

Howard Burns, M.D. 



Earl Chambers, M.D. 
K. W. Golley, M.D. 



T. Nelson Carey, M.D. 
Assistants 

J. M. Miller, M.D. 

Gastro-Enterologist 
Julius Friedenwald, A.M., M.D. 

Associates 
T. Frederick Leitz, M.D. Theodore Morrison, M.D. 

Assistants 
Maurice Feldman, M.D. Joseph Sindler, M.D. 



MERCY HOSPITAL STAFF 25 

Pediatricians 
Edgar B. Frledenwald, M.D. 

Associates 
F. B. Smith, M.D. Thomas J. Coonan, M.D. 

Assistants 
W. J. Schmitz, M.D. G. B. Mansdorfer, M.D. 

W. M. Seabold 

Neurologist and Psychiatrist 
Andrew C. Gillis, M.D. 

Associate 
Milford Levy, M.D. 

OBSTETRICAL DIVISION 

E. P. Smith, M.D. 

Abram S. Samuels, M.D. William S. Gardner, M.D. 

George A. Strauss, M.D. Thomas K. Galvin, M.D. 

Ernest Edlavitch, M.D. John J. Erwln, M.D. 

Associate Obstetricians 
Frank K. Morris, M.D. Francis W. Gillis, M.D. 

GYNECOLOGICAL DIVISION 

Gynecologists 

William S. Gardner, M.D. 
Thomas J. Galvln, M.D. Abram Samuels, M.D. 

George A. Strauss, M.D. E. P. Smith, M.D. 

Associate 
J. J. Erwln, M.D. 

Assistants 
E. S. Edlavitch, M.D. Frank K. Morris, M.D. 

PATHOLOGICAL DIVISION 
Walter C. Merkel, M.D. Hugh R. Spencer, M.D. 

Clinical Pathologists 

H. T. COLLENBERG, M.D. 

H. R. Peters, M.D. Charles E. Bramble, Ph.D. 

Technicians 
Sister Mary Joan Sister Mary Celeste 

Sister Mary Claude Frances Donovan 

Eleanor Behr 



26 



BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, U. OF MD. 



X-RAY DEPARTMENT 

Radiographer 
Albertus Cotton, M.D. 

Associate 
Harry L. Rogers, M.D. 

Technicians 



Sister M. Kevin 



Elizabeth Crook 



MERCY HOSPITAL RESIDENT STAFF 

Chief Resident 
Meyer H. Zuravtn, M.D. 



Resident Surgeon 
Daniel R. Robinson, M.D. 

Assistant Resident Surgeons 



Frank H. Cutler, M.D. 
William C. Dunntgan, M.D. 



Harry F. Kane, M.D. 
Lawrence H. Mills, M.D. 



Irving Freeman, M.D. 



Medical Resident 
W. Graeton Hersperger, M.D. 



Reld L. Beers, M.D. 
Harold H. Burns, M.D. 
Joseph Drozd, M.D. 
Marion H. Gillis, Jr., M.D. 



William H. Grenzer, M.D. 



Assistant Medical Residents 

Resident Gynecologist 
Joseph V. Jerardi, M.D. 

Resident Obstetrician 
G. Cole Herndon, M.D. 

Rotating Internes 

E. Jones, Jr., M.D. 

Raymond J. Lipin, M.D. 

Grant Lund, M.D. 

Richard H. Pembroke, Jr., M.D. 

George D. Selby, M.D. 



I. O. Rtdgely, M.D. 
John O'Connor, M.D. 
H. F. Bongardt, M.D. 
I. R. Trimble, M.D. 
S. Demarco, M.D. 
T. J. Touhey, M.D. 



DISPENSARY STAFF 

Surgeons 

Supervisor, Julius J. Leyko, M.D. 

J. W. Nelson, M.D. 

Simon Brager, M.D. 

Julius Goodman, M.D. 

E. E. Covington, M.D. 

Richard T. Shackelford, M.D. 

William N. McFaul, M.D. 

Raymond F. Helfrich, M.D. 



MERCY HOSPITAL DISPENSARY STAFF 



27 



A. J. Gillis, M.D. 



Albertus Cotton, M.D. 



Genito-Urinary 



Orthopaedists 



K. D. Legge, M.D. 



Harry L. Rogers, M.D. 



J. M. Miller, M.D. 



I. H. Maseritz, M.D. 

Physicians 

Supervisor, Maurice C. Pincoffs, B.S., M.D. 

Henry Sheppard, M.D. \ „. . , , „ 7 . . 
^ T _ .._ ) Chief s of Chmc 

Earl L. Chambers, M.D.J J J 

S. A. TUMM1NELLO, M.D. 

Cardiovascular Diseases 
T. C. Wolff, M.D., Chief of Clinic 

Diseases of the Lung 
S. Snyder, M.D., Chief of Clinic 

Diseases of Metabolism 
J. S. Eastland, M.D., Chief of Clinic 

Allergic Diseases 

H. M. Bubert, M.D., Chief of Clinic 
S. Snyder, M.D. 

Diseases of the Stomach 
Supervisor, Julius Friedenwald, M.D. 



S. Snyder, M D. 



T. Frederick Leitz, M.D. 
M. Feldman, M.D. 



Theodore H. Morrison, M.D. 
Joseph Sindler, M.D. 



Milford Levy, M.D. 
Philip F. Lerner, M.D. 



H. William Primakoff, M.D. 

Esophagoscopist 
Waitman F. Zlnn, M.D. 

Nervous Diseases 
Supervisor, A. C. Gillis, M.D. 

Pediatricians 



Miriam F. Dunn, M.D. 
Harry Goldsmith, M.D. 



Supervisor, Edgar B. Friedenwald, M.D. 
W. J. Schmttz, M.D. Thomas Coonan, M.D. 

G. B. Mansdorfer, M.D. 

Gynecologists 

Abram S. Samuels, M.D., Chief of Clinic 
Thomas K. Galvin, M.D., Assistant Chief of Clinic 

E. S. Edlavitch, M.D. Frank K. Morris, M.D. 

F. W. Gillis, M.D. » H. L. Granoff, M.D. 



28 



BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, U. OF MD. 



Diseases of Nose and Throat 
Waitman F. Zinn, M.D. 



Benjamin S. Rich, M.D. 

BlRKHEAD MACGOWAN, M.D. 



H. K. Fleck, M.D. 
J. I. Kemler, MD. 



Diseases of Eye and Ear 



R. F. McKenzie, M.D. 
Horace Strickland, M.D. 



M. Raskin, M.D. 
F. A. Pacienza, M.D. 



Dermatologist 
Llewellyn Lord, M.D. 



Sister Mary Beatrice 



Social Service Department 



Loretta Smith 



MERCY HOSPITAL DISPENSARY REPORT 

(Year 1935) 

Department Old New Total 

Surgery 5,035 

Medicine 2, 103 

Cardiac 350 

Diabetic 252 

Gynecology 868 

Eye and Ear 597 

Nose and Throat 769 

Neurology 772 

Pediatrics 396 

Gastro-Intestinal 473 

Dental 195 

Rectal 113 

Orthopedics 1,094 

Skin 516 

Genito-Urinary 3 , 183 

Tumor 29 

Total 16,745 5,476" 22,221 



1,290 


6,325 


888 


2,991 


68 


418 


5 


257 


442 


1,310 


391 


988 


565 


1,334 


110 


882 


277 


673 


90 


563 


222 


417 


61 


174 


364 


1,458 


267 


783 


418 


3,601 


18 


47 



OTHER CLINICAL FACILITIES 

THE BALTIMORE CITY HOSPITALS 

The clinical advantages of the University have been largely increased 
by the liberal decision of the Department of Public Welfare to allow 
the immense material of these hospitals to be used for the purpose of medical 
education. There are daily visits and clinics in medicine and surgery by 
the Staff of the Hospitals. The autopsy material is unsurpassed in this 
country in amount, thoroughness of study, and the use made of it in medical 
teaching. 



THE BALTIMORE CITY HOSPITALS 29 

The Baltimore City Hospital consists of the following separate divisions: 
The General Hospital, 400 beds. 
The Hospital for Chronic Cases, 508 beds. 
The Hospital for Tuberculosis, 179 beds. 
The Psychopathic Hospital, 275 beds. 
Infirmary (Home for Aged) 1053 beds. 

STAFF OF BALTIMORE CITY HOSPITALS 

Parker J. McMillin, Superintendent 

VISITING STAFF 

Physician-in-Chief Thomas R. Boggs, S.B., M.D. 

Surgeon-in-Chief Arthur M. Shipley, Sc.D., M.D. 

Physician-in-Chief, Tuberculosis Hospital Harry M. Stein, M.D. 

Physician-in-Chief, Psychopathic Hospital Esther L. Richards, M.D. 

Obstetrician-in-Chief Louis H. Douglass, M.D. 

Pediatrician-in-Chief T. Campbell Goodwin, A.B., M.D. 

Visiting Pathologist S. S. Blackman, A.B., M.D. 

Resident Pathologist R. T. Terry, M.D. 

Dental Surgeon-in-Chief L. P. Henneberger, D.D.S. 

ASSOCIATE VISITING STAFF 

T. Bayron Aycock, M.D. 
C. A. Reifschnelder, M.D. 
Luther E. Little, M.D. 

Surgery \ Grant Ward, M.D. 

E. M. Hanrahan, M.D. 

I. Ridgeway Trimble, M.D. 

James C. Owings, M.D. 

Tuberculosis Lawrence M. Serra, M.D. 

J. G. M. Reese, M.D. 
Margaret Ballard, M.D. 
Kenneth B. Boyd, M.D. 

Obstetrics \ John M. Haws, M.D. 

Alan F. Guttmacher, M.D. 
Marius P. Johnson, M.D. 
[Susanne Sterling, M.D. 

Pediatrics Lawson Wilkins, M.D. 

(R. Gerard Willse, M.D. 
Gynecology \ J. Mason Hundley, Jr., M.D. 

[jOHN T. HlBBITTS, M.D. 

Ophthalmology j Cecil Bagley, M.D. 

\ Frank Walsh, M.D. 
f Allen F. Voshell, M.D. 

Orthopaedics \ H. Alvan Jones, M.D. 

( Henry F. Ullrich, M.D. 
Edward A. Looper, M.D. 

Laryngology I Harry R. Slack, M.D. 

Franklin B. Anderson, M.D. 
Thomas R. O'Rourk, M.D. 



30 BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, U. OF MD. 

Urology W. Houston Toulson, M.D. 

Roentgenology John W. Pierson, M.D. 

Neurological Surgery f Charles Bagley, Jr., M.D. 

[Richard G. Coblentz, M.D. 
Thomas C. Wolff, M.D. 

Neurology I James G. Arnold, Jr. 

O. R. Lang worthy, M.D. 

Frank Ford, M.D. 
Proctology /Monte Edwards, M.D. 

\ Lewis Rosenthal, M.D. 

Otology Leroy M. Polvogt, M.D. 

Dermatology Isaac R. Pels, M.D. 

f H. Glenn Waring, D.D.S. 

Dental Surgery <j Irvin Golboro, D.D.S. 

[Morris M. Bimestefer, D.D.S. 

THE JAMES LAWRENCE KERNAN HOSPITAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL OF 
MARYLAND FOR CRIPPLED CHILDREN 

This institution is situated on an estate of 75 acres at Hillsdale. The 
site is just within the northwestern city limits and of easy access from the 
city proper. 

The location is ideal for the treatment of children, in that it affords all 
the advantages of sunshine and country air. 

A complete hospital unit, new in every respect, offers all modern facili- 
ties for the care of any orthopaedic condition in children. 

The hospital is equipped with 82 beds — endowed, and city and state 
supported. 

The Children's Orthopaedic Dispensary at the University Hospital is 
maintained in closest affiliation and cares for the cases discharged from 
the Kernan Hospital. The physiotherapy department is very well equipped 
with modern apparatus and trained personnel. 

STAFF 

Surgeon-in-Chief and Medical Director Allen Fiske Voshell, A.B., M.D. 

Attending Orthopaedic Surgeon Albertus Cotton, A.M., M.D. 

Associate Orthopaedic Surgeons f Moses Gellman, B.S., M.D. 

(Harry L. Rogers, M.D. 

Resident Orthopaedic Surgeon E. M. Karp, B.S., M.D. 

Consulting Surgeons (J- M - T - Finney, A.B., M.D., D.S.M., F.R.C.S., (Eng.,Ire.)Hon. 
\ Arthur M. Shipley, Sc.D., M.D. 

Consulting Plastic Surgeons /J 0HN Staige Davis, B.Sc, M.D. 

\Edward Ff. Kitlowski, M.D. 

Consulting Neurological Surgeon Charles Bagley, Jr., A.B., M.D. 

Consulting Oculist Harry Friedenwald, M.D. 

Oculist F. A. Pacienza, M.D. 

Consulting Aurist and Laryngologist Edward A. Looper, M.D. 



ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 31 

Aurist and Laryngologist F. B. Anderson, M.D. 

Consulting Dentist Harry B. McCarthy, D.D.S. 

Dentist M. E. Coberth, D.D.S. 

{Thomas B. Futcher, A.B., M.D. 
Thomas R. Brown, A.B., M.D. 
Lewellys F. Barker, A.B., M.D. 

Pediatrist Benjamin Tappan, A.B., M.D. 

Dermatologists (Harry M. Robinson, M.D. 

[Leon Ginsberg, M.D. 

Consulting Pathologists /Sydney M. Cone, A.B., M.D. 

\Hugh R. Spencer, M.D. 

Consulting Neurologist Irving J. Spear, M.D. 

Neurologist R. V. Seliger, M.D. 

Anaesthetists J J- A - Tompkins, M.D. 

\j. D. Holly, M.D. 

Roentgenologist Albertus Cotton, A.M., M.D. 

Superintendent Miss C. Gertrude Forrester, R.N. 

Dispensary and Social Service Nurse Miss Mabel S. Brown, R.N. 

Technicians: Physical Therapy and X-Ray (Mrs. Georgiana Wisong 

\Miss Jane Anderson 
Instructor in Grammar School Miss Laura Hampson 



LIBRARIES 

The University Library, founded in 1813 by the purchase of the collec- 
tion of Dr. John Crawford, now contains 16,054 volumes, a file of 188 current 
medical journals, and several thousand pamphlets and reprints. It is well 
stocked with recent literature, including books and periodicals of general 
interest. The home of the library is Davidge Hall, a comfortable and com- 
modious building in close proximity to the classrooms and the laboratories 
of the Medical Department. The library is open daily during the year 
for use of members of the faculty, the students, and the profession generally. 

The Library of the Medical and Chirurgical Faculty of Maryland, 
containing 50,000 volumes, is open to the students of the school. The 
leading medical publications of the world are received by the library, and 
complete sets of many journals are available. Other libraries of Baltimore 
are the Peabody (250,000 volumes) and the Enoch Pratt Free Library 
(709,129 volumes). 

All these libraries are open to the students of the school without charge. 

ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 

The following curriculum is the result of a thorough revision of teaching 
in this school in order to meet modern requirements. The multiplication 
of specialties in medicine and surgery necessitates a very crowded course 
and the introduction of electives will very soon be depended on to solve 
some of the difficulties. 



32 BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, U. OF MD. 

The curriculum is organized under eleven departments. 

1. Anatomy (including Histology and Embryology). 

2. Physiology. 

3. Bacteriology and Immunology. 

4. Biological Chemistry. 

5. Pharmacology and Materia Medica. 

6. Pathology. 

7. Medicine (including Medical Specialties). 

8. Surgery (including Surgical Specialties). 

9. Obstetrics. 

10. Gynecology. 

11. Ophthalmology. 

The instruction is given in four years of graded work. 

Several courses of study extend through two years or more, but in no 
case are the students of different years thrown together in the same course 
of teaching. 

The first and second years are devoted largely to the study of the struc- 
tures and functions of the normal body. Laboratory work occupies most 
of the student's time during these two years. 

Some introductory instruction in Medicine and Surgery is given in the 
second year. The third and fourth years are almost entirely clinical. 

A special feature of instruction in the school is the attempt to bring to- 
gether teacher and student in close personal relationship. In many courses 
of instruction the classes are divided into small groups and a large number 
of instructors insures attention to the needs of each student. 

In most courses the final examination as the sole test of proficiency has 
disappeared and the student's final grade is determined largely by partial 
examinations, recitations and assigned work carried on throughout the 
course. 

DEPARTMENT OF ANATOMY, INCLUDING GROSS 
ANATOMY, HISTOLOGY AND EMBRYOLOGY 

Carl L. Davis, M.D Professor of Anatomy 

Eduard Uhlenhuth, Ph.D Professor of Anatomy 

Frank H. Figge, A.B., Ph.D Associate Professor of Gross Anatomy 

O. G. Harne Associate Professor of Histology 

John F. Lutz, A.B., M.D Associate in Histology 

Joseph Pokorny, M.D Instructor in Histology 

Jaroslav Hulla, B.S., M.D Instructor in Histology 

Martin J. Hanna, M.D Instructor in Histology 

Arthur G. Siwinski, A.B., M.D Instructor in Gross Anatomy 

William M. Seabold, A.B., M.D Instructor in Neuro-anatomy 

William L. Fearing, M.D Instructor in Histology 

Eugene E. Covington, M.D Assistant in Gross Anatomy 

Joseph Edwin Schenthal, A.B Weaver Fellow in Anatomy 



ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 33 

Gross Anatomy. First Year. Total number of hours 350. 

The entire course centers around the dissection of the human body. 
Each student is given opportunity to dissect an entire half (left or right) 
of the body. The dissection is supplemented by lectures and informal 
discussions. 

Anatomy is taught as an independent science, emphasis being laid on the 
human species as contrasted with animal morphology. An attempt is 
made to familiarize the student with the elements of anthropometry, with 
systematic and regional anatomy, with the principles of topographical 
anatomy and with osteology. 

The actual dissection is preceded by a general examination of the body 
surface and superficial organs. Opportunity is provided for taking repre- 
sentative measurements of the head, face, trunk and limbs, and of acquiring 
a knowledge of the use of anthropometric instruments. Throughout the 
dissection the student is encouraged to take measurements and weights of 
all the major organs, including the brain and the endocrines, and to obtain 
a knowledge of the proportions of each organ to the body as a whole, as 
well as to the variability of these proportions. 

The dissection is undertaken in relation to topographical regions of the 
body, but systematic relations are continually emphasized and, wherever 
possible, brought out by actual dissection. 

Osteology is taught in conjunction with the dissection of the muscles 
and the study of the functional mechanism of the skeleto-muscular appa- 
ratus. The students are provided with skeletal bones, as far as our fa- 
cilities permit. 

Second, Third and Fourth Years. Opportunity is provided for advanced 
special dissections and for research work in every branch of anatomy. 
Dr. Uhlenhuth and Dr. Figge. 

HISTOLOGY AND EMBRYOLOGY 

First Year — 150 hours. The course in histology is divided equally be- 
tween the study of the fundamental tissues and that of organs. Through- 
out the entire course the embryology of the part being studied precedes 
the study of the fully developed tissue. Thus embryology becomes a 
correlated part of the whole subject of microscopic anatomy and not an 
independent subject. 

Each student is furnished a set of histological slides, previously prepared 
in our own laboratory, thus insuring a uniform and satisfactory quality of 
material for study and permitting the time of the student to be expended 
in the study of material rather than in the technic of its preparation. The 
object of the course is to present the evidence of function as shown by the 
structure of tissues and organs. 



34 BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, U. OF MD. 

An optional laboratory course is offered. This supplements the required 
course giving laboratory experience which can not be incorporated in the 
former. No added charge is made for the course. 

NEURO-ANATOMY 

Second Year — 90 hours. Neuro-anatomy embraces a study of the funda- 
mental structure of the central nervous system as applied to its function. 
An abundance of material permits of individual dissection of the human 
brain. A series of appropriately stained sections of the human brain stem 
is furnished each student for the microscopic study of the internal struc- 
ture of the nervous system. Dr. Davis, Dr. Lutz. 

For a description of the graduate courses offered by the members of the 
staff, consult the catalog of the Graduate School. 

DEPARTMENT OF PHYSIOLOGY 

Magnus I. Gregersen, M.A., Ph.D Professor of Physiology 

Walter S. Root, Ph.D Associate Professor Qf Physiology 

Assistant Professor of Physiology 

Elizabeth Painter, A.B Instructor in Physiology 

Carroll Lockard Conley, A.B Teaching Fellow in Physiology 

F. F. McAllister, A.B Weaver Fellow in Physiology 

Three lectures, one conference and two laboratory periods a week. Feb- 
ruary to May inclusive. The fundamental concepts of physiology are 
presented in lectures and illustrated by laboratory experiments and demon- 
strations. 

Lectures 46 hours 

Conferences 24 hours 

Laboratory 160 hours 

Total 230 hours 

For a description of the graduate courses offered by the members of the 
staff, consult the catalog of the Graduate School. 

DEPARTMENT OF BACTERIOLOGY AND IMMUNOLOGY 

Frank W. Hachtel, M.D Professor of Bacteriology 

J. A. F. Pfeiffer, M.D Instructor in Bacteriology 

Henry F. Buettner, M.D Instructor in Bacteriology 

H. Edmund Levin, M.D Assistant in Bacteriology 

H. M. Bubert, M.D Assistant in Bacteriology 

K. Pierre Dozois, M.S Weaver Fellow in Bacteriology 

Instruction in bacteriology is given in the laboratory to the students of 
of the second year during the first semester. This includes the 
methods of preparation and sterilization of culture media, the study of 
pathogenic bacteria, and the bacteriological examination of water and 



ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 35 

milk. The bacteriological diagnosis of the communicable diseases is also 
included in this course. Animal inoculations are made in connection with 
the bacteria studied. The most important protozoa are also studied in 
the laboratory. The principles of general bacteriology are taught by quiz, 
conference and lecture. 

The principles of immunology are presented by means of quizzes, con- 
ferences and lectures to the second-year class throughout the second semes- 
ter, and practical experiments are carried out by the class in laboratory 
sessions. 

Bacteriology Imtnunoloiy 

Lectures and recitations 16 hours 



Laboratory 104 hours 

Total 120 hours 72 hours 

DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGICAL CHEMISTRY 

H. Boyd Wylie, M.D Professor of Biological Chemistry 

Emil G. Schmidt, Ph.D Assistant Professor of Biological Chemistry 

Frank N. Ogden, M.D Associate in Biological Chemistry 

Dorothy E. Schmalzer, B.S Assistant in Biological Chemistry 

John E. Savage, B.S., M.D Hitchcock Fellow in Obstetrics, 

Pursuing Related Biochemical Problems 
Maurice J. Schmulovitz, A.B Weaver Fellow in Biological Chemistry 

This course is designed to present the fundamental concepts of biological 
chemistry. The phenomena of living matter, and its principal ingredients, 
secretions and excretions are discussed in lectures and conferences and 
examined experimentally. Training is afforded in routine biochemical 
methods of investigation. 

Lectures 66 hours 

Conferences 26 hours 

Laboratory 88 hours 

Total 180 hours 

For a description of the graduate courses offered by the members of 
the staff, consult the catalog of the Graduate School. 

DEPARTMENT OF PHARMACOLOGY 

John C. Krantz, Jr., Ph.D Professor of Pharmacology 

C. Jelleff Carr, M.S Instructor in Pharmacology 

Ruth Musser, A.B., M.S. . . .Instructor in Pharmacology and Secretary of Department 

William Ellsworth Evans, M.S., Ph.D Instructor in Pharmacology 

Marius P. Johnson, A.B., M.D Assistant in Pharmacology 

William G. Harne Demonstrator in Pharmacology 

Frances F. Beck, A.B., M.S Isaac E. Emerson Fellow in Pharmacology 



36 BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, U. OF MD. 

This course is designed to include those phases of pharmacology necessary 
for an intelligent use of drugs in the treatment of disease. The didactic 
instruction includes materia medica, pharmacy, prescription-writing, toxi- 
cology, posology, pharmacodynamics, and experimental therapeutics. 
The laboratory exercises parallel the course of lectures. 

In addition, optional conference periods and lectures are available for 
students desiring further instruction or advice. 

Lectures 80 hours 

Laboratory 96 hours 

Total 176 hours 

For a description of the graduate courses offered by the members of 
the staff, consult the catalog of the Graduate School. 

DEPARTMENT OF PATHOLOGY 

Hugh R. Spencer, M.D Professor of Pathology 

Sydney M. Cone, A.B., M.D Associate Professor of Pathology 

Robert B. Wright, B.S., M.D Assistant Professor of Pathology 

C. Gardner Warner, A.B., M.D Assistant Professor of Pathology 

Albert E. Goldstein, M.D Associate in Pathology 

Walter C. Merkel, A.B., M.D Associate in Pathology 

M. Alexander Novey, A.B., M.D Instructor in Pathology 

Wm. S. Love, Jr., A.B., M.D Instructor in Pathology 

Leon Freedom, M.D Instructor in Pathology 

William R. Geraghty, B.S., M.D Instructor in Pathology 

Benjamin Abeshouse, Ph.B., M.D Instructor in Pathology 

Milton S. Sacks, B.S., M.D Instructor in Pathology 

W. R. Johnson, M.D Instructor in Pathology 

James G. Arnold, A.B., M.D Assistant in Pathology 

Conrad B. Acton, B.S., M.D Assistant in Pathology 

John E. Savage, B.S., M.D Assistant in Pathology 

Robert W. Johnson, M.D Assistant in Pathology 

Harry C. Hull, M.D Assistant in Pathology 

Harry V. Langeluttig, A.B., M.D Assistant in Pathology 

William M. Seabold, A.B., M.D Assistant in Pathology 

J. E. Wilson, Jr., A.B., M.D Assistant in Pathology 

Courses of instruction in pathology are given during the second and third 
years. These courses are based on previous study of normal structure and 
function and aim to outline the natural history of disease. Instruction is 
made as practical as possible so that the student may become familiar with 
the appearance of tissues in disease and may be able to correlate anatomical 
lesions with clinical symptoms and signs. 

1. General Pathology. {Second Year.) This course includes the 
study and demonstration of disturbances of the body fluids, disturbances 
of structure, nutrition and metabolism of cells, disturbances of fat, carbo- 
hydrate and protein metabolism, disturbances in pigment metabolism, 
inflammation and tumors. 



ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 37 

2. Applied Pathology. Including Gross Morbid Anatomy and 
Morbid Physiology. {Third Year.) In this course the special relation 
of lesions to clinical symptoms and signs is emphasized. 

In the laboratory the class is divided into groups for the study of classi- 
fied autopsy material. 

3. Autopsies. {Third Year.) Small groups of students attend autop- 
sies at the morgues of the University Hospital and Baltimore City Hospitals. 
They are required to assist at autopsies and to prepare protocols. 

4. Clinical Pathological Conference. {Fourth Year.) In collabo- 
ration with the Department of Medicine, material from autopsies is 
studied with reference to the correlation of the clinical aspects with the 
pathological findings. 

5. Advanced Work in Pathology. Properly qualified students will 
be permitted to carry out advanced or research work along the lines of 
experimental pathology. 

Summary 
Second Year 

Lectures 50 hours 

Laboratory 118 hours 

Total 168 hours 

Third Year 

Lectures 30 hours 

Laboratory 130 hours 

Total 160 hours 

Fourth year 

Clinical Pathological Conference 30 hours 

DEPARTMENT OF MEDICINE 

Maurice C. Pincoffs, B.S., M.D Professor of Medicine 

Jos. E. Gichner, M.D Professor of Clinical Medicine and Physical Therapeutics 

G. Carroll Lockard, M.D Professor of Clinical Medicine 

Harvey G. Beck, Sc.D., M.D Professor of Clinical Medicine 

Harry M. Stein, M.D Professor of Clinical Medicine 

Paul W. Clough, B.S., M.D Associate Professor of Medicine 

C. C. W. Judd, A.B., M.D Associate Professor of Medicine 

Sydney R. Miller, A.B., M.D Associate Professor of Medicine 

Walter A. Baetjer, A.B., M.D Associate Professor of Medicine 

Thomas R. Sprunt, M.D Associate Professor of Medicine 

W. S. Love, Jr., A.B., M.D Associate Professor of Medicine 

William H. Smith, M.D Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine 

H. J. Maldeis, M.D Associate Professor of Medical Jurisprudence 

S. Lloyd Johnson, A.B., L.L.B., M.D Assistant Professor of Medicine 

John G. Huck, M.D Assistant Professor of Medicine 

George McLean, M.D Assistant Professor of Medicine 



38 



BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, U. OF MD. 



L. A. M. Krause, M.D Assistant Professor of Medicine 

H. R. Peters, M.D Assistant Professor of Medicine 

John E. Legge, M.D Assistant Professor of Medicine 

Thomas C. Wolff, M.D Assistant Professor of Medicine 

E. B. Freeman, M.D Lecturer in Medicine 

Charles R. Goldsborough, M.D Lecturer in Medicine 

H. M. Bubert, M.D Associate in Medicine 

J. S. Eastland, M.D Associate in Medicine 

T. Nelson Carey, M.D Associate in Medicine 

Wetherbee Fort, M.D Associate in Medicine 

Frank J. Geraghty, M.D Associate in Medicine 

L. P. Gundry, M.D Associate in Medicine 

M. G. Gichner, M.D Instructor in Medicine 

Samuel T. Helms, M.D Instructor in Medicine 

Earl L. Chambers, M.D Instructor in Medicine 

E. H. Tonolla, M.D Instructor in Medicien 

David Tenner, M.D Instructor in Medicine 

J. Howard Burns, M.D Instructor in Medicine 

R. B. Mitchell, Jr., M.D Instructor in Medicine 

Samuel Legum, A.B., M.D Instructor in Medicine 

Nathaniel Beck, M.D Assistant in Medicine 

Carl Benson, M.D Assistant in Medicine 

A. Scagnetti, M.D Assistant in Medicine 

W. H. Triplett, M.D Assistant in Medicine 

M. Paul Byerly, M.D Assistant in Medicine 

H. Edmund Levin, M.D Assistant in Medicine 

J. G. Feman, M.D Assistant in Medicine 

Morris Fine, M.D Assistant in Medicine 

Harry V. Langeluttig, A.B., M.D Assistant in Medicine 

Philip D. Flynn, M.D Assistant in Medicine 

Richard France, M.D Assistant in Medicine 

Conrad Acton, M.D Assistant in Medicine 

M. S. Shiling, M.D Assistant in Medicine 

Robert W. Garis, M.D Assistant in Medicine 

Sol Smith, M.D Assistant in Medicine 

W. Grafton Hersperger, M.D Assistant in Medicine 

G. W. Brugler, M.D Hitchcock Fellow in Medicine 

GENERAL OUTLINE 
Second Year 
Introduction to clinical medicine. 

(a) Introductory physical diagnosis. 

(1 hour a week, first semester; 2 hours a week, second semester.) 

(b) Medical clinics. 

(1 hour a week, second semester.) 

Third Year 
I. The methods of examination (13 hours a week). 

(a) History taking. 

(b) Physical diagnosis. 

(c) Clinical pathology. 

These subjects are taught and practiced in the hospital out-patient department 
and in the clinical laboratory. 



ORGANIZATION OF TEE CURRICULUM 39 

II. The principles of medicine (5 hours a week). 

(a) Lectures, clinics and demonstrations in general medicine, neurology, pediatrics; 
psychiatry and preventive medicine. 
III. The principles of therapeutics (10 hours a week). 
Lectures and demonstrations. 

Fourth Year 
The practice of medicine. 
I. Clinical clerkship on the medical wards. 
(26 hours a week for ten weeks.) 

(a) Responsibility, under supervision, for the history, physical examination, 

laboratory examinations and progress notes of assigned cases. 

(b) Ward classes in general medicine, the medical specialties, and therapeutics. 
II. Clinics in general medicine and the medical specialties. 

(6 hours a week.) 

III. Dispensary work in the medical specialties. 

IV. Clinical pathological conferences (1 hour a week). 

Medical Dispensary Work 

The medical dispensaries of both the Mercy and the University Hos- 
pitals are utilized for teaching in the third year. Each student spends 
two hours daily for ten weeks in dispensary work. The work is done in 
groups of four to six students under an instructor. Systematic history- 
taking is especially stressed. Physical findings are demonstrated. The 
student becomes familiar with the commoner acute and chronic disease 
processes. 

Physical Diagnosis 

Second Year. Didactic lectures and practical demonstrations in topo- 
graphical anatomy and normal physical signs. 

Third Year. The class is divided into small groups, and each section 
receives instruction for two hours daily for ten weeks. This course is given 
at the City Hospitals. The large clinical material there is utilized to give 
each student the opportunity to familiarize himself with the common types 
of bodily structure, with the normal variations in physical signs and with 
the physical signs of the chief pulmonary, circulatory and abdominal 
diseases. 

A course of lectures (1 hour a week) on physical diagnosis supplements 
the practical work in this subject. 

Therapeutics 

Third Year. General therapeutics and materia medica are taken up and 
an effort is made to familiarize the student with the practical treatment of 
disease. The special therapy of the chief diseases is then reviewed. One 
hour a week. Dr. Lockard. 



40 BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, U. OF MD. 

Fourth Year. Special consideration is given to the practical application 
of therapeutic principles in bedside teaching and the chief therapeutic 
methods are demonstrated. 

Students attend therapeutic ward rounds once a week throughout their 
medical trimester. 

Tuberculosis 

During the third year in connection with the instruction in physical 
diagnosis a practical course is given at the Municipal Tuberculosis Hos- 
pital. Stress is laid upon the recognition of the physical signs of the 
disease, as well as upon its symptomatology and gross pathology. 

Cardiology 

During the fourth year an elective course in cardiology is offered at the 
Mercy Hospital. The course occupies one and one-half hours weekly. 
Physical diagnosis, electrocardiography and the therapeutic management 
of cardiac cases are stressed. 

Syphilis 

Third Year. During the third year the subject of syphilis is dealt with 
in the lecture course. 

Fourth Year. An elective course in the therapeutic management of 
syphilis is offered in the dispensary. 

CLINICAL PATHOLOGY 

John G. Huck, M.D Assistant Professor of Medicine 

Head of Department of Clinical Pathology 

H. J. Maldeis, M.D Associate Professor of Medical Jurisprudence 

S. Lloyd Johnson, A.B., LL.B., M.D Assistant Professor of Medicine 

Samuel T. Helms, M.D Instructor in Medicine 

E. M. Reese, M.S Assistant in Medicine 

During the third year the student is thoroughly drilled in the technic of 
the usual clinical laboratory work, so that he is able to perform all routine 
examinations which may be called for during his fourth year, in connection 
with the work in the wards and dispensary. 

The practical work is supplemented by a series of didactic lectures and 
demonstrations in which the entire teaching staff of the department takes 
an active part. The microscopical and chemical study of blood, exudates 
and transudates, gastric juice, spinal fluid, feces and urine are successively 
taken up, and special attention directed to the clinical significance of the 
findings. 

Clinical parasitology from the standpoint of the infecting agent and the 
carrier is given careful consideration. 



ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 41 

The entire course is thoroughly practical. Each student has his own 
microscope and is provided with blood counters and hemoglobinometer 
for his exclusive use, and every two students are equipped with a special 
laboratory outfit for all routine purposes. 

During the fourth year the student applies what he has learned during 
the preceding year in the laboratories of the various affiliated hospitals. 
He is also supplied with a laboratory outfit which is sufficiently complete 
to enable him to work independently of the general equipment. Special 
instructors are available during certain hours to give necessary assistance 
and advice. 

Lectures 32 hours 

Laboratory 96 hours 

Total 128 hours 

GASTRO-ENTEROLOGY 

Professor of Gastro-Enterology 

T. Fred Leitz, M.D Clinical Professor of Gastro-Enterology 

Theodore H. Morrison, M.D Clinical Professor of Gastro-Enterology 

Maurice Feldman, M.D .Assistant Professor of Gastro-Enterology 

Zachariah Morgan, M.D Assistant Professor of Gastro-Enterology 

Samuel Morrison, M.D Assistant Professor of Gastro-Enterology 

Joseph Sindler, M.D Associate in Gastro-Enterology 

M. S. Koppelman, M.D Instructor in Gastro-Enterology 

Z. Vance Hooper, M.D Instructor in Gastro-Enterology 

C. Victor Richards, M.D Instructor in Gastro-Enterology 

Ernest Levi, M.D Instructor in Gastro-Enterology 

H. William Primakoff, M.D Assistant in Gastro-Enterology 

Albert J. Shochat, M.D Assistant in Gastro-Enterology 

Beatrice Bamberger, M.D Assistant in Gastro-Enterology 

Third Year. A series of six lectures is given on the diseases of the 
digestive tract. 

Fourth Year. Clinics and demonstrations to the class for one hour a week. 
Dispensary instruction to small groups throughout the entire session. 
Practical instruction is given in the use of modern methods of study of 
the diseases of the gastro-intestinal tract. 

PSYCHIATRY 

Ross McC. Chapman, M.D Professor of Psychiatry 

kRalph P. Truitt, M.D Associate Professor of Psychiatry 

Harry Goldsmith, M.D Assistant Professor of Psychiatry 

Lawrence F. Woolley, M.D Assistant Professor of Psychiatry 

*H. W. Newell, M.D Assistant Professor of Psychiatry 

Harry M. Murdoch:, M.D Assistant Professor of Psychiatry 

Chester L. Reynolds, M.D Associate in Psychiatry 



42 



BULLETIN OF TEE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, U. OF MD. 



First Year. The student attends six lectures dealing with the develop- 
ment and function of the normal personality. 

Second Year. The student attends fourteen lectures dealing with 
psychopathology. 

Third Year. Psychopathology continued, six lectures; reaction types, 
twelve hours, lectures and demonstrations; the psychoses, six hours, lec- 
tures and demonstrations; history- taking and actual study of cases, out- 
patient clinic, thirty hours. 

Fourth Year. The neuroses, psychoneuroses, psychoses, lectures and 
demonstrations, ten hours. In this year the class is divided into sections 
for clinical conferences on selected cases. 



PEDIATRICS 

C. Loring Joslin, M.D Professor of Pediatrics 

Edgar B. Friedenwald, M.D Professor of Clinical Pediatrics 

T. Campbell Goodwin, M.D Associate Professor of Pediatrics 

John H. Traband, M.D Assistant Professor of Pediatrics 

Albert Jaffe, M.D Assistant Professor of Pediatrics 

A. H. Finkelstein, M.D Assistant Professor of Pediatrics 

Frederick Smith, M.D Assistant Professor of Pediatrics 

William J. Todd, M.D Associate in Pediatrics 

William G. Geyer, M.D Associate in Pediatrics 

Clewell Howell, M.D Associate in Pediatrics 

Samuel S. Glick, M.D Associate in Pediatrics 

F. Stratner Orem, M.D Associate in Pediatrics 

R. M. Hening, M.D Instructor in Pediatrics 

M. Paul Byerly, M.D Instructor in Pediatrics 

G. Bowers Mansdorrer, M.D Instructor in Pediatrics 

J. Edmund Bradley, M.D Instructor in Pediatrics 

John A. Askin, M.D Instructor in Pediatrics 

William M. Seabold, M.D Instructor in Pediatrics 

Thomas J. Coonan, M.D Instructor in Pediatrics 

W. J. Schmetz, M.D Assistant in Pediatrics 

Israel P. Meranski, M.D Assistant in Pediatrics 

H. D. Franklin, M.D Assistant in Pediatrics 

H. Whitney Wheaton, M.D Assistant in Pediatrics 

Gustav Highstein, M.D Assistant in Pediatrics 

S. C. Feldman, M.D Assistant in Pediatrics 

Nelsa Lee Wade, M.D Assistant in Pediatrics 

Lauriston L. Keown, M.D Assistant in Pediatrics 

O. Walter Spurrier, M.D Assistant in Pediatrics 



Third Year. A. Lectures on infant feeding and the fundamentals of 
diseases of infants and children. (15 hours.) 

B. Lectures on contagious diseases in conjunction with the Department 
of Hygiene and Preventive Medicine. (14 hours.) 

C. A special course in physical diagnosis is given at City Hospitals. 
(20 hours.) 



ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 43 

D. Clinical conferences demonstrating diseases of the newly-born. (6 
hours.) 

Fourth Year. A. Amphitheatre Clinic at which patients are shown to 
demonstrate the chief features of diseases discussed. (30 hours.) 

B. Conferences and demonstrations are given in problems concerning 
diagnosis, care, treatment and clinical pathology of diseases of infants and 
children; also in the preparation of theses on assigned pediatric subjects. 
(30 hours.) 

C. Clinical clerkship on the pediatric wards. This includes experience 
in the taking of histories, making physical examinations and doing routine 
laboratory work, and in following up of the patient's progress, all under the 
supervision of members of the visiting staff of the Department of Pediatrics. 
(140 hours.) 

D. Instruction in the pediatric clinic of the out-patient department of 
the University Hospital. This consists of lj hours daily for rive weeks — 
30 minutes each day being devoted to clinical demonstration of some inter- 
esting case by a member of the staff; one hour daily to the taking of histories 
and the making of a physical examination under supervision of one of the 
staff instructors. (45 hours.) 

Total hours devoted to the teaching of pediatrics : 300. 

NEUROLOGY 

Irving J. Spear, M.D Professor of Neurology 

Andrew C. Gillis, A.M., M.D., LL.D Professor of Neurology 

G. M. Settle, A.B., M.D., Associate Professor of Neurology and Clinical Medicine 

Milford Levy, M.D Assistant Professor of Neurology 

Leon Freedom, M.D Assistant Professor of Neurology 

Benjamin Pushkin, M.D Associate in Neurology 

James G. Arnold, Jr., M.D Instructor in Neurology 

Philip F. Lerner, A.B., M.D Assistant in Neurology 

Third Year. Ten lecture-demonstrations are given in which the major 
types of diseases of the nervous system are presented. A short course is 
also given at the Baltimore City Hospitals, consisting of six periods of two 
hours each, in which the students in small groups carry out complete neuro- 
logic examinations of selected cases which illustrate the chief neurologic 
syndromes. 

Fourth Year. Clinical conference one hour each week to the entire class. 
This subject is taught at the University and Mercy Hospitals. All patients 
presented at these clinics are carefully examined; complete written records 
are made by the students who demonstrate the patients before the class. 
The patients are usually assigned one or two weeks before they are pre- 
sented, and each student in the class must prepare one or more cases during 
the year. 



44 BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, U. OF MD. 

Ward Class Instruction. In small sections at the University and Mercy 
Hospitals. In these classes the students come in close personal contact 
with the patients in the wards under the supervision of the instructor. 

Dispensary Instruction. Small sections are instructed in the dispensaries 
of the University and Mercy Hospitals four afternoons each week. In this 
way students are brought into contact with nervous diseases in their early 
and late manifestations. 

HYGIENE AND PREVENTIVE MEDICINE 

Huntington Williams, M.D., Dr.P.H Professor of Hygiene and Public Health 

William H. F. Warthen, M.D Associate in Hygiene and Public Health 

Myron G. Tull, M.D Instructor in Hygiene and Public Health 

Third Year. One hour lecture to the whole class each Monday from 
September to May. Basic instruction is given in the clinical and public 
health aspects of the communicable diseases. The lectures are under the 
auspices of the Department of Medicine and are given by staff members 
in that department, including physicians representing Pediatrics, and 
Hygiene and Preventive Medicine. 

Fourth Year. Two hour instruction periods for the entire class, in 
groups of ten to fifteen students on six Wednesday afternoons. These 
sessions enable the students themselves to prepare birth and death certifi- 
cates, to vaccinate against smallpox and to conduct other practical public 
health procedures. In addition there are four Wednesday afternoon field 
inspection trips for each third of the class. These trips, under guidance 
of full time public health workers, include visits to (1) city water filtration 
plant, (2) rural dairy farm, (3) milk pasteurization plant, ice cream plant 
and bakery and (4) industrial plant which has an active program of hygiene. 
Elective case work in association with the Western Health District. 

The course deals with the fundamentals of public health and supplements 
the work in the third year. The major emphasis in both years is on the 
practice of preventive medicine and the relation of prevention to diagnosis 
and treatment. The entire class, in small groups, receives practical in- 
struction at Sydenham Hospital, the one-hundred bed communicable 
disease hospital of the Baltimore City Health Department. 

MEDICAL JURISPRUDENCE 

H. J. Maldeis, M.D Associate Professor of Medical Jurisprudence 

Baltimore City Post Mortem Physician 

Third Year. One hour each week for three weeks. 
This course embraces a summary of the following : Proceedings in criminal 
and civil prosecution, medical evidence and testimony, identity and its 



ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 45 

general relations, sexual abnormalities, personal identity, impotence and 
sterility, rape, criminal abortions, signs of death, wounds in their medico- 
legal relations, death — natural and homicidal, malpractice, insanity, and 
medico-legal autopsies. 

DEPARTMENT OF SURGERY 

Arthur M. Shipley, Sc.D., M.D Professor of Surgery 

Alexius McGlannan, A.M., M.D., LL.D Professor of Surgery 

Nathan Winslow, A.M., M.D Professor of Clinical Surgery 

Page Edmunds, M.D Professor of Traumatic Surgery 

Walter D. Wise, M.D Professor of Clinical Surgery 

Frank S. Lynn, M.D Professor of Clinical Surgery 

Elliott H. Hutchins, A.M., M.D Professor of Clinical Surgery 

Charles Reid Edwards, M.D Professor of Clinical Surgery 

Charles Bagley, Jr., A.B., M.D Professor of Neurological Surgery 

F. L. Jennings, M.D Professor of Clinical Surgery 

Robert P. Bay, M.D Professor of Oral Surgery 

Thomas R. Chambers, A.M., M.D Associate Professor of Surgery 

R. W. Locher, M.D Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery 

A. M. Evans, M.D Associate Professor of Surgery 

Edward S. Johnson, M.D Associate Professor of Surgery 

D. J. Pessagno, M.D Associate Professor of Surgery 

Charles A. Reifschnelder, M.D Associate Professor of Surgery 

Monte Edwards, M.D Associate Professor of Surgery 

Cyrus F. Horine, M.D Associate Professor of Surgery 

N. Clyde Marvel, M.D Associate Professor of Surgery 

I. 0. Ridgley, M.D Associate in Surgery 

H. F. Bongardt, M.D Associate in Surgery 

Thomas B. Aycock, B.S., M.D Associate in Surgery 

Richard G. Coblentz, M.D Associate in Neurological Surgery 

Grant E. Ward, A.B., M.D Associate in Surgery 

W. R. Johnson, M.D Instructor in Surgery 

E. M. Hanrahan, A.B., M.D Instructor in Surgery 

S. Demarco, M.D Instructor in Surgery 

Karl J. Steinmueller, A.B., M.D Instructor in Surgery 

W. W. Walker, M.D Instructor in Surgery 

J. J. Leyko, M.D Instructor in Surgery 

George H. Yeager, B.S., M.D Instructor in Surgery 

Luther E. Little, M.D Instructor in Surgery 

J. Frank Hewitt, A.B., M.D Instructor in Surgery 

J. G. Onnen, M.D Instructor in Surgery 

Dwight Mohr, M.D Assistant in Surgery 

William R. Geraghty, B.S., M.D Assistant in Surgery 

Howard B. McElwain, M.D Assistant in Surgery 

A. V. Buchness, M.D Assistant in Surgery 

T. J. Touhey, M.D Assistant in Surgery 

Clyde F. Earns, M.D Assistant in Surgery 

Paul Schenker, M.D Assistant in Surgery 



46 BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, U. OF MD. 

Robert W. Johnson, M.D Assistant in Surgery 

Frank K. Morris, A.B., M.D Assistant in Surgery 

J. Willis Guyton, M.D Assistant in Surgery 

Wm. N. McFaul, Jr., M.D Assistant in Surgery 

Samuel H. Culver, M.D Assistant in Surgery 

Simon H. Brager, M.D Assistant in Surgery 

C. W. Peake, M.D Assistant in Surgery 

James C. Owings, M.D Assistant in Surgery 

Albert R. Wilkerson, M.D Assistant in Surgery 

J. W. Nelson, M.D Assistant in Surgery 

Julius Goodman, M.D Assistant in Surgery 

I. Ridgeway Trimble, M.D Assistant in Surgery 

Arthur G. Siwinski, A.B., M.D Assistant in Surgery 

J. H. Wilkerson, M.D Assistant in Surgery 

L. T. Chance, M.D Assistant in Surgery 

Samuel McLanahan, Jr., M.D Assistant in^Surgery 

W. Allen Deckert, Jr., M.D Assistant in Surgery 

Raymond F. Helfrich, M.D Assistant in Surgery 

Harry C. Hull, M.D Assistant in Surgery 

Samuel E. Proctor, M.D Assistant in Surgery 

George Govatos, M.D Assistant in Surgery 

Francis W. Gillis, M.D Assistant in Surgery 

R. Walter Graham, Jr., M.D Assistant in Surgery 

H. Alvan Jones, M.D Assistant in Surgery 

Richard T. Shackelford, M.D Assistant in Surgery 

The teaching is done in the anatomical laboratory, the dispensaries, 
wards, clinical laboratories and operating rooms of the University and Mercy 
Hospitals, and in the wards and operating rooms of the Baltimore City 
Hospitals. 

Instruction is given by means of lectures, recitations, dispensary work, 
bedside instruction, ward classes, and clinics. The work begins in the sec- 
ond year, and continues throughout the third and fourth years. 

Second Year 

Topographic and Surgical Anatomy. The course is designed to bridge 
the gap between anatomy in the abstract and clinical anatomy as applied 
to the study and practice of medicine and surgery. 

The teaching is done in the anatomical laboratory, and students are 
required to demonstrate all points, outlines, and regions on the cadaver. 
Underlying regions are dissected to bring out outlines and relations of 
structures. 

Didactic Lectures. Two hours a week for one semester, augmented 
by demonstrations with specimens, charts, and cross sections. Dr. Monte 
Edwards. 

Laboratory. Five hours a week for 16 weeks. Dr. Monte Edwards 
assisted by Drs. Yeager, Hull and Jones. 



ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 47 

Principles of Surgery. This course includes history-taking, records 
of physical examinations and of operations and progress notes; the 
preparation of surgical dressing, suture materials and solutions. It 
includes inflammation, infections, ulcers, gangrene, fistulae and sinuses, 
hemorrhage, shock and tumors. Lectures and conferences, two hours per 
week for one semester, to the entire class. Dr. C. R. Edwards. 

Third Year 

General and Regional Surgery. Lectures, recitations and clinics 
on the principles of surgery and general surgery are given three hours 
a week to the entire class. Drs. Lynn and Wise. 

The class is divided into groups and receives instruction in history-taking, 
gross pathology, and surgical diagnosis — at the bedside and in the dead- 
house of the Baltimore City Hospitals. Drs. Shipley, Reifschneider, 
Aycock and Little. 

Operative Surgery. Instruction is given in operative surgery upon 
the cadaver and on dogs. The class is divided into sections, and each sec- 
tion is given practical and individual work under the supervision of the 
instructors. Dr. Lynn, assisted by Drs. Winslow, E. S. Johnson, Aycock, 
Demarco, Pessagno, Onnen, W. R. Johnson, Steinmueller, R. W. Johnson, 
Culver, Brager, Walker, Karns, Gillis, Peake, Proctor, Govatos, Ullrich 
and Deckert. 

Fractures and Dislocations. This course consists of instruction in 
the various forms of fractures, dislocations and their treatment. There 
is a regular schedule of didactic lectures, which is supplemented by practical 
demonstrations in diagnosis and treatment. 

Surgical Dispensary. Under supervision, the student takes the his- 
tory, makes the physical examinations, attempts the diagnosis, and, as far 
as possible, carries out the treatment of the ambulatory surgical patients 
in the University and in the Mercy Hospitals. Mercy Hospital — Dr. 
Leyko assisted by the entire dispensary staff. University Hospital — Dr. 
C. R. Edwards assisted by the entire dispensary staff. 

Fourth Year 

Clinics. A weekly clinic is given at the Mercy and at the University 
Hospitals to one-half the class throughout the year. As far as possible 
this is a diagnostic clinic. Mercy Hospital — Dr. Wise. University Hos- 
pital — Dr. Shipley. 

Surgical Pathology. A weekly exercise of one hour at Mercy Hospital 
for one semester at which specimens from the operating room and museum 
are studied in the gross and microscopically in relation to the case history. 
Dr. McGlannan. 

Traumatic Surgery. Operative and post-operative treatment of acci- 



48 BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, U. OF MD. 

dent cases, with instructions as to the relationship between the state, the 
employee, the employer, and the physician's duty to each. One hour a 
week to sections of the class throughout the year. Dr. Edmunds. 

Clinical Clerkship. The personal study of assigned hospital patients, 
under supervision of the staffs of the University and Mercy Hospitals, 
history-taking, and physical examination of patients, laboratory examina- 
tions, attendance at operations and observation of post-operative treatment. 

Ward Classes. Ward class instruction in small groups will consist of 
ward rounds, surgical diagnosis, treatment and the after-care of operative 
cases. Mercy Hospital — Drs. Wise, Hutchins, Jennings, Pessagno and Mar- 
vel. University Hospital — Drs. Shipley, Edmunds, Lynn and Edwards. 

ANAESTHESIA 

S. Griffith Davis, M.S., M.D Professor of Anaesthesia 

E. Hollister Davis, A.B., M.D Assistant in Anaesthesia 

Mary J. O'Brien, R.N Anaesthetist 

Third Year 

Lectures on the general physiology of anaesthesia, with consideration of 
special physiology of each anaesthetic agent. Methods of induction and 
administration of anaesthesia. Factors influencing the selection of the 
anaesthetic and types of anaesthetic agents. Preparation and care of the 
anaesthetized patient. 

The lectures are correlated with practical demonstrations during operative 
clinics at the City Hospitals. 

Fourth Year 

During operative clinics in both surgery and gynecology each student 
will be given practical instruction in the administration of anaesthetics and 
will be required to record such changes as take place in blood pressure, 
pulse and respiration. 

DERMATOLOGY 

Harry M. Robinson, M.D Professor of Clinical Dermatology 

John R. Abercrombie, A.B., M.D Associate in Dermatology 

Francis Ellis, A.B., M.D Associate in Dermatology 

Harold M. Goodman, A.B., M.D Associate in Dermatology 

Arthur C. Monninger, M.D Instructor in Dermatology 

Joseph C. Bernstein, M.D Assistant in Dermatology 

Robert B. Taylor, M.D Assistant in Dermatology 

Clinical conferences are held one hour each week with the entire class. 
This course consists of demonstrations of the common diseases of the skin 
in addition to a number of lectures on the general principles of dermatology. 
Dr. Robinson. 



ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 49 

Dispensary instruction in the diagnosis and treatment of skin diseases 
is given daily at the University Hospital by Drs. Robinson, Ellis, Goodman 
and Monninger. A similar course of instruction is given at the Mercy 
Hospital on Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays. These courses are de- 
vised for the specific purpose of giving the student close and intimate con- 
tact with skin diseases. Students are assigned cases and under supervision 
are permitted to diagnose and administer accepted treatment. 

ORTHOPAEDIC SURGERY 

Allen Fiske Voshell, A.B., M.D Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery 

Albertus Cotton, A.M., M.D Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery 

Compton Riely, M.D Clinical Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery 

Moses Gellman, B.S., M.D Associate Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery 

Harry L. Rogers, M.D Associate Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery 

Henry F. Ullrich, M.D Assistant in Orthopaedic Surgery 

In this course didactic, clinical, bedside and out-patient instruction is 
given. This instruction is provided in the University Hospital Amphi- 
theatre, Mercy Hospital and Dispensary, Kernan Hospital and Industrial 
School for Crippled Children at "Radnor Park" and in the Dispensary of 
the University Hospital. 

Lectures or clinics are held once a week at each of the hospitals named 
in town. In addition, a weekly bedside clinic is held for small sections of 
the class at "Radnor Park" and Mercy Hospital. Daily teaching in the 
Dispensary is stressed. 

The course covers instruction in the special methods of examination, 
pathology, diagnosis and treatment in this specialty. 

Brief outlines and demonstrations are also given of the apparatus em- 
ployed in physiotherapy, muscle training and corrective gymnastics. 

ROENTGENOLOGY 

Henry J. Walton, M.D Professor of Roentgenology 

Albertus Cotton, A.M., M.D Professor of Roentgenology 

Eugene L. Flippin, M.D Associate in Roentgenology 

Walter L. Kilby, M.D Assistant in Roentgenology 

During the academic year small groups of the fourth year class are given 
weekly demonstrations in the diagnostic and therapeutic uses of the Roent- 
gen rays. An effort is made to familiarize the student with the appearance 
of normal Roentgenograms, after which instruction is given in the interpre- 
tation of the more common pathological lesions seen on the Roentgen films 
and fluoroscopic screen. The history, physics and practical application 
of the Roentgen rays are alluded to, but not stressed. Weekly conferences 
are held with the medical and pathological departments, which are also 
open to members of the fourth year class. 



50 BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, U. OF MD. 



DISEASES OF THE NOSE AND THROAT 

Edward A. Looper, M.D., D.Oph Professor of Diseases of the Nose and Throat 

Waitman F. Zinn, M.D Clinical Professor of Diseases of the Nose and Throat 

Franklin B. Anderson, M.D Associate in Diseases of the Nose and Throat 

W. Raymond McKenzie, M.D Associate in Diseases of the Nose and Throat 

Thomas R. O'Rourk, M.D Associate in Diseases of the Nose and Throat 

Birkhead Macgowan, M.D Assistant in Diseases of the Nose and Throat 

Third Year. Instruction to entire class is given in the common diseases 
of the nose and throat, attention being especially directed to infections of 
the accessory sinuses, the importance of focal infections in the etiology of 
general diseases and modern methods of diagnosis. Lectures illustrated by 
lantern slides are given one hour weekly throughout the second semester 
by Dr. Looper. 

Fourth Year. Dispensary instruction one and one-half hours daily, to 
small sections at the University and the Mercy Hospitals. The student 
is given opportunity to study, diagnose and treat patients under super- 
vision. Ward classes and clinical demonstrations are given in periods of 
one and one-half hours weekly throughout the session in the University 
and the Mercy Hospitals. 

The Looper Clinic, recently established in the University Hospital for 
bronchoscopy and esophagoscopy, affords unusual opportunities for stu- 
dents to study diseases of the larynx, bronchi and esophagus. The clinic 
is open to students daily from 2 to 4 P.M., under direction of Dr. Looper. 

The Mercy Hospital Clinic for bronchoscopy and esophagoscopy is under 
the direction of Dr. Zinn. In these two clinics the etiology, symptoma- 
tology, diagnosis and treatment of foreign bodies in the air and food pas- 
sages, as well as bronchoscopy, are taught to students, as an aid in the 
diagnosis and treatment of diseases of the lungs. 

GENITO-URINARY SURGERY 

W. H. Toulson, A.B., M.Sc, M.D Professor of Genito-Urinary Surgery 

A. J. Gillis, M.D Clinical Professor of Genito-Urinary Surgery 

Austin H. Wood, M.D Associate in Genito-Urinary Surgery 

L. J. Millan, M.D Associate in Genito-Urinary Surgery 

K. D. Legge, M.D Associate in Genito-Urinary Surgery 

L. K. Fargo, M.D Associate in Genito-Urinary Surgery 

John F. Hogan, M.D Associate in Genito-Urinary Surgery 

Samuel T. Helms, M.D Instructor in Genito-Urinary Surgery 

W. A. H. Councill, M.D Instructor in Genito-Urinary Surgery 

Harry S. Shelley, B.S., M.D Assistant in Genito-Urinary Surgery 

Third Year. This course is given from eight to ten hours to the entire 
class. It consists of lectures and demonstrations including the use of lan- 
tern slides and motion pictures. Dr. Toulson. 



ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 51 

Fourth Year. The course in this year includes explanations and dem- 
onstrations of urethroscopy, cystoscopy, ureteral catheterization, renal 
function tests, urography, urine cultures and the various laboratory pro- 
cedures. The teaching consists of clinics and ward rounds to small groups, 
and attendance by members of the senior class upon the out-patients in 
the dispensary. The student here is placed much on his own responsibility 
in arriving at a diagnosis. Members of the Staff are in constant attendance 
for consultations. These dispensary classes are conducted at both the 
Mercy and University Hospitals where practically every variety of venereal 
disease is here encountered and used for teaching purposes. 

DISEASES OF THE RECTUM AND COLON 

Charles F. Blake, A.M., M.D Professor of Diseases of Rectum and Colon 

J. Dawson Reeder, M.D Professor of Diseases of Rectum and Colon 

Monte Edwards, M.D Associate in Diseases of Rectum and Colon 

James C. Owings, M.D Assistant in Diseases of the Rectum and Colon 

Third Year. Five hours to the entire class. This course is for instruction 
in the diseases of the colon, sigmoid flexure, rectum and anus, and will cover 
the essential features of the anatomy and physiology of the large intestine 
as well as the various diseases to which it is subject. Dr. Reeder and Dr. 
Edwards. 

Fourth Year. Ward and dispensary instruction is given in the University 
and Mercy Hospitals, where different phases of the various diseases are 
taught by direct observation and examination. The use of the proctoscope 
and sigmoidoscope in the examination of the rectum and sigmoid is made 
familiar to each student. Mercy Hospital — Dr. Blake. University Hos- 
pital — Drs. Reeder and Monte Edwards. 

OTOLOGY 

J. W. Downey, M.D Professor of Otology 

Franklin B. Anderson, M.D Associate in Otology 

F. A. Holden, M.D Instructor in Otology 

Benjamin S. Rich, M.D Assistant in Otology 

Birkhead Macgowan, M.D Assistant in Otology 

Thomas R. O'Rourk, M.D Assistant in Otology 

The course in otology is planned to give a practical knowledge of the 
anatomy and physiology of the ear, and its proximity and relationship to 
the brain and other vital structures. The inflammatory diseases, their 
etiology, diagnosis, treatment and complications are particularly stressed, 
with emphasis upon their relationship to the diseases of children, head- 
surgery and neurology. 

Third Year. The entire class is given instruction by means of talks, 
anatomical specimens and lantern slides. 



52 BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, U. OF MD. 

Fourth Year. Small sections of the class receive instruction and make 
personal examinations of patients under the direction of an instructor. 
The student is urged to make a routine examination of the ear in his ward 
work in general medicine and surgery. 

NEUROLOGICAL SURGERY 

Charles Bagley, Jr., A.B., M.D Professor of Neurological Surgery 

Richard G. Coblentz, A.B., M.D Associate in Neurological Surgery 

William R. Geraghty, B.S.,M.D Instructor in Neurological Surgery 

James G. Arnold, Jr., A.B., M.D Hitchcock Fellow in Neurological Surgery 

Third Year. The course covers instruction in diagnosis and treatment 
of surgical conditions of the brain, spinal cord, and the peripheral nerves. 
Ten lectures are given to the entire class. Dr. Bagley. 

Fourth Year. Weekly ward rounds and conferences are given at the 
University Hospital. Drs. Bagley and Coblentz. 

ONCOLOGY 

J. Mason Hundley, Jr., M.A., M.D Professor of Gynecology 

Grant E. Ward, A.B., M.D Associate in Surgery 

Every facility for the diagnosis and treatment of neoplastic diseases is 
available; this includes electro-surgery, radium therapy and deep X-ray 
therapy. 

An out-patient clinic is held twice weekly which affords an opportunity 
for instruction to a limited number of students. The gynecological prob- 
lems are under the supervision of Dr. Hundley, and the general surgical 
conditions are under the direction of Dr. Ward. 

Instruction, other than dispensary teaching, is given to small groups of 
students, for one hour a week, in the history, physics and practical applica- 
tion of radium. Drs. Ward and Hundley. 

ORAL SURGERY 

Robert P. Bay, M.D Professor of Oral Surgery 

Brice M. Dorsey, D.D.S Professor of Exodontia 

Charles A. Reifschnedder, M.D Associate Professor of Surgery and Oral Surgery 

William E. Hahn, D.D.S Instructor in Exodontia 

This section in the Department of Surgery is established for the teaching 
of both medical and dental students. A new subdivision in the Dispensary 
has also been established, and beds will be provided in the University Hos- 
pital for the care of patients, who will be available for the teaching of stu- 
dents from both schools. 

Senior year: clinics weekly. 

Ward instruction and group teaching in dispensary. Instruction includes 
diagnosis and treatment of diseases of the face, mouth and jaws. 



ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 53 

INDUSTRIAL MEDICINE AND SURGERY 

Page Edmunds, M.D Professor of Traumatic Surgery 

G. Carroll Lockard, M.D Professor of Clinical Medicine 

This section is under the combined supervision of the Medical and Sur- 
gical Departments and is a cooperative effort by members of the Medical 
School and Hospital Staff to afford means for study, both clinical and 
laboratory, of the patient who has been subjected to industrial hazard, 
either traumatic or medical, so that adequate care may be instituted to 
promote his physical well-being. The entire resources of the Laboratories 
of the Medical School and Hospital are available as needed. 

Under direction of this department limited undergraduate instruction 
will be given, especially in the methods of examination and of keeping 
records; and in the general medico-legal principles as they affect the indus- 
trial employee, the employer, the general insurers, the physician and the 
hospital. There will also be instruction upon methods of making life insur- 
ance and other physical examinations, whether for employment or for 
health purposes. The wards of the University, Mercy and City Hospitals 
will supply suitable material for bed-side instruction. 

DEPARTMENT OF OBSTETRICS 

J. M. H. Rowland, M.D., Sc.D., LL.D Professor of Obstetrics 

L. H. Douglass, M.D Professor of Clinical Obstetrics 

J. McFarland Bergland, M.D Associate Professor of Obstetrics 

Emil Novak, M.D Associate Professor of Obstetrics 

J. G. M. Reese, M.D Assistant Professor of Obstetrics 

M. Alexander Novey, A.B., M.D Assistant Professor of Obstetrics 

Isadore A. Siegel, A.B., M.D Associate in Obstetrics 

E. P. H. Harrison, A.B., M.D Associate in Obstetrics 

Margaret B. Ballard, M.D Assistant in Obstetrics 

E. S. Edlavitch, M.D Assistant in Obstetrics 

Kenneth B. Boyd, M.D Assistant in Obstetrics 

Frank K. Morris, A.B., M.D Assistant in Obstetrics 

Dudley P. Bowe, A.B., M.D Assistant in Obstetrics 

John E. Savage, B.S., M.D Hitchcock Fellow and Assistant in Obstetrics 

W. A. Deckert, M.D Assistant in Obstetrics 

Jaroslav Hulla, B.S., M.D Assistant in Obstetrics 

Marius P. Johnson, A.B., M.D Assistant in Obstetrics 

Third Year. Two lectures and recitations are given each week to the 
entire class. Drs. Rowland, Douglass, Novak, Bergland, Siegel, Novey 
and Harrison. 

Clinics, recitations and lectures are given to one-half of the class each 
week at the Baltimore City Hospitals and the University Hospital. Drs. 
Rowland, Reese and Novey. 



54 BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, U. OF MD. 

Demonstrations at the University Hospital Dispensary are given to sec- 
tions of the class. Drs. Siegel and Harrison. 

Students observe and assist in deliveries at the University and Baltimore 
City Hospitals throughout the year. 

Fourth Year. A clinical conference is given each week. Drs. Rowland, 
Douglass and Siegel. 

Ward classes are given six hours per week, for five weeks, to sections of 
the class at the University Hospital. Drs. Douglass, Reese and Novey. 
Manikin work is given to sections of the class at the University Hospital. 
Drs. Morris, Bowe and Deckert. 

Each member of the senior class is required to conduct the delivery of 
ten women in their homes under the supervision of the teaching and resi- 
dent staff. Students observe, assist in and conduct, under supervision, 
deliveries at the University Hospital. 

DEPARTMENT OF GYNECOLOGY 

J. Mason Hundley, Jr., A.B., M.A., M.D Professor of Gynecology 

Abram S. Samuels, M.D Clinical Professor of Gynecology 

George A. Strauss, Jr., M.D Assistant Professor of Gynecology 

R. G. Willse, M.D Assistant Professor of Gynecology 

Thomas K. Galvin, M.D Assistant Professor of Gynecology 

Leo Brady, A.B., M.D Assistant Professor of Gynecology 

John T. Hibbitts, M.D Associate in Gynecology 

Kenneth B. Boyd, M.D Associate in Gynecology 

E. P. Smith, M.D Associate in Gynecology 

Thomas S. Bowyer, M.D Instructor in Gynecology 

Joseph V. Castagna, M.D Instructor in Gynecology 

E. S. Edlavitch, A.B., M.D Instructor in Gynecology 

Beverley C. Compton, A.B., M.D Assistant in Gynecology 

W. Allen Deckert, A.B., M.D Assistant in Gynecology 

Frank K. Morris, A.B., M.D Assistant in Gynecology 

John C. Dumler, B.S., M.D Assistant in Gynecology 

Third Year. A course of twenty-five lectures and recitations is given to 
the whole class. In addition, a short course of lecture-demonstrations is 
given at the Baltimore City Hospitals, consisting of eight periods of one 
hour each, in which small groups of students are instructed in the funda- 
mentals of gynecological diagnosis and examination. 

Fourth Year. Operative clinics — lectures and demonstrations — are given 
six hours per week, for five weeks, to sections of the class. 

Instruction in Female Urology is given, and a small number of students 
may attend the cystoscopic dispensary which is held twice weekly. 

The course in Gynecology also includes instruction in the diagnosis and 
treatment of cancer of the generative organs, small groups of students 
attending the Oncological dispensary for additional work. 



ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 55 

DEPARTMENT OF OPHTHALMOLOGY 

Clyde A. Clapp, M.D Professor of Ophthalmology 

M. Randolph Kahn, M.D Clinical Professor of Ophthalmology 

H. K. Fleck, M.D Associate Professor of Ophthalmology 

R. D. West, M.D Associate in Ophthalmology 

Henry F. Graff, A.B., M.D Associate in Ophthalmology 

Jonas Friedenwald, A.B., M.D Lecturer in Ophthalmic Pathology 

Joseph I. Kemler, M.D Associate in Ophthalmology 

F. A. Holden, M.D Instructor in Ophthalmology 

Frank A. Pacienza, M.D Instructor in Refraction 

John G. Runkle, M.D Assistant in Ophthalmology 

Thomas R. O'Rourk, M.D Assistant in Ophthalmology 

Jerome Snyder, M.D Assistant in Ophthalmology 

Third Year. Second semester. Dr. Kahn will give a course reviewing 
the anatomy and physiology of the eye and the methods used in making 
the various examinations. Errors of refraction and their effect upon the 
general system will be explained. Weekly section work, demonstrating 
the use of the ophthalmoscope, will be carried on during the entire session. 

Fourth Year. Clinics and demonstrations in diseases of the eye, weekly, 
for one year. Dr. Clapp. 

This course consists of lectures upon the diseases of the eye, with par- 
ticular reference to their diagnosis and relation to general medicine. Spe- 
cial lectures will be given upon vascular changes in the eye and upon the 
pathology of the eye. Some operations will be demonstrated by motion 
pictures. 

Weekly ward classes at the University, The Baltimore Eye, Ear and 
Throat and Mercy Hospitals during which the eye grounds in the various 
medical and surgical conditions are demonstrated. Drs. Fleck, West, 
Kemler and Graff. 

Also daily demonstrations are given in the taking of histories and the 
diagnosis and treatment of the various conditions as seen in the dispensary. 

Third Year- 
Lectures 20 hours 

Ophthalmoscopy 10 hours 

Total 30 hours 

Fourth Year — 

Lectures and demonstrations ^- 26 hours 

Clinical work 20 hours 

Total 46 hours 



56 BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, U. OF MD. 

DEPARTMENT OF ART AS APPLIED TO MEDICINE 

Carl Dame Clarke Associate Professor of Art as Applied to Medicine 

This department is maintained for the purpose of supplying pictorial 
and plastic illustrations for visual teaching in the classrooms of the Uni- 
versity and for publication in scientific periodicals. 

Special courses of instruction are given to qualified students. 

HISTORY OF MEDICINE 

John Rathbone Oliver, M.D., Ph.D Professor of the History of Medicine 

In this department, a series of lectures is given each year in March, 
April and May. The course is planned so that the entire field of Medical 
History may be covered in four years. Any medical student attending 
these lectures during his four years' course will be given, at least, an out- 
line of the history of his profession. 

During the past academic year, the lectures have been somewhat cur- 
tailed on account of the illness of the professor. One lecture was given by 
Dr. Owsei Temkin of the Institute of the History of Medicine at the Johns 
Hopkins University, who lectured on the Early History of Clinical Teaching. 
The other lectures dealt with the medicine of the 18th Century and the 
beginnings of American Medicine. One lecture was devoted to the out- 
standing figures of William and John Hunter and the connection of their 
dissecting room in Windmill Street, London, with the beginnings of Ameri- 
can Medicine. Another lecture was devoted to Jenner and the history of 
inoculation; still another, to William Beaumont as an example of pioneer 
research in America. 

In the coming year 1936-37, the lectures will deal with the beginnings of 
medicine, primitive medicine and the medicine of Babylonia, Egypt, India 
and Greece. 

The Head of the Department is always glad to welcome any student who 
is interested in Medical History and will be glad to advise him as to his 
reading or to suggest subjects for special study. 



ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 



57 



FIRST YEAR SCHEDULE 

FIRST SEMESTER, SEPTEMBER 24, 1936 TO JANUARY 30, 1937 



Hours 


Monday 


Tuesday 


Wednesday 


Thursday 


Friday 


Saturday 


9.00 

to 

1.00 


Gross Anatomy — Lectures and Laboratories 


(9-12) 

Neuro- 

Anatomy 

32-34 S. Paca St. 


1.00 

to 

2.00 


Lunch 




2.00 

to 
5.00 


Histology and 

Embryology 

32-34 S. Paca St. 


Neuro- 

Anatomy 

32-34 S. Paca St. 


Histology and 

Embryology 

32-34 S. Paca St. 





SECOND SEMESTER, FEBRUARY 1 TO MAY 29, 1937 



Hours 


Monday 


Tuesday 


Wednesday 


Thursday 


Friday 


Saturday 


9.00 


Biological 


Biological 


Biological 


(8.30-9.30) 


(8.30-9.30) 


(8.30-9.30) 


to 


Chemistry 


Chemistry 


Chemistry 


Physiology 


Physiology 


Physiology 


10.00 
















29 


29 


29 


C.E. 


C.E. 


C.E. 


10.00 


Laboratory 


Laboratory 


Biological 


(9.30-10.30) 


(9.30-10.30) 




to 


— 


— 


Chemistry 


Biological 


Biological 




11.00 


Physiology 


Physiology 




Chemistry 


Chemistry 






Sect. A 
(10-4) 


Sect. B 
(10-4) 


29 


29 


29 






Laboratory 


Laboratory 


(10.30-11.30) 




11.00 


Biological 


Biological 


— 


— 


Psychiatry 




to 


Chemistry 


Chemistry 


Physiology 


Physiology 






4.00 


Sect. B 


Sect. A 


Sect. A 


Sect. B 


29 






(1-4) 


(1-4) 


(11-5) 

Biological 


(10.30-4.30) 
Biological 




















4.00 






Chemistry 


Chemistry 






to 






Sect. B 


Sect. A 






5.00 






(1-4) 


(1-4) 







Locations of Lecture Halls and Laboratories: 
Adm. 1 — First Floor, Administration Building, Lombard and Greene Streets. 
A. H. — Anatomical Hall — Upper Hall, N. E. Cor. Lombard and Greene Streets. 
C. H. — Chemical Hall, Lower Hall, N. E. Cor. Lombard and Greene Streets. 
29 — 29 South Greene Street, First Floor. 

Anatomy Laboratory — Third Floor, Gray Laboratory, Lombard and Greene Streets. 
Biological Chemistry Laboratory — Third Floor, 31 South Greene Street. 
Histology and Embryology Laboratory — 32-34 South Paca Street, Sixth Floor. 
Neuro-Anatomy Laboratory — 32-34 South Paca Street, Sixth Floor. 
Mid-Year Examinations — January 25-30, 1937 
Final Examinations— May 24-29, 1937 
(This schedule is subject to revision for 1936-1937) 



58 



BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINF, U. OF MD. 



SECOND YEAR SCHEDULE 

FIRST SEMESTER, SEPTEMBER 24, 1936 TO JANUARY 30, 1937 



Hours 


Monday 


Tuesday 


Wednesday 


Thursday 


Friday 


Saturday 


9.00 

to 
12.00 


*Neuro- 
Anatomy 


Neuro- 
Anatomy 


(9-10) 

Medicine 

Amp. 


Neuro- 
Anatomy 


Pharmacology 

Laboratory 

Sect. B 




12 00 


Lunch 


Lunch 


Lunch 


Lunch 




to 
12.30 


(10-1) 

Pharmacology 

Laboratory 

Sect. A 




12.30 


tBacteriology 
Laboratory 


Bacteriology 
Laboratory 


Bacteriology 
Laboratory 


(12.30-1.30) 

Bacteriology 
C.H. 




2.30 


(1-1.30) 
Lunch 


(1.30-2.30) 

Psychiatry 

C.H. 




2.30 

to 
3.30 


Pharmacology 
C.H. 


Pharmacology 
C.H. 


(1.30-3.30) 
Bacteriology 
Laboratory 


Methods of 

Neurological 

Examination 

C.H. 







* Neuro-anatomy course ends November 25, 1936. Examination date to be announced, 
t Bacteriology Laboratory — Section work during the last month. 



ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 



59 



SECOND SEMESTER, FEBRUARY 1 TO MAY 29, 1937 



Hours 


Monday 


Tuesday 


Wednesday 


Thursday 


Friday 


Saturday 


8.30 

to 
9.30 


Surgery 
Adm. 1 


Surgery 
Adm. 1 


Surgical 
Anatomy 

Adm. 1 


Physiology 
C.H. 


Physiology 
C.H. 


Physiology 
C.H. 


9.30 


Pharmacology 
Adm. 1 


Pharmacology 
Adm. 1 


Surgical 

Anatomy 
Laboratory 




Physiology 
Laboratory 

{Demonstra- 
tions) 




to 
10.30 


(10-11) 

Medical Clinic 

Amp. 




10.30 


Pathology 
A.H. 


Pathology 
A.H. 




to 
11.30 






11.30 

to 
12.00 


Lunch 


Lunch 


Lunch 


Lunch 


Lunch 


(9.30-5.00) 


12.00 

to 

1.00 


Pathology 
Laboratory 


Pathology 
Laboratory 


Pathology 
A.H. 


Pathology 
Laboratory 


Pathology 
Laboratory 


Physiology 
Laboratory 


1.00 

to 
2.00 


Pathology 
A.H. 


(Sections) 


2.00 

to 
3.00 


Surgical 
Anatomy 
Adm. 1 


II Immunology 
Laboratory 


Immunology 
Laboratory 


Pharmacology 

Laboratory 

Sect. A 

Physical 

Diagnosis 

Sect. B 

(3.00-5.30) 


Pharmacology 

Laboratory 

Sect. B 

Physical 
Diagnosis 

Sect. A 
(3 . 00-5 . 30) 




3.00 

to 
5.00 


Surgical 

Anatomy 

Laboratory 





Immunology Laboratory — Section work during last two months. 

Locations of Lecture Halls and Laboratories: 
Adm. 1 — First Floor, Administration Building, Lombard and Greene Streets. 
A. H. — Anatomical Hall — Upper Hall, N. E. Cor. Lombard and Greene Streets. 
C. H. — Chemical Hall, Lower Hall, Lombard and Greene Streets. 

Amp. — Wilson Memorial Amphitheatre, New University Hospital, Greene and Redwood Streets, Eighth Floor. 
Laboratories: 

Bacteriology — Second Floor, 31 South Greene Street. 
Immunology — Second Floor, 31 South Greene Street. 
Neuro-Anatomy — 32-34 South Paca Street. 
Pathology — Second Floor, 31 South Greene Street. 

Pharmacology — Second Floor, Gray Laboratory, Lombard and Greene Streets. 
Physiology — First Floor, Gray Laboratory, Lombard and Greene Streets. 
Surgical Anatomy — Third Floor, Gray Laboratory, Lombard and Greene Streets. 
Mid-Year Examinations — January 25-30, 1937 
Final Examinations — May 24-29, 1937 
(This schedule is subject to revision for 1936-1937) 



60 



BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, U. OF MD. 



THIRD YEAR SCHEDULE 

SEPTEMBER 24, 1936 TO MAY 29, 1937 



SCHEDULE 1 



Hours 


Monday 


Tuesday 


Wednesday 


Thursday 


Friday 


Saturday 


8.30 


(Wholt Class) 


(Whole Class) 


(Whole Class) 


(Whole Class) 


(Whole Class) 


(Whole Class) 


to 


Obstetrics 


Surgery 


Obstetrics 


Surgery 


Pathology 


Surgery 


9.30 


C.H. 


C.H. 


C.H. 


*C. H. Udm. 1 


*C. H. \Adm. 1 


*C. H. Udm. 1 


9.30 














to 




Transfer to Baltimore City Hospitals 






10.00 














10.00 














to 




Physical Diagnosis, Pathology and Pediatrics at B. C. H. 




12.00 














12.00 


Transfer 


Transfer 




Transfer 






to 


and 


and 


Lunch 


and 


Lunch 




1.00 


Lunch 


Lunch 




Lunch 










(Whole Class) 












(Whole Class) 


* Gynecology 




(Whole Class) 








Nose & Throat, 


fEye— 10 wks. 
(Feb. 5 to 


Medical 


Clinical 


Obstetrical 




1.00 


Otology, 


April 9) 










to 


Proctology, 


tOncology 


Clinic 


Pathology 


Clinic 




2.00 


Urology 


— 5 wks. 

(April 16 to 

May 14) 












C.H. 


C.H. 


B. C. H. 


C.H. 


B. C. H. 










Surgery 


(Whole Class) 


Surgery 




2.00 


(Whole 


Class) 


(2.00 to 4.00) 




(2.00 to 4.00) 




to 


Pathology 1 


Laboratory 


— 


Clinical 


— 




4.00 


3 


/ 


Neurology 
(2.00 to 4.30) 

Gynecology 


Pathology 


Neurology 
(2.00 to 4.30) 

Gynecology 








(Whole Class) 






(Whole Class) 


Physical 


Orthopaedics 




Orthopaedics 




4.00 


Preventive 


Diagnosis, 


Psychiatry 


Laboratory 


Psychiatry 




to 


Medicine 


Psychiatry, 


(Subgroups of 




(Subgroups of 




5.00 




Legal Medicine 


Surgery Group) 




Surgery Group) 






C.H. 


C.H. 


(4.00 to 5.00) 


31 


(4.00 to 5.00) 





First Semester. 



t Second Semester. 



ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 



61 



SCHEDULE 2 



Hours 


Monday 


Tuesday Wednesday 


Thursday 


Friday 


Saturday 


8.30 

to 
9.30 


Same as Schedule 1 


9.30 

to 
10.20 


Pediatrics 
C.H. 


Medicine 
C.H. 


Medicine 
C.H. 


Therapeutics 
C.H. 


Medicine 
C.H. 


Neurology 
C.H. 


10.30 

to 
12.30 


Operative Surgery — 29 South Greene Street 
Medical and Surgical Dispensaries — (Univ. and Mercy Sections) 


12.30 

to 

1.00 


Lunch 


Lunch 


Lunch 


Lunch 


Lunch 




1.00 

to 

2.00 


Same as 
Schedule 1 


Medical 
Clinic 
Amp. 


Same as 
Schedule 1 


Psychiatry 

(9 weeks) 

Dermatology 

(6 weeks) 

N.B.— The whole 

section reports to 

psychiatry for 

first three weeks, 

then subdivides. 

Adm.l 

for first 3 wks. 

U. H. Disp. 




2.00 

to 
4.00 


Ophthalmoscopy 
(5 weeks) 
B. E. H. 

Obstetrics 

(5 weeks) 

Univ. Hosp. 

Otology (5 wks.) 
Univ. Hosp. 




4.00 

to 
5.00 








Obstetrics 
C.H. 





The Junior Class will be divided into two sections — A and B. Each section reports to classes in keeping with the 
following schedule assignment, in which the letters represent the class sections and the numerals indicate the schedules to 
be followed for the 15-week periods shown. 

Schedule Assignment 
Periods Sections and Schedules 

September 24 to January 23 A-l, B-2 

February 1 to May 15 B-l, A-2 

Locations of Lecture Halls, etc- 
Adm. 1 — Administration Bldg., Lombard and Greene. 

Amp. — Wilson Memorial Amphitheatre, New University Hospital, Eighth Floor. 
B. C. H— Baltimore City Hosps., 4940 Eastern Ave. 

B. E. H.— Baltimore Eye, Ear and Throat Hospital, 1214 Eutaw Place. 

C. H— Chemical Hall, Lower Hall, N. E. Cor. Lombard and Greene Sts. 
Univ. Hosp. — New University Hospital, Greene and Redwood Streets. 

U. H. Disp.— Old Hospital Building, S. W. Cor. Lombard and Greene Streets. 
31 — 31 South Greene Street. 

Clinical Pathology Laboratory — 31 South Greene St., Second Floor. 
Pathology Laboratory — 31 South Greene Street, Special Rooms, Basement. 
Mid-Year Examinations — January 25-30, 1937 
Final Examinations — May 17-29, 1937 
(This schedule is subject to revision for 1936-1937) 



62 



BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, U. OF MD. 



FOURTH YEAR SCHEDULE 

SEPTEMBER 24, 1936 TO MAY 29, 1937 



Hours 


Monday 


Tuesday 


Wednesday 


Thursday 


Friday 


Saturday 


9.00 

to 
11.00 


Ward Classes 

(a) Medicine 

(a) Surgery 

(b) Obstetrics 
(d) Pediatrics 


Ward Classes 

(a) Medicine 

(a) Surgery 

(b) Gynecology 

(c) Gynecology 


Ward Classes 

(a) Medicine 

(a) Surgery 

(b) Obstetrics 
(d) Pediatrics 


Ward Classes 

(a) Medicine 

(a) Surgery 

(b) Gynecology 

(c) Gynecology 


Ward Classes 

(a) Medicine 

(a) Surgery 

(b) Obstetrics 
(d) Pediatrics 


Ward Classes 

(a) Medicine 

(a) Surgery 

(b) Gynecology 
(d) Pediatrics 


11.00 

to 
12.00 


Orthopaedic 
Surgery 

Univ. Sec. Amp. 
P. & S. Sec. 51 


Medical 

Clinic 

Univ. Sec. Amp. 

Surgical 

Pathology 

P. & S. Sec. 40 


Clinical 
Pathological 
Conference 

Univ. Sec. C. H. 
P. & S. Sec. 34 


Surgical 
Clinic 

Univ. Sec. Amp 
P. & S. Sec. 51 


Medical 
Clinic 

Univ. Sec. Amp. 
P. & S. Sec. 34 


Pediatric 
Clinic 

Univ. Sec. Amp. 
P. & S. Sec. 34 


12.00 

to 
2.00 


Dispensary 

Lunch and 

Transfer 


Dispensary 

and 

Lunch 


Dispensary 

Lunch and 

Transfer 


Dispensary 

and 

Lunch 


Dispensary 

Lunch and 

Transfer 


Dispensary 


2.15 

to 
3.15 


Dermatology 
Clinic 

(Full Class at 
Univ. Hosp.) 

Amp. 


Neurology 
Clinic 

Univ. Sec. Amp. 
P. & S. Sec. 34 


Eye and Ear 
Clinic 

(Full Class at 
Univ. Hosp.) 

Amp. & C. H. 


Obstetrical 
Clinic 

(Full Class at 
Univ. Hosp.) 

Amp. 


Gastroenter- 
ology Clinic 

(Full Class at 
Univ. Hosp.) 

Amp. 




3.30 

to 
5.00 


P. & S. Sect. 
Ward Classes 

Medicine 
Eye and Ear 


P. & S. Sect. 
Ward Classes 

Medicine 
Orthopaedics 


P. & S. Sect. 

Ward Classes 

Medicine 

Nose and 
Throat 

Preventive 
Medicine 


P. & S. Sect. 

Ward Classes 

Medicine 

Proctology 
Pediatrics 


P. & S. Sect. 

Ward Classes 

Neurology 

Roentgen- 
ology 

Psychiatry 




3.30 

to 
5.00 


Univ. Sect. 
Ward Classes 

Medicine 

Roentgen- 
ology 

Neurological 
Surgery 


Univ. Sect. 
Ward Classes 

Therapeutics 

Proctology 

Oncology 

(3.30-4.30) 

Amp. 


Univ. Sect. 
Ward Classes 

Medicine 
Urology 

Eye and Ear 


Univ. Sect. 
Ward Classes 

Medicine 

Nose and 
Throat 

Physical 
Therapeutics 


Univ. Sect. 
Ward Classes 

Neurology 

Psychiatry 

Orthopaedic 
Surgery 
(Kernan 
Hospital) 




5.00 

to 
6.00 








"History of 

Medicine 

C.H. 







(a) — Univ. and P. & S. Sections, 
(b) — Univ. Section, 
(c) — Whole P. & S. special group. 

(d) — P. & S. special group, divided attendance at Univ. and P. & S. 
* March, April and May, 5-6 p.m. 

The Senior Class is divided into two sections, which report, one at Lombard and Greene Streets, the other at Calvert 
and Saratoga Streets, for one semester each, then rotate. 

Each section of the class is divided into three groups — Medical, Surgical, and Special. These groups will rotate on 
the following dates: 

First Semester Second Semester 

1st period Sept. 24-Oct. 31 1st period Feb. 1-Mar. 6 

2nd period Nov. 2-Dec. 5 2nd period Mar. 8-Apr. 10 

3rd period Dec. 7-Jan. 23 3rd period Apr. 12-May 15 

C. H. — Chemical Hall — N. E. Cor. Lombard and Greene Streets. 
Amp. — Wilson Memorial Amphitheatre — New University Hospital. 
P. & S., 34 — Second Floor, Calvert and Saratoga Streets. 
P. & S., 40, 51 — Fourth Floor, Calvert and Saratoga Streets. 
For sub-sections of P. & S. ward classes, 3.30 to 5.00 p. m., see supplementary schedule at Mercy Hospital. For sub- 
sections of U. H. ward classes, 3.30 to 5.00 p. m., see Medical School Bulletin Beard. 
Mid-Year Examinations — January 25-30, 1937 
Final Examinations — May 17-22, 1937 
(This schedule is subject to revision for 1936-1937) 



REQUIREMENTS FOR MATRICULATION 63 

ANNOUNCEMENT OF CHANGES IN THE 
REQUIREMENTS FOR MATRICULATION 

Beginning with the session of 1937-1938, and until further notice, the 
minimum requirements for matriculation in the School of Medicine will be : 

(a) Graduation from an approved secondary school, or the equivalent 
in entrance examinations, and 

(b) Three years of acceptable premedical credit earned in an approved 
college of arts and sciences. The quantity and quality of this pre- 
professional course of study shall be not less than that required for 
recommendation by the institution where the premedical courses are 
being studied. 

The premedical curriculum shall include one-year courses, or their equiva- 
lents, in English, biology, inorganic chemistry, organic chemistry, physics, 
and French or German, and such elective courses as will complete a balanced 
three-year schedule of study. 

The elective group should include a second course in English, scientific 
French or German (a reading knowledge of either language is desirable, 
although German is preferred), comparative vertebrate anatomy, embry- 
ology, histological technique, quantitative analysis, physical chemistry, eco- 
nomics, history, mathematics, political science, psychology, sociology, etc. 

Thirty semester hours in the non-science courses (i.e., exclusive of biology, 
chemistry, physics, and mathematics) will make a balanced curriculum in 
the three-year schedule of study. 

Wherever possible, a premedical student should complete a four-year 
curriculum and earn the baccalaureate degree. 

In selecting candidates for admission, preference will be given to those 
applicants who have satisfactory high school and college records (including 
the ratio of science and non-science courses) ; acceptable scores in the Moss 
Aptitude Test (which is given each fall by the Association of American 
Medical Colleges in the institutions that are preparing students for medi- 
cine); the most favorable letters of recommendation from their respective 
premedical committees, or from one instructor in each of the departments 
of biology, chemistry, and physics; and who in all other respects give the 
most promise of becoming successful students and physicians of high 
standing. 

Applications for admission to the 1937-1938 class will be received beginning 
October 1, 1936. They will be considered in the order of their reception. 



64 BULLETIN OF TEE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, U. OF MD. 

COMBINED COURSE IN ARTS AND SCIENCES, 
AND MEDICINE 

A combined seven years' curriculum leading to the degrees of Bachelor 
of Science and Doctor of Medicine is offered by the University of Maryland. 
The first three years are taken in residence in the College of Arts and 
Sciences at College Park, and the last four years in the School of Medicine 
in Baltimore. (See University catalogue for details of quantitative and 
qualitative premedical course requirements.) 

Upon the successful completion of the first year in the School of Medicine, 
and upon the recommendation of the Dean, the degree of Bachelor of 
Science may be conferred by the College of Arts and Sciences. 

Students are urged to consider carefully the advantages this combination 
course offers over the minimum requirements of two years. By completing 
three years the training may be gradually broadened by a wider latitude in 
the election of courses in the arts subjects. 

POST-GRADUATE STUDENTS 

Graduates in medicine desiring to take the work of the senior year with- 
out being candidates for the degree, and, therefore, without examination, 
may receive a certificate of attendance on completing the full course 
satisfactorily. 

RULES 

1. All students are required to take the spring examinations unless excused 
by the Dean. No student will be permitted to advance from a lower to 
a higher class with conditions. 

2. Should a student be required to repeat any year in the course, he 
must pay regular fees. 

3. A student failing in final examinations for graduation at the end of the 
fourth year will be required to repeat the entire course of the fourth year 
and to take examinations in such other branches as may be required, should 
he again be permitted to enter the school as a candidate for graduation. 

4. The general fitness of a candidate for graduation, as well as the results 
of his examinations, will be taken into consideration by the Faculty. 

5. All students are required to provide themselves with microscopes of a 
satisfactory type. 

A standard microscope of either Bausch & Lomb, Leitz, Spencer, or 
Zeiss make, fitted with the following attachments, will fill the requirements: 

Triple nose piece: 10 x and 5 x Oculars 

Wide aperture stage: 16 nun. and 4 mm. Objectives 

Quick Screw condenser (Abbe): 1.9 mm. 125 N.A. Oil Immersion Lens 



FEES 65 

All used microscopes are subject to inspection and approval before their 
use in the laboratory is permitted. The student is cautioned against the 
purchase of such an instrument before its official approval by the school. 

STUDENTS MUST BE PREPARED TO PURCHASE MICROSCOPES 
AT THE BEGINNING OF THE FIRST YEAR 

All the above rules, as well as the fees stated below, relate to the year 
ending June 5th, 1937 only. The right is reserved to make changes in the 
curriculum, the requirements for graduation, the fees and in any of the 
regulations whenever the University authorities deem it expedient. 

FEES 

Matriculation fee (paid once) $10.00 

Tuition fee (each year) for residents of Maryland 400 .00 

Tuition fee (each year) for non-residents 600.00 

Laboratory fee (each year) 25 .00 

Special and re-examination fee 5 . 00 

Graduation fee 15 .00 

No fees are returnable. 

The above fees apply to all students who matriculate in the School of 
Medicine in any class for the session beginning September 24, 1936. 

All students, after proper certification, are required to register at the 
Office of the Registrar. (See calendar in front part of this bulletin for 
dates for the payments of fees, and the note regarding late registration 
fee.) 

The matriculation fee is payable at the time the applicant is offered 
acceptance as a student. 

The laboratory fee and one-half of the tuition fee for the year shall be 
paid at the time of the first semester registration, and the remainder of the 
tuition fee shall be paid at the second semester registration date. 

Failure to meet these conditions will debar automatically the student 
from attendance on classes and other privileges of the University. 

When offering checks in payment of tuition and other fees, students are 
requested to have them drawn in the exact amount of such fees. Personal 
checks whose face value is in excess of the fees due will be accepted only for 
collection. 



66 BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, U. OF MD. 

DEFINITION OF RESIDENCE STATUS OF STUDENTS* 

Students who are minors are considered to be resident students if, at the 
time of their registration, the parents* have been residents of this State 
for at least one year. 

Adult students are considered to be resident students if, at the time of 
their registration, they have been residents of this State for at least one 
year, provided such residence has not been acquired while attending any 
school or college in Maryland. 

The status of the residence of a student is determined at the time of his 
first registration in the University and may not thereafter be changed by 
him unless, in the case of a minor, his parents* move to and become legal 
residents of this State by maintaining such residence for at least one full 
calendar year. However, the right of the student (minor) to change from 
a non-resident to a resident status must be established by him prior to 
registration for a semester in any academic year. 

STATE MEDICAL STUDENT QUALIFYING 
CERTIFICATES 

Candidates for admission who live in or expect to practice medicine in 
Pennsylvania, New Jersey or New York, should apply to their respective 
state boards of education for medical student qualifying certificates (Penn- 
sylvania and New Jersey) or approval of applications for medical student 
qualifying certificates (New York). 

Those students who are accepted here must file their state certificates 
in the Office of the Director of Admissions, University of Maryland, 
during the period of attendance in the School of Medicine. 

MEDICAL CARE OF STUDENTS 

The Medical Council has made provision for the systematic care of stu- 
dents in the Medical School, according to the following plan: 

1. Preliminary Examination — All new students will be examined during 
the first week of the semester. Notice of the date, time, and place of the 
examination will be announced to the classes and on the bulletin board. 
The passing of this physical examination is necessary before final accep- 
tance of any student. 

2. Medical Attention — Students in need of medical attention will be seen 
by the School Physician, Dr. T. N. Carey, in his office at the Medical 

* The term "parents" includes persons who, by reason of death or other unusual 
circumstances, have been legally constituted the guardians of or stand in loco parentis 
to such minor students. 



SCHOLARSHIPS 67 

School, between 4 and 5 P.M., daily, except Saturday and Sunday. In 
cases of necessity, students will be seen at their homes. 

3. Hospitalization — If it becomes necessary for any student to enter the 
hospital during the school year, the Medical Council has arranged for the 
payment of part or all of his hospital expenses, depending on the length of 
his stay and special expenses incurred. This applies only to students 
admitted through the School Physician's Office. 

4. Prospective students are advised to have any known physical defects 
corrected before entering school in order to prevent loss of time which 
later correction might incur. As minor visual defects are frequently un- 
recognized until detected by an ophthalmologist, it is especially urged that 
all new students have their eyes examined and any error of refraction cor- 
rected before beginning the course. 

PRIZES AND SCHOLARSHIPS 

FACULTY PRIZE 

The Faculty each year awards a Gold Medal to the Graduate who during 
the four years of his course has shown the greatest proficiency in preparing 
for the practice of medicine. The five candidates standing next in order 
will be awarded Certificates of Honor. 

DR. A. BRADLEY GAITHER MEMORIAL PRIZE 

A prize of $25.00 is given each year by Mrs. A. Bradley Gaither as a 
memorial to the late Dr. A. Bradley Gaither, to the student in the senior 
class doing the best work in Genito-Urinary Surgery. 

SCHOLARSHIPS* 

The Dr. Samuel Leon Frank Scholarship 
(Value $125.00) 

This scholarship was established by Mrs. Bertha Rayner Frank as a 
memorial to the late Dr. Samuel Leon Frank, an alumnus of this University. 

It is awarded by the Trustees of the Endowment Fund of the University 
each year upon nomination by the Medical Council "to a medical student 
of the University of Maryland, who in the judgment of said Council, is of 
good character and in need of pecuniary assistance to continue his medical 
course." 

This scholarship is awarded to a second, third or fourth year student 

* Note : Scholarships, unless specifically renewed on consideration of application, are 
for one year only. 



68 BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, U. OF MD. 

who has successfully completed one year's work in this school. No student 
may hold such scholarship for more than two years. 

The Charles M. Hitchcock Scholarships 
(Value $125.00 each) 

Two scholarships were established from a bequest to the School of Medi- 
cine by the late Charles M. Hitchcock, M.D., an alumnus of the University. 

These scholarships are awarded annually by the Trustees of the Endow- 
ment Fund of the University, upon nomination by the Medical Council, 
to students who have meritoriously completed the work of at least the first 
year of the course in medicine, and who present to the Council satisfactory 
evidence of a good moral character and of inability to continue the course 
without pecuniary assistance. 

The Randolph Winslow Scholarship 
(Value $125.00) 

This scholarship was established by Prof. Randolph Winslow, M.D., 
LL.D. 

It is awarded annually by the Trustees of the Endowment Fund of the 
University, upon nomination by the Medical Council, to a "needy student 
of the Senior, Junior, or Sophomore Class of the Medical School." 

"He must have maintained an average grade of 85% in all his work up 
to the time of awarding the scholarship." 

"He must be a person of good character and must satisfy the Medical 
Council that he is worthy of and in need of assistance." 

Dr. Leo Karlinsky Memorial Scholarship 
(Value $200.00) 

This scholarship was established by Mrs. Ray Mintz Karlinsky as a 
memorial to her husband, the late Dr. Leo Karlinsky, an alumnus of the 
University. 

It is awarded annually by the Trustees of the Endowment Fund of the 
University, upon the nomination of the Medical Council, to "a needy stu- 
dent of the Senior, Junior or Sophomore Class of the Medical School." 

He must have maintained in all his work up to the time of awarding the 
scholarship a satisfactory grade of scholarship. 

He must be a person of good character and must satisfy the Medical 
Council that he is worthy of and in need of assistance. 

The University Scholarships 

Two scholarships are awarded by the University: One to a student of 
the College of Arts and Sciences appointed by the President, to be held for 



SCHOLARSHIPS 69 

only one year; the other, which entitles the holder to exemption from pay- 
ment of the tuition fee of the year, is awarded annually by the Medical 
Council to a student of the senior class who presents to the Medical Council 
satisfactory evidence that he is of good moral character and is worthy of 
and in need of assistance to complete the course. 

Frederica Gehrmann Scholarship 

(Not open to holders of Warfield and Cohen Scholarships) 

This scholarship was established by the bequest of the late Mrs. Frederica 
Gehrmann and entitles the holder to exemption from payment of tuition 
fees. The scholarship is awarded to a third-year student who at the end 
of the second year has passed the best practical examinations in Physiology, 
Pharmacology, Pathology, Bacteriology, Immunology, Serology, Surgical 
Anatomy and Neuro-Anatomy. 

The Clarence and G enema War Held Scholarships 
(Value $300.00 each) 

There are five scholarships established by the Regents from the income 
of the fund bequeathed by the will of Dr. Clarence Warfield. 

Terms and Conditions: These scholarships are available to students of 
any of the classes of the course in medicine. Preference is given to students 
from the counties of the State of Maryland which the Medical Council 
may from time to time determine to be most in need of medical practi- 
tioners. 

Any student receiving one of these scholarships must agree, after gradua- 
tion and a year's interneship, to undertake the practice of medicine, for a 
term of two years, in the county to which the student is accredited, or in a 
county selected by the Council. In the event that a student is not able 
to comply with the condition requiring him to practice in the county to 
which he is accredited by the Council, the money advanced by the Regents 
shall be refunded by the student. 

Israel and Cecilia E. Cohen Scholarship 

(Value $250.00) 

This scholarship was established by Miss Eleanor S. Cohen in memory 
of her parents, Israel and Cecelia E. Cohen. Terms and conditions: This 
scholarship will be available to students of any one of the classes of the 
course in Medicine; preference is given to students of the counties in the 
State of Maryland which the Medical Council may from time to time deter- 
mine to be most in need of medical practitioners. Any student receiving 
one of these scholarships must,, after graduation and a year's interneship, 



70 BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, U. OF MD. 

agree to undertake the practice of medicine for a term of two years in the 
county to which the student is accredited, or in a county selected by the 
Council. In the event that a student is not able to comply with the con- 
dition requiring him to practice in the county to which he is accredited by 
the Council, the money advanced by the Regents shall be refunded. 

ANNUAL HOSPITAL APPOINTMENTS 

Each session the following annual appointments are made from among 
the graduates of the school: 

TO THE UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL 

Two Residents in Surgery Resident in Nose and Throat 

Two Residents in Medicine Resident in Roentgenology 

Three Residents in Obstetrics Thirteen Senior Internes rotating in 

Two Residents in Gynecology Medicine and Surgery 

Resident in Pediatrics Twelve Junior Internes rotating in the 

Specialties 

TO THE MERCY HOSPITAL 

Chief Resident Physician Resident in Nose and Throat 

Two Residents in Medicine Resident in Pathology 

Four Residents in Surgery Nine Internes on a Rotating Service 
Resident in Gynecology 

NOTICE TO STUDENTS 

The personal expenses of the students are at least as low in Baltimore as 
in any large city in the United States. The following estimates of a stu- 
dent's personal expenses for the academic year of eight months have been 
prepared by students, and are based upon actual experience. In addition 
to these the student must bear in mind the expenditure for a microscope. 

Items Low Average Liberal 

Books $50 $75 $100 

College Incidentals 20 20 20 

Board, eight months 200 250 275 

Room rent 64 80 100 

Clothing and laundry 50 80 150 

All other expenses 25 50 75 

Total $409 $556 $720 

Students will save time and expense upon their arrival in the city by 
going directly to the School of Medicine on the University grounds, N. E. 
Corner Lombard and Greene Streets. Here may be found a list of com- 
fortable and convenient boarding houses suitable to their means and wishes. 
For further information, apply to 

J. M. H. Rowland, Dean, 

Lombard and Greene Streets. 



GRADUATES, 1935 



71 



GRADUATES, UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND SCHOOL OF 
MEDICINE AND COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS AND 
SURGEONS, JUNE 6, 1936 



Batalion, Abraham Louis. Maryland 

Beers, Reid Lafeal, A.B Utah 

Bernstein, Milton, A.B Maryland 

Bieren, Roland Essig Maryland 

Booth, Harold Thomas, A.B. . . .New York 

Bowie, Harry Clay, B. S Maryland 

Bunn, James Harry, Jr., B.S 

North Carolina 
Burka, Irving, B.S. . .District of Columbia 

Burns, Harold Hubert Pennsylvania 

Burton, Jerome Kermit Maryland 

Bush, Joseph Edgar, A.B Maryland 

Chesson, Andrew Long. . . .North Carolina 
Coplin, George Joseph, B.S. . . .New Jersey 
Ctibor, Vladimir Frantisek, A.B. 

New Jersey 

Curtis, Leo Michael Maryland 

Davidson, Nachman, A.B Maryland 

Davis, George Howey, B. S Maryland 

Deehl, Seymour Ralph, B.S. . .New Jersey 

Dittmar, Stuart Watt Pennsylvania 

^Dixon, Darius McClelland, B.S . . Maryland 

Drozd, Joseph Maryland 

Feldman, Jerome Maryland 

Fissel, John Edward, Jr., B.S. . .Maryland 

Fox, Lester Mitchell Maryland 

Franklin, Philip Lair Maryland 

Frich, Michael Garland Pennsylvania 

Gillis, Marion Howard, Jr Maryland 

Gimbel, Harry Solomon, A.B. . .Maryland 

Glassner, Frank Maryland 

Gordner, Jesse Walter, Jr., B.S 

Pennsylvania 
Greengold, David Bernard, A.B. .Maryland 

Gregory, Philip Orson Maine 

Greifinger, William, A.B New Jersey 

Grollman, Jaye Jacob Maryland 

Isaacs, Benjamin Herbert, A.B. .Maryland 

Jones, Ceirianog Henry Pennsylvania 

Jones, Emory Ellsworth, Jr. .West Virginia 
Karfgin, Walter Esselman, B.S. .Maryland 

Karpel, Saul, B.S New York 

Katz, Joseph Maryland 

Kleiman, Norman, A.B Maryland 

Knobloch, Howard Thomas, B.S 

Pennsylvania 

Kolodner, Louis Joseph Maryland 

Kroll, Louis Joseph, A.B Maryland 

Lipin, Raymond Joseph Maryland 

Lowman, Robert Morris Maryland 

Lund, Grant Utah 

Mansfield, William Kenneth . Pennsylvania 

Maser, Louis Robert Maryland 

McCauley, Arthur Franklin, B.S. 

Maryland 
McKnew, Hector Caldwell, Jr. .Maryland 



McNinch, Eugene Robinson, B.S. 

Pennsylvania 
Moran, James Blessing, Ph.B. 

Rhode Island 

Moran, James Patrick, B.S New York 

Moses, Benjamin Bernard Maryland 

Myerovitz, Joseph Robert Maryland 

Myers, William, B.S Pennsylvania 

Nester, Hansford Dorsey, A.B., B.S. 

West Virginia 
Nestor, Thomas Agnew, Ph.B. 

Rhode Island 
Nicholson, Morris John, B.S. . . .Maryland 
Nowak, Sigmund Roman, B.S. . Maryland 
O'Brien, William Aloysius, Jr., A.B. 

New Jersey 

Parr, William Andrew Maryland 

Pembroke, Richard Heber, Jr., A.B. 

Maryland 
Pentecoste, Salvador Dante, B.S. 

New Jersey 

Pigman, Carl, B.S Kentucky 

Reichel, Samuel Marvin, A.B. . .Maryland 
Reynolds, John Henry, Jr . . . Pennsylvania 

Rochlin, Gregory Narcisse Maryland 

Roseman, Ralph Bernard, A.B. 

Pennsylvania 

Rosenthal, Victor, B.S New York 

Royster, James Dan, B.S. .North Carolina 
Schmieler, George Peter, B.S. 

Pennsylvania 

Selby, George Durward, A.B Maryland 

Shimanek, Lawrence Joseph. . . .Maryland 

Smith, William Carey North Carolina 

Solomon, Cyril Maryland 

Sorin, Matthew New Jersey 

Spain, David Michael New York 

Squires, Millard Fillmore, Jr. . . .Maryland 
Stapen, Milton Honore, B.S. . . .New York 

Steinberg, Samuel Maryland 

Stern, Morris Harold, B.S New Jersey 

Sunday, Stuart Dos Passos, A.B. Maryland 

Terr, Isaac, B.S New York 

Thomas, Anthony Joseph, Ph.B. 

Massachusetts 
Tierney, Lawrence Matthew . . Connecticut 
Troutman, Baxter Suttles, B.S. 

North Carolina 
Waller, William Kennedy, A.B . . Maryland 

Wehner, Daniel George Maryland 

Weinstein, Jack Joseph Maryland 

Wells, Gibson Jackson, A.B Maryland 

Wilfson, Daniel, Jr., A.B Maryland 

Wilkinson, Arthur Gilbart, A.B. 

Connecticut 

Wolf, Nathan Maryland 

Yavelow, Charles Sidney, A.B. .New York 
Zimring, Joseph George, B.S. . .New York 



72 BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, U. OF MD. 

Honors 

University Prize Gold Medal George Howey Davis 

Certificates of Honor 

Louis Joseph Kroll Howard Thomas Knobloch 

Harry Clay Bowie John Henry Reynolds, Jr. 

Gibson Jackson Wells 

Prize 

The Doctor A. Bradley Gaither Memorial Prize of $25.00 for the best work in genito- 
urinary surgery during the senior year George Durward Selby 

INTERNESHIPS— CLASS OF 1935 

Adelman, Milton Harris Hospital for Joint Diseases, N. Y. City 

Albrittain, John Warren University Hospital, Balto., Md. 

Alessi, Edward James West Balto. Gen. Hosp., Balto., Md. 

Alonso, Miguel South Balto. Gen. Hosp., Balto., Md. 

Alpert, George Ball Memorial Hospital, Muncie, Ind. 

Anderson, John Bascom City Memorial Hosp., Winston-Salem, N. C. 

Aungst, Melvin Rauch Church Home & Infirmary, Balto., Md. 

Barnes, Henry Eugene, Jr City Memorial Hosp., Winston-Salem, N. C. 

Battaglia, Dominic Thomas Franklin Square Hosp., Balto., Md. 

Bierer, Dan George Columbia Hospital, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Bock, Charles Aloysius Allegheny General Hosp., Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Brouillet, George Hector St. Joseph's Hospital, Balto., Md. 

Bunn, James Pettigrew, Jr University Hospital, Balto., Md. 

Cassidy, William Adrian Balto. City Hosp., Balto., Md. 

Cornbrooks, Ernest Ivon, Jr University Hospital, Balto., Md. 

Cotter, Edward Francis University Hospital, Balto., Md. 

Cutler, Frank Henry Mercy Hospital, Balto., Md. 

Dickey, Francis George University Hospital, Balto., Md. 

Diehl, Earl Henry Church Home & Infirmary, Balto., Md. 

Dodge, Douglas Rude Pasadena Hospital, Pasadena, Cal. 

Doerner, Alexander Andrew Metropolitan Hospital, Welfare Island, N. Y. 

Du Bois, Robert Lionel St. Mary's Hospital, Waterbury, Conn. 

Dunnigan, William Charles Mercy Hospital, Balto., Md. 

Einhorn, Samuel Edward Cumberland Hospital, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Ewald, August Ludwig Maryland General Hospital, Balto., Md. 

Fader, Ferdinand West Balto. Gen. Hosp., Balto., Md. 

Freeman, Irving University Hospital, Balto., Md. 

Fruchtbaum, Robert Pearson Elizabeth General Hosp., Elizabeth, N. J. 

Galitz, Philip Jacob Wyckoff Heights Hosp., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Gerwig, Walter Henry, Jr University Hospital, Balto., Md. 

Godbey, John Randolph University Hospital, Balto., Md. 

Grenzer, William Howard Mercy Hospital, Balto., Md. 

Gross, Joseph Bernard Sinai Hospital, Balto., Md. 

Hammill, Gerard Paul Mercy Hospital, Pittsburgh, Pa. 



INTERNESHIPS, 1935 73 

Hamrick, John Carl University Hospital, Balto., Md. 

Harris, Aaron Sydenham Hospital, Balto., Md. 

Hartman, Ira Frank Balto. City Hospital, Balto., Md. 

Heghinian, Jeannette Rosaline E Methodist Episcopal Hospital, Phila., Pa. 

Helfrich, Wm. Goldsborough University Hospital, Balto., Md. 

Herald, James Kennedy Youngstown Hospital, Youngstown, Ohio 

Herrold, Lewis Charles York Hospital, York, Pa. 

Hollander, Arthur Bronx Hospital, Bronx, N. Y. 

Hugg, John Henry St. Margaret's Memorial Hosp., Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Hunt, Josiah Arnold Maryland General Hospital, Balto., Md. 

Jordan, Wm. Pritchard Letterman Gen. Hosp., San Francisco, Cal. 

Kaminsky, Aaron Louis 

Kane, Harry Francis Mercy Hospital, Balto., Md. 

Keller, Michael Lawrence St. Joseph's Hospital, Paterson, N. J. 

Klein, Harold Henry Sinai Hospital, Balto., Md. 

Klompus, Irving Irvington Gen. Hosp., Irvington, N. J. 

Knowles, Frederick Edwin, Jr Mercy Hospital, Balto., Md. 

Laino, Frank Armento Rockaway Beach Hospital, Rockaway Beach, N. Y. 

Lane, Edwin Charles Elizabeth Gen. Hosp., Elizabeth, N. J. 

Layton, Caleb Rodney Mercy Hospital, Balto., Md. 

Lewis, Archie Clifton Charleston Gen. Hosp., Charleston, W. Va. 

Lichtenberg, Walter Balto. City Hospital, Balto., Md. 

Lieb, Saul Newark Memorial Hosp., Newark, N. J. 

Llewelyn, Louis Grandin St. Agnes Hospital, Balto., Md. 

MacLaughlin, Donald Clay Bon Secour Hosp., Balto., Md. 

Marek, Charles Bernard St. Agnes Hospital, Balto., Md. 

Mays, Howard Brooks University Hospital, Balto., Md. 

McDonough, Oscar Tracy, Jr Washington Hospital, Washington, Pa. 

McGregor, Alpine Watson California Hospital, Los Angeles, Cal. 

McGregor, Lorenzo Watson California Hospital, Los Angeles, Cal. 

McHenry, DeArmond John York Hospital, York, Pa. 

Mech, Karl Frederick St. Agnes Hospital, Balto., Md. 

Mills, Lawrence Hoy Mercy Hospital, Balto., Md. 

Montgomery, Bruce McKeesport Hosp., McKeesport, Pa. 

Noon, Milton Alexander Uniontown Hospital, Uniontown, Pa. 

Owen, Philip Jersey City Medical Center, Jersey City, N. J. 

Pepe, Anthony James St. Vincent's Hosp., Bridgeport, Conn. 

Raffel, William Sinai Hosp., Balto., Md. 

Reier, Charles Henry University Hospital, Balto., Md. 

Roberts, David P Sinai Hospital, Balto., Md. 

Robinson, Harry Maximilian, Jr University Hospital, Balto., Md. 

Robinson, Milton Coney Island Hospital, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Rogers, Frank Tipton Maryland General Hospital, Balto., Md. 

Rosen, Israel West Balto. Gen. Hosp., Balto., Md. 

Rosen, Sol Eastern Dispensary & Casualty Hosp., Wash., D. C. 

Rosenberg, Harold Wm Harlem Hospital, N. Y. City 

Russell, John Carroll Uniontown Hospital, Uniontown, Pa. 

Schlachman, Milton Metropolitan Hospital, Welfare Island, N. Y. 

Schmitt, George Fredrick, Jr University Hospital, Balto., Md. 

Schonfeld, Paul University Hospital, Balto., Md. 



74 BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, U. OF MD. 

Shapiro, Joseph Rockaway Beach Hosp., Rockaway Beach, N. Y. 

Shapiro, Sydney Harold Jewish Memorial Hosp., N. Y. City 

Shaul, John Melvin University Hosp., Albany Medical School, Albany, N. Y. 

Siscovick, Milton Balto. City Hosp., Balto., Md. 

Skeen, Leo Brown Watts Hosp., Durham, N. C. 

Spitznagle, Vernon Edward Maryland Gen. Hosp., Balto., Md. 

Stein, Benjamin Maxwell Jamaica Hosp., Jamaica, N. Y. 

Teitel, Louis Gouverneur Hospital, N. Y. City 

Teitelbaum, Harry Allen Fellowship — University of Maryland School of Medicine 

Tuby, Joseph King's County Hosp., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Vozel, Luther F Union Memorial Hosp., Balto., Md. 

Waghelstein, Julius Meyer Mercy Hospital, Balto., Md. 

Warren, John McCullen University Hospital, Balto., Md. 

Wheless, James Block City Memorial Hosp., Winston-Salem, N. C. 

Williams, Jesse Frank, Jr Maryland Gen. Hosp., Balto., Md. 

Williamson, Charles Vernon St. Agnes Hosp., Balto., Md. 

Wilson, Norman James University Hospital, Balto., Md. 

Wode, Alvin Eugene Wm South Balto. Gen. Hosp., Balto., Md. 

Wood, Everet Hardenbergh Maryland Gen. Hosp., Balto., Md. 

Woodward, Lewis Klair, Jr University Hospital, Balto., Md. 



MATRICULATES 

FOURTH YEAR CLASS 1935-36 

Batalion, Abraham Louis Maryland Gordner, Jesse Walter, Jr., B.S. 

Beers, Reid Lafeal, A.B Utah Pennsylvania 

Bernstein, Milton, A.B Maryland Greengold, David Bernard, A.B. .Maryland 

Bieren, Roland Essig Maryland Gregory, Philip Orson Maine 

Booth, Harold Thomas, A.B.. . .New York Greifinger, William, A.B New Jersey 

Bowie, Harry Clay, B.S Maryland Grollman, Jaye Jacob Maryland 

Bunn, James Harry, Jr., B.S. *Herman, Daniel Loeb, A.B Maryland 

North Carolina Isaacs, Benjamin Herbert, A.B... Maryland 

Burka, Irving, B.S.. .District of Columbia Jones, Ceirianog Henry Pennsylvania 

Burns, Harold Hubert Pennsylvania Jones, Emory Ellsworth, Jr.. West Virginia 

Burton, Jerome Kermit Maryland Karfgin, Walter Esselman, B.S. ..Maryland 

Bush, Joseph Edgar, A.B Maryland Karpel, Saul, B.S New York 

Chesson, Andrew Long. . . .North Carolina Katz, Joseph Maryland 

Coplin, George Joseph, B.S.. . .New Jersey Kleiman, Norman, A.B Maryland 

Ctibor, Vladimir Frantisek, A.B. Knobloch, Howard Thomas, B.S. 

New Jersey Pennsylvania 

Curtis, Leo Michael Maryland Kolodner, Louis Joseph Maryland 

Davidson, Nachman, A.B Maryland Kroll, Louis Joseph, A.B Maryland 

Davis, George Howey, B.S Maryland Lipin, Raymond Joseph Maryland 

Deehl, Seymour Ralph, B.S... .New Jersey Lowman, Robert Morris Maryland 

Dittmar, Stuart Watt Pennsylvania Lund, Grant Utah 

Dixon, Darius McClelland, B.S. ..Maryland Mansfield, William Kenneth.. Pennsylvania 

Drozd, Joseph Maryland Maser, Louis Robert Maryland 

Feldman, Jerome Maryland McCauley, Arthur Franklin, B.S. 

Fissel, John Edward, Jr., B.S. . . .Maryland Maryland 

Fox, Lester Mitchell Maryland McKnew, Hector Caldwell, Jr.. .Maryland 

Franklin, Philip Lair Maryland McNinch, Eugene Robinson, B.S. 

Frich, Michael Garland Pennsylvania Pennsylvania 

Gillis, Marion Howard, Jr Maryland Moran, James Blessing, Ph.B. 

Gimbel, Harry Solomon, A.B.. . . Maryland Rhode Island 

Glassner, Frank Maryland * Deceased. 



MATRICULATES 



75 



Moran, James Patrick, B.S New York 

Moses, Benjamin Bernard Maryland 

Myerovitz, Joseph Robert Maryland 

Myers, William, B.S Pennsylvania 

Nester, Hansford Dorsey, A.B., B.S. 

West Virginia 
Nestor, Thomas Agnew, Ph.B. 

Rhode Island 
Nicholson, Morris John, B.S. . . .Maryland 
Nowak, Sigmund Roman, B.S.. .Maryland 
O'Brien, William Aloysius, Jr., A.B. 

New Jersey 

Parr, William Andrew Maryland 

Pembroke, Richard Heber, Jr., A.B. 

Maryland 
Pentecoste, Salvador Dante, B.S. 

New Jersey 

Pigman, Carl, B.S Kentucky 

Reichel, Samuel Marvin, A.B Maryland 

Reynolds, John Henry, Jr Pennsylvania 

Rochlin, Gregory Narcisse Maryland 

Roseman, Ralph Bernard, A.B. 

Pennsylvania 

Rosenthal, Victor, B.S New York 

Royster, James Dan, B.S. . .North Carolina 
Schmieler, George Peter, B.S. 

Pennsylvania 
Selby, George Durward, A.B.. . .Maryland 



Shimanek, Lawrence Joseph Maryland 

Smith, William Carey North Carolina 

Solomon, Cyril Maryland 

Sorin, Matthew New Jersey 

Spain, David Michael New York 

Squires, Millard Fillmore, Jr. . . .Maryland 
Stapen, Milton Honore, B.S. . . .New York 

Stecher, Joseph Louis Maryland 

Steinberg, Samuel Maryland 

Stern, Morris Harold, B.S New Jersey 

Sunday, Stuart Dos Passos, A. B.. Maryland 

Terr, Isaac, B.S New York 

Thomas, Anthony Joseph, Ph.B. 

Massachusetts 
Tierney, Lawrence Matthew . . Connecticut 
Troutman, Baxter Suttles, B.S. 

North Carolina 
Vieweg, George Louis, Jr. . . . West Virginia 
W'aller, W T illiam Kennedy, A.B... Maryland 

Wehner, Daniel George Maryland 

Weinstein, Jack Joseph Maryland 

W T ells, Gibson Jackson, A.B Maryland 

Wilfson, Daniel, Jr., A.B Maryland 

Wilkinson, Arthur Gilbart, A.B. 

Connecticut 

Wolf, Nathan Maryland 

Yavelow, Charles Sidney, A.B. . .New York 
Zimring, Joseph George, B.S.. . .New York 



THIRD YEAR CLASS 1935-36 



Abbott, Thomas Gilbert Maryland 

Bank, R. Stanley, A.B Maryland 

Barnett, Ernest, B.S New York 

Bereston, Eugene Sydney, A.B... Maryland 

Brill, Leonard Maryland 

Burtnick, Lester Leon Maryland 

Carlson, Carl Edwin Connecticut 

Casanova, Jose Ramon Puerto Rico 

Christensen, Roland Arnold.. Pennsylvania 
Cocimano, Joseph Michael 

District of Columbia 

Cooney, Robert Francis Pennsylvania 

Coughlan, Stuart Gray, B.S Maryland 

Daily, Louis Eugene Maryland 

D'Alessio, Charles Magno, B.S. 

Connecticut 
D'Amico, Thomas Vincent, A.B. 

New Jersey 

Davidson, Eli, B.S New York 

Deradorian, Neshon Edward, B.S. 

Connecticut 

Diggs, Everett Schnepfe, B.S Maryland 

Eisner, William Monroe, B.S... .New York 
Ellison, Emanuel Simon, B.S.. . .Maryland 

Ensor, Helen Robinson Maryland 

Feldnjan, Philip Michael, B.S. ..New York 
Finn, John Hannon, A.B.. .Massachusetts 

Frenkil, James Maryland 

Frohman, Isaac Maryland 

Gehlert, Sidney Richard, A.B.. .Maryland 
Gillespie, John Lawrence, B.S. .New Jersey 



Goffin, Herbert, B.S New York 

Goldberg, Sigmund Maryland 

Gordon, William Cecil, A.B New York 

Gore, Robert Joseph, A.B Maryland 

Gottdiener, Elvin Edward Maryland 

Greenwald, Frank, A.B New York 

Hahn, Charles Solomon, B.S. . . .New York 
Hedrick, Grover Cleveland, Jr. 

West Virginia 

Highstein, Benjamin Maryland 

Hochfeld, Leo, B.S New York 

Hodgson, Eugene Welch Pennsylvania 

Hoffman, Charles Wilbur, Jr. . . . Maryland 
Humphries, William Coolidge, A.B. 

Maryland 
Insley, James Knox, Jr., A.B.. . .Maryland 

Jackson, Samuel, B.S New York 

Jacobson, Isadore Alan, A.B.. . .Maryland 
Johnston, Clarence Frederick, Jr., A.B. 

Maryland 

Jones, James Porter West Virginia 

Kadan, James Earl, A.B Maryland 

Kagen, Gordon Arthur, A.B. . Pennsylvania 
Kaltreider, D. Frank Olewiler, Jr., A.B. _ 
Pennsylvania 

Kaplan, Isadore Maryland 

Kaplan, Jack Allen, B.S New York 

Kaplan, Nathan, A.B Maryland 

Katz, Albert Herbert, A.B Maryland 

Katz, Isadore, M.S New York 

Kemick, Irvin Bernard Maryland 



76 



BULLETIN OF TEE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, V. OF MD. 



Klemkowski, Irvin Philip, A.B. . . Maryland 

Kolman, Lester Norman Maryland 

Kunkowski, Mitchell Frank, B.S.Maryland 

*La Mar, David William Maryland 

Leskin, Louis Woron, B.S New York 

Levine, Leonard Warren, B.S. . Connecticut 

Levinson, Leonard Jules, B.S New York 

Linhardt, Elmer George Maryland 

Lisansky, Ephraim Theodore, A.B. 

Maryland 
Long, William Broughton, Jr., B.S. 

Maryland 
Lubinski, Chester James, A.B.. .Maryland 
Mackowiak, Stephen Casimir. . .Maryland 

Manieri, Frank Vincent, B.S Maryland 

Marino, Irene Thelma, B.S New York 

Matheke, Otto George, Jr., B.S. 

New Jersey 

Meyer, Milton Joseph, B.S New York 

Muller, Stephen Edwin Maryland 

Muse, Joseph Ennalls, B.S Maryland 

Myers, Philip, A.B Maryland 

Nataro, Maurice, B.S New Jersey 

Novey, Samuel Maryland 

Owens, Richard Spurgeon, Jr., B.S. 

Virginia 

Pass, Isidore Earl Maryland 

Pavlatos, August Constantine, B.S. 

Pennsylvania 

Perlman, Lawrence, B.S New York 

Piccolo, Pasquale Albert, B.S. . Connecticut 
Pokrass, Frederick Phillip, A.B. 

Pennsylvania 

Resnick, Elton Maryland 

Revell, Samuel Thompson Redgrave, 

Jr., B.S Georgia 

Rigdon, Henry Lewis Maryland 

Robins, Isadore Morris, A.B. . Pennsylvania 



Robinson, Martin Herman, A.B. 

Pennsylvania 

Rochkind, Reuben, A.B Maryland 

Roseman, Ephraim, A.B Maryland 

Rubin, Morris, A.B Connecticut 

Rudman, Gilbert Elmore, A.B.. .Maryland 

Saf ran, Sidney Maryland 

Sakowski, John Paul New Jersey 

Sartorius, Norman Ellis, Jr., A.B. 

Maryland 
Scarborough, Clarence Parke, A.B. 

Pennsylvania 

Schmidt, Jacob Edward Maryland 

*Schmulovitz, Maurice Jacob, A.B. 

Maryland 
Seegar, John King Beck Emory, Jr., A.B. 

Maryland 

Seidel, Joshua, A.B Maryland 

Semoff, Milton C. F., B.S New York 

Shapiro, Abraham, B.S Maryland 

Shear, Meyer Robert Maryland 

Spielman, Morton Marvin, B.S. .Maryland 

Stapen, Mannie, B.S New York 

Statman, Bernhardt Joseph, B.S. 

New Jersey 

Steiner, Albert Maryland 

Sullivan, Thomas John, B.S. . .New Jersey 

Suwalsky, Sydney, B.S Connecticut 

Trupp, Mason, B.S Maryland 

Weems, George Jones, A.B Maryland 

Weiss, Henry Wolf, B.S New York 

Whitworth, Frank Dixon Maryland 

Wilkin, Mabel Giddings, M.A Texas 

Williams, Richard Jones, A.B. . . . Maryland 
Williams, Robert Roderic, A.B . .New York 

Wolff, Eldridge Henry Maryland 

Woodrow, Jack Henry, A.B New York 

Zacek, Frank Anthony Massachusetts 

Zeligman, Israel, A.B Maryland 



SECOND YEAR CLASS 1935-36 



Abarbanel, Milton G., B.S. . . .New Jersey 

Abramson, Daniel Jerome Maryland 

Applefeld, Willard, B.S Maryland 

Baum, Max, A.B Maryland 

Bonner, Robert Alexander, Jr.. Connecticut 
Borden, Melvin Nachlas, A.B.. .Maryland 
Bowers, John Zimmerman, B.S. Maryland 
Bradley, Stanley Edward, A.B. . . Maryland 

Brooks, Wilbur Starr, A.B New York 

Brown, Manuel Maryland 

Bunting, John James New Jersey 

Callahan, Timothy Andrew, Jr.. .Maryland 

Chance, Burton, Jr Pennsylvania 

Cohen, Hilliard Maryland 

Colleran, Harold Leo, B.S. . .Pennsylvania 
Coolahan, John Francis, B.S. . . .Maryland 
Cooper, Donald Dwight, A.B... .Maryland 

* Did not complete the year. 



Costas, Jaime Luis Puerto Rico 

Cowherd, William Jerome Maryland 

Crawford, Robert Clifford, A.B.. Maryland 

Dausch, Michael Joseph Maryland 

Dodd, William Anthony Maryland 

Dolfman, Victor, M.S Pennsylvania 

Eichert, Arnold Herman Maryland 

Feder, Aaron New York 

Fox, Lester Irving, A.B Massachusetts 

Fox, Samuel Louis Maryland 

Gareis, Louis Calvin Maryland 

George, Joseph Mathias, Jr., A.B. 

Maryland 

Gertman, Samuel, A.B Maryland 

Gibel, Harry New York 

Ginsberg, Milton, A.B Maryland 

Glassman, Edward Lewin Maryland 

1>V 



MATRICULATES 



11 



Goodman, Louis E., Jr., A.B Maryland 

Goodman, Sylvan Chaimcey. . . . Maryland 

Gottdiener, Florence Hazel Maryland 

Govons, Sidney Robert Maryland 

Graff, Frederick Lewis, A.B..West Virginia 

Guyton, William Lehman Maryland 

Haase, John Henry Maryland 

Harris, Sidney, A.B New Jersey 

Hayleck, Mary Lodema, A.B Maryland 

Horky, John Ralph Maryland 

Januszeski, Francis Joseph Maryland 

Katz, Milton Aaron, A.B Maryland 

Kelmenson, Harry Maryland 

Knox, John Joseph, B.S Pennsylvania 

Kotleroff, Jerome, B.S New York 

Kump, Albert Barker New Jersey 

Kurtz, Gerald Independence, A.B. 

New Jersey 

Ladensky, Milton, A.B Maryland 

Lauve, Celeste Constance Maryland 

Lenker, Luther Albert, B.S. . Pennsylvania 

Lipsitz, Morton Hirsch, B.S Maryland 

Lopez, Hilton Luis Puerto Rico 

Lumpkin, William Randolph Maryland 

Michaelson, Ernest Maryland 

Milholland, Arthur Vincent, A.B.Maryland 

Miller, Clarence Lee Missouri 

Miller, Royston Maryland 

Miniszek, James Haight Maryland 

Molofsky, Leonard Carl Maryland 

Palmer, David Waugh West Virginia 

Post, Laurence Caldwell, B.S. 

West Virginia 
Powell, Geraldine Kennedy, A.B.Maryland 

Rizzolo, John, B.S New Jersey 

Roman, Paul, A.B Maryland 



Rossello, Juan A Puerto Rico 

Rothkopf, Henry, B.S New York 

Sabatino, Bernard Joseph, A.B. .Maryland 
Sarajian, Aram Martyr, A.B.. .New Jersey 

Schaefer, John Ferdinand Maryland 

Schammel, Adam John Maryland 

Schenthal, Joseph Edwin, A.B. . .Maryland 

Scherlis, Sidney, A.B Maryland 

Schlesinger, Robert Abraham. . . New York 

Scott, John Matthai Maryland 

Sevcik, Charles Vincent Maryland 

Sheppard, Robert Clay Maryland 

Siegel, Edward, M.A New York 

Silberman, Donald Jared, A.B.. .Alabama 

Smith, John P., A.B Maryland 

Sprei, Emanuel, M.S New York 

Stein, Aaron, A.B Maryland 

Steinberg, Morris W 7 illiam Maryland 

Swiss, Adam George Maryland 

Thomas, Bernard Oscar, B.S. . . .Maryland 
Thompson, Winfield Lynn, B.S. .Maryland 
Twardowicz, Albin Harry, B.S. . .Maryland 

Urlock, John Peter, Jr Maryland 

Vollmer, Frederick Joseph, B.S. .Maryland 

Wagner, John Alfred, B.S Maryland 

Warres, Herbert Leonard, B.S. . .New York 

W T elfeld, Alvan Abram, A.B Maryland 

White, Harry Fletcher, Jr Maryland 

White, Samuel Cottrell, B.S.,. . .Maryland 

Winer, Albert Sidney, A.B Maryland 

Woodward, Theodore Englar, B.S. 

Maryland 
Worthington, Richard Walker, Jr. 

Maryland 

Wulwick, Michael, B.S New York 

Yaffe, Kennard Levinson Maryland 



FIRST YEAR CLASS 1935-36 



Aaron, James Philip, Jr Maryland 

Abrahams, John James, Jr Maryland 

Algire, Glenn Horner, B.S Maryland 

Baile, John Ray, A.B Maryland 

Baylus, Herman Maryland 

Beck, Harry McBrine, A.B Maryland 

Berman, Edgar Frank Maryland 

Bernstein, Aaron Maryland 

Bernstein, Albion Older, B.S. . .New York 
Bess, Elizabeth Grant, A.B . . West Virginia 
Brezinski, Edward Joseph, A.B. 

New Jersey 

Briele, Henry Alison Maryland 

Brodsky, Bernard, A.B New York 

Cianos, James Nicholas, B.S. . . .Maryland 
Coffman, Robert Thornhill. .West Virginia 

Cohen, Frank Samuel Maryland 

Conley, Carroll Lockard, A.B. . .Maryland 

Corfeitt, Richard Wylie West Virginia 

Cunningham, Raymond Murray, A.B. 

Maryland 

Evans, Virginia John, A.B Maryland 

Filtzer, David Leonard Maryland 



Fine, Morton Norman, A.B Maryland 

Fink, Francis Thomas Maryland 

Fish, Eugene Arthur, A.B Maryland 

Freed, Arnold Ulysses Maryland 

Fusting, William Hammond, B.S. 

Maryland 

Gaver, Leo Junior Maryland 

Goldberg, Nathan Zanvyl, A.B . . Maryland 
Goldberg, Raymond Bernard, A.B. 

Maryland 

Goldberg, Sylvan David Maryland 

Grier, George Smith III Delaware 

Grott, Harold Allan Maryland 

Haimowitz, Samuel Isaac, A.B. 

Pennsylvania 

Hartman, Oscar Maryland 

Hartz, Alvin Sidney, A.B Maryland 

Heimoff, Leonard Lincoln, A.B. .New York 

Hooker, Charles Bullard Maryland 

Hutchins, Thomas Manning .... Maryland 

Isaacson, Benjamin Maryland 

Jandorf , R. Donald, A.B Maryland 

Jannarone, Lewis Henry New Jersey 



78 



BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, U. OF MD. 



Jones, Charles Wilson, A.B Maryland 

Kairys, David, A.B Maryland 

Kammer, William Henry, Jr., A.B. 

Maryland 

Kappelman, Melvin Daniel Maryland 

Keister, Philip Weyforth, A.B.. .Maryland 

Kerr, James Patterson, Jr Maryland 

Kiely, James Arthur, A.B New York 

Kinnamon, Howard Franklin, Jr. 

Maryland 

Kleiman, Bernard Stanley Maryland 

Kurland, Albert Alexander Maryland 

Kyle, Henry Hall Maryland 

Lapinsky, Herbert, M.S New York 

Lavenstein, Arnold Fabian, A.B. .Maryland 

Layman, William Templeton Maryland 

Leitch, William Harvey Maryland 

*Levin, Bernard Maryland 

Magness, Stephen Lee, A.B Maryland 

Magruder, John Robinson, A. B.. Maryland 

Marks, Irving Lowell Maryland 

McClaflerty, William James, Jr., A.B. 

Rhode Island 
McGinity, Francis Rowland .... Maryland 
McLaughlin, Francis Joseph. . . .Maryland 

Meyer, Alvin Francis New York 

Miller, William Shepherd, A.B. .Maryland 
Minor, Michael Maurice .... Pennsylvania 
Moran, John Anthony Massachusetts 

* Did not complete the year. 



Nuttall, James Baker Maryland 

Polek, Melvin Frank, B.S Maryland 

Reimann, Dexter LeRoy Maryland 

Richter, Conrad Louis Maryland 

Rochberg, Samuel, B.S New Jersey 

Ruzicka, Edwin Russell Maryland 

Sadove, Max Samuel Maryland 

Scher, Isadore Maryland 

Sexton, Thomas Scott West Virginia 

Siegel, Maurice Bert New York 

Smoak, Philip Laurens Florida 

Solarz, Sylvan Daniel, A.B Maryland 

Spiegel, Herbert Pennsylvania 

Steger, William Joseph, A.B. 

West Virginia 

Stevens, Leland Bates, B.S Maryland 

Stires, Carroll Chapin, A.B Maryland 

Tartikoff, George, B.S New York 

Taylor, William Wallace, B.S. . .Maryland 

Thomas, Ramsay Berry, B.S Maryland 

Wallenstein, Leonard, A.B Maryland 

Wanner, Jesse Rosenberger, Jr. .Maryland 

Weisberg, Millard Maryland 

Whitworth, Fuller Barnard Maryland 

Wilder, Milton Jay Maryland 

Williams, Herman Joseph, B.S. 

Pennsylvania 

W T ilner, Sol, M.S New York 

Wilson, Harry Thomas, Jr Maryland 

Zalis, Daniel Leonard Maryland 



OFFICERS OF THE MEDICAL ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

For the Year 1936-37 



President Dr. Francis J. Kirby 

!Dr. Frank B. Hines 
Dr. Everard Briscoe 
Dr. Lynn H. Brumback 

Secretary Dr. Frank K. Morris 

Assistant Secretary Dr. T. Nelson Carey 

Treasurer Dr. D. J. Pessagno 

Dr. Alfred T. Gundry, Chairman 

Dr. T. B. Aycock 

Dr. Francis J. Kirby 

Dr. Arthur Hebb 

Dr. W. H. Toulson 

Dr. Robert P. Bay 

Dr. Frank K. Morris 

Dr. T. Nelson Carey 

Dr. D. J. Pessagno 

Dr. George F. Sargent 
Dr. Kenneth Jones 
Dr. S. Demarco, Chairman 
Dr. Frank Jennings 

Nominating Committee { Dr. Frank S. Lynn 

Dr. Morley Hoag 
Dr. Paul Byerly 



Board of Directors. 



Hospital Council . 



ALUMNI ASSOCIATION SECTION 79 



Library Committee Dr. W. S. Love, Jr. 

Dr. W. S. Love, Chairman 



Student Rotating Fund. 



Editors 

Alumni Council. 



Dr. R. L. Mitchell 
A. F. Ries 

Dr. Eugene Hayward 
Dr. Emil Novak 
Dr. C. Gardner Warner 
Dr. W. H. Triplett 
Dr. Francis J. Kirby 

ENDOWMENT FUND 

The following constitute the Board of Trustees of this Fund: 

E. F. Kelly, Ph.G., Chairman Daniel Baker, Jr. 

J. M. H. Rowland, M.D., Sc.D., LL.D. Stuart Janney 

Harry Adler, M.D. Robertson Griswold 

Randolph Winslow, A.M., M.D., LL.D. Arthur M. Shipley, Sc.D., M.D. 

Henry Holzapfel, Jr. 

This Board is incorporated by act of the Legislature of the State, its 
legal title being "The Trustees of the Endowment Fund of the University 
of Maryland," and is independent and self-perpetuating. Its powers are 
limited to the expenditure of the interest derived from the various funds, which 
is applied as directed by donors for the benefit of the University. Con- 
tributions, donations and bequests are solicited from Alumni and friends. 
They may be made to the general or University Fund, to the Medical Fund 
or to any other department of the University. If intended for the School 
of Medicine, they may be given to the general medical fund or to some spe- 
cial object, as building, research, library, pathology, hospital, publication, 
laboratories, gymnasium, scholarship, medal, prize, etc., in which case the 
wishes of the donor will be strictly regarded. Attention is invited to the 
"Charles Frick Research Fund," already established in memory of that 
distinguished investigator. Checks should be made payable to Endow- 
ment Fund of the University of Maryland, J. M. H. Rowland, Treasurer, 
Lombard and Greene Streets, Baltimore, Md. 

FORMS OF DEVISE OR BEQUEST 
To School of Medicine 

I give, devise and bequeath to the Regents of the University of Maryland, a corporation 
incorporated under the laws of the State of Maryland, for the benefit of the Faculty of 

Physic 

(Here state amount or describe property) 
To Endowment Fund 
I give, devise and bequeath to the Trustees of the Endowment Fund of the University 
of Maryland, a corporation incorporated under the laws of the State of Maryland, for the 

benefit of the Faculty of Physic . . .-. it 

(Here state amount or describe property) 



80 BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, U. OF MD. 

THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND SCHOOL OF NURSING 

The University of Maryland School for Nurses was established in the 
year 1889. Since that time it has been an integral part of the University 
of Maryland, coming under the same government. It is a non- sectarian 
school, the only religious services being morning prayers. 

The University Hospital is a general hospital containing about 400 beds. 
It is equipped to give young women a thorough course of instruction and 
practice in all phases of nursing. 

Programs Offered : The programs of study of the school are planned for 
two groups of students: (a) the five-year group, (b) the three-year group. 

The requirements for admission to the five-year program of the School 
of Nursing are the same as for other colleges of the University. The com- 
pletion of this course entitles the student to the degree of Bachelor of 
Science from the University of Maryland and to the diploma of the Uni- 
versity Hospital School of Nursing. 

The requirements for admission to the three year program are the satis- 
factory completion of an academic course in an approved high school. 
The completion of this course entitles the student to the diploma of the 
University of Maryland School of Nursing. Blank certificates will be 
furnished upon application to the Director of the School of Nursing. 

MERCY HOSPITAL SCHOOL OF NURSING 

The Mercy Hospital School of Nursing was established in 1899 and 
incorporated on December 23, 1901. It has developed the art of the pro- 
fession according to the high standard necessary to qualify as a Registered 
Nurse. 

The rapid growth of the institution, attested by the increasing number 
of its graduates, is evidence of the active part it takes in the health of the 
community. Through its connection with the Mercy Hospital its oppor- 
tunities are unlimited. By its affiliation with the University of Maryland 
it has the advantage of the best professors for the instruction of the nurses. 

The University of Maryland, in affiliation with the Mercy Hospital 
School of Nursing, offers a five year combined Academic and Nursing 
program. The completion of this course entitles the student to the degree 
of Bachelor of Science from the University of Maryland, and to the diploma 
of the Mercy Hospital School of Nursing. Graduate nurses who hold col- 
lege degrees are greatly in demand, especially for positions in administration 
and teaching institutions. This program consequently offers a distinct 
advantage. 



INDEX 



PAGE 

Alumni Association 78 

Annual Hospital Appointments 70 

Board of Regents 3 

Calendar 2 

Combined Course in Arts and Medi- 
cine 64 

Consolidation of Schools 11 

Curriculum, Organization of 31 

Anatomy 32 

Histology 33 

Embryology 33 

Neuro Anatomy '. . 34 

Physiology 34 

Bacteriology and Immunology 34 

Biological Chemistry 35 

Pharmacology and Materia Medica 35 

Pathology 36 

Medicine 37 

Clinical Pathology 40 

Gastro-Enterology 41 

Psychiatry 41 

Pediatrics 42 

Neurology 43 

Hygiene and Preventive Medicine . . 44 

Medical Jurisprudence 44 

Surgery 45 

Anaesthesia 48 

Dermatology 48 

Orthopaedic Surgery 49 

Roentgenology 49 

Diathermy and Radium Therapy. . 49 

Throat and Nose 50 

Bronchoscopy and Esophagoscopy. . 50 

Genito-Urinary 50 

Rectum and Colon 51 

Otology.. 51 

Neurological Surgery 52 

Oncology 52 

Oral Surgery 52 

Industrial Medicine and Surgery ... 53 

Obstetrics 53 

Gynecology 54 



PAGE 

Ophthalmology 55 

Art as Applied to Medicine 56 

History of Medicine 56 

Dispensary Reports: 

Mercy Hospital 28 

University Hospital 21 

Clinical Facilities: 

Mercy Hospital 22 

University Hospital 13 

Dispensary Staffs: 

Mercy Hospital 26 

University Hospital 18 

Endowment Fund 79 

Expenses, Students 70 

Faculty of Physic 4 

Fees 65 

Hospitals : 

James Lawrence Kernan 30 

Mercy Hospital 22 

Baltimore City Hospitals 28 

University Hospital 13 

Internships 72 

Libraries 31 

Matriculates 74 

Medical Care of Students 66 

Medical Council 4 

Prizes 67 

Requirements for Matriculation 63 

Rules 64 

Schedule 57 

Scholarships 67 

Staffs: 

Baltimore City Hospitals 29 

James Lawrence Kernan Hospital. . 30 

Mercy Hospital 22 

University Hospital 15 

Training Schools for Nurses: 

Mercy Hospital 80 

University Hospital 80 

University Senate 4 

University of Maryland, Organization 

of 12 



81 



VOLUME 11 NUMBER 5 



BULLETIN 



OF THE 



SCHOOL */ MEDICINE 

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



MAY, 1937 




PUBLISHED FIVE TIMES A YEAR 
(JANUARY, APRIL, MAY, JULY AND OCTOBER) 



Lombard and Greene Streets 
Baltimore, Md. 



Entered as second-class matter June 16, at the Postomce at Baltimore, Maryland, 
under the Act of August 24, 1912 



Made in United Slates of America 



BULLETIN 



OF THE 



University of Maryland School of Medicine 
and College of Physicians and Surgeons 



Successor to The Hospital Bulletin of the University of Maryland, 

Baltimore Medical College News, and the Journal of the 

Alumni Association of the College of 

Physicians and Surgeons 




Annual Announcement 
Session 1937-38 



VOLUME 2.1, NO. 5 
MAY, I937 



CALENDAR FOR 1937-38 



1937 




September 21 


Tuesday 


September 22 


Wednesday 


September 23 


Thursday 


November 24 


Wednesday 


November 29 


Monday 


December 18 


Saturday 


1938 




January 3 


Monday 


January 24 


Monday 


to 


to 


January 29 


Saturday 


January 29 


Saturday 


January 31 


Monday 


February 22 


Tuesday 


April 13 


Wednesday 


April 20 


Wednesday 


June 4 


Saturday 


September 20 


PAR 

Tuesday 


September 21 


Wednesday 


September 22 


Thursday 



SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 
FIRST SEMESTER 

*Registration for first and second-year students 

*Registration for all other students 
Instruction begins with the first scheduled period 
Thanksgiving recess begins after the last scheduled period 
Instruction resumed with the first scheduled period 
Christmas recess begins after the last scheduled period 

Instruction resumed with the first scheduled period 

*Registration for second semester 

First semester ends after the last scheduled period 
SECOND SEMESTER 

Instruction begins with the first scheduled period 

Washington's Birthday — Holiday 

Easter recess begins after the last scheduled period 

Instruction resumed with the first scheduled period 

Commencement 



PARTIAL CALENDAR FOR 1938-1939 



*Registration for first and second-year students 
*Registration for all other students 
Instruction begins with the first scheduled period 



* A student who neglects or fails to register prior to or within the day or days specified 
for his or her school will be called upon to pay a fine of five dollars ($5.00). The last day 
of registration with fine added to regular fees is Saturday at noon of the week in which 
instruction begins following the specified registration period. (This rule may be waived 
only upon the written recommendation of the dean.) 

The offices of the registrar and comptroller are open daily, not including Saturday, 
from 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., and on Saturday from 9:00 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. with the 
following exceptions: Monday, September 13, 1937, until 8:00 p.m.; Saturday, September 
25, 1937, until 5 : 00 p.m. ; and on Saturday, January 29, 1938, until 5 : 00 p.m. 

Advance registration is encouraged. 



ORGANIZATION 

THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Harry Clifton Byrd, B.S., LL.D., President and Executive Officer 

BOARD OF REGENTS 

Term expires 

Dr. W. W. Skinner, Chairman 1945 

Kensington, Montgomery County 

Mrs. John L. Whitehurst, Secretary 1938 

4101 Greenway, Baltimore 

Hon. W. Calvin Chesnut 1942 

United States Postoffice Building, Baltimore 

Hon. William P. Cole, Jr 1940 

Towson, Baltimore County 

Henry Holzapfel, Jr., Esq 1943 

Hagerstown, Washington County 

Harry H. Nuttle, Esq 1941 

Denton, Caroline County 

J. Milton Patterson, Esq 1944 

Cumberland, Allegany County 

John E. Raine, Esq 1939 

Towson, Baltimore County 

Clinton L. Riggs, Esq 1942 

903 N. Charles Street, Baltimore 

Control of the University of Maryland is vested in a Board of nine 
Regents, appointed by the Governor and confirmed by the Senate for terms 
of nine years each. The general administration of the University is vested 
in the President. The University Council is an advisory body, composed 
of the President, the Vice-President, the Director of the Agricultural Experi- 
ment Station, the Director of the Extension Service, and the Deans. The 
University Council acts upon all matters having relation to the University 
as a whole or to cooperative work between the constituent groups. Each 
school has its own Faculty Council, composed of the Dean and members of 
its Faculty; each Faculty Council controls the internal affairs of the group 
it represents. 

The University has the following educational organization: 

The College of Agriculture, The College of Education, 

The College of Engineering, The College of Home Economics, 

The College of Arts and Sciences, The Graduate School, 

The School of Medicine, The Summer School, 

The School of Law, The Department of Physical Education 

The School of Dentistry, and Recreation. 

The School of Pharmacy, 

The Schools of Medicine, Law, Dentistry and Pharmacy are located in 
Baltimore; the others in College Park, Maryland. 

3 



4 BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, U. OF MD. 

THE UNIVERSITY SENATE 

(Baltimore Schools) 

H. C. Byrd, B.S., LL.D President of the University 

J. M. H. Rowland, M.D., Sc.D., LL.D Dean of the School of Medicine 

Roger Howell, Ph.D., LL.B Dean of the School of Law 

Andrew G. DuMez, M.S., Ph.D Dean of the School of Pharmacy 

J. Ben Robinson, D.D.S., F.A.C.D Dean of the School of Dentistry 

T. H. Taliaferro, C.E., Ph.D Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences 

Arthur J. Lomas, M.D., CM., D.P.H Superintendent of the Hospital 

T. O. Heatwole, M.D., D.D.S., D.Sc Secretary of the Baltimore Schools 

W. M. Hillegeist Director of Admissions 



MEDICAL COUNCIL 

Arthur M. Shipley, M.D., Sc.D. Eduard Uhlenhuth, Ph.D. 

M. H. Rowland, M.D., Sc.D., LL.D. Clyde A. Clapp, M.D. 

Hugh R. Spencer, M.D. John C. Krantz, Jr., Ph.D. 

H. Boyd Wylie, M.D. Walter D. Wise, M.D. 

Carl L. Davis, M.D. J. Mason Hundley, Jr., M.A., M.D. 

Maurice C. Pincoffs, B.S., M.D. William R. Amberson, Ph.D. 

Frank W. Hachtel, M.D. Louis H. Douglass, M.D. 



FACULTY OF PHYSIC 

J. Frank Crouch, M.D Professor Emeritus of Clinical Ophthalmology and Otology 

Harry Friedenwald, A.B., M.D Professor Emeritus of Ophthalmology 

William S. Gardner, M.D Professor Emeritus of Gynecology 

Julius Friedenwald, A.M., M.D Professor Emeritus of Gastro-Enterology 

Alexius McGlannan, A.M., M.D., LL.D Professor Emeritus of Surgery 



Arthur M. Shipley, M.D., Sc.D., Professor of Surgery. 

J. M. H.Rowland, M.D. , Sc.D., LL.D., Dean of the Faculty. 

Hugh R. Spencer, M.D., Professor of Pathology. 

H. Boyd W t ylie, M.D., Professor of Biological Chemistry. 

Carl L. Davis, M.D., Professor of Anatomy. 

Maurice C. Pincoffs, B.S., M.D., Professor of Medicine. 

Frank W. Hachtel, M.D., Professor of Bacteriology. 

Clyde A. Clapp, M.D., Professor of Ophthalmology. 

John C. Krantz, Jr., Ph.D., Professor of Pharmacology. 

Eduard Uhlenhuth, Ph.D., Professor of Anatomy. 

J. Mason Hundley, Jr., M.A., M.D., Professor of Gynecology. 

Walter D. Wise, M.D., Professor of Surgery. 

William R. Amberson, Ph.D., Professor of Physiology. 

William H. Schultz, Ph.B., Ph.D., Research Professor of Pharmacology. 

Joseph E. Gichner, M.D., Professor of Clinical Medicine and Physical Therapeutics. 



FACULTY OF PHYSIC 

Irving J. Spear, M.D., Professor of Neurology. 

Charles F. Blake, A.M., M.D., Professor of Diseases of the Rectum and Colon. 

S. Griffith Davis, M.S., M.D., Professor of Anaesthesia. 

G. Carroll Lockard, M.D., Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

Harvey G. Beck, M.D., Sc.D., Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

Albertus Cotton, A.M., M.D., Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery and Roentgenology. 

Andrew C. Gillis, A.M., M.D., LL.D., Professor of Neurology. 

Henry J. Walton, M.D., Professor of Roentgenology. 

Ross McC. Chapman, M.D., Professor of Psychiatry. 

John Rathbone Oliver, A.B., M.D., Ph.D., Professor of the History of Medicine. 

L. H. Douglass, M.D., Professor of Clinical Obstetrics. 

Edgar B. Friedenwald, M.D., Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. 

Edward A. Looper, M.D., D.Oph., Professor of Diseases of the Nose and Throat. 

J. W. Downey, M.D., Professor of Otology. 

Harry M. Stein, M.D., Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

W. H. Toulson, A.B., M.Sc, M.D., Professor of Genito-Urinary Surgery. 

Charles Bagley, Jr., A.B., M.D., Professor of Neurological Surgery. 

Allen Fiske Voshell, A.B., M.D., Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery. 

Nathan Winslow, A.M., M.D., Professor of Clinical Surgery. 

Page Edmunds, M.D., Professor of Traumatic Surgery. 

Harry M. Robinson, M.D., Professor of Dermatology. 

Frank S. Lynn, M.D., Professor of Clinical Surgery. 

Elliott H. Hutchins, A.M., M.D., Professor of Clinical Surgery. 

Charles Reld Edwards, M.D., Professor of Clinical Surgery. 

F. L. Jennings, M.D., Professor of Clinical Surgery. 

Huntington Williams, M.D., Dr.P.H., Professor of Hygiene and Public Health. 

Robert P. Bay, M.D., Professor of Oral Surgery. 

C. Loring Joslin, M.D., Professor of Pediatrics. 

Brice M. Dorsey, D.D.S., Professor of Exodontia. 

J. Dawson Reeder, M.D., Professor of Diseases of the Rectum and Colon. 

Compton Riely, M.D., Clinical Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery. 

W. S. Smith, M.D., Clinical Professor of Gynecology. 

T. Fred Leitz, M.D., Clinical Professor of Gastro-Enterology. 

M. Randolph Kahn, M.D., Clinical Professor of Ophthalmology. 

Waitman F. Zinn, M.D., Clinical Professor of Diseases of the Nose and Throat. 

A. J. Gillis, M.D., Clinical Professor of Genito-Urinary Surgery. 

Theodore H. Morrison, M.D., Clinical Professor of Gastro-Enterology. 

Abram S. Samuels, M.D., Clinical Professor of Gynecology. 

H. K. Fleck, M.D., Clinical Professor of Ophthalmology. 

R. W. Locher, M.D., Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery. 

Sydney M. Cone, A.B., M.D., Associate Professor of Pathology. 

H. J. Maldeis, M.D., Associate Professor of Medical Jurisprudence. 

G. M. Settle, A.B., M.D., Associate Professor of Neurology and Clinical Medicine. 
Thomas R. Chambers, A.M., M.D., Associate Professor of Surgery. 

William H. Smith, M.D., Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine. 
Paul W. Clough, B.S., M.D., Associate Professor of Medicine. 
Sydney R. Miller, A.B., M.D., Associate Professor of Medicine. 
J. McFarland Bergland, M.D., Associate Professor of Obstetrics. 
Walter A. Baetjer, A.B., M.D., Associate Professor of Medicine. 
A. M. Evans, M.D., Associate Professor of Surgery. 



6 BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, U. OF MD. 

Edward S. Johnson, M.D., Associate Professor of Surgery. 

Emil Novak, M.D., Associate Professor of Obstetrics. 

Ralph P. Truitt, M.D., Associate Professor of Psychiatry. 

D. J. Pessagno, M.D., Associate Professor of Surgery. 

Moses Gellman, B.S., M.D., Associate Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery. 

Harry L. Rogers, M.D., Associate Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery. 

O. G. Harne, Associate Professor of Histology. 

Charles A. Reifschneider, M.D., Associate Professor of Traumatic Surgery and Oral 

Surgery. 
Thomas R. Sprunt, M.D., Associate Professor of Medicine. 
Monte Edwards, M.D., Associate Professor of Surgery and Associate in Diseases of the 

Rectum and Colon. 
Frank H. Figge, A.B., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Gross Anatomy. 
W. S. Love, Jr., A.B., M.D., Associate Professor of Medicine and Instructor in Pathology. 
Raymond Hussey, M.A., M.D., Associate Professor of Medicine. 
L. A. M. Krause, M.D., Associate Professor of Medicine. 
Clyde N. Marvel, M.D., Associate Professor of Surgery. 
T. Campbell Goodwin, M.D., Associate Professor of Pediatrics. 
Carl Dame Clarke, Associate Professor of Art as Applied to Medicine. 
Emil G. Schmidt, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Biological Chemistry. 
Lawrence F. Woolley, M.D., Associate Professor of Psychiatry. 
Thomas B. Ayccck, B.S., M.D., Associate Professor of Surgery. 
Richard G. Coblentz, A.B., M.D., Associate Professor of Neurological Surgery. 
Grant E. Ward, A.B., M.D., Associate Professor of Surgery. 
D. Conrad Smith, M.A., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Physiology. 
George McLean, M.D., Assistant Professor of Medicine. 
Maurice Feldman, M.D., Assistant Professor of Gastro-Enterology. 
Robert B. Wright, B.S., M.D., Assistant Professor of Pathology. 
H. R. Peters, M.D., Assistant Professor of Medicine. 
Milford Levy, M.D., Assistant Professor of Neurology. 
John H. Traband, M.D., Assistant Professor of Pediatrics. 
Albert Jaffe, M.D., Assistant Professor of Pediatrics. 
C Gardner Warner, A.B., M.D., Assistant Professor of Pathology. 
Harry Goldsmith, M.D., Assistant Professor of Psychiatry. 
H. W. Newell, M.D., Assistant Professor of Psychiatry. 

Leon Freedom, M.D., Assistant Professor of Neurology and Instructor in Pathology. 
Zachariah Morgan, M.D., Assistant Professor of Gastro-Enterology. 
Samuel Morrison, M.D., Assistant Professor of Gastro-Enterology. 
Harry M. Murdock, M.D., Assistant Professor of Psychiatry. 
A. H. Finkelstein, M.D., Assistant Professor of Pediatrics. 
John E. Legge, M.D., Assistant Professor of Medicine. 
Thomas C. Wolff, M.D., Assistant Professor of Medicine. 
Frederick Smith, M.D., Assistant Professor of Pediatrics. 
J. G. M. Reese, M.D., Assistant Professor of Obstetrics. 
M. Alexander Novey, A.B., M.D., Assistant Professor of Obstetrics. 
George A. Strauss, Jr., M.D., Assistant Professor of Gynecology. 
R. G. Willse, M.D., Assistant Professor of Gynecology. 
Thomas K. Galvin, M.D., Assistant Professor of Gynecology. 
Leo Brady, A.B., M.D., Assistant Professor of Gynecology. 



FACULTY OF PHYSIC 7 

Robert H. Oster, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Physiology. 

H. M. Bubert, M.D., Assistant Professor of Medicine and Assistant in Bacteriology. 

T. Nelson Carey, M.D., Assistant Professor of Medicine and Physician in Charge of 

Medical Care of Students. 
Walter C. Merkel, A.B., M.D., Assistant Professor of Pathology. 
C. Jelleff Carr, M.S., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Pharmacology. 
Jonas Friedenwald, A.B., M.D., Lecturer in Ophthalmic Pathology. 
E. B. Freeman, M.D., Lecturer in Medicine. 
Charles R. Goldsborough, M.D., Lecturer in Medicine. 
John R. Abercrombie, A.B., M.D., Associate in Dermatology. 
Joseph I. Kemler, M.D., Associate in Ophthalmology. 
Frank N. Ogden, M.D., Associate in Biological Chemistry. 
E. P. Smith, M.D., Associate in Gynecology. 

Franklin B. Anderson, M.D. , Associate in Diseases of the Nose and Throat and Otology. 
Austin H. Wood, M.D., Associate in Genito-Urinary Surgery. 
Albert E. Goldstein, M.D., Associate in Pathology. 
Samuel S. Glick, M.D., Associate in Pediatrics. 
W. J. Todd, M.D., Associate in Pediatrics. 
William G. Geyer, M.D., Associate in Pediatrics. 
Clewell Howell, M.D., Associate in Pediatrics. 
Joseph Sindler, M.D., Associate in Gastro-Enterology. 
John F. Lutz, A.B., M.D., Associate in Histology. 
Isadore A. Siegel, A.B., M.D., Associate in Obstetrics. 
H. F. Bongardt, M.D., Associate in Surgery. 
I. O. Ridgley, M.D., Associate in Surgery. 
R. D. West, M.D., Associate in Ophthalmology. 
Eugene L. Flippin, M.D., Associate in Roentgenology. 
J. S. Eastland, M.D., Associate in Medicine. 
L. J. Millan, M.D., Associate in Genito-Urinary Surgery. 
W. Raymond McKenzie, M.D., Associate in Diseases of the Nose and Throat. 
K. D. Legge, M.D., Associate in Genito-Urinary Surgery. 

E. P. H. Harrison, A.B., M.D., Associate in Obstetrics. 

William H. F. Warthen, M.D., Associate in Hygiene and Public Health. 
Francis Ellis, A.B., M.D., Associate in Dermatology. 
L. K. Fargo, M.D., Associate in Genito-Urinary Surgery. 
Henry F. Graff, A.B., M.D., Associate in Ophthalmology. 
Harold M. Goodman, A.B., M.D., Associate in Dermatology. 
Wetherbee Fort, M.D., Associate in Medicine. 

F. Stratner Orem. M.D., Associate in Pediatrics. 
Frank J. Geraghty, M.D., Associate in Medicine. 
L. P. Gundry, M.D., Associate in Medicine. 

John F. Hogan, M.D., Associate in Genito-Urinary Surgery. 

Thomas R. O'Rourk, M.D., Associate in Diseases of the Nose and Throat and Assis- 
tant in Ophthalmology and Otology. 
Kenneth B. Boyd, M.D., Associate in Gynecology and Assistant in Obstetrics. 
Chester L. Reynolds, M.D., Associate in Psychiatry. 
Ben'jamin Pushkin, M.D., Associate in Neurology. 
John T. Hibbitts, M.D., Associate in Gynecology. 
E. H. Tonolla, M.D., Associate in Medicine. 
J. Edmund Bradley, M.D., Associate in Pediatrics 
W. W. Walker, M.D., Associate in Surgery. 



8 BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, U. OF MD. 

C. W. Peake, M.D., Associate in Surgery. 

John H. Mills, M.D., Associate in Medicine. 

Henry F. Buettner, M.D., Instructor in Bacteriology. 

J. A. F. Pfelffer, M.D., Instructor in Bacteriology. 

M. S. Koppelman, M.D., Instructor in Gastro-Enterology. 

M. G. Gichner, M.D., Instructor in Medicine. 

M. G. Tull, M.D., Instructor in Hygiene and Public Health. 

W. R. Johnson, M.D., Instructor in Surgery and Pathology. 

E. M. Hanrahan, A.B., M.D., Instructor in Surgery. 
R. M. Hening, M.D., Instructor in Pediatrics. 

Ruth Musser, A.B., M.S., Instructor in Pharmacology. 

Benjamin Abeshouse, Ph.B., M.D., Instructor in Pathology. 

Joseph Pokorney, M.D., Instructor in Histology. 

Jaroslav Hulla, M.D., Instructor in Histology. 

A. C. Monninger, M.D., Instructor in Dermatology. 

S. Demarco, M.D., Instructor in Surgery. 

Karl J. Steinmueller, A.B., M.D., Instructor in Surgery. 

William Ellsworth Evans, M.S., Ph.D., Instructor in Pharmacology. 

Samuel T. Helms, M.D., Instructor in Medicine and Genito-Urinary Surgery. 

William R. Geraghty, B.S., M.D., Instructor in Neurological Surgery and Pathology 

and Assistant in Surgery. 
George H. Yeacer, B.S., M.D., Instructor in Surgery. 

F. A. Holden, M.D., Instructor in Ophthalmology and Otology. 
Martin J. Hanna, M.D., Instructor in Histology. 

Earl L. Chambers, M.D., Instructor in Medicine. 

Z. Vance Hooper, M.D., Instructor in Gastro-Enterology. 

C. Victor Richards, M.D., Instructor in Gastro-Enterology. 

M. Paul Byerly, M.D., Instructor in Pediatrics and Assistant in Medicine. 

G. Bowers Mansdorfer, M.D., Instructor in Pediatrics. 

W. A. H. Councill, M.D., Instructor in Genito-Urinary Surgery. 

William E. Hahn, D.D.S., Instructor in Exodontia. 

Luther E. Little, M.D., Instructor in Surgery. 

J. Frank Hewitt, A.B., M.D., Instructor in Surgery. 

Arthur G. Siwinski, A.B., M.D., Instructor in Gross Anatomy and Assistant in Surgery. 

David Tenner, M.D., Instructor in Medicine. 

J. Howard Burns, M.D., Instructor in Medicine. 

R. B. Mitchell, Jr., M.D., Instructor in Medicine. 

Samuel Legum, A.B., M.D., Instructor in Medicine. 

Ernest Levi, M.D., Instructor in Gastro-Enterology. 

James G. Arnold, Jr., A.B., M.D., Instructor in Neurology and Assistant in Pathology. 

J. G. Onnen, M.D., Instructor in Surgery. 

E. S. Edlavitch, M.D., Instructor in Gynecology. 

William M. Seabold, A.B., M.D., Instructor in Neural Anatomy and Pediatrics and 

Assistant in Pathology. 
J. Victor Monke, M.A., Instructor in Physiology. 
Milton S. Sacks, B.S., M.D., Instructor in Pathology. 
Thomas J. Coonan, M.D., Instructor in Pediatrics. 
Thomas S. Bowyer, M.D., Instructor in Gynecology. 
Joseph V. Castagna, M.D., Instructor in Gynecology. 
Sol Smith, M.D., Instructor in Medicine. 
M. S. Siiilixg, M.D., Instructor in Medicine. 
Robert W. Garis, M.D., Instructor in Medicine and Assistant in Pathology. 



FACULTY OF PHYSIC 9 

Harry V. Langeluttig, A.B., M.D., Instructor in Medicine and Assistant in Pathology. 
Eugene E. Covington, M.D., Instructor in Gross Anatomy and Assistant in Diseases of 

the Rectum and Colon. 
Simon H. Brager, M.D., Instructor in Surgery. 
J. W. Nelson, M.D., Instructor in Surgery. 
I. Ridgeway Trimble, M.D., Instructor in Surgery. 
H. Alvan Jones, M.D., Instructor in Surgery and Orthopaedic Surgery. 
Richard T. Shackelford, M.D., Instructor in Surgery. 
Raymond F. Helfrich, M.D., Instructor in Surgery. 
Henry F. Ullrich, M.D., Instructor in Orthopaedic Surgery. 
Walter L. Kilby, M.D., Instructor in Roentgenology. 
Harry Wasserman, M.D., Instructor in Dermatology. 

Frank K. Morris, A.B., M.D., Assistant in Surgery, Obstetrics and Gynecology. 
Marius P. Johnson, A.B., M.D., Assistant in Pharmacology and Obstetrics. 
D wight Mohr, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 
Howard B. McElwain, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 
Robert VV. Johnson, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 
A. V. Buchness, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 
T. J. Touhey, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 
Nathaniel Beck, M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 
Carl Benson, M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 
A. Scagnettt, M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 
W. J. Schmitz, M.D., Assistant in Pediatrics. 
H. Edmund Levin, M.D., Assistant in Bacteriology and Medicine. 
John G. Runkle, M.D., Assistant in Ophthalmology. 
Margaret B. Ballard, M.D., Assistant in Obstetrics. 
Birkhead Macgowan, M.D., Assistant in Otology. 
Clyde F. Karns, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 
Paul Schenker, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 
Morris Fine, M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 
Samuel H. Culver, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 
J. Willis Guyton, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 
Benjamin S. Rich, M.D., Assistant in Otology. 
W. H. Trlplett, M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 
J. G. Feman, M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 
E. M. Reese, M.S., Assistant in Medicine. 
H. W t illiam Primakoff, M.D., Assistant in Gastro-Enterology. 
William N. McFaul. Jr., M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 
E. Hollister Davis, A.B., M.D., Assistant in Anaesthesia. 

James C. Owtngs, M.D., Assistant in Surgery and Diseases of the Rectum and Colon. 
Conrad B. Acton, B.S., M.D., Assistant in Pathology and Medicine. 
Israel P. Meranski, M.D., Assistant in Pediatrics. 
H. D. Franklin, M.D., Assistant in Pediatrics. 
Albert R. Wilkerson. M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 
Julius Goodman, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 
Dudley P. Bowe, A.B., M.D., Assistant in Obstetrics. 
Dorothy E. Schmalzer, B.S., Assistant in Biological Chemistry. 
John E. Savage, B.S., M.D., Assistant in Pathology and Obstetrics. 
Philip D. Flynn, M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 
Albert J. Shochat, M.D., Assistant in Gastro-Enterology. 
S. C. Feldman, M.D., Assistant in Pediatrics. 



10 BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, U. OF MD. 

Nelsa Lee Wade, M.D., Assistant in Pediatrics. 

H. Whitney Wheaton, M.D., Assistant in Pediatrics. 

Harry C. Hull, M.D., Assistant in Pathology and Surgery. 

W. Grafton Hersperger, M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 

Beatrice Bamberger, M.D., Assistant in Gastro-Enterology. 

Lauriston L. Keown, M.D., Assistant in Pediatrics. 

Philip F. Lerner, A.B., M.D., Assistant in Neurology. 

J. H. Wilkerson, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

L. T. Chance, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

Samuel McLanahan, Jr., M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

W. Allen Deckert, M.D., Assistant in Surgery, Obstetrics and Gynecology. 

Samuel E. Proctor, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

George Govatos, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

Francis W. Gillis, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

R. Walter Graham, Jr., M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

Harry S. Shelley, B.S., M.D., Assistant in Genito-Urinary Surgery. 

Beverley C. Compton, A.B., M.D., Assistant in Gynecology. 

John C. Dumler, B.S., M.D., Assistant in Gynecology and Oncology. 

Jerome Snyder, M.D., Assistant in Ophthalmology. 

I. H. Maseritz, M.D., Assistant in Orthopaedic Surgery. 

John V. Hopkins, M.D., Assistant in Orthopaedic Surgery. 

J. G. Benesuns, M.D., Assistant in Orthopaedic Surgery. 

E. L. Mortimer, Jr., Assistant in Orthopaedic Surgery. 

James R. Gibbons, M.D., Assistant in Diseases of the Nose and Throat and Otology. 

Joseph Nurkin, M.D., Assistant in Diseases of the Nose and Throat. 

Samuel H. Bryant, D.D.S., Assistant in Exodontia. 

Harold Goldstein, D.D.S., Assistant in Exodontia. 

Eldred Roberts, M.D., Assistant in Oncology. 

William H. Carnes, Jr., M.D., Assistant in Pathology. 

William H. Grenzer, M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 

George Silverstein, M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 

Robert A. Reiter, M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 

Thomas A. Christensen, M.D., Assistant in Pediatrics 

D \yight M. Currie, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

Harry M. Robinson, Jr., M.D., Assistant in Dermatology 

Rollin C. Hudson, M.D., Assistant in Dermatology. 

Thomas E. Roach, M.D., Assistant in Dermatology. 

James Robert Gibbons, M.D., Assistant in Otology. 

Milton C. Lang, M.D., Assistant in Ophthalmology. 

Harold C. Dix, M.D., Assistant in Ophthalmology. 

Maxwell L. Mazer, M.D., Assistant in Obstetrics. 

George A. Hart, M.D., Assistant in Obstetrics. 

Joe M. Blumberg, B.S., M.D., Assistant in Obstetrics. 

Hugh B. McNally, B.S., M.D., Assistant in Obstetrics. 

E. Ferd. Kadan, A.B., M.D., Assistant in Obstetrics. 

Catherine Blumberg, A.B., M.D., Assistant in Obstetrics. 

Paul Schonfeld, M.D., Assistant in Dermatology. 



HISTORY OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 11 

HISTORY OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 

The present School of Medicine, with the title of the University of Mary- 
land School of Medicine and College of Physicians and Surgeons, is the 
result of a consolidation and merger of the University of Maryland School 
of Medicine with the Baltimore Medical College (1913) and the College of 
Physicians and Surgeons (1915). 

The School of Medicine of the University of Maryland is one of the oldest 
foundations for medical education in America, ranking fifth in point of 
age among the medical colleges of the United States. It was organized in 
1807, and chartered in 1808, under the name of the College of Medicine 
of Maryland, and its first class was graduated in 1810. In 1812 the College 
was empowered by the Legislature to annex three other colleges or facul- 
ties: Divinity, Law, and Arts and Sciences; and the four colleges thus 
united were "constituted an University by the name and under the title of 
the University of Maryland." 

The beautiful college building at Lombard and Greene Streets, erected 
in 1812, is the oldest structure in America devoted to medical teaching. 
Here was founded one of the first medical libraries and the first medical 
college library in the United States. 

Here for the first time in America dissecting was made a compulsory 
part of the curriculum; here instruction in Dentistry was first given (1837) 
and here were first installed independent chairs for the teaching of Diseases 
of Women and Children (1867), and of Eye and Ear Diseases (1873). 

The School of Medicine was one of the first to provide for adequate 
clinical instruction by the erection in 1823 of its own hospital, and in this 
hospital intramural residency for the senior student was first established. 

In 1913, juncture was brought about with the Baltimore Medical College, 
an institution of thirty-two years' growth. By this association the facilities 
of the School of Medicine were enlarged in faculty, equipment and hospital 
connection. 

The College of Physicians and Surgeons was incorporated in 1872, and 
established on Hanover Street in a building afterward known as the Mater- 
nite, the first obstetrical hospital in Maryland. In 1878 union was effected 
with the Washington University School of Medicine, in existence since 
1827, and the college was removed to Calvert and Saratoga Streets. By the 
consolidation with the College of Physicians and Surgeons, medical control 
of the teaching beds in the City Hospital, now the Mercy Hospital, was 
obtained. 



12 BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, U. OF MD. 

ORGANIZATION OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 

LABORATORY FACILITIES 

The laboratories are located at two centers, the group of buildings at 
Greene and Lombard Streets, and at 32 and 34 South Paca Street. The 
schedule is so adjusted that the laboratory periods are placed with a view 
of obviating unnecessary movement on the part of the classes. The build- 
ing known as Gray Laboratory, at Greene and Lombard Streets, houses 
three departments. The Anatomical Laboratory is placed upon the top 
floor, where skylights and an auxiliary modern system of electric lighting 
give adequate illumination of the subjects. The Department of Pharma- 
cology occupies the second floor. There is a large room for the genera] 
student laboratory, which is thoroughly equipped with apparatus of recent 
acquisition, and in addition contains many instruments of unique and origi- 
nal design. With office and stockroom adjoining, this laboratory is com- 
plete for student experimentation. On the first floor of Gray Laboratory 
is the Department of Physiology. In addition to the large student labora- 
tory, which is constructed for groups of fifty-eight students, there are rooms 
for the departmental office, preparation of material, and storage of appa- 
ratus. An additional room is devoted exclusively to mammalian experi- 
ments. In this building there is maintained an animal room in which is kept 
an abundance of material for experimental purposes. The embalming 
and storage plant for the Department of Anatomy is in physical connection 
with the building and its special departments. The laboratories of physi- 
ology and pharmacology are completely equipped with apparatus and 
lockers in accord with the best ideas of instruction. The students work in 
groups of two each, and each group has sufficient apparatus, so that the 
experimental work can be carried on without delay or recourse to a general 
stockroom. 

The laboratories of Pathology, Bacteriology, Biochemistry and Clinical 
Pathology are located in the Medical laboratory building on Greene Street 
north of Lombard. 

The Departments of Pathology, Bacteriology and Clinical Pathology 
use, conjointly, the large modernly equipped student laboratory on the 
second floor. The capacity is one hundred students. On the second floor 
there are also students' preparation rooms for the making and sterilization 
of media, cold storage and incubating rooms and research laboratories for 
the Departments of Bacteriology and Clinical Pathology. 

On the main floor of this building are the offices, library, research and 
technical rooms of the Departments of Pathology and Bacteriology. The 
basement is given over to teaching museums, store rooms, students' 
locker room and lavatories. 



CLINICAL FACILITIES 13 

The Department of Biological Chemistry is housed on the top floor of 
this building. The space allotted to teaching includes a large student 
laboratory equipped with one hundred and thirty-two commodious locker 
units. It is supplied with gas, hot and cold water, vacuum and direct 
current service, a special apparatus room, a warm room, a colorimeter 
room, a balance room, a first-aid room and a stockroom. These rooms have 
modern laboratory furniture and apparatus, a constant temperature and 
ventilating system, and are equipped and arranged for economic use of the 
students' time. 

Adjoining the students' space are private offices and laboratories of the 
staff, a departmental library, a shop and a preparation room. 

In the Main Building is the Museum of Anatomy, where are arranged 
for student reference, specimens which represent the careful selection of 
material over a period of many years. In the University Hospital is the 
Student Laboratory for analytical studies by those students who are 
serving as clinical clerks on the wards. A similar laboratory is maintained 
in the building at the northwest corner of Saratoga and Calvert Streets, for 
the student work of the Mercy Hospital. 

At 32 and 34 South Paca Street are the Laboratories of Histology and 
Embryology. These laboratories accommodate the full class, and are 
equipped with necessary lockers for microscopes and apparatus. The 
department housed in this building is provided with individual offices, 
preparation and stockrooms. 

CLINICAL FACILITIES 

UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL 

The University Hospital, which is the property of the University of Mary- 
land, is the oldest institution for the care of the sick in the State of Mary- 
land. It was opened in September, 1823, under the name of the Baltimore 
Infirmary, and at that time consisted of but four wards, one of which was 
reserved for eye patients. 

In 1933-1934 the new University Hospital was erected, and patients were 
admitted to this building in November 1934. The new hospital is situated 
at the southwest corner of Redwood and Greene Streets, and is consequently 
opposite the Medical School buildings. The students, therefore, are in 
close proximity and little time is lost in passing from the lecture halls and 
laboratories to the clinical facilities of the new building. 

The new hospital has a capacity of practically four hundred beds devoted 
to general medicine, surgery, obstetrics, pediatrics, and the various medical 
and surgical specialties. On the second, seventh and eighth floors are 
centered practically all the clinical and laboratory teaching facilities of the 



14 BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, U. OF MD. 

institution. The north wing of the second floor is occupied by the entire 
Department of Roentgenology. The east wing houses clinical pathology and 
special laboratories for clinical microscopy, bio-chemistry, bacteriology, 
and an especially well appointed laboratory for students' training. The 
south wing has its electro-cardiographic and basal metabolism departments, 
with new and very attractive air-conditioned or oxygen therapy cubicles. 
The west wing contains the Department of Rhinolaryngology and Bronchos- 
copy, Industrial Surgery, Ophthalmology, and Male and Female Cystos- 
copy. 

The teaching zone extends from this floor to the eighth floor and comprises 
wards for surgery, medicine, obstetrics, pediatrics, and a large clinical lec- 
ture hall. 

On the seventh floor is the general operating suite, the delivery suite, 
and the central supply station. The eighth floor is practically a students' 
floor and affords a mezzanine over the operating and delivery suites, and a 
students' entrance to the clinical lecture hall. 

There are practically 270 beds available for teaching. In the basement 
there is a very well appointed Pathological Department with a large 
teaching autopsy room and its adjunct service of instruction of students 
in pathological anatomy. 

Owing to its situation, adjacent to the largest manufacturing district of 
the city and the shipping district, a large number of accident patients are 
received. 

The obstetrical service is particularly well arranged and provides accommo- 
dation for forty ward patients. This service, combined with an extensive 
home service, assures the student of abundant obstetrical training. 

During the year ending December 31, 1936, 923 cases were delivered in 
the hospital and 709 cases in the outdoor department. Students in the 
graduating class observed at least thirty-five cases, each student being 
required to deliver ten cases in their homes or in allied hospitals. 

The dispensaries associated with the University Hospital and the Mercy 
Hospital are organized upon a uniform plan in order that the teaching may 
be the same in each. Each dispensary has the following departments: 
Medicine, Surgery, Obstetrics, Pediatrics, Eye and Ear, Genito-Urinary, 
Gynecology, Gastro-Enterology, Neurology, Orthopaedics, Proctology, 
Dermatology, Throat and Nose, Tuberculosis and Psychiatry. 

All students in their junior year work each day during one-third of the 
year in the Departments of Medicine and Surgery of the dispensaries. In 
their senior year, all students work one hour each day in the special 
departments. 

The new building, with its modern planning, makes a particularly attrac- 
tive teaching hospital and is a very valuable addition to the clinical facilities 
of the Medical School. 



UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL STAFF 



15 



The old hospital building has been remodeled and is occupied by the 
Out-patient Department. Thus the students of the future have been pro- 
vided with a splendidly appointed group of clinics for their training in out- 
patient work. All departments of clinical training are represented in 
this remodeled building and all changes have been predicated on the teach- 
ing function for which this department is intended. 

The Department of Art also occupies quarters in this building. 



HOSPITAL COUNCIL 

Harry Clifton Byrd, B.S., LL.D., President. 

W. W. Skinner, Esq., Chairman of the Board of Regents. 

J. M. H. Rowland, M.D., Sc.D., LL.D., Dean of the School of Medicine. 

M. C. Pincoffs, B.S., M.D., Head of the Department of Medicine. 

A. M. Shipley, M.D., Sc.D., Head of the Department of Surgery. 

A. J. Lomas, M.D., CM., D.P.H., Superintendent of the Hospital. 

Miss Annie Crighton, R.N., Superintendent of Nurses. 

Miss Florence Sadtler, Representing Woman's Auxiliary Board. 

Mrs. John L. Whitehurst, Member Board of Regents. 

John E. Raine, Esq., Member, Board of Regents. 

Ralph P. Truitt, M.D. \ _ a ,. __ .., . „■ _ 

Louis H. Douglass, M.D. I ^presenHng Hos^tal Staf. 

G. Carroll Lockard, M.D 
Alfred T. Gundry, M.D. 



Representing Medical Alumni. 



UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL STAFF 

A. J. Lomas, M.D., CM., D.P.H., Superintendent of the Hospital 

Physicians 



Maurice C Pincoffs, B.S., M.D. 



Harry M. Stein, M.D. 
Walter A. Baetjer, M.D. 
Thomas R. Sprunt, M.D. 
John E. Legge, M.D. 
L. A. M. Krause, M.D. 



George M. Settle, M.D. 

Ralph P. Truitt, M.D. 
C Loring Joslin, M.D. 



G. Carroll Lockard, M.D. 

Joseph E. Gichner, M.D. 

William H. Smith, M.D. 

William S. Love, Jr., M.D. 

T. Nelson Carey, M.D. 



Gastro-Enterologist 
Zachariah R. Morgan, M.D. 

Neurologists 
Irving J. Spear, M.D. 

Psychiatrists 
Ross McC Chapman, M.D. 

Pediatricians 



Leon Freedom, M.D. 

Harry M. Murdock, M.D. 
Albert Jaffe, M.D. 



16 BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, U. OF MD. 

Pathologist 
Hugh R. Spencer, M.D. 

Surgeons 

Arthur M. Shipley, M.D., Sc.D. Page Edmunds, M.D. 

Nathan Winslow, A.M., M.D. Frank S. Lynn, M.D. 

Charles Reid Edwards, M.D. Robert P. Bay, M.D. 

Neurological Surgeons 
Charles Bagley, Jr., A.B., M.D. Richard G. Coblentz, A.B., M.D. 

Laryngologists 

Edward A. Looper, M.D., D.Oph. Franklin B. Anderson, M.D. 

Thomas R. O'Rourk, A.B., M.D. 

Proctologists 
J. Dawson Reeder, M.D. Monte Edwards, M.D. 

Orthopaedic Surgeons 

Allen Fiske Voshell, A.B., M.D. Compton Riely, M.D. 

Moses Gellmai:, B.S., M.D. Henry F. Ullrich, M.D. 

Genito-Urinary Surgeons 
W. H. Toulson, A.B., M.Sc, M.D. Lyle J. Millan, M.D. 

Roentgenologists 
Henry J. Walton, M.D. Eugene L. Flippin, M.D. 

Walter L. Kilby, M.D. 

Dermatologist 
Harry M. Robinson, M.D. 

Broncho sco pi st 
Edward A. Looper, M.D., D. Oph. 

Anaesthetists 
S. Griffith Davis, M.S., M.D. E. Hollister Davis, A.B., M.D. 

Mary J. O'Brien, R.N. 

Otologist 
J. W. Downey, Jr., M.D. 

Obstetricians 

J. M. H. Rowland, M.D., Sc.D., LL.D. Isadore A. Siegel, A.B., M.D. 

L. H. Douglass, M.D. J. G. M. Reese, M.D 

M. A. Novey, A.B., M.D. J. E. Savage, B.S., M.D. 



UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL STAFF 17 

Ophthalmologists 

Clyde A. Clapp, M.D. William Tarun, M.D. 

Henry F. Graff, A.B., M.D. 

Gynecologists 
W. S. Gardner, M.D. R. G. Willse, M.D. 

J. M. Hundley, Jr., M.A., M.D. Leo Brady, A.B., M.D. 

Oncologists 
J. M. Hundley, Jr., M.A., M.D. Grant E. Ward, A.B., M.D. 

UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL RESIDENT AND INTERNE STAFF 

1937-1938 

RESIDENT STAFF 

Thurston R. Adams, M.D., Resident Surgeon. 

Walter Henry Gerwig, Jr., M.D., Assistant Resident Surgeon. 

John Carl Hamrick, B.S., M.D., Assistant Resident Surgeon. 

Andrew J. Weaver, B.S., M.D., Assistant Resident Surgeon. 

R.OBERT L. Dubois, M.D., Assistant Resident Surgeon. 

Howard Brooks Mays, M.D., Assistant Resident Surgeon. 

William B. Patton, A.B., M.D., Assistant Resident Surgeon. 

John Alfred Myers, B.E., M.D., Medical Resident. 

Irving Freeman, B.S., M.D., Assistant Medical Resident. 

Francis George Dickey, A.B., M.D., Assistant Medical Resident. 

Charles K. Fetterhoff, M.D., Resident Obstetrician. 

John Warren Albrittain, B.S., M.D., Assistant Resident Obstetrician. 

Arthur Baptisti, Jr., B.S., M.D., Assistant Resident Obstetrician. 

George A. Hahn, M.D., Assistafil Resident Obstetrician. 

Clarence Conway Briscoe, M.D., Resident Gynecologist. 

Ernest Ivon Cornbrooks, Jr., A.B., M.D., Assistant Resident Gynecologist. 

Thomas A. Christensen, M.D., Resident Pediatrician. 

Davis L. Sprinkle, M.D., Resident Roentgenologist. 

SENIOR INTERNS 

Roland E. Bieren, M.D. Walter Esselman Karfgin, B.S., M.D. 

Harry Clay Bowie, B.S., M.D. Thomas Agnew Nestor, Ph.B., M.D. 

Joseph E. Bush, A.B., M.D. Morris John Nicholson, B.S., M.D. 

Nachman Davidson, A.B., M.D. William Kennedy Waller, A.B., M.D. 

George Howey Davis, B.S., M.D. Gibson J. Wells, A.B., M.D. 

Charles H. Doeller, Jr., A.B., M.D. Norman James Wilson, B.S., M.D. 

JUNIOR INTERNS 

Stuart G. Coughlan, B.S., M.D. Samuel T. R. Revell, Jr., B.S., M.D. 

Everett S. Diggs, B.S., M.D. Henry L. Rigdon, M.D. 

D. Frank Kaltreider, Jr., A.B., M.D. S. N. Rumpanos, A.B., M.D. 

William B. Long, Jr., B.S., M.D. John K. B. E. Seegar, Jr., A.B., M.D. 

Leonard W. Levine, B.S., M.D. Hawley Howard Seiler, A.B., M.D. 

Richard S. Owens, Jr., B.S., M.D. Tom Weber, M.D. 
Raymond E. Zeiner, D.D.S. (Dental) 



18 BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, U. OF MD. 

UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL DISPENSARY STAFF 

Emma Winship, R.N. 

Dispensary Supervisor 

DISPENSARY COMMITTEE 

C. R. Edwards, M.D., Chairman 

Emma Winship, R.N., Secretary 
L. H. Douglass, M.D. John E. Legge, M.D. 

J. Mason Hundley, Jr., M.D. A. J. Lomas, M.D. 

C. Loring Joslin, M.D. Ralph P. Truitt, M.D. 

MEDICINE 

John E. Legge, M.D., Chief of Clinic 

Consultant Physicians 

Paul W. Clough, M.D. L. A. M. Krause, M.D. 

Lewis P. Gundry, M.D., Assistant Chief of Clinic 
M. S. Shiling, M.D., Assistant Chief of Clinic 
Harry G. Jones, M.D. William Michel, M.D. 

William H. Triplett, M.D. Robert A. Reiter, M.D. 

Charles H. Reier, M.D. George Silverstein, M.D. 

M. A. Fine, M.D. Carl P. Roetling, M.D. 

GASTROENTEROLOGY 

Zachariah Morgan, M.D., Chief of Clinic 

Z. V. Hooper, M.D. M. S. Koppelman, M.D. 

Ernest Levi, M.D. Samuel Morrison, M.D. 

Albert J. Shochat, M.D. 

NEUROLOGY 

Leon Freedom, M.D., Chief of Clinic 

Benjamin Pushkin, M.D. William L. Fearing, M.D. 

Charles E. Balfour, M.D. 

PSYCHIATRY 

Ralph P. Truitt, M.D., Chief of Clinic 

H. W. Newell, M.D. Harry Murdock, M.D. 

Harry Goldsmith, M.D. Joseph C. Solomon, M.D. 

Alice J. Rockwell, Ph.D. 

DISEASES OF THE LUNGS 

E. H. Tonolla, M.D., Chief of Clinic 

H. V. Langeluttig, M.D. Hugh G. Whitehead, M.D. 

Arthur Karpgin, M.D. Manuel Levin, M.D. 

Meyer W. Jacobson, M.D. 



UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL DISPENSARY STAFF 19 

DISEASES OF METABOLISM 

Lewis P. Gundry, M.D., Chief of Clinic 

CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASES 

William S. Love, Jr., M.D., Chief of Clinic 

Robert W. Garis, M.D., Assistant Chief of Clinic 

Samuel J. Hankin, M.D. Robert B. Mitchell, Jr., M.D. 

Conrad Acton, M.D. Harry M. Robinson, Jr., M.D. 

Robert A. Reiter, M.D. William G. Helfrich, M.D. 

ALLERGY CLINIC 

H. M. Bubert, M.D., Chief of Clinic 

Paul E. Carliner, M.D. Robert B. Taylor, M.D. 

Samuel Snyder, M.D. Harry M. Robinson, Jr., M.D. 

Edward S. Kalllns, M.D. B. S. Rich, M.D. 

PEDIATRICS 

C. Loring Joslin, M.D., Director 

John H. Traband, M.D., Chief of Clinic 

Clewell Howell, M.D., Chief of Clinic 

M. Paul Byerly, M.D. W. H. Wheaton, M.D. 

A. H. FlNKELSTEIN, M.D. S. C. Feldman, M.D. 

William G. Geyer, M.D. H. D. Franklin, M.D. 

Samuel S. Glick, M.D. Albert Jaffe, M.D. 

R. M. Hening, M.D. S. Lilienfeld, M.D. 

F. Strattner Orem, M.D. T. W. Keown, M.D. 

Israel P. Meranski, M.D. William J. Todd, M.D. 

Robert B. Taylor, M.D. Thomas A. Christensen, M.D. 

William M. Seabold, M.D. Milton Siscovick, M.D. 

Nelsa Wade, M.D. Israel Rosen, M.D. 

SURGERY 
Charles Reid Edwards, M.D., Chief of Clinic 
L. T. Chance, M.D. Robert F. Chenowith, M.D. 

R. Walter Graham, Jr., M.D. J. Frank Hewitt, M.D. 

W. R. Johnson, M.D. Luther E. Little, M.D . 

W'illiam N. McFaul, Jr., M.D. Samuel McLanahan, Jr., M.D. 

James C. Owings, M.D. Samuel E. Proctor, M.D. 

A. G. Siwlnski, M.D. A. R. Wilkerson, M.D. 

J. H. Wilkerson, M.D. 

ORTHOPAEDIC SURGERY 

Allen Fiske Voshell, M.D., Chief of Clinic 

J. G. Benesuns, M.D. Moses Gellman, M.D. 

John V. Hopkins, M.D. I. H. Maseritz, M.D. 

Henry F. Ullrich, M.D. 

GENITO-URINARY 

W. H. Toulson, M.D., Chief of Clinic 
W. A. H. Council, M.D. Walter A. Cox, M.D. 

John F. Hogan, M.D. L. J. Millan, M.D. 

Harry S. Shelley, M.D. 



20 BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, U. OF MD. 

ROENTGENOLOGY 

Henry J. Walton, M.D., Chief of Clinic 
Eugene L. Flippin, M.D. 

DERMATOLOGY 

Harry M. Robinson, M.D., Chief of Clinic 
Francis A. Ellis, M.D. H. M. Goodman, M.D. 

R. C. Hudson, M.D. A. C. Monninger, M.D. 

Harry Wasserman, M.D. 

NOSE AND THROAT 

Franklin B. Anderson, M.D., Chief of Clinic 
Meyer Baylus, M.D. James R. Gibbons, M.D. 

Joseph Nurkin, M.D. Thomas R. O'Rourk, M.D. 

Benjamin S. Rich, M.D. 

COLON AND RECTUM 

Monte Edwards, M.D., Chief of Clinic 
James C. O wings, M.D. 

GYNECOLOGY 

J. Mason Hundley, Jr., M.D., Chief of Clinic 
Thomas S. Bowyer, M.D. Kenneth B. Boyd, M.D. 

Joseph V. Castagna, M.D. Beverley C. Compton, M.D. 

John C. Dumler, M.D. W. Allen Deckert, M.D. 

John T. Hibbitts, M.D. Marius P. Johnson, M.D. 

Helen I. Maginnis, M.D. 

FEMALE CYSTOSCOPY 

J. Mason Hundley, Jr., M.D. W. Allen Deckert, M.D. 

John T. Hibbitts, M.D. Beverley C. Compton, M.D. 

John C. Dumler, M.D. 

ORAL SURGERY 

Brice M. Dorsey, D.D.S., Chief of Clinic 
Harold Goldstein, D.D.S. Samuel H. Bryant, D.D.S. 

OBSTETRICS 

Louis H. Douglass, M.D., Chief of Clinic 

J. G. M. Reese, M.D., Assistant Chief of Clinic 

M. A. Novey, M.D., Assistant Chief of Clinic 

I. A. Siegel, M.D., Assistant Chief of Clinic 

M. B. Ballard, M.D. Kenneth B. Boyd, M.D. 

M. L. Mazer, M.D. John E. Savage, B.S., M.D. 

J. Hulla, M.D. J. M. Blumberg, B.S., M.D. 

M. P. Johnson, M.D. George A. Hart, M.D. 

D. P. Bowe, A.B., M.D. Hugh B. McNally, B.S., M.D. 

W. Allen Deckert, M.D. Catherine Blumberg, A.B., M.D. 

E. Ferd. Kadan, A.B., M.D. 



UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL DISPENSARY 



21 



ONCOLOGY 



Gynecological Division 
J. Mason Hundley, Jr., M.D. 
Thomas S. Bowyer, M.D. 
Beverley C. Compton, M.D. 
John C. Dumler, M.D. 



Surgical Division 

Grant E. Ward, M.D. 

E. E. Covington, M.D. 

J. D. Moores, M.D. 

J. W. Nelson, M.D. 

Eldred Roberts, M.D. 

A. G. Siwinski, M.D. 



OPHTHALMOLOGY 
H. F. Graff, A.B., M.D., Chief of Clinic 



Frank A. Holden, M.D. 
Thomas R. O'Rourk, M.D. 
Milton C. Lang, M.D. 



J. G. Runkle, M.D. 
Jerome Snyder, M.D. 
Harold C. Dix, M.D. 



OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY 
Miss Sue P. Hurt, Directress 

SOCIAL SERVICE 
Miss Grace Pearson, Directress 



UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL DISPENSARY 
Report from October 1, 1935 to September 30, 1936 

Departments New Cases Old Cases Total 

Pediatrics 2,321 14,522 16,843 

Dermatology 3 ,647 9,783 13 ,430 

Obstetrics 1,303 7,731 9,034 

Surgery 1 ,853 5,782 7,635 

Medicine 1,676 4,450 6,126 

Protein 107 4,072 4,179 

Eye 972 3,028 4,000 

Gynecology 1,185 2,810 3,995 

Orthopedic 972 2,572 3,544 

Oncology 259 2 ,316 2 ,575 

Genito-Urinary 462 1 ,737 2 , 199 

Nose, Throat and Ear 1 ,049 964 2 ,013 

Tuberculosis 224 1,709 1,933 

Cardiology 206 1 ,649 1 ,855 

Gastro-Intestinal 257 1 , 134 1 ,391 

Oral Surgery 556 482 1 ,038 

Neurology 194 768 962 

Cystoscopy 116 380 496 

Proctology 183 257 440 

Psychiatry 93 273 366 

Total 17,635 66,419 84,054 



22 BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, U. OF MD. 

MERCY HOSPITAL 

The Sisters of Mercy first assumed charge cf the Hospital at the corner 
of Calvert and Saratoga Streets, then owned by the Washington University, 
in 1874. By the merger of 1878 the Hospital came under the control of 
the College of Physicians and Surgeons, but the Sisters continued their work 
of ministering to the patients. 

In a very few years it became apparent that the City Hospital, as it was 
then called, was much too small to accommodate the rapidly growing de- 
mands upon it. However, it was not until 1888 that the Sisters of Mercy, 
with the assistance of the Faculty of the College of Physicians and Surgeons, 
were able to lay the cornerstone of the present Hospital. This building 
was completed and occupied late in 1889. Since then the growing demands 
for more space have compelled the erection of additions, until now there are 
accommodations for 275 patients. 

In 1909 the name was changed from The Baltimore City Hospital to 
Mercy Hospital. 

The clinical material in the free wards is under the exclusive control of 
the Faculty of the University of Maryland School of Medicine and Col- 
lege of Physicians and Surgeons. 

The Hospital adjoins the College building, and all surgical patients 
from the public wards are operated upon in the College operating rooms. 
This union of the Hospital and College buildings greatly facilitates the 
clinical teaching. 

Mercy Hospital is the hospital of the United Railways and Electric Com- 
pany of Baltimore City, and receives patients from the Baltimore and Ohio 
Railroad Company and from the Pennsylvania Railroad Company and 
its branches. 

MERCY HOSPITAL STAFF 

BOARD OF GOVERNORS 

Alexius McGlannan, A.M., M.D., LL.D., Chairman 

Sister M. Placide Walter D. Wise, M.D. 

Sister M. Veronica Maurice C. Pincoffs, M.D. 

Sister M. Hildegarde Waitman F. Zinn, M.D. 

Sister M. Siena Thomas K. Galvtn, M.D. 

Sister M. Hilda Edward P. Smith, M.D. 

Sister M. Joseph 

HOSPITAL STAFF 

SURGICAL DIVISION 

Consulting Surgeon 

Alexius McGlannan, A.M., M.D., LL.D. 



MERCY HOSPITAL STAFF 



23 



Charles F. Blake, M.D. 
F. L. Jennings, M.D. 
R. W. Locher, M.D. 
Thomas R. Chambers, M.D. 



Surgeons 
Walter D. Wise, M.D. 



N. Clyde Marvel, M.D. 



Elliott H. Hutchins, M.D. 

D. J. Pessagno, M.D. 

A. M. Evans, M.D. 

William F. Rienhoff, M.D. 



I. O. Ridgely, M.D. 
J. W. Nelson, M.D. 
H. B. McElwain, M.D. 
Raymond F. Helfrich, M.D. 
Simon Brager, M.D. 



Associate Surgeons 



H. F. Bongardt, M.D. 

Thomas B. Aycock, M.D. 

Charles W. Maxson, M.D. 

I. R. Trimble, M.D. 

R. T. Shackelford, M.D. 



John A. O'Connor, M.D. 
Julius Goodman, M.D. 
E. E. Covington, M.D. 



Assistant Surgeons 



S. Demarco, Jr., M.D. 

T. J. Touhey, M.D. 

William N. McFaul, M.D. 



Ophthalmologists and Otologists 
Harry Friedenwald, A.B., M.D. 



H. K. Fleck, M.D. 



J. W. Downey, M.D. 



Associates 



J. I. Kemler, M.D. 



F. A. Pacienza, M.D. 



Consulting Rhinologists and Laryngolo gists 



Raymond McKenzie, M.D. 



George W. Mitchell, M.D. 



F. A. Pacienza, M.D. 
F. A. Kayser, M.D. 



Rhinologists and Laryngolo gists 
Waitman F. Zinn, M.D. 

Associates 



Bronclwscopist 
Waitman F. Zinn, M.D. 

Associate 
F. A. Kayser M.D. 



BlRKHEAD MACGOWAN, M.D. 

Benjamin S. Rich, M.D. 



Proctologist 
Charles F. Blake, M.D. 



24 



BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, U. OF MD. 



Kenneth D. Legge, M.D. 



Assistant 
E. E. Covington, M.D. 

Orthopaedic Surgeon 
Albertus Cotton, M.D. 

Associate 
H. L. Rogers, M.D. 

Urologist 
Alexander J. Gillis, M.D. 

Associates 

Dentist 
N. D. Fusco, D.D.S. 

Assistant 
J. J. Foley, D.D.S. 

MEDICAL DIVISION 

Physicians 
Maurice C. Pincoffs, B.S., M.D. 



Leon K. Fargo, M.D. 



C. B. Gamble, M.D. 
Harvey G. Beck, M.D. 



Hubert C. Knapp, M.D. 
Bartus T. Baggott, M.D. 
J. S. Eastland, M.D. 



S. A. TUMMINELLO, M.D. 

Howard Burns, M.D. 



Associates 

T. Nelson Carey, M.D. 
Assistants 

J. M. Miller, M.D. 

Gastro-Entcrologist 
Julius Friedenwald, A.M., M.D. 



H. K. Peters, M.D. 
George McLean, M.D. 



Wetherbee Fort, M.D. 

L. A. M. Krause, M.D. 

John E. Legge, M.D. 



Earl Chambers, M.D. 
K. W. Golley, M.D. 



T. Frederick Leitz, M.D. 



Maurice Feldman, M.D. 



Associates 



Assistants 



Theodore Morrison, M.D. 
Joseph Sindler, M.D. 



MERCY HOSPITAL STAFF 



IS 



F. B. Smith, M.D. 
W. J. Schmitz, M.D. 



Pediatricians 
Edgar B. Friedenwald, M.D. 

Associates 

Assistants 

W. M. Seabold, M.D. 

Neurologist and Psychiatrist 
Andrew C. Gillis, M.D. 

Associate 
Milford Levy, M.D. 



Thomas J. Coonan, M.D. 



G. B. Mansdorfer, M.D. 



OBSTETRICAL DIVISION 
E. P. Smith, M.D. 



Abram S. Samuels, M.D. 
George A. Strauss, M.D. 
Ernest Edla vetch, M.D. 



Frank K. Morris, M.D. 



Associate Obstetricians 



William S. Gardner, M.D. 

Thomas K. Galvin, M.D. 

John J. Erwin, M.D. 



Francis W. Gillis, M.D. 



Thomas K. Galvin, M.D. 
George A. Strauss, M.D. 



E. S. Edlavitch, M.D. 



Walter C. Merkel, M.D. 



H. R. Peters, M.D. 



Sister Mary Joan 
Sister Mary Claude 



GYNECOLOGICAL DIVISION 

Gynecologists 
William S. Gardner, M.D. 



Associate 
J. J. Erwin, M.D. 

Assistants 
PATHOLOGICAL DIVISION 

Clinical Pathologists 
H. T. Collenberg. M.D. 



Abram Samuels, M.D. 
E. P. Smith, M.D. 



Frank K. Morris, M.D. 



Hugh R. Spencer, M.D. 



Technicians 



Eleanor Behr 



Charles E. Bramble, Ph.D. 



Sister Mary Celeste 
Frances Donovan 



26 BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, U. OF MD. 

X-RAY DEPARTMENT 

Radiographer 
Albertus Cotton, M.D. 

Associate 
Harry L. Rogers, M.D. 

Assistant 
Harry Archer Miller, M.D. 

Technicians 
Sister M. Kevin Elizabeth Crook 

MERCY HOSPITAL RESIDENT STAFF 

Resident Surgeon 
Joseph V. Jerardi, M.D. 

Assistant Resident Surgeons 
Grant Lund, M.D. Raymond Lipin, M.D. 

Harold H. E t trns, M.D. Robert W. Stevens, M.D. 

Medical Resident 
William A. Grenzer, M.D. 

Assistant Medical Resident 
Richard H. Pembroke, M.D. 

Resident Gynecologist 
Harry F. Kane, M.D. 

Rotating Internes 

Thomas G. Abbott, M.D. Sidney R. Gehlert, Jr., M.D. 

J. Lawrence Gillespie, M.D. James P. Jones, M.D. 

Ephraim T. Lisansky, M.D. Stephen E. Muller, M.D. 

T. Willard Reynolds, M.D. Thomas J. Sullivan, M.D. 

Frank A. Zack, M.D. 



DISPENSARY STAFF 

Surgeons 

Supervisor, Raymond F. Helfrich, M.D. 

I. O. Rtdgely, M.D. J. W. Nelson, M.D. 

John O'Connor, M.D. Simon Brager, M.D. 

H. F. Bongardt, M.D. Julius Goodman, M.D. 

I. R. Trimble, M.D. E. E. Covington, M.D. 

S. Demarco, M.D. Richard T. Shackelford, M.D. 

T. J. Touhey, M.D. William N. McFaul, M.D. 



MERCY HOSPITAL DISPENSARY STAFF 
Genito-Urinary 



27 



A. J. Gillis, M.D. 



Albertus Cotton, M.D. 



Orthopaedists 

I. H. Maseritz, M.D. 

Physicians 

Supervisor, Maurice C. Pincoffs, B.S., M.D. 

Henry Sheppard, M.D. ) _,. . ,>-.,.. 

_ T „ _, „ > Chiefs oj Clinic 

Earl L. Chambers, M.D.J J J 



K. D. Legge, M.D. 
Harry L. Rogers, M.D. 



J. M. Miller, M.D. 



S. Snyder, M D. 



S. A. TUMMINELLO, M.D. 

Cardiovascular Diseases 
T. C. Wolff, M.D., Chief of Clinic 

Diseases of the Lung 
S. Snyder, M.D., Chief of Clinic 

Diseases of Metabolism 
J. S. Eastland, M.D., Chief of Clinic 

Allergic Diseases 

H. M. Bubert, M.D., Chief of Clinic 
S. Snyder, M.D. 

Diseases of the Stomach 

Supervisor, Julius Friedenwald, M.D. 

T. Frederick Leitz, M.D. Theodore H. Morrison, M.D. 

M. Feldman, M.D. Joseph Sindler, M.D. 

H. William Primakoff, M.D. 

Esophagoscopist 
Waitman F. Zinn, M.D. 

Gynecologists 

Abram S. Samuels, M.D., Chief of Clinic 
Thomas K. Galvin, M.D., Assistant Chief of Clinic 

E. S. Edlavitch, M.D. Frank K. Morris, M.D. 

F. W. Gillis, M.D. H. L. Granoff, M.D. 

Diseases of Nose and Throat 
Waitman F. Zinn, M.D. 



Benjamin S. Rich, M.D. 

BlRKHEAD MACGOWAN, M.D. 



R. F. McKenzie, M.D. 
Horace Strickland, M.D. 



28 BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, U. OF MD. 

Diseases of Eye and Ear 

H. K. Fleck, M.D. M. Raskin, M.D. 
J. I. Kemler, MD. F. A. Pacienza, M.D. 

Social Service Department 

Sister Mary Beatrice Loretta Smith 

MERCY HOSPITAL DISPENSARY REPORT 

(Year 1936) 

Department Old New Total 

Surgery 4,119 1,187 5,306 

Medicine 1,887 860 2,747 

Diabetic 227 8 235 

Cardiac 331 58 389 

Gynecology 752 310 1,062 

Eye and Ear 497 273 770 

Nose and Throat 1,128 549 1,677 

Neurology 760 112 872 

Pediatrics 387 244 631 

Gastro-Intestmal 470 91 561 

Dental 121 169 290 

Rectal 82 39 121 

Orthopedics 904 290 1 , 194 

Skin 529 273 802 

Genito-Urinary 1 ,973 347 2 ,320 

Cancer _95 _17 112 

Total 14,262 4,827 19,089 



OTHER CLINICAL FACILITIES 
THE BALTIMORE CITY HOSPITALS 

The clinical advantages of the University have been largely increased 
by the liberal decision of the Department of Public Welfare to allow 
the immense material of these hospitals to be used for the purpose of medical 
education. There are daily visits and clinics in medicine and surgery by 
the Staff of the Hospitals. The autopsy material is unsurpassed in this 
country in amount, thoroughness of study, and the use made of it in medical 
teaching. 

The Baltimore City Hospital consists of the following separate divisions: 
The General Hospital, 400 beds. 
The Hospital for Chronic Cases, 508 beds. 
The Hospital for Tuberculosis, 179 beds. 
The Psychopathic Hospital, 275 beds. 
Infirmary (Home for Aged) 1053 beds. 



THE BALTIMORE CITY HOSPITALS 29 

STAFF OF BALTIMORE CITY HOSPITALS 

Parker J. McMillin, Superintendent 
VISITING STAFF 

Physician-in-Chief Thomas R. Boggs, S.B., M.D. 

Surgeon-in-Chief Arthur M. Shipley, M.D., Sc.D. 

Physician-in-Chief, Tuberculosis Hospital Harry M. Stein, M.D. 

Physician-in-Chief, Psychopathic Hospital Esther L. Richards, M.D. 

Obstetrician-in-Chief Louis H. Douglass, M.D. 

Pediatrician-in-Chief T. Campbell Goodwin, A.B., M.D. 

Dental Surgeon-in-Chief L. P. Henneberger, D.D.S. 

Assistant Chief Surgeon T. Bayron Aycock, B.S., M.D. 

(C. A. Reifschneider, M.D. 

S g \Edward M. Hanrahan, M.D. 

fl. Ridgeway Trimble, M.D. 

. . M T _. . . „ J Luther E. Little, M.D. 

Assistant I isiting Surgeons < T „ _ ,_ ~ 

6 6 James C. Owings, M.D. 

[Harry C. Hull, M.D. 

Assistant Visiting Vascular Surgeon George H. Yeager, B.S., M.D. 

Assistant Visiting Physician in Tuberculosis Lawrence M. Serra, M.D. 

Assistant Visiting Psychiatrist Thomas A. C. Rennie, M.D. 

Visiting Obstetrician J. G. M. Reese, M.D. 

Margaret Ballard, M.D. 

Kenneth B. Boyd, M.D. 
Assistant Visiting Obstetricians ) John M. Haws, M.D. 

Marius P. Johnson, M.D. 

Susanne Sterling, M.D. 

. . t . rr . .,. „,.... /B. Matthew Debuskey, M.D. 

Assistant V isiting Pediatricians <„ T ,, _ ' ^ 

[William M. Seabold, M.D. 

T .. . t . „ 7 . . (j. Mason Hundley, Jr., M.D. 

I isiting Gynecologists < L, ... ' .r ' 

[R. Gerard Willse, M.D. 

- . . . Tr . ... „ , . t / John T. Hibbitts, M.D. 

Assistant V isiting Gynecologists {"L _ _^ ,, _ 

[John C. Dumler, M.D. 

Visiting Physician Paul W. Clough, M.D. 

Warde Allan, M.D. 

James G. Arnold, M.D. 

C. Holmes Boyd, M.D. 

Thomas C. Wolff, M.D. 

Raymond G. Hussey, M.D. 

Assistant Visiting Ophthalmologist Frank B. Walsh, M.D. 

Visiting Orthopedic Surgeon Allen F. Voshell, A.B., M.D. 

. . .. T7 . ... ~ ., . j. a /H. Alv an Jones, M.D. 

Assisung Visiting Orthopedic Surgeons < TT „ „ ,, ^ 

[Henry F. Ullrich, M.D. 

Visiting Laryngologist Edward A. Looper, M.D., D.Oph. 

Franklin B. Anderson, M.D. 



Assistant Visiting Physicians. 



Assistant Visiting Laryngolo gists 

& > B B [Thomas R. O'Rourk, M.D 

Visiting Urologist W. Houston Toulson, M.Sc, M.D. 

Chief Radiologist John W. Pierso*, M.D. 

Visiting Neurological Surgeon Charles Bagley, Jr., A.B., M.D 



30 BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, U. OF MD. 

Assistant Visiting Neurological Surgeon Richard G. Coblentz, A.B., M.D. 

[Frank Ford, M.D. 
Assistant Visiting Neurologists { O. R. Langworthy, M.D. 

[Lawrence C. Kolb, M.D. 

Visiting Proctologist Monte Edwards, M.D. 

Visiting Oncologist Grant E. Ward, M.D. 

i . T .. . . ~ M 1 . A /Leroy M. Polvogt, M.D. 

Assistant Visiting Otologists < 

6 6 [J. J. Belemer, M.D. 

Visiting Dermatologist Isaac R. Pels, M.D. 

Visiting Dental Surgeon H. Glenn Waring, D.D.S. 

[Irvin B. Golboro, D.D.S. 
Assistant Visiting Dental Surgeons I Lawrence W. Bimestefer, D.D.S. 

[Joseph B. Berke, D.D.S. 

THE JAMES LAWRENCE KERNAN HOSPITAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL OE 
MARYLAND FOR CRIPPLED CHILDREN 

This institution is situated on an estate of 75 acres at Dickeyville. The 
site is just within the northwestern city limits and of easy access from the 
city proper. 

The location is ideal for the treatment of children, in that it affords all 
the advantages of sunshine and country air. 

A complete hospital unit, new in every respect, offers all modern facili- 
ties for the care of any orthopaedic condition in children. 

The hospital is equipped with 82 beds — endowed, and city and state 
supported. 

The Orthopaedic Dispensary at the University Hospital is maintained 
in closest affiliation and cares for the cases discharged from the Kernan 
Hospital. The Physical Therapy Department is very well equipped with 
modern apparatus and trained personnel. 

STAFF 

Surgeon-in-Ckief and Medical Director Allen Fiske Voshell, A.B., M.D. 

Attending Orthopaedic Surgeon Albertus Cotton, A.M., M.D. 

Associate Orthopaedic Surgeons f Moses Gellman, B.S., M.D. 

[Harry L. Rogers, M.D. 

Resident Orthopaedic Surgeon E. M. Karp, B.S., M.D. 

Consulting Surgeons (J- M. T. Finney, A.B., M.D., D.S.M., F.R.C.S., (Eng.,Ire.)Hon. 
\ Arthur M. Shipley, Sc.D., M.D, 

Consulting Plastic Surgeons /John Staige Davis, B.Sc, M.D. 

\Edward H. Kitlowski, M.D. 

Consulting Neurological Surgeon Charles Bagley, Jr., A.B., M.D. 

Consulting Oculist Harry Friedenwald, M.D. 

Oculist F. A. Pacienza, M.D. 

Consulting Aurisl and Laryngologist Edward A. Looper, M.D. 

A urist gnd Laryngologist F. B. Anderson, M.D. 

Consulting Dentist Harry B. McCarthy, D.D.S. 



ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 31 

Dentist M. E. Coberth, D.D.S. 

{Thomas B. Futcher, A.B., M.D. 
Thomas R. Brown, A.B., M.D. 
Lewellys F. Barker, A.B., M.D. 
Pediatrist Benjamin Tappan, A.B., M.D. 

Dermatologists (Harry M. Robinson, M.D. 

[Leon Ginsberg, M.D. 

Consulting Pathologists /Sydney M. Cone, A.B., M.D. 

\Hugh R. Spencer, M.D. 

Consulting Neurologist Irving J. Spear, M.D. 

Neurologist R. V. Seliger, M.D. 

Anaesthetists /j- A - Tompkins, M.D. 

\j. D. Holly, M.D. 

Roentgenologist Albertus Cotton, A.M., M.D. 

Superintendent Miss C. Gertrude Forrester, R.N. 

Dispensary and Social Service Nurse Miss Mabel S. Brown, R.N. 

(Miss Jane Ewing 
Technicians: Physical Therapy and X-Ray JMrs. Georgiana Wisong 

(Miss Jane Anderson 
Instructor in Grammar School Miss Laura Hampson 

LIBRARIES 

The University Library, founded in 1813 by the purchase of the collec- 
tion of Dr. John Crawford, now contains 17,434 volumes, a file of 190 current 
medical journals, and several thousand pamphlets and reprints. It is well 
stocked w T ith recent literature, including books and periodicals of general 
interest. The home of the library is Davidge Hall, a comfortable and com- 
modious building in close proximity to the classrooms and the laboratories 
of the Medical Department. The library is open daily during the year 
for use of members of the faculty, the students, and the profession generally. 

The Library of the Medical and Chirurgical Faculty of Maryland, 
containing 50,000 volumes, is open to the students of the school. The 
leading medical publications of the world are received by the library, and 
complete sets of many journals are available. Other libraries of Baltimore 
are the Peabody (250,000 volumes) and the Enoch Pratt Free Library 
(709,129 volumes). 

All these libraries are open to the students of the school without charge. 

ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 

The following curriculum is the result of a thorough revision of teaching 
in this school in order to meet modern requirements. The multiplication 
of specialties in medicine and surgery necessitates a very crowded course 
and the introduction of electives will very soon be depended on to solve 
some of the difficulties. 



32 BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, U. OF MD. 

The curriculum is organized under eleven departments. 

1. Anatomy (including Histology and Embryology). 

2. Physiology. 

3. Bacteriology and Immunology. 

4. Biological Chemistry. 

5. Pharmacology and Materia Medica. 

6. Pathology. 

7. Medicine (including Medical Specialties). 

8. Surgery (including Surgical Specialties). 

9. Obstetrics. 

10. Gynecology. 

11. Ophthalmology. 

The instruction is given in four years of graded work. 

Several courses of study extend through two years or more, but in no 
case are the students of different years thrown together in the same course 
of teaching. 

The first and second years are devoted largely to the study of the struc- 
tures and functions of the normal body. Laboratory work occupies most 
of the student's time during these two years. 

Some introductory instruction in Medicine and Surgery is given in the 
second year. The third and fourth years are almost entirely clinical. 

A special feature of instruction in the school is the attempt to bring to- 
gether teacher and student in close personal relationship. In many courses 
of instruction the classes are divided into small groups and a large number 
of instructors insures attention to the needs of each student. 

In most courses the final examination as the sole test of proficiency has 
disappeared and the student's final grade is determined largely by partial 
examinations, recitations and assigned work carried on throughout the 
course. 

DEPARTMENT OF GROSS ANATOMY 

Eduard Uhlenhuth, Ph.D Professor of Anatomy 

Frank H. Figge, A.B., Ph.D Associate Professor of Gross Anatomy 

Assistant Professor of Gross Anatomy 

Arthur G. Siwinski, A.B., M.D Instructor in Gross Anatomy 

Eugene E. Covington, M.D Instructor in Gross Anatomy 

Glenn Horner Algire, A.B Weaver Fellow in Gross Anatomy 

Course 101 /. Freshman Gross Anatomy. Total number of hours 350. 
Four hours lectures and conferences and eighteen hours laboratory (dis- 
section of the human subject) during the first semester. E. Uhlenhuth 
and Frank H. Figge. 

Course 201 /. Advanced Anatomy (elective course) . Total number of 
hours 130. Selected problems in gross anatomy. This course is intended 



ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 33 

primarily to offer to the sophomore student an opportunity of extending 
the knowledge secured in the freshman course. E. Uhlenhuth and Frank H. 
Figge. 

In addition to the above courses, facilities for special anatomical problems 
are offered to the more advanced student and physician. 

DEPARTMENT OF HISTOLOGY AND EMBRYOLOGY 

Carl L. Davis, M.D Professor of Anatomy 

O. G. Harne Associate Professor of Histology 

John F. Lutz, A.B., M.D Associate in Histology 

Joseph Pokorny, M.D Instructor in Histology 

Jaroslav Hulla, M.D Instructor in Histology 

Martin J. Hanna, M.D Instructor in Histology 

William M. Seabold, A.B., M.D Instructor in Neuro-anatomy 

First Year — 150 hours. The course in histology is divided equally be- 
tween the study of the fundamental tissues and that of organs. Through- 
out the entire course the embryology of the part being studied precedes 
the study of the fully developed tissue. Thus embryology becomes a 
correlated part of the whole subject of microscopic anatomy and not an 
independent subject. 

Each student is furnished a set of histological slides, previously prepared 
in our own laboratory, thus insuring a uniform and satisfactory quality of 
material for study and permitting the time of the student to be expended 
in the study of material rather than in the technic of its preparation. The 
object of the course is to present the evidence of function as shown by the 
structure of tissues and organs. Dr. Davis, Dr. Lutz and Professor Harne. 

An optional laboratory course is offered. This supplements the required 
course giving laboratory experience which can not be incorporated in the 
former. No added charge is made for the course. 

NEURO-ANATOMY 

Second Year — 90 hours. Neuro-anatomy embraces a study of the funda- 
mental structure of the central nervous system as applied to its function. 
An abundance of material permits of individual dissection of the human 
brain. A series of appropriately stained sections of the human brain stem 
is furnished each student for the microscopic study of the internal struc- 
ture of the nervous system. Dr. Davis, Dr. Lutz. 

For a description of the graduate courses offered by the members of the 
staff, consult the catalog of the Graduate School. 

DEPARTMENT OF PHYSIOLOGY 

William R. Amberson, Ph.D Professor of Physiology 

D. Conrad Smith, M.A., Ph.D Associate Professor of Physiology 



34 BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, U. OF MD. 

Robert H. Oster, Ph.D Assistant Professor of Physiology 

J. Victor Monke, M.A Instructor in Physiology 

Edwin P . Hiatt, A .B ., M .A Weaver Fellow in Physiology 

Three lectures, one conference and two laboratory periods a week. Feb- 
ruary to May inclusive. The fundamental concepts of physiology are 
presented with special reference to mammalian problems. Total number 
of hours 230. 

DEPARTMENT OF BACTERIOLOGY AND IMMUNOLOGY 

Frank W. Hachtel, M.D Professor of Bacteriology 

J. A. F. Pfeiffer, M.D Instructor in Bacteriology 

Henry F. Buettner, M.D Instructor in Bacteriology 

H. Edmund Levin, M.D Assistant in Bacteriology 

H. M. Bubert, M.D Assistant in Bacteriology 

Instruction in bacteriology is given in the laboratory to the students of 
of the second year during the first semester. This includes the 
methods of preparation and sterilization of culture media, the study of 
pathogenic bacteria, and the bacteriological examination of water and 
milk. The bacteriological diagnosis of the communicable diseases is also 
included in this course. Animal inoculations are made in connection with 
the bacteria studied. The most important protozoa are also studied in 
the laboratory. The principles of general bacteriology are taught by quiz, 
conference and lecture. 

The principles of immunology are presented by means of quizzes, con- 
ferences and lectures to the second-year class throughout the second semes- 
ter, and practical experiments are carried out by the class in laboratory 
sessions. 

Total number of hours: Bacteriology 120. 
Immunology 72. 

DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGICAL CHEMISTRY 

H. Boyd Wylie, M.D Professor of Biological Chemistry 

Emil G. Schmidt, Ph.D Associate Professor of Biological Chemistry 

Frank N. Ogden, M.D. Associate in Biological Chemistry 

Dorothy E. Schmalzer, B.S Assistant in Biological Chemistry 

This course is designed to present the fundamental principles of biological 
chemistry and to indicate their applications to the clinical aspects of medi- 
cine. The phenomena of living matter and its chief ingredients, secretions 
and excretions are discussed in lectures and conferences and examined 



ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 35 

experimentally. Training is given in routine biochemical methods of 
investigation. Total number of hours 180. 

Graduate Courses. Consult the catalogue of the Graduate School for 
descriptions of the graduate courses offered by members of the staff. 

DEPARTMENT OF PHARMACOLOGY 

John C. Krantz, Jr., Ph.D Professor of Pharmacology 

C. Jelleff Carr, M.S., Ph.D Assistant Professor of Pharmacology 

Ruth Musser, A.B., M.S Instructor in Pharmacology 

William Ellsworth Evans, M.S., Ph.D Instructor in Pharmacology 

Martus P. Johnson, A.B., M.D Assistant in Pharmacology 

William G. Harne Demonstrator in Pharmacology 

Frederick K. Bell, Ph.D U. S. Pharmacopoeia Fellow 

Frances F. Beck, A.B., M.S International Cancer Foundation Fellow 

Sylvan Forman, B.S., M.S Isaac E. Emerson Fellow in Pharmacology 

This course is designed to include those phases of pharmacology necessary 
for an intelligent use of drugs in the treatment of disease. The didactic 
instruction includes materia medica, pharmacy, prescription-writing, toxi- 
cology, posology, pharmacodynamics, and experimental therapeutics. 
The laboratory exercises parallel the course of lectures. 

In addition, optional conference periods and lectures are available for 
students desiring further instruction or advice. 

Total number of hours 176. 

For a description of the graduate courses offered by the members of 
the staff, consult the catalog of the Graduate School. 

DEPARTMENT OF PATHOLOGY 

Hugh R. Spencer, M.D Professor of Pathology 

Sydney M. Cone, A.B., M.D Associate Professor of Pathology 

Robert B. Wright, B.S., M.D Assistant Professor of Pathology 

C. Gardner Warner, A.B., M.D Assistant Professor of Pathology 

Walter C. Merkel, A.B., M.D Assistant Professor of Pathology 

Albert E. Goldstein, M.D Associate in Pathology 

Wm. S. Love, Jr., A.B., M.D Instructor in Pathology 

Leon Freedom, M.D Instructor in Pathology 

Benjamin Abeshouse, Ph.B., M.D Instructor in Pathology 

William R. Geraghty, B.S., M.D Instructor in Pathology 

Milton S. Sacks, B.S., M.D Instructor in Pathology 

W. R. Johnson, M.D Instructor in Pathology 

James G. Arnold, A.B., M.D : Assistant in Pathology 

Conrad B. Acton, B.S., M.D Assistant in Pathology 

John E. Savage, B.S., M.D Assistant in Pathology 

Harry C. Hull, M.D Assistant in Pathology 

Harry V. Langeluttig, A.B., M.D Assistant in Pathology 



36 BULLETIN OF TEE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, U. OF MD. 

William M. Seabold, A.B., M.D Assistant in Pathology 

Robert W. Garis, A.B., M.D Assistant in Pathology 

William H. Carnes, Jr., M.D Assistant in Pathology 

George F. Schmitt, B.S., M.D Weaver Fellow in Pathology 

2. Applied Pathology. Including Gross Morbid Anatomy and 
Morbid Physiology. (Third Year.) In this course the special relation 
of lesions to clinical symptoms and signs is emphasized. 

In the laboratory the class is divided into groups for the study of classi- 
fied autopsy material. 

3. Autopsies. (Third Year.) Small groups of students attend autop- 
sies at the morgues of the University Hospital and Baltimore City Hospitals. 
They are required to assist at autopsies and to prepare protocols. 

4. Clinical Pathological Conference. (Fourth Year.) In collabo- 
ration with the Department of Medicine, material from autopsies is 
studied with reference to the correlation of the clinical aspects with the 
pathological findings. 

5. Advanced Work in Pathology. Properly qualified students will 
be permitted to carry out advanced or research work along the lines of 
experimental pathology. 

Second Year — Total number of hours 168 

Third Year — Total number of hours 160 

Fourth Year — Clinical Pathological Conference 30 

DEPARTMENT OF MEDICINE 

Maurice C. Pincoffs, B.S., M.D Professor of Medicine 

Jos. E. Gichner, M.D Professor of Clinical Medicine and Physical Therapeutics 

G. Carroll Lockard, M.D Professor of Clinical Medicine 

Harvey G. Beck, Sc.D., M.D Professor of Clinical Medicine 

Harry M. Stein, M.D Professor of Clinical Medicine 

Paul W. Clough, B.S., M.D Associate Professor of Medicine 

Sydney R. Miller, A.B., M.D Associate Professor of Medicine 

Walter A. Baetjer, A.B., M.D Associate Professor of Medicine 

Thomas R. Sprunt, M.D Associate Professor of Medicine 

W. S. Love, Jr., A.B., M.D Associate Professor of Medicine 

Raymond Hussey, M.A., M.D Associate Professor of Medicine 

L. A. M. Krause, M.D Associate Professor of Medicine 

William H. Smith, M.D Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine 

H. J. Maldeis, M.D Associate Professor of Medical Jurisprudence 

George McLean, M.D Assistant Professor of Medicine 

H. R. Peters, M.D Assistant Professor of Medicine 

John E. Legge, M.D Assistant Professor of Medicine 

Thomas C. Wolff, M.D Assistant Professor of Medicine 

H. M. Bubert, M.D Assistant Professor of Medicine 



ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 



37 



T. Nelson Carey, M.D Assistant Professor 

J. S. Eastland, M.D Associate 

Wetherbee Fort, M.D Associate 

Frank J. Geraghty, M.D Associate 

L. P. Gundry, M.D Associate 

E. H. Tonolla, M.D Associate 

M. G. Gichner, M.D Instructor 

Samuel T. Helms, M.D Instructor 

Earl L. Chambers, M.D Instructor 

David Tenner, M.D Instructor 

J. Howard Burns, M.D Instructor 

R. B. Mitchell, Jr., M.D Instructor 

Samuel Legum, A.B., M.D Instructor 

Harry V. Langeluttig, A.B., M.D Instructor 

Robert W. Garis, A.B., M.D Instructor 

M. S. Shiling, M.D Instructor 

Sol Smith, M.D Instructor 

Carl Benson, M.D Assistant 

A. Scagnetti, M.D Assistant 

W. H. Triplett, M.D Assistant 

M. Paul Byerly, M.D Assistant 

H. Edmund Levin, M.D Assistant 

J. G. Feman, M.D Assistant 

Morris Fine, M.D Assistant 

Philip D. Flynn, M.D Assistant 

Conrad Acton, M.D Assistant 

W. Grafton Hersperger, M.D Assistant 

William H. Grenzer, M.D Assistant 

George Silverstein, M.D Assistant 

Robert A. Reiter, M.D Assistant 



of Medicine 
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Lecturers 

E. B. Freeman, M.D Lecturer in Medicine 

Charles R. Goldsborough, M.D Lecturer in Medicine 



GENERAL OUTLINE 
Second Year 
Introduction to clinical medicine. 

(a) Introductory physical diagnosis. 

(1 hour a week, first semester; 2 hours a week, second semester.) 

(b) Medical clinics. 

(1 hour a week, second semester.) 

Third Year 
I. The methods of examination (13 hours a week). 

(a) History taking. 

(b) Physical diagnosis. 

(c) Clinical pathology. 

These subjects are taught and practiced in the hospital out-patient department 
and in the clinical laboratory. 



38 BULLETIN OF TEE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, U. OF MD. 

II. The principles of medicine (5 hours a week). 

(a) Lectures, clinics and demonstrations in general medicine, neurology, pediatrics, 
psychiatry and preventive medicine. 
III. The principles of therapeutics (10 hours a week). 
Lectures and demonstrations. 

Fourth Year 
The practice of medicine. 
I. Clinical clerkship on the medical wards. 
(26 hours a week for ten weeks.) 
(a) Responsibility, under supervision, for the history, physical examination, 

laboratory examinations and progress notes of assigned cases, 
(b; Ward classes in general medicine, the medical specialties, and therapeutics. 
II. Clinics in general medicine and the medical specialties. 
(6 hours a week.) 

III. Dispensary work in the medical specialties. 

IV. Clinical pathological conferences (1 hour a week). 

Medical Dispensary Work 

The medical dispensaries of both the Mercy and the University Hos- 
pitals are utilized for teaching in the third year. Each student spends 
two hours daily for ten weeks in dispensary work. The work is done in 
groups of four to six students under an instructor. Systematic history- 
taking is especially stressed. Physical findings are demonstrated. The 
student becomes familiar with the commoner acute and chronic disease 
processes. 

Physical Diagnosis 

Second Year. Didactic lectures and practical demonstrations in topo- 
graphical anatomy and normal physical signs. 

Third Year. The class is divided into small groups, and each section 
receives instruction for two hours daily for ten weeks. This course is given 
at the City Hospitals. The large clinical material there is utilized to give 
each student the opportunity to familiarize himself with the common types 
of bodily structure, with the normal variations in physical signs and with 
the physical signs of the chief pulmonary, circulatory and abdominal 
diseases. 

A course of lectures (1 hour a week) on physical diagnosis supplements 
the practical work in this subject. 

Therapeutics 

Third Year. General therapeutics and materia medica are taken up and 
an effort is made to familiarize the student with the practical treatment of 
disease. The special therapy of the chief diseases is then reviewed. One 
hour a week. Dr. Lockard. 



ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 39 

Fourth Year. Special consideration is given to the practical application 
of therapeutic principles in bedside teaching and the chief therapeutic 
methods are demonstrated. 

Students attend therapeutic ward rounds once a week throughout their 
medical trimester. 

Tuberculosis 

During the third year in connection with the instruction in physical 
diagnosis a practical course is given at the Municipal Tuberculosis Hos- 
pital. Stress is laid upon the recognition of the physical signs of the 
disease, as well as upon its symptomatology and gross pathology. 

Cardiology 

During the fourth year an elective course in cardiology is offered at the 
Mercy Hospital. The course occupies one and one-half hours weekly. 
Physical diagnosis, electrocardiography and the therapeutic management 
of cardiac cases are stressed. 

Syphilis 

Third Year. During the third year the subject of syphilis is dealt with 
in the lecture course. 

Fourth Year. An elective course in the therapeutic management of 
syphilis is offered in the dispensary. 

CLINICAL PATHOLOGY 

Raymond Hussey, M.A., M.D. 

Associate Professor of Medicine and Head of Department of Clinical Pathology 

H. J. Maldeis, M.D Associate Professor of Medical Jurisprudence 

John H. Mills, M.D Associate in Medicine 

Samuel T. Helms, M.D Instructor in Medicine 

E. M. Reese, M.S Assistant in Medicine 

During the third year the student is thoroughly drilled in the technic of 
the usual clinical laboratory work, so that he is able to perform all routine 
examinations which may be called for during his fourth year, in connection 
with the work in the wards and dispensary. 

The practical work is supplemented by a series of didactic lectures and 
demonstrations in which the entire teaching staff of the department takes 
an active part. The microscopical and chemical study of blood, exudates 
and transudates, gastric juice, spinal fluid, feces and urine are successively 
taken up, and special attention directed to the clinical significance of the 
findings. 

Clinical parasitology from the standpoint of the infecting agent and the 
carrier is given careful consideration. 



40 BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, U. OF MD. 

The entire course is thoroughly practical. Each student has his own 
microscope and is provided with blood counters and hemoglobinometer 
for his exclusive use, and every two students are equipped with a special 
laboratory outfit for all routine purposes. 

During the fourth year the student applies what he has learned during 
the preceding year in the laboratories of the various affiliated hospitals. 
He is also supplied with a laboratory outfit which is sufficiently complete 
to enable him to work independently of the general equipment. Special 
instructors are available during certain hours to give necessary assistance 
and advice. 

Total number of hours 128 

GASTRO-ENTEROLOGY 

Professor of Gastro-Enterology 

T. Fred Leitz, M.D Clinical Professor of Gastro-Enterology 

Theodore H. Morrison, M.D Clinical Professor of Gastro-Enterology 

Maurice Feldman, M.D Assistant Professor of Gastro-Enterology 

Zachariah Morgan, M.D Assistant Professor of Gastro-Enterology 

Samuel Morrison, M.D Assistant Professor of Gastro-Enterology 

Joseph Sindler, M.D Associate in Gastro-Enterology 

M. S. Koppelman, M.D Instructor in Gastro-Enterology 

Z. Vance Hooper, M.D Instructor in Gastro-Enterology 

C. Victor Richards, M.D Instructor in Gastro-Enterology 

Ernest Levi, M.D Instructor in Gastro-Enterology 

H. William Primakoff, M.D Assistant in Gastro-Enterology 

Albert J. Shochat, M.D Assistant in Gastro-Enterology 

Beatrice Bamberger, M.D Assistant in Gastro-Enterology 

Third Year. A series of six lectures is given on the diseases of the 
digestive tract. 

Fourth Year. Clinics and demonstrations to the class for one hour a week. 
Dispensary instruction to small groups throughout the entire session. 
Practical instruction is given in the use of modern methods of study of 
the diseases of the gastro-intestinal tract. 

PSYCHIATRY 

Ross McC. Chapman, M.D Professor of Psychiatry 

Ralph P. Truitt, M.D Associate Professor of Psychiatry 

Lawrence F. Woolley, M.D Associate Professor of Psychiatry 

Harry Goldsmith. M.D Assistant Professor of Psychiatry 

H. W. Newell, M.D Assistant Professor of Psychiatry 

Harry M. Murdock, M.D Assistant Professor of Psychiatry 

Chester L. Reynolds, M.D Associate in Psychiatry 



ORGANIZATION OF TEE CURRICULUM 



11 



First Year. The student attends six lectures dealing with the develop- 
ment and function of the normal personality. 

Second Year. The student attends fourteen lectures dealing with 
psychopathology. 

Third Year. Psychopathology continued, six lectures; reaction types, 
twelve hours, lectures and demonstrations; the psychoses, six hours, lec- 
tures and demonstrations; history- taking and actual study of cases, out- 
patient clinic, thirty hours. 

Fourth Year. The neuroses, psychoneuroses, psychoses, lectures and 
demonstrations, ten hours. In this year the class is divided into sections 
for clinical conferences on selected cases. 



PEDIATRICS 

C. Loring Joslin, M.D Professor of Pediatrics 

Edgar B. Friedenwald, M.D Professor of Clinical Pediatrics 

T. Campbell Goodwin, M.D Associate Professor of Pediatrics 

John H. Traband, M.D Assistant Professor of Pediatrics 

Albert Jaffe, M.D Assistant Professor of Pediatrics 

A. H. Finkelstein, M.D Assistant Professor of Pediatrics 

Frederick Smith, M.D Assistant Professor of Pediatrics 

William J. Todd, M.D Associate in Pediatrics 

William G. Geyer, M.D Associate in Pediatrics 

Clewell Howell, M.D Associate in Pediatrics 

Samuel S. Glick, M.D Associate in Pediatrics 

F. Stratner Orem, M.D Associate in Pediatrics 

J. Edmund Bradley, M.D Associate in Pediatrics 

R. M. Hening, M.D Instructor in Pediatrics 

M. Paul Byerly, M.D Instructor in Pediatrics 

G. Bowers Mansdorfer, M.D Instructor in Pediatrics 

William M. Seabold, M.D Instructor in Pediatrics 

Thomas J. Coonan, M.D Instructor in Pediatrics 

W. J. Schmitz, M.D Assistant in Pediatrics 

Israel P. Meranskt, M.D Assistant in Pediatrics 

H. D. Franklin, M.D Assistant in Pediatrics 

H. Whitney Wheaton, M.D Assistant in Pediatrics 

S. C. Feldman, M.D Assistant in Pediatrics 

Nelsa Lee Wade, M.D Assistant in Pediatrics 

Lauriston L. Keown, M.D Assistant in Pediatrics 

Thomas A. Christensen, M.D Assistant in Pediatrics 



Third Year. A. Lectures on infant feeding and the fundamentals of 
diseases of infants and children. (15 hours.) 

B. Lectures on contagious diseases in conjunction with the Department 
of Hygiene and Preventive Medicine. (14 hours.) 

C. A special course in physical diagnosis is given at City Hospitals. 
(20 hours.) 



42 BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, U. OF MD. 

D. Clinical conferences demonstrating diseases of the newly-born. (6 
hours.) 

Fourth Year. A. Amphitheatre Clinic at which patients are shown to 
demonstrate the chief features of diseases discussed. (30 hours.) 

B. Conferences and demonstrations are given in problems concerning 
diagnosis, care, treatment and clinical pathology of diseases of infants and 
children; also in the preparation of theses on assigned pediatric subjects. 
(30 hours.) 

C. Clinical clerkship on the pediatric wards. This includes experience 
in the taking of histories, making physical examinations and doing routine 
laboratory work, and in following up of the patient's progress, all under the 
supervision of members of the visiting staff of the Department of Pediatrics. 
(140 hours.) 

D. Instruction in the pediatric clinic of the out-patient department of 
the University Hospital. This consists of 1§ hours daily for five weeks — 
30 minutes each day being devoted to clinical demonstration of some inter- 
esting case by a member of the staff; one hour daily to the taking of histories 
and the making of a physical examination under supervision of one of the 
staff instructors. (45 hours.) 

Total hours devoted to the teaching of pediatrics : 300. 

NEUROLOGY 

Irving J. Spear, M.D Professor of Neurology 

Andrew C. Gillis, A.M., M.D., LL.D Professor of Neurology 

G. M. Settle, A.B., M.D., Associate Professor of Neurology and Clinical Medicine 

Milford Levy, M.D Assistant Professor of Neurology 

Leon Freedom, M.D Assistant Professor of Neurology 

Benjamin Pushkin, M.D Associate in Neurology 

James G. Arnold, Jr., M.D Instructor in Neurology 

Philip F. Lerner, A.B., M.D Assistant in Neurology 

Second Year. Fifteen lectures correlating the anatomy and physiology 
of the nervous system with clinical neurology. 

Third Year. Ten lecture-demonstrations are given in which the major 
types of diseases of the nervous system are presented. A short course is 
also given at the Baltimore City Hospitals, consisting of six periods of two 
hours each, in which the students in small groups carry out complete neuro- 
logic examinations of selected cases which illustrate the chief neurologic 
syndromes. 

Fourth Year. Clinical conference one hour each week to the entire class. 
This subject is taught at the University and Mercy Hospitals. All patients 
presented at these clinics are carefully examined; complete written records 
are made by the students who demonstrate the patients before the class. 
The patients are usually assigned one or two weeks before they are pre- 



ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 43 

sented, and each student in the class must prepare one or more cases during 
the year. 

Ward Class Instruction. In small sections at the University and Mercy 
Hospitals. In these classes the students come in close personal contact 
with the patients in the wards under the supervision of the instructor. 

Dispensary Instruction. Small sections are instructed in the dispensaries 
of the University and Mercy Hospitals four afternoons each week. In this 
way students are brought into contact with nervous diseases in their early 
and late manifestations. 

HYGIENE AND PREVENTIVE MEDICINE 

Huntington Williams, M.D., Dr.P.H Professor of Hygiene and Public Health 

William H. F. Warthen, M.D Associate in Hygiene and Public Health 

Myron G. Tull, M.D Instructor in Hygiene and Public Health 

Third Year. One hour lecture to the whole class each Monday from 
September to May. Basic instruction is given in the clinical and public 
health aspects of the communicable diseases. The lectures are under the 
auspices of the Department of Medicine and are given by staff members 
in that department, including physicians representing Pediatrics, and 
Hygiene and Preventive Medicine. 

Fourth Year. Two hour instruction periods for the entire class, in 
groups of ten to fifteen students on six Wednesday afternoons. These 
sessions enable the students themselves to prepare birth and death certifi- 
cates, to vaccinate against smallpox and to conduct other practical public 
health procedures. In addition there are four Wednesday afternoon field 
inspection trips for each third of the class. These trips, under guidance 
of full time public health workers, include visits to (1) city water filtration 
plant, (2) rural dairy farm, (3) milk pasteurization plant, ice cream plant 
and bakery and (4) industrial plant which has an active program of hygiene. 
Elective case work in association with the Western Health District. 

The course deals with the fundamentals of public health and supplements 
the work in the third year. The major emphasis in both years is on the 
practice of preventive medicine and the relation of prevention to diagnosis 
and treatment. The entire class, in small groups, receives practical in- 
struction at Sydenham Hospital, the one-hundred bed communicable 
disease hospital of the Baltimore City Health Department. 

MEDICAL JURISPRUDENCE 

H. J. Maldeis, M.D Associate Professor of Medical Jurisprudence 

Baltimore City Post Mortem Physician 

Third Year. One hour each week for three weeks. 



44 BULLETIN OF TEE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, U. OF MD. 

This course embraces a summary of some of the following : Proceedings in 
criminal and civil prosecution, medical evidence and testimony, identity 
and its general relations, sexual abnormalities, personal identity, impotence 
and sterility, rape, criminal abortions, signs of death, wounds in their 
medico-legal relations, death — natural and homocidal, malpractice, insan- 
ity, and medico-legal autopsies. 

DEPARTMENT OF SURGERY 

Arthur M. Shipley, Sc.D., M.D Professor of Surgery 

Walter D. Wise, M.D Professor of Surgery 

Nathan Winslow, A.M., M.D Professor of Clinical Surgery 

Page Edmunds, M.D Professor of Traumatic Surgery 

Frank S. Lynn, M.D Professor of Clinical Surgery 

Elliott H. Hutchins, A.M., M.D Professor of Clinical Surgery 

Charles Reid Edwards, M.D Professor of Clinical Surgery 

Charles Bagley, Jr., A.B., M.D Professor of Neurological Surgery 

F. L. Jennings, M.D Professor of Clinical Surgery 

Robert P. Bay, M.D Professor of Oral Surgery 

Thomas R. Chambers, A.M., M.D Associate Professor of Surgery 

R. W. Locher, M.D Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery 

A. M. Evans, M D Associate Professor of Surgery 

Edward S. Johnson, M.D Associate Professor of Surgery 

D. J. Pessagno, M.D Associate Professor of Surgery 

Charles A. Reifschnetder, M.D Associate Professor of Traumatic Surgery 

Monte Edwards, M.D Associate Professor of Surgery 

N. Clyde Marvel, M.D Associate Professor of Surgery 

Thomas B. Aycock, B.S., M.D Associate Professor of Surgery 

Richard G. Coblentz, A.B., M.D Associate Professor of Neurological Surgery 

Grant E. Ward, A.B., M.D Associate Professor of Surgery 

I. O. Ridgley, M.D Associate in Surgery 

H. F. Bongardt, M.D Associate in Surgery 

W. W. Walker, M.D Associate in Surgery 

C. W. Peake, M.D Associate in Surgery 

W. R. Johnson, M.D Instructor in Surgery 

E. M. Hanrahan, A.B., M.D Instructor in Surgery 

S. Demarco, M.D Instructor in Surgery 

Karl J. Steinmueller, A.B., M.D Instructor in Surgery 

George H. Yeager, B.S., M.D Instructor in Surgery 

Luther E. Little, M.D Instructor in Surgery 

J. Frank Hewitt, A.B., M.D Instructor in Surgery 

J. G. Onnen, M.D t Instructor in Surgery 

Simon H. Brager, M.D Instructor in Surgery 

J. W. Nelson, M.D Instructor in Surgery 

I. Ridgeway Trimble, M.D Instructor in Surgery 

H. Alvan Jones, M.D Instructor in Surgery 

Richard T. Shackelford, M.D Instructor in Surgery 



ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 45 

Henry F. Ullrich, M.D Instructor in Surgery 

Raymond F. Helfrich, M.D Instructor in Surgery 

Dwight Mohr, M.D Assistant in Surgery 

William R. Geraghty, B.S., M.D Assistant in Surgery 

Howard B. McElwain, M.D Assistant in Surgery 

A. V. Buchness, M.D Assistant in Surgery 

T. J. Touhey, M.D Assistant in Surgery 

Clyde F. Earns, M.D Assistant in Surgery 

Paul Schenker, M.D Assistant in Surgery 

Robert W. Johnson, M.D Assistant in Surgery 

Frank K. Morris, A.B., M.D Assistant in Surgery 

J. Willis Guyton, M.D Assistant in Surgery 

Wm. N. McFaul, Jr., M.D Assistant in Surgery 

Samuel H. Culver, M.D Assistant in Surgery 

James C. Owlngs, M.D Assistant in Surgery 

Albert R. Wilkerson, M.D Assistant in Surgery 

Julius Goodman, M.D Assistant in Surgery 

Arthur G. Siwinski, A.B., M.D Assistant in Surgery 

J. H. Wilkerson, M.D Assistant in Surgery 

L. T. Chance, M.D Assistant in Surgery 

Samuel McLanahan, Jr., M.D Assistant in Surgery 

W. Allen Deckert, Jr., M.D Assistant in Surgery 

Harry C. Hull, M.D Assistant in Surgery 

Samuel E. Proctor, M.D Assistant in Surgery 

George Govatos, M.D Assistant in Surgery 

Francis W. Gillis, M.D Assistant in Surgery 

R. Walter Graham, Jr., M.D Assistant in Surgery 

Dwight Currie, M.D Assistant in Surgery 

The teaching is done in the anatomical laboratory, the dispensaries, 
wards, clinical laboratories and operating rooms of the University and Mercy 
Hospitals, and in the wards and operating rooms of the Baltimore City 
Hospitals. 

Instruction is given by means of lectures, recitations, dispensary work, 
bedside instruction, ward classes, and clinics. The work begins in the sec- 
ond year, and continues throughout the third and fourth years. 



Second Year 

Topographic and Surgical Anatomy. The course is designed to bridge 
the gap between anatomy in the abstract and clinical anatomy as applied 
to the study and practice of medicine and surgery. 

The teaching is done in the anatomical laboratory, and students are 
required to demonstrate all points, outlines, and regions on the cadaver. 



46 BULLETIN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, U. OF MD. 

Underlying regions are dissected to bring out outlines and relations of 
structures. 

Didactic Lectures. Two hours a week for one semester, augmented 
by demonstrations with specimens, charts, and cross sections. Dr. Monte 
Edwards. 

Laboratory. Five hours a week for 16 weeks. Dr. Monte Edwards 
assisted by Drs. Yeager, Hull and Jones. 

Principles or Surgery. This course includes history-taking, records 
of physical examinations and of operations and progress